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publications 

of  tbe 

Catbolic  IRecorb  Society 

Vol.  XIII 


The  Catholic  Record  Society  was  founded 
10  June  1904,  for  printing  Registers  and  other 
old  Records  of  the  Faith,  chiefly  personal 
and  genealogical,  since  the  Reformation  in 
England  and  Wales. 


All  Rights  Reserved 
by  the  Society 


Vera  Effigies 
D.  GERTRVDIS  MORE 

Anno  Domini  1633,  -^Etatis  28 


Frontispiece. 


Cath.  Rec.  Soc.  XIII. 


CATHOLIC 
RECORD  SOCIETY 

MISCELLANEAVIII 


LONDON 

PRIVATELY  PRINTED  FOR  THE  SOCIETY 

BY  BALLANTYNE,  HANSON  &  CO. 

EDINBURGH 


ZTbts  IDolume  is 

Sssuefc  to  the  Members  for  1911*12 

ffieino  tbe  Second  for  tbe  13ear 


TABLE   OF  CONTENTS 

PAGE 

I.  Records  of  the  English  Benedictine  Nuns  at 
Cambrai  (now  StanbroOk),  i 620-1 793.  Contributed 
by  the  Lady  Abbess  of  Stanbrook.  Edited  by  Joseph 
Gillow 1 

II.  Two  lists  of  supposed  adherents  of  Mary  Queen 
of  Scots,  1574  and  1582.  Edited  by  John  Bannerman 
Wainewright 86 

III.  A  Portuguese  Narration  of  the  Martyrdom  of  the 

Ven.  Thomas  Holland,  S.J.  Contributed  by  the  Rev. 
Edzvard  Robert  James 143 

IV.  Papers   from   the   Courtfield   Muniments.     Contri- 

buted by  John  Hobson  Matthews 150 

V.  Addresses  of  Jesuits  in  England,  1727-34.  Con- 
tributed by  Richard  Trappes-Lomax       .         .         .         .160 

VI.  Ralph  Clavering's  Account-Book,  1763-4.  Contri- 
buted by  Richard  Trappes-Lomax  .         .         .  1 90 

VII.  Boys  at  Liege  Academy,  1773-91  :  their  parents, 
guardians,  &c.  Contributed  by  Richard  Trappes- 
Lomax         .........     202 

VIII.  Minute-Book  of  the  Roman  Catholic  Club,  1793-8. 

Contributed  by  Joseph  S.  Hansom  .         .         .         .214 

IX.  Registers  of  Fr.  Thomas  Worthington,  O.P.,  kept 
in  Lancashire,  17 13-17.  Contributed  by  Joseph  S. 
Hansom 222 

X.  Catholic   Registers   of   Danby,  West  Witton,  and 

Leyburn,  Yorkshire,  1 742-1840;  with  notes  of 
the  Scrope  Family,  1663-1754.  Contributed  by 
Joseph  S.  Hansom.    Historical  notes  by  Joseph  Gillow   .     227 

XI.  Registers  of  the  Rev.  Pierce  Parry  at  Claxby, 
Lincolnshire,  and  Oscott,  Warwickshire,  1755-66. 
Contributed  by  Joseph  Gillow 288 

XII.  Catholic  Registers  of  Britwell- Prior,  Oxford- 
shire, 1765-88.     Contributed  by  the  Rev.  John  Edge, 

SJ. ,     292 

XIII.  Catholic  Registers  of  Isleworth,  Middlesex,  1746- 
1835.  Contributed  by  Joseph  S.  Hansom.  Historical 
notes  by  Joseph  Gillow  .         .         .         .         .         -299 


Vlii  TABLE   OF   CONTENTS 

PAGE 

XIV.  Catholic  Registers  of  Newport,  Shropshire,  1785- 
1846.  Contributed  by  the  Rev.  Chichele  Giles.  His- 
torical notes  by  Joseph  Gillow 335 

XV.  Catholic  Registers  of  Culcheth,  Lancashire,  1791- 
1825.  Contributed  by  the  Rev.  John  Donohoe.  Historical 
?iotes  by  Joseph  Gillow.  Printed  at  the  expense  of  J.  P. 
Smith  .........     370 

XVI.  Catholic  Registers  of  Southworth  Hall,  Lanca- 
shire, 1 795-182 7.  Contributed  by  the  Rev.  Joh?i 
Do?iohoe.  Historical  notes  by  Joseph  Gillow.  Printed 
at  the  expense  of  J.  P.  Smith 396 

Index.     Compiled  by  Miss  Edith  Rix         ....      417-480 


ILLUSTRATIONS 


FACING   PAGE 


i.  Portrait  of  Dame  Gertrude  More,  O.S.B.        .         .  Frontispiece 

2.  Formula  of  Vows  of  Dame  Anne  Benedicta  Warwick,  O.S.B.         1 

3.  Portrait  of  Dame  Barbara  Constable,  O.S.B.         .         .         .12 

4.  Portrait  of  Dame  Catharine  Gascoigne,  O.S.B.      ...       40 

5.  Formula  of  Vows  of  Dame  Bridget  More,  O.S.B.  .         .       43 

6.  Portrait  of  Dame  Anne  Mary  Plumpton,  O.S.B.    ...       62 

7.  Seal  of  the  More  family  arms,  quartering  Cresacre         .         .       74 

8.  Mandate  of  King  Charles  I.  to  stay  execution  on  Dame 

Joane  Vaughan  of  Ruardean  for  harbouring  a  priest         .     156 

9.  Scrope  family  notes     .         .         .         .         .         .         .         .227 

10.  Scrope  family  notes     .         .         .         .         .         .         .         .236 

11.  Two  chalices  belonging  to  the  mission  at  Newport,  Salop      .     335 


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From  the  original  formula  of  vows  in  the  handwriting  of 
Dame  Anne  Benedicta  Warwick,  O.S.B. 


To  face  p.  1. 


Cath.Rec.  Soc.  XIII. 


NO.  I 

RECORDS  OF  THE  ABBEY  OF  OUR  LADY  OF 
CONSOLATION  AT  CAMBRAI,  1620-1793 

CONTRIBUTED    BY   THE   RIGHT   REVEREND   LADY   CECILIA    HEYWOOD, 

ABBESS    OF   STANBROOK 

EDITED   WITH    HISTORICAL    NOTES    BY   JOSEPH   GILLOW 

The  Abbey  of  Benedictine  nuns  of  the  English  Congregation  was  estab- 
lished in  1620  at  Cambrai  by  Monks  of  that  Congregation,  chiefly  through 
the  instrumentality  of  the  president,  Dom  William  Rudesind  Barlow,  and 
Dom  William  Benet  Jones,  who  brought  over  from  England  nine  English 
ladies  to  form  the  nucleus  of  the  foundation,  of  whom  Helen  More  (Dame 
Gertrude)  is  considered  chief  foundress,  the  pecuniary  means  having  been 
mainly  furnished  by  her  father  Mr.  Cresacre  More,  lineal  descendant  of 
the  blessed  martyr  Sir  Thomas  More.  For  the  training  of  these  postulants 
in  the  monastic  life,  three  nuns  were  lent  by  the  kindness  of  the  abbess  of 
the  English  Benedictine  abbey  at  Brussels,  Lady  Mary  Percy ;  and  their 
spiritual  direction  was  entrusted  to  the  eminent  Father  David  Augustine 
Baker,  who  remained  at  Cambrai  about  eight  years. 

Dame  Frances  Gawen  of  Brussels  was  appointed  abbess  of  the  infant 
community  until  in  1629,  at  the  first  general  chapter  after  their  profession, 
one  of  their  own  number,  Dame  Catherine  Gascoigne,  was  chosen  abbess. 
Though  their  instructresses,  the  three  Brussels  nuns,  were  now  free  to  return 
to  their  own  convent,  they  begged  to  be  allowed  to  form  part  of  the  com- 
munity of  Cambrai.  Two  of  them,  Dame  Frances  Gawen  and  Dame 
Pudentiana  Deacons,  remained  till  their  death  several  years  later,  but 
Dame  Viviana  Yaxley  eventually  availed  herself  of  her  right  according  to 
the  original  stipulation,  and  returned  to  Brussels  in  1650. 

The  Cambrai  community  were  from  the  first  under  the  immediate  juris- 
diction of  the  president  and  general  chapter  of  the  English  Congregation  of 
Monks  of  the  Order  of  St.  Benedict,  and  this  with  the  full  consent  and  con- 
currence of  the  Archbishop  of  Cambrai,  Francis  Van  der  Burch,  and  the 
solemn  approbation  of  Pope  Urban  VIII. 

In  1793  the  Community  of  Cambrai,  twenty-one  in  number,  were  violently 
ejected  by  the  French  Government,  and  carried  in  open  carts  to  Compiegne, 
where  they  remained  in  close  prison  for  eighteen  months.  They  obtained 
their  release  at  last  in  1795,  reaching  Dover  on  May  3rd  of  that  year.  Be- 
friended by  the  Monks  of  the  English  Congregation  to  which  they  belonged, 
they  remained  at  Woolton  in  Lancashire,  earning  a  small  means  of  sub- 
sistence by  teaching  a  school  belonging  to  the  Benedictine  mission.  In 
1807,  by  the  kindness  of  Mrs.  Stanford,  they  removed  to  a  mansion  belonging 
to  her  in  Warwickshire,  Salford  Hall,  near  Evesham,  which  they  were 
to  have  free  of  rent,  not  only  during  her  lifetime,  but  during  that  of  the  heir- 
at-law,  Mr.  Robert  Berkeley  of  Spetchley,  who  concurred  generously  in  this 
negotiation.  In  1838  they  removed  finally  to  Stanbrook  Hall  in  Worcester- 
shire, purchasing  the  house  and  property  for  themselves,  and  eventually, 
after  several  years,  erecting  a  church,  consecrated  in  1871,  and  a  consider- 
able portion  of  a  regular  Abbey  in  1880. 

The  dearth  of  original  early  documents  at  Stanbrook  Abbey  is  owing  to 
XIII.  A 


2  RECORDS  OF  THE  ABBEY  OF  OUR  LADY  OF 

the  fact  that  the  seizure  of  the  abbey  at  Cambrai,  in  October  1793;  was  so 
sudden  and  so  ruthless  that  in  less  than  half-an-hour  the  nuns  were  hurried 
into  open  carts  and  transferred  to  the  prison  of  Compiegne,  each  nun  being 
allowed  no  more  baggage  than  a  small  bundle  of  necessaries  hastily  put 
together  in  presence  of  ruffians  armed  with  clubs.  All  their  books  and 
papers  were  put  under  seal,  and  eventually  were  transferred  to  the  public 
library  and  archives  of  Cambrai,  where  a  portion  still  remains.  Another 
portion  was  carried  at  a  still  later  date  to  the  Archives  Centrales  of  Lille, 
where  they  are  stowed  away  in  two  cartons  marked  "  Benedictines  de 
Cambrai."  In  or  about  1876  the  Lady  Abbess  of  Stanbrook;  the  Right 
Rev.  Lady  Gertrude  L.  d'Aurillac  Dubois,  at  some  expense  had  copies 
made  of  the  more  valuable  of  the  manuscripts  at  Lille,  and  these  have 
recently  been  carefully  verified.  During  the  last  eight  years  transcripts 
have  been  made  by  friends  of  a  few  of  the  manuscripts  at  Cambrai,  as  here 
particularised.  The  more  important  original  documents  have  utterly  dis- 
appeared, but  copies,  evidently  made  for  business  purposes  long  before  the 
Revolution  and  kept  by  the  nuns  in  their  archives  at  Cambrai,  have 
sufficient  value  to  be  offered  to  the  Catholic  Record  Society  in  absence  of 
the  originals. 


COPIA   CONSENSUS   ET   APPROBATIO   D.    ARCHIEPISCOPI  , 

6  octobris  1622     [In  margin] 

Franciscus  Vanderburch  Dei  Et  apostolicse  Sedis  gracia  archie- 
piscopus  et  Dux  Cameracensis  Sancti  Romani  imperii  Princeps  Comes 
Cameracesii  Universis  prsesentes  Litteras  inspecturis  Salutem  in  Domino 
Sempiternam.  Cum  S.  Concilii  Tridentini  decreto  cautum  Sit  ut  nulla 
monasteria  et  domus  tarn  virorum  quam  mulierum  Erigantur,  nisi 
Episcopi  licentia,  in  cujus  dioecesi  Erigenda  sint  Prius  Obtenta,  Pro 
parte  Eximiorum  Dominorum  ac  Religiosorum  Patrum :  f.  Rudisindii 
Barlo  S.  Theologian  doctoris  et  Congregationis  Angliae  Benedictinae 
prsesidis  ac  f.  Leandri  de  S.  Martino  Sacrse  quoque  Theologian  Doc- 
toris et  Benedictinorum  praefatae  Congregationis  in  conventu  ac 
collegio  divi  gregorii  duaci  Prioris  nobis  Expositum  Est  Crescente  in 
dies  numero  monialium  anglarum  ita  paucula  earum  monasteria  anhe- 
lant  Recipiendis  Locus  omnino  Desit  ac  proinde  nobis  supplicatum 
Est,  ut  Licentiam  in  Civitate  nostra  Cameracensi  Ccenobium  in  Domo 
ac  fundo  ab  iisdem  pro  monialibus  anglis  ordinis  S.  Benedicti  Emendis, 
Erigendi  authoritate  nostra  ordinaria  concedere  Vellemus  ac  Dig- 
naremur.  Nos  igitur  optime  conscii  quantum  in  Ecclesia  Dei  splen- 
doris,  atque  Utilitatis  ex  monasteriis  hujusmodi  monialium  anglarum 
alibi  constitutis  oriatur,  in  domino  quoque  Confidentes  Ejusmodi 
moniales  suis  divinis  officiis,  orationibus,  Bonis  operibus,  et  Exemplis, 
nostrae  Civitati  Cameracensi  non  parum  profuturas,  dictis  Reverendis 
Prioribus,  Rudisindo  et  Leandro  hac  in  parte  gratificandum,  eorumque 
petitioni,  Una  cum  magistratu  hujus  nostras  Civitatis(de  Cujus  consensu 
ad  hoc  praestito  nobis  constitit)  annuendum  censuimus,  pro  ut  lubentes 
gratificamur  Et  annuimus  per  presentes ;  iisdem  Licentiam  et  facultatem 
Concedentes,  ut  in  praedicta  nostra  Civitate,  Pro  monialibus  anglis 
ordinis  Sancti  Benedicti  Emere  cedificium  cum  fundo  sufficient  et  in  eo 
Ccenobium  forma  debita  cum  Ecclesia  Competenti  in  qua  juxta  ordinis 
Sancti  Benedicti  institutionem,  misses,  aliaque  officia  Divina  celebrentur 


CONSOLATION    AT   CAMBRAI,    1620-1793  3 

Et  peragantur  Extructa  et  Prope  ipsum  ccenobium  Pro  hujusmodi  moni- 
alium  Vicario  et  confessariis  hospitium  adificare  Libere  possint  et  Valeant ; 
Cseterum  intendimus  ac  volumus  lit  praememoratae  moniales  quae  Sub 
Regula,  legibus  et  Constitutionibus  ordinis  Sancti  Benedicti  ac  congre- 
gations anglicanae,  Sub  Regimine  ac  moderamine  illius  praesidis,  ac 
vicarii  et  confessariorum  ejusdem  ordinis  et  congregationis  vivent, 
ordinariae  nostrae  ac  successorum  nostrorum  archiepiscoporum  Camera- 
censium  jurisdictioni  et  Visitationi  immediate  Subjaceant;  Et  ut 
uniuscujusque  puellae  in  monialem  hujusmodi  ccenobii  assumendae 
dos  Realiter  nobis  Representetur,  quatenus  ita  Constet,  Conventum 
istum  nullatenus  oneri  fore  Civitati  et  Dicecesi  nostrae  Cameracensi 
in  Praemissorum  fidem  ac  Robur  praesentibus  per  secretarium  nostrum 
Subsignatis  Sigillum  nostrum  duximus  apprimendum.  Datum  Cameraci 
in  palatio  nostro  archiepiscopali  anno  Domini  millesimo  Sexcentesimo 
vig°  secundo  mensis  octobris  Die  Sexta. 

Subscriptum  erat  de  mandato  illustrissimi  ac  Reverendissimi 
domini  pti,  Et  Erat  signatum  Lud.  fullo  secret.  Cum  Parapho  Et 
appendebat  Sigillum  dicti  illustrissimi  Cum  Cauda  cera  Rubra 
impressum. 

Et  supra  dorsum  Scriptum  Erat  ut  Sequitur. 

[The  following  is  endorsed  on  the  foregoing  document: — ] 

Illustrissimus  et  Reverendissimus  dominus  meus  archiepiscopus  et 
dux  Cameracensis  Post  Expeditionem  harum  retroscriptarum  ob  rationes 
sibi  Expositas  permisit  ac  consentit  ut  in  illis  praememoratae  moniales 
Sub  Regula,  legibus  ceremoniis  ac  privilegiis  Congregationis  Anglicanae 
Benedictinae  ab  Hispanica  dependentis  vivant,  Et  a  praeside  Vicario  et 
Confessariis  congregationis  Ejusdem  per  immediatam  jurisdictionem 
Regantur :  illustrissimae  et  Reverendissimae  Suae  dominationi  person- 
aliter  dumtaxat,  Si  opus  fuerit  auctoritatem  Visitandi  Reservando,  ut 
exordia  ccenobii  hujus  Securius  Stabiliantur.  De  Reliquo  Post  Ex- 
cessum  illustrimae  et  Rmae  S.D.  ipsum  ccenobium  moniales,  Vicarium, 
Confessariosque  praefatos  jurisdictioni  dictae  congregationis,  privilegiis 
atque  Exemptioni  a  Sancta  sede  apostolica  indultis  penitus  Relin- 
quendo.  In  cujus  Rei  fidem  presentes  per  Secretarium  Suum  Sub- 
signari  jussit  Cameraci  in  palatio  Suo  archiepiscopali  anno  domini 
M.D.C.  xxui  mensis  julii  die  vigesima  Secunda.  Subscriptum  Erat 
de  mandato  illmi  et  R™  domini  mei  archiepiscopi  praefati  Et  Signatum 
Erat  J.  de  la  Rille  Secretarius  cum  parapho. 

CONSENTEMENT   ET    PERMISSION    DU    MAGISTRAT    17ME    MAY    1 623 

A  tous  ceux  qui  ces  presentes  lettres  voiront  ou  viront  Prevost 
Eschevins  et  Magistrat  de  la  Ville  cite  et  duce  de  Cambray,  Salue. 
Scavoir  faisons  que  sur  la  Requeste  a  nous  presentee  de  la  part  du 
Reverend  Pere  Leandre  de  St.  Martin  Prieur  des  Benedictins  Anglois 
du  Couvent  de  St.  Gregoire  en  Douay  et  nous  avons  accorde  et 
consenti,  consentons  et  accordons  que  Ton  puisse  achester  certains 
heritages  propre  et  convenable  en  ceste  dite  ville  de  la  qualite  et 
endroit  duquel  debveront  estre  advertis  et  satisfaits  paravant  l'achast 
aux  fins  d'y  construire  et  eriger  une  maison  et  monastere  pour  des 


4  RECORDS  OF  THE  ABBEY  OF  OUR  LADY  OF 

filles  Angloises  religieuses  de  l'Ordre  de  St.  Benoit,  refermees  non 
mendiantes  et  observantes  la  closture,  moiennant  toutefois  que  de  la 
pare  d'icelles  filles  soit  pourvu  des  moyens  et  de  biens  pour  subvenir 
au  dfc  achast  Construction,  erection  et  Batimens  de  la  dte  maison  et 
monastere  a,  leur  nourriture  aux  vetements  et  toutes  choses  quel- 
conques  qui  peuvent  en  aucune  maniere  toucher  et  concerner  elles  et 
leur  dite  maison  et  monastere,  et  ce  sy  bien  et  largement  que  ceste 
ville  de  Cambray  et  pays  de  Cambresis  en  general  ou  en  particulier  ne 
puisse  en  quel  temps  et  pour  quel  cas  que  ce  soit  ressentir  aulcunes 
charges  d'ycelles  et  de  leur  dit  monastere  n'y  y  supporter  aulcun  coust 
frais  et  depens  interest  ou  prejudices  moyennant  aussi  que  nulle  des 
dites  filles  Angloises  ne  pourra  en  nul  temps  estre  introduite  et  recue 
au  dfc  monastere  que  prealablement  le  magistrat  de  cette  dite  ville  ne 
soit  deuement  appaise  d'une  dote  et  bonne  asseuroie  fondation  de 
deux  cens  florins  de  rente  qu'elle  aura  et  apportera  au  d*  monastere 
pour  y  demeurer  et  appartenir  a  perpetuite  et  moyennant  encores  que 
au  dfc  monastere  quoiqu'il  soit  institue  premierement  pour  des  filles 
Angloises,  les  filles  Cambresiennes  y  pourront  etre  et  seront  aussi 
recces  et  admises  pour  y  estre  au  meme  rang  et  advantages  qu'icelles 
Anglaises,  entendons  au  surplus  que  ces  conditions  soient  pleinement 
observees  et  a  toujours  sans  que  Tenet  d'icelles  puisse  par  quelques 
dissimulations  tollorances  on  usaige  contraire  de  tel  et  sy  long  temps 
que  ce  soit  estre  emportee  annullee  et  preserites  a  Tadvenir,  En  temoing, 
recognoissance  et  approbation  duquel  consentement  accord  et  con- 
cession nous  avons  a  ces  presentes  signees  de  notre  grefrier,  fait  mettre 
et  appendre  le  seel  aux  causes  d'icelles  ville  le  dix  septieme  jour  du 
mois  de  May  Tan  de  grace  mil  six  cent  vingt  et  trois. 

Sur  le  replis  des  dtes  lettres  etait  escrite  Pour  la  Chambre  et  signe 
M.  de  la  Miere  avec  paraphe  et  y  appendant  au  d*  reply  le  seel  aux 
causes  d'icelles  Ville  en  cire  verde  en  double  queue  de  parchemin. 

[Here  follow  a  few  lines  declaring  that  a  collation  has  been  made  of 
the  above  transcript  with  the  original  and  found  to  be  word  for  word 
the  same  by  the  Public  Notary  of  Cambray  undersigned,  the  22nd 
August  1659,  Hustin  Not] 

PERMIT   BY   THE   INFANTA   ISABELLA   FOR   THE   FOUNDATION 

La  Serenissime  Infante  ayant  vue  les  Actes  de  consentement  a  la 
Reception  des  Religieuses  Anglaises  de  la  Congregation  de  St.  Benoit 
en  la  Ville  de  Cambray  tant  de  l'Archeveque  que  de  ceux  du  magistrat, 
elle  a  pour  bonnes  considerations  et  a  leur  supplication,  permis  et 
donne  licence  comme  elle  fait  par  ceste,  aux  dites  religieuses  d'y 
pouvoir  batir  et  eriger  un  monastere  de  leur  Ordre  mais  aux  charges  et 
conditions  requises  par  les  dts  actes  ordonnant  a  tous  ceux  qu'il 
appartiendra  de  se  regler  selon,  et  fait  a  Bruxelles  soub  le  nom  et 
cachet  secret  de  Son  Alsse, 

le  trentieme  de  May  1623 

+  Ysabel 
Par  ordonnance  de  Son  Al8ee 

Mafaille  (?)  avec  paraphe  : 


CONSOLATION   AT   CAMBRAI,    1620-1793  5 

[The  following  brief  extracts  by  Dom  Gilbert  Dolan,  O.S.B.,  are 
from  the  archives  of  the  Congregation  of  Valladolid,  O.S.B.,  at  the 
Abbey  of  S.  Domingo  de  Silos.] 

Letter  of  Dom  Rudesind  Barlow  [in  original  "  Fr.  Rosendo  Barlo] 
to  the  Procurator  of  the  English  Congregation  in  Spain  [D.  Boniface 
Blandy?] — Vol.  xix.  del  Archivo,  1624.  Jan.  3  : 

I.  "  We  have  begun  our  monastery  of  nuns  at  Cambray  with  great 
honour  and  edification  ;  there  be  twelve  religious  women  as  fine  dames 
as  I  have  seen  and  Virtuous  souls  j  from  their  house  I  write  this,  for 
here  I  am  stayed  to  see  them  settled  and  put  in  order.  I  got  from  the 
Dames  of  Brussels  three  of  the  best  qualified  of  all  their  company  to  be 
their  guides  and  .  .  .  [illegible], 

II.  Vol.  xix  del  Archivo.  1625: 

"Novissime  vero  omnium  erectum  est  monasterium  Sanctimoni- 
alium  Ordinis  et  nationis  nostras  sub  jurisdictione  Congregationis  hujus 
in  civitate  Cameracensi  juxta  Duacum  in  quo  sunt  12  nobiles  Virgines 
professae  et  6  aliae  in  probatione." 

III.  1633.  January  28.  Status  Congregationis.  [Report  of  F. 
President  Bagshaw  to  General  Chapter  of  Spain].  ...  In  mon™ 
monialium  .  .  .  "20  monialies  et  8  sorores  laicae  sive  conversae." 

"...  Cameraci  pro  solatio  monialium  2  monachi  et  unus  conversus 
qui  sunt  conventuales  etiam  Duaceni." 

1633.  P.  198  of  same  vol.  [A  Spanish  report  of  this  enumerates 
22  nuns  and  8  lay-sisters.] 

"  Aquel  de  las  mongas  en  Cambray  passa  con  mucho  traverso  y 
recessidad  a  causa  que  la  major  parte  del  exercito  del  Principe  Cardinal 
aloido  mucho  tiempo  en  aquellas  partas  y  como  tienen  pocas  rentas  y 
el  precio  de  todo  ay  ha  subido  mucho  han  sufoido  muchissimo." 

[The  three  following  documents  were  transcribed  from  the  originals  in 
the  archives  of  the  Sacred  Congregation  of  Bishops  and  Regulars  by  Dom 
Wilfrid  Corney,  O.S.B.,  and  presented  to  the  Lady  Abbess  of  Stanbrook 
in  1908  : — ] 

[A] 

[Endorsed]  "S.  Bened.  Sanctissimo    Dno  Nostro  A.   M.   Fagnani. 
14    7bris   1629.      Archiepo    pro    infor   cum   voto.      Pro   Procuratore 
Angliae  Congregationis  Sti  Benedicti." 
Beatissime  Pater ! 

Supplicat  Bni  Vrae  Procurator  Congregationis  Angliae  ordinis  Sti 
Benedicti,  quat3  dispensare  velit  cum  Gertrude  Mora,  nobilis  qm 
Thomae  Mori  pro  fide  in  Anglia  passi  abnepte  quae  25  tantummodo 
annos,  et  Catarina  Gasconia,  quae  28  annos  habet,  et  concedere  ut  non 
obstante  hoc  defectu  aetatis  quaelibet  earum  eligi  possit  in  Abbatissam  aut 
Priorissam  Monasterii  B.  Virginis  ordinis  S.  Benedicti  Congregationis 
Angliae  Cameracensis  autem  Dicecesis  et  in  eodem  oppido  Cameraco 
siti  et  a  dicecesani  jurisdictioni  exempti,  et  si  ita  visum  fuerit  Praesidi  et 
Definitoribus  Congregationis  Angliae,  cui  idem  Monasterium  subest 
post  quadriennium  in  eadem  ofiicia  eligi.  Nam  cum  idem  Monasterium 
a  sex  tantummodo  annis  erectum  fuerit,  nee  inveniatur  in  eo  StJ 
Moniales  quae  annos,  aut  aetatis  aut  religionis  ad  curam  Abbatissae 


6  RECORDS  OF  THE  ABBEY  OF  OUR  LADY  OF 

suscipiendam  prsefixos  habet,  et  aliqua  Sanctimonialium  in  Abbatissam 
eligi  debet  illas  duas  praecipue  habilitari  ad  hoc  officium  Congregatio 
desiderat  quod  caeteras  habitus  antiquitate  discretione  et  regulari 
observantia  praecedant  et  alia  minora  officia  cum  laude  gesserunt. 
Gertrudis  autem  quam  praeferri  cupit  et  Monasterii  praecipua  fundatrix 
est.  Nee  aliquod  damnum  aut  error  in  Regimine  ex  minori  earum 
aetate  timendus  est  cum  praeter  confessarium  *  sine  cujus  consensu 
nihil  possunt  momenti  agere,  etiam  ordinarius  t  constituitur  ejusdem 
Monasterii  superior  qui  curam  habebit  ne  praedictae  Gertrudis  aut 
Catarina  in  errorem  ullum  offendant.     et  pro  hac  gratia  quam  Deus — 

[B] 

[The  archbishop  having  been  consulted^  replies  as  follows  to  the  Sacred 
Congregation?^ 

Illme  et  Rme  Domine 

Accepi  litteras  Illmae  ac  Rmae  D.V.  necnon  libellum  ex  parte 
monasterii  B.  Mariae  Virginis  ordinis  S.  Benedicti  in  civitate  Camera- 
censi  et  congregationis  Anglicanae  (cui  illud  subest)  Sacrae  Congrega- 
tioni  Illinorum  et  Rmorum  Dominorum  Cardinalium  negotiis  Regularium 
praepositae  oblatum.  Et  quia  super  eo  Illinae  et  Rmae  Dm  V.  caeterisque 
Illmis  Patribus  sententiam  meam  expetere  placuit,  sine  mora  de  omnibus 
in  eo  contentis  me  quam  diligentissime  potui  informavi  cumque  omnia 
quae  narrantur  verissima  esse  compererim,  sub  humillima  correctione 
expedire  judico,  ut  supplicantium  petitioni  annuatur,  eo  magis  quod 
moniales  istae  ob  singularem  suam  pietatem  omnem  favorem  mereantur. 
Nihilominus  rem  totam,  ut  debeo,  discretioni  et  arbitrio  Illmae  et 
Rmae  D.V.  humillime  submitto,  Deo  supplicans  ut  eamdem  diutissime 
servet  incolumem. 

Castelli  Cameracensii  9  Novembris  1629. 
Illmae  et  Revniae  D.V. 
humillimus  et  obsequentissimus  servus 
Franciscus  Van  der  Burch 
Archiepus  Cameracensis. 

On  the  reverse  of  the  foregoing  document,  the  official  of  the  Sacred 
Congregation  has  made  the  following  summary  : — 

"  Cambrai.  ii  Janrii  1630.  Concedat:  si  nulla  alia  existat  habens 
requisita.  Si  supa  per  la  facolta  d'  eleggere  p.  Abba  e  Priora  del  Mon. 
della  Mad*  di  Cambrai  che  una  d'  eta  di  24  e  1'  altra  di  28  anni  non 
essendovi  altre  che  abbiano  V  eta  e  gli  anni  della  professione  a  cio 
necessarii,  e  considera  anche  che  possiano  governar  benmo  con  la 
sopraintendenza  particolamente  del  Conf*  e  dell'  Arcivescovo  al  qle  il 
Mon.  e  soggetto.J 

"L'Arciv.  attesta  1'  esporta  ea  approva  L'Abba  e  quadriennale  e 
il  Mon.  e  eretto  da  9  anni." 

*  The  official  "  Vicarius  monialium,"  an  office  subsequently  abrogated. 

f  By  the  term  ordinary  was  here  intended,  as  in  the  text  of  the  Statutes,  the 
President  of  the  English  Benedictine  Congregation,  and  not  the  Archbishop. 

%  Here  the  official  has  misunderstood  the  bearing  of  the  term  "  Ordinary."  The 
error,  as  such,  is  evident  in  the  text  of  the  archbishop's  letter,  where  he  states  the 
house  in  question  to  be  M  subject  to  the  English  Congregation."  The  error  is  rectified 
subsequently  at  Rome. 


CONSOLATION   AT   CAMBRAI,    1620-1793  7 

[The  Rescript  evidently  having  been  sent  to  the  nuns,  they,  noticing  its 
clause  to  the  effect,  that  their  petition  was  granted  on  condition  of  there 
being  no  one  else  in  the  convent  of  requisite  age,  &c,  were  obliged  to  send 
afresh  petition  to  have  this  clause  cancelled ;  because,  though  none  of  the 
foundation  itself  were  of  age,  the  three  nuns  le?it  from  Brussels  to  train 
them  ivere  still  there,  and  in  office.  Moreover,  these  latter  were  wishful 
to  remain  instead  of  returning  to  the  house  of  their  profession,  as  originally 
stipulated.  In  any  case,  the  foundation  now  fully  effected  must  be  governed 
by  its  own  members^ 

[C] 
Illmi  et  Revmi  Dni. 

Supplicatum  fuit  Sacrae  Cong*  quatenus  dispensare  dignetur  cum 
Gertrude  Mora,  Nobilis  quondam  Thomae  Mori,  pro  fide  in  Anglia 
passi,  Abnepte,  et  Monrfi  B.V.  Cameracen :  prsecipua  fondatrice,  ut 
non  obstante  defectu  turn  aetatis  turn  annorum  in  Religione,  promoveri 
posset  in  Abbatissam  ejusdem  Monrn  secundum  desiderium  et  de- 
cretum  Capituli  Generalis  cui  idem  Monasterium  subest,  in  mense 
Julio  celebrati,  et  accepta  informatione  a  Rmo  Archiepo  Cameracen : 
Sacra  Cong°  statuit  annuendum  supplicationi,  si  nulla  alia  sit  quae 
habeat  requisita.  Cum  vero  hinc  oriri  possit  difficultas,  nee  gratia  ulla 
concedi  a  Sacra  Conge  nee  desiderium  dictae  Congoi8  Anglicanae  im- 
pleri,  est  enim  ipsamet  Abbatissa  quae  modo  regit,  et  Priorissa  quarum 
utraque  habet  a  jure  requisita,  et  propterea  praedicta  dispensatio  nulla 
redditur,  humiHter  supplicatur  ut  sicut  Praeses  praedictae  Cong'8 
obnixe  petit  clausula  ea  si  nulla  alia  invenitur  qua  habet  requisita 
tollatur,  et  absolute  dispensetur,  nee  timeri  potest  ulla  in  regimine 
illius  difficultas,  cum  in  praecipuo  Confessario  Monrn  subdatur  in 
omnibus  autem  Praesidi  Congis  et  Monrn  ejusdem  speciali  Visitatori 
et  pro  hac  gratia  et  quos  Deus  &c. 

[Endorsed  on  the  foregoing,  is  the  following  copy  of  reply  to  the  pro- 
curator of  the  English  Congregation  in  Rome : — ] 

11  S.  Benedetto  della  Congfie  Anglicana  Illmis  et  Rfriis  Dfiis  DD. 
Cardinalibus  negotiis  Episcoporum  et  Regularium  praepositis.  25 
Janrii  1630.  Arb.  Archiepo.  Pro  Procuratore  Congis  Angliae  ord. 
S.  Benedicti.  II  Procuratore  della  Cong.  Anglicana  dell'  ordine  di 
S.  Benedetto  espone  che  la  S.C.  a  dato  facolta  d'  eleggere  in  Abba  e 
Priora  del  Mon.  della  Mada  di  Cambrai  una  d'  eta  di  28  el'  altra  di 
24  ann.  con  la  clausula  si  nulla  alia  existat  habens  requisita,  e  perche 
questa  clausula  rendi  la  grazia  frustatoria  o  almeno  la  rend :  molto 
difficile,  di  supa  per  la  moderatione  di  essa  stante  che  una  in  par- 
ticolare  e  fondatrice  e  piena  di  molte  qualita  e  che  V  Arcivescovo 
approva." 

[No  further  document  is  at  Stanbrook,  but  the  result  of  the  negotiation 
ivas  that  Dame  Catherine  Gascoigne  was  installed  as  abbess  in  that  year, 
1630,  the  preference,  probably,  being  given  by  reason  of  age.  It  was 
providential,  as  Dame  Gertrude  More  was  carried  off  by  smallpox  in  the 
August  of  16 33.  Dame  Catheri?ie  Gascoigne,  by  repeated  quadriennial 
elections,  governed  the  Abbey  for  a  period  op forty  years .] 


8  RECORDS  OF  THE  ABBEY  OF  OUR  LADY  OF 

[Bull  of  Pope  Urban  VIII.,  1638,  confirming  the  monastery  at 
Cambrai,  transcribed  from  a  copy  formerly  in  the  possession  of  the 
Community \  and  now  in  the  Archives  Communales  de  Cambrai,  Serie 
GG.  241  [Liasse].  A  photograph  of  the  text  was  kindly  procured  for 
Stanbrook  Abbey  by  Dom  Edward  Benedict  Weld-Blundell,  O.S.B.,  in 
1909 :— ] 

Confirmatio  D.  Urbani  Papae  8i  Pro  monialibus  Sti  Benedicti 
congregationis  anglicanse  Cameraci  1638. 

Urbanus  Episcopus  Servus  Servorum  Dei  venerabili  fratri  archi- 
episcopo  Cameracensi  seu  Dilecto  filio  ejus  officiali  salutem  et  apos- 
tolicam  Benedictionem. 

Pro  parte  congregationis  dilectarum  in  Christo  filiarum  monialium 
ordinis  Sancti  Benedicti  quae  ex  Anglia  ante  plures  annos  ad  Civitatem 
Cameracensem  Pro  consequenda  Regulari  Disciplina  et  Religionis 
catholicse  liberiori  Professione  migrarunt :  nobis  nuper  Expositum 
fuit  quod  quamvis  fuerit  pro  earum  habitatione  et  aliis  usibus  suis 
concessa  per  quondam  Antonium  a.  Montmorencii  tunc  Existentem 
Abbatem  Monasteriorum  Sancti  Andraeae  de  Castello  et  Sancti 
Stephani  de  Fidemio  Oppidorum  seu  locorum  Cameracensis  Dioecesis 
Ejusdem  ordinis  Certa  Domus  inter  suos  notissimos  fines  in  eadem 
Civitate  Cameracensi  sita  et  ad  Dictum  Monasterium  Sancti  Stephani 
Spectans  Cum  eo  quod  si  structura  et  disciplina  regularis  in  eodem 
restauraretur,  quae  jam  pridem  ob  controversiam  inter  utrumque 
Regem  motam  an  hujusmodi  monasterium  foret  inter  Limites 
Franciae  vel  Belgii  Collapsa  fuit  tunc  et  tali  casu  pretium  dictae 
Domus  juxta  extimationem  per  peritum  assumptum  factam  in  utilitatem 
dicti  monasterii  investiri  debeat  Eandemque  concessionem  approba- 
vimus  cum  Decreto  quod  dicta  domus  ad  formam  monasterii  per 
ordinarium  loci  produci  debeat :  Quod  De  illius  Licentia  et  Consensu 
est  Effectuatum.  Nihilominus  tamen  dilectus  filius  Josephus  Has- 
trugus  ordinis  Sancti  Benedicti  et  forsan  plures  alii  ejusdem  or- 
dinis praetendunt  hujusmodi  concessionem  fore  et  esse  invalidam. 
Contra  quos  quia  interest  dictae  congregationis  concessionem  pre- 
fatam  indicialiter  validam  per  ordinarium  loci  declarari  quod  ipse 
seu  ipsi  absque  Speciali  Rescripto  Apostolico  fieri  non  posse  pariter 
praetendunt.  Ideo  pro  parte  dictae  Congregationis  nobis  fuit  humiliter 
supplicatum  quatenus  causam  et  causas  validationis  hujusmodi 
Concessionis  domus  ac  quam  et  quas  habet  et  monet  habereque 
et  monere  vult  et  intendit  contra  praefatos  omnesque  alios  sua  quomo- 
dolibet  interesse  praetendentes  etiamsi  forsan  conventum  fuerit  de  et 
super  praemissis  rebusque  aliis  cum  omnibus  suis  incidentibus,  de- 
pendentibus,  emergentibus,  annexis  et  connexis  totoque  negotio  princi- 
pali;  et  tarn  conjunctum  quam  divisum  tibi  summarie  et  pro  ut  in 
beneficialibus  audiendam,  cognoscendam,  fineque  debito  terminandam 
prout  juris  fuerit  cum  potestate  quos,  quando,  et  quoties  et  ubi  opus 
fuerit  etiam  per  Edictum  publicum  Constito  summari  et  extra  indicialiter 
de  non  tuto  accessu  utendi  Sub  censuris  et  Pcenis  ejus  arbitrio  Servata 
forma  Concilii  Tridentini  infligendis  et  applicandis  inhibendi,  brachi- 


CONSOLATION    AT   CAMBRAI,    1620-1793  9 

umque  saeculare  quatenus  opus  fit  invocandi,  aliaque  faciendi  dicendi 
gerendi,  exercendi  et  Exequendi  in  praemissis  et  circa  ea  necessaria  et 
opportuna  praemissis  nee  Constitutionibus  et  ordinationibus  apostolicis 
Caeterisque  contrariis,  non  obstantibus  quibuscumque  committere  et 
mandare  aliasque  in  praemissis  opportune  Providere  De  benignitate 
apostolica  dignaremur.  Nos  igitur  unicuique  justitiam  (ut  decet)  minis- 
trari  cupientes,  ac  Singulares  personas  Congregationis  hujusmodi  a, 
quibus  ecclesiasticis  Censuris,  Si  quibus  quomodolibet  innodati  ex- 
istunt  ad  effectum  praesentium  duntaxat  consequendum  harum  serie 
absolventes,  fraternitati  tuae  frater  Arch iepisc ope  Seu  Discretioni  tuae 
fili  officialis  per  apostolica  Scripta  mandamus  quatenus  vocatis  ad  id 
qui  fuerint  evocandi  in  praemissis  omnibus  et  singulis  autoritate  nostra 
facias  prout  dejure  fuerit  faciendum.  Datum  Romae  apud  Sanctum 
Petrum  anno  Incarnationis  dominicae  16380  quinto  decimo  Kalendas 
februarii  Pontificatus  nostri  anno  160  Subsignatum  erat  Maurus  C. 
Wathour  &  paulo  inferius  Baro  not :  cum  paraphis  et  super  plica 
H.  Odam  et  a  dextro  latere  Godefridi,  et  pendet  Sigillum  plombeum 
Urbani  Papae  Octavi  Sub  Duplici  Cauda. 

MANDATUM. 

Illustrissimi  archiepiscopi  Vanderburch  Datum  Dominae 
Catharinae  Gascoigne  congregationis  Benedictinae 
Anglicanae  Cameracencis  Religiosae  Pro  Reforma- 
tione  Sororum  Sancti  Lazari  dicta  Civitatis  Anno 
M.DC:  XLII. 

Franciscus  Vanderburch  dei  et  Sanctae  Sedis  apostolicae  gratia 
archiepiscopus  et  dux  Cameracensis.  S.R.  imperii  Princeps,  Comes 
Cameracesii  &c. 

Universis  praesentes  inspecturis  Salutem  in  domino,  notum  facimus 
quod  praehabito  monalium  quarum  interest  de  Conventu  Monasterii 
S.  Lazari  nostrae  Civitatis  Cameracensis  et  Superiorum  Benedictino- 
rum  Congregationis  Anglicanae  in  nostra  Provincia  Cameracensi  Con- 
sensu, ordinandam  constituendam  et  nominandam  duxerimus  pro  ut 
tenore  praesentium  ordinamus  Constituimus  et  nominavimus  Dominam 
Catharinam  Gascoigne  monasterii  Beatae  Mariae  de  Consolatione  in 
praetacta  nostra  Civitate  Cameracensi  dictae  Congregationis  anglicanae 
Monialem. 

Expresse  Professam  veram  Legitimam  et  indubetatam  Superiorem 
in  Rebus  omnibus  spiritualibus  Praefati  monasterii  Sancti  Lazari,  hocque 
tarn  Respectu  modernae  prefatae  ac  Superioris  quam  Earum  omnium 
quae  Reformationis  habitum  sumere  volunt.  Omnes  enim  aliae  sub 
Pristinae  Superioris  obedientia  Sicut  antea  manere  Debebunt;  itaque 
volumus  et  mandamus  ut  hanc  Superioris  jurisdictionem  et  Potestatem 
praefata  Domina  Catharina  Gascoigne  habeat  quoad  usque  omnia 
Recte  ordinata,  omnesque  Religiosae  Reformationem  amplectentes 
competenter  instructae  Sint  in  iis  quae  ad  Sancti  Benedicti  Spectant 
institutum  et  Constitutiones  ipsis  a  nobis  ad  hunc  finem  traditas  Pro 
quibus  omnibus  addiscendis  credimus  unius  anni  Spatium  vel  circiter 
sufficere  Posse.     Quapropter  omnibus  et  singulis  Praenominatis  moni- 


10  RECORDS  OF  THE  ABBEY  OF  OUR  LADY  OF 

alibus  Reformationem  acceptantibus,  Praecipimus  in  virtute  Sanctse 
obediential  Et  sub  poenis  arbitrio  nostro  infligendis,  quatenus  non 
tantum  ipsam  dominam  Catharinam  Gascoigne  in  Suam  Superiorem 
Recipiant,  Verum  etiam  Ei  Debitam  Reverentiam  Et  obedientiam 
Exhibeant,  Ad  majorem  autem  hujus  ordinationis  nostrae  firmitatem 
Et  Vigorem,  Volumus  Et  mandamus  Praesentes  nostras  litteras  legi 
Et  Publican  coram  toto  Conventu  monialium  Sancti  Lazari  Reforma- 
tionem Praetactam  amplectentium,  in  Primo  Capitulo  ab  ipsius  dominae 
Catharinae  gascoigne  adventu  in  illius  Monasterium. 

In  Quorum  omnium  fidem  hac  litteras  Sub  Sigillo  nostro  ac 
secretarii  nostri  Signatura  jussimus  Expediri  Cameraci  Calendis 
decembris  anni  M.DC.XLII. 

De  mandato  illmi  et  Rmi  Dni  Archipi  ptf 
[Locus  Sigilli] 

foulon  Secret. 

Cum  Parapho. 

MSS.    BY   DAME   BARBARA   CONSTABLE   AT   EVERINGHAM    PARK 

[The  letter  written  in  the  first  volume ;  and  in  the  same  handwriting, 
occupies  12  pages  {unnumbered),  after  which  comes  "The  Preface  to  the 
Reders,"  24  pages  (unnumbered),  followed  by  the  Treatise,  602  pages, 
ending  with  the  date  "June  16,  Finis,  1663."] 

I. 

A  Spiritual  Treatise,  conteininge  some  advise  for  seculars  composed 
by  the  unworthy  Religious  Str  B.C.  of  Jesus  of  the  holy  Order  of  Sfc 
Benedict  in  the  monastery  of  Our  Lady  of  Consolation  in  Cambray 
of  the  English  Congregation. 

Estote  perfecti  sicut  Pater  vester. 
Ambula  coram  me,  et  esto  perfectus  :     (Gen.  17,  1.) 
Nolite  contaminare  anima  vestra :  ego  sum  Dns  deus  vester 
Sanctus  estote  quia  ego  sanctus  sum.     (Lev.  n,  44.) 
To  my  most  deare  brother  Sir  Marmaduke  Constable,  I  wish  all 
health  and  happiness. 

My  dearest  brother  since  my  affection  and  good  will  for  you  is  not 
lesse  then  for  the  rest  of  my  friends  to  whom  according  to  my  poor 
capacity  I  have  indeavoured  to  contribute  a  little  of  the  expence  of  the 
idle  time  my  condition  affords  towards  the  good  and  sanctifying  of 
their  soules  according  to  the  varietie  of  their  conditions  and  necessities, 
tho'  less  needing  then  you;  All  circumstances  considered,  who  being 
in  a  secular  state,  ingaged  in  much  distraction  and  incompassed  with 
all  tentations  have  as  much  if  not  more  need  to  be  comforted,  assisted 
and  incouraged  in  ye  way  of  virtue;  nor  must  you  think  that  virtue 
is  not  compatible  or  belongs  not  to  your  estate  or  condition  as  well  as 
others,  this  is  a  great  error  wh.  I  hope  to  let  you  see  in  this  little  booke 
you  are  much  abused  by.  God  has  created  all  creatures  to  love  and 
serve  him  in  the  perfectest  manner  they  can ;  and  such  is  the  force 
of  Christian  grace  that  it  will  sanctify  all  states  and  conditions  of  what 
profession  or  trade  soever,  provided  it  be  lawfull,  and  to  testify  the 
truth  of  this,  God  has  exempted  none,  from  the  court  to  the  cart,  that 


CONSOLATION    AT   CAMBRAI,    1620-1793  II 

he  hath  not  produced  great  saints  of,  as  any  may  see  who  will  but 
reade  histories.  And  in  the  primitive  Church,  at  which  time  sanctity 
most  flourished  all  in  a  manner,  were  secular  persons  charged  with 
wives  &  children  and  the  service  of  their  prince  and  countrie,  and 
yet  the  Apostles  who  preached  the  evangelicall  doctrine  in  its  greatest 
purity,  preached  publickly  not  only,  the  maine  principles  of  Christian 
doctrine,  but  even  the  highest  poynts  of  perfection,  witness  Sfc  Paules' 
Epistles,  with  Sfc  Peter,  Sfc  John,  &  S*  James  wh.  were  writt  in  common 
to  all  Christians ;  and  after  them  their  disciples  Sfc  Ignatius  the  martyr 
&  S*  Policarp,  etc.  &  even  S*  Denis  writt  his  high  and  divine  bookes 
in  that  age  when  religious  were  rare,  altho'  indeed  he  limited  it  only  to 
such  persons  as  lived  most  religiously  yet  certainly  without  distinction  of 
cleargie  or  secular  persons  but  left  it  indifferent  in  that  poynt,  &  yet 
the  most  recluse  person  cannot  practise  a  higher  or  more  divine 
doctrine.  I  doe  not  say  this  that  I  would  indifferently  now  in  this 
age  recommend  such  bookes  to  secular  persons,  no  it  is  not  convenient, 
but  to  lett  you  see  that  secular  persons  have  and  now  may  be  if  they 
please  as  capable  of  the  practise  of  the  highest  perfection  as  religious, 
perfection  &  sanctity  are  not  limited  in  such  narrow  bonds  as  monas- 
teries, but  rather  it  is  by  God's  own  words  of — estote  perfecti  sicut 
pater  vester — delivered  to  the  large  extent  of  the  whole  world.  What 
greater  perfection  can  be  required  of  the  most  perfect  religious  then 
is  contained  in  the  10  commandments  and  other  Apostolicall  and 
Ecclesiasticall  doctrines  and  ordinations,  without  the  observing  whereof 
none  can  be  saved ;  and  yet  seculars  are  strictly  obliged  to  the  per- 
formance of  them,  if  ever  they  will  enjoy  eternall  beatitude.  To  love 
God  above  all  things  &  our  neighbours  as  ourselves,  the  prime  com- 
mandment ;  is  a  perfection  that  even  the  most  solitarie  and  carefull 
religious  will  find  enough  to  doe  to  attaine  to  the  perfection  of  them  : 
and  yet  none  can  be  saved  without  indeavouring  to  practise  them 
the  best  they  can ;  but  you  will  say,  perhaps  all  cannot  be  saints ; 
to  which  I  answer  all  may  arrive  to  that  degree  of  virtuousness  and 
sanctity  which  God  has  designed  them  to,  that  will  cooperate  with  his 
grace,  which  is  never  wanted  to  those  he  sees  industrious  and  desirous 
to  negotiate  for  heaven  with  it,  all  desire  heaven  but  they  will  not  give 
the  price  for  it  that  God  requires  for  it,  and  so  it  is  true  that  God 
in  fine  gives  it  to  whom  and  as  he  pleases,  as  not  considering  so  much 
our  deeds  and  desires  for  it,  wh:  are  truely  and  indeed  far  inferior 
to  the  worth  of  so  great  a  reward  as  eternall  beatitude,  yet  he  will  have 
us  gaine  it  by  our  good  &  virtuous  lifes,  &  you  will  find  yourself  much 
abused  if  you  thinke  a  virtuous  &  perfect  life  belongs  only  to  ecclesi- 
asticke  and  religious  persons ;  you  may  as  well  thinke  &  say  that 
heaven  belongs  only  to  them,  lett  them  take  it  and  give  me  the 
pleasures  of  this  world,  but  this  would  be  a  most  strange  &  unchristian 
like  thought  or  saying :  &  yet  really  in  effect  so  it  proves  for  only  those 
that  lead  good  lives  will  gaine  heaven,  &  those  that  doe  not  shall 
gaine  the  contrarie ;  if  then  heaven  and  the  enjoying  of  God  for  all 
eternity  be  the  thing  you  aim  at,  as  I  doubt  not  it  is :  sic  currite 
ut  comprehendatis,  as  the  great  Apostle  advise  all  christians,  so  run 
the  course  of  your  life  that  you  may  gaine  what  you  aim  at,  wh.  will 


12  RECORDS  OF  THE  ABBEY  OF  OUR  LADY  OF 

not  be  by  giving  yourself  to  an  idle  &  vain  life,  taking  pleasure  and 
seeking  after  the  riches  and  honours  of  the  world,  for  as  the  same 
Apostle  saith  in  another  place,  where  he  reckons  up  many  that  shall 
never  enter  into  heaven,  neque  avari,  neque  ebriosi,  neque  maledici, 
neque  rapaces,  regnum  dei  possidebunt,  but  many  will  say  they  are  not 
guilty  of  these  crimes,  to  whom  I  will  answer  only  thus  perhaps  not 
according  to  the  largest  sense  of  the  words,  but  lay  your  hand  upon 
your  heart  and  examine  well  its  affections  &  desires  &  the  effects  they 
produce  and  see  whether  manny  sinnes  doe  not  proceed  from  these 
sources,  wh.  doe  not  only  defile  but  hasard  your  soule.  You  doe,  you 
will  say,  not  covett  &  extort  other  men's  goods  wrongfully;  but  yet 
you  would  be  glad  to  be  master  of  all  the  treasures  of  the  world 
lawfully,  &  have  you  not  some  inordinate  &  secret  desire  &  wishes 
you  were  so,  &  would  you  not  take  much  delight  and  complaisance 
in  being  so  rich,  &  very  loth  to  loose  a  pennie  of  it  tho'  by  way  of 
alms  &  charity  &  doing  yr  poor  neighbour  any  good,  or  doe  you  not 
feel  a  certaine  repining  &  sorrow  when  by  some  casuality  you  loose  it ; 
if  yes,  you  are  not  right,  this  proceeds  from  the  origin  of  a  covetous 
desire  of  having  riches  for  our  owne  delight  &  satisfaction  &  will 
indanger  salvation  if  we  spend  our  lives  carelessly  in  it.  You  say  also 
you  hate  drunkenness,  &  gluttony;  but  if  you  delight  not  only  in 
eating  &  drinking  abundantly  &  superflously,  but  doe  spend  much 
money  &  cause  much  paines  to  be  taken  in  finding  out  fine  delicfous 
inventions  only  for  the  pleasing  of  your  sensuall  appetite,  wh.  serves 
rather  for  the  destruction  then  maintaining  &  nourishing  your  bodily 
health  &  strength,  this  is  not  right,  take  heed  you  find  not  your  part 
among  drunkards  &  gluttons,  or  at  least,  by  these  and  other  such 
inordinations  wh.  are  nowadays  much  practised  by  most  &  the  sins 
thereof  not  much  regarded,  you  come  not  at  last  to  be  of  the  number 
of  those,  qui  non  possidebunt  regnum  dei.  In  fine  not  to  be  tedious 
to  you  in  this  my  dedication,  consider  that  you  are  now  in  those  last 
days,  et  periculosa  tempora,  when  homines  erant  seipsos  amantes,  etc. 
I  endeavour  for  you  by  these  following  advise,  which  if  you  take 
as  much  paines  to  practise  as  I  have  done  to  gather  and  unite  them 
together,  I  shall  hope  to  receive  the  comfort  I  desire,  wh.  is  to  meet 
you  in  eternity  for  wh.  I  shall  offer  my  poor  prayers  as  long  as  I  shall 
live  &  be  able  to  say,  I  am 

ever  yours  to  com. 
S.  B.  C. 
Finis     June  16.  1663. 

II. 

[A  small  volume  of  the  same  size  and  writing^ 

"A  little  Instruction  to  teach  a  Secular  Woman  how  she  should 
live,  &c.     Translated  out  of  an  old  French  Author  without  a  name." 

[On  the  fly-leaf  is  the  autograph  "  Ann  Constable,  1695,"  and  in 
later  writing — "A  nun  born  1654,  daughter  of  Sir  Mar.  Constable 
&  Ann,  d.  of  Tho.  Sherburn  of  Stonyhurst " — She  was  baptized  April 
21,  1655,  and  her  mother  was  the  dau.  of  Richard  Sherborne.  She  was 
a  nun  O.S.A.,  and  died  Feb,  10,  1705.  At  the  end  of  the  volume,  which 
consists  of  "650  pages,  is  the  date  "  Nbvem.  Finis.  1666."] 


DAME  BARBARA  CONSTABLE,  O.S.B. 

From  the  original  painting  (presumably  by  Robert  Walker)  at 

Burton  Constable,  the  seat  of  Major  Walter  George 

Raleigh  Chichester-Constable,  J. P.,  D.L. 


Cath.  Rec.  Soc.  XIII. 


To  face  p.  12. 


CONSOLATION    AT   CAMBRAI,    1620-1793 


13 


Archives  Communales  de  Cambrai. 
GG  Liesse  241. 

27  Juin  1793. 
Citoyens,  president  etc. 
Les  Dames  Angloises  ne  doutent  nullement  de  la  bonte  des 
citoyens  composant  le  Comite  de  la  Section  D  de  Cambrai  envers 
elles.  Elles  s'empressent  de  satisfaire  a  leurs  ordres,  et  si  elles  ne 
trouvent  pas  dans  Particle  XI  cite  du  Decret  du  21  Mars,  qu'elles 
soient  incluses  dans  la  loi  qui  regarde  les  Etrangers,  elles  supposent 
que  le  nombre  XI  a  ete  mis  par  meprise,  etant  fermement  persuadees 
que  vous  ne  les  auriez  comprises,  si  elles  ne  Petoient  pas  en  effet. 
Pour  nous  conformer  done  a  vos  ordres  nous  vous  envoyons  les 
noms  et  ages  et  les  lieux  de  naissance  de  toutes  les  Anglois  ou 
etrangers  composant  notre  famille 


nee  a  Frickleyen  laComteedeYork. 
nee  a  Tournay  de  parents  ecossais. 
nee  h.  Winchester,  Hampshire, 
nee  a  Prescot,  Lancashire. 
neeaHaggerston,  Northumberland. 

nee  a.  Pennystone  dans  le  Comte 
de  Yorkshire. 

nee  a  Childon,  Lancashire. 

nee  a  Londres  Angleterre. 

nee  a  Bryantown  en  Maryland. 

nee  a  Marketraisen,  Lincolnshire. 

nee  dans  Walton  en  la  Comte  de 
Lancashire. 

nee  Huttington,  Buckinghamshire. 

nee  a.  Broughton,  Lancashire. 

nee  Walton  en  la  Comte  de  Lan- 
cashire. 

nee  a  Dublin  en  Irlande. 

nee  a  Winchester,  Hampshire. 

nee  a   Lisbona  en    Portugal    de 
parents  Anglais. 

nee  a  Sephton,  Lancashire. 

nee  a  Sephton,  Lancashire. 

nee  a  Cottham,  Lancashire. 

ne  dans  la  paroisse  de  Dean  Lan- 
cashire. 
James  Higginson  Chaplain,  age  29      ne  a  Standish,  Lancashire. 

Elles  esperent  que  cette  liste  satisfera  en  plain  aux  desirs  et  attente 
du  Comite  auquel  elles  protestent  toute  la  soumission  qui  lui  est  due. 
En  Notre  Maison  a  Cambrai  ce  27  Juin  1793 
Abbesse 
et  Procuratrice. 

[This  draft  bears  the  following  endorsement.'] 

"  These  papers  belong  to  Str  Ann  Teresa.     The  originals  were  sent 


M.  Anselm  Ann,  agee  de  78  ans 
M .  Jeanne  Alexander,  agee  de  7  7  ans 
M.  Frangois  Sheldon,  agee  de  7  2  ans 
M.Margarite  Burgess,  ageede7oans 
M.  Bernarde  Haggerston,  agee  de 

66  ans 
M.  Lucie  Blyde,  agee  de  63  ans 

Anne  Francoise  Pennington,  agee  58 
Therese  Joseph  Walmesley,  agee  5  2 
M.  Louise  Hagan,  agee  52 
Ann  Joseph  Knight,  agee  50 
Ann  Therese  Partington,  agee  47 

M.  Magdeleine  Kimberley,  agee  46 

Scholastica  Caton,  agee  43 

M.  Benedicte  Partington,  agee  40 

M.  Bernarde  Barn  wall,  agee  35 

Martha  Fryer,  agee  31 

M.  Agnes  Robinson,  agee  30 

M.  Teresa  Shepherd,  agee  30 
M.  Augustine  Shepherd,  agee  28 
Joseph  Miller,  agee  25 
Augustin  Walker  Directeur,  age  7  2 


14  RECORDS  OF  THE  ABBEY  OF  OUR  LADY  OF 

to  the  Section  D  June  the  27,  1793,  to  comply  with  an  order  sent  by 
the  said  Section  which  required  us  to  give  in  the  names,  ages  and 
places  of  birth  of  all  our  Nuns." 

As  the  existing  catalogue  of  the  community  printed  hereafter  is  not  a 
complete  register  of  the  community,  it  is  deemed  advisable  at  this  point  to 
insert  brief  notes  on  the  names  appearing  in  the  above  prison  list. 

Dame  Elizabeth  Anselma  Anne,  born  in  1715,  was  the  third  daughter  of 
Marmaduke  Anne,  ofFrickley  Hall  and  Burghwallis  Hall,  co.  York,  Esq., 
by  Elizabeth,  daughter  of  Robert  Plumpton,  of  Plumpton  Hall,  co.  York, 
Esq.  Her  father  was  son  of  Michael  Anne,  Esq.,  and  his  wife  the  Hon. 
Jane  Langdale,  daughter  of  Marmaduke,  2nd  Lord  Langdale  of  Holme. 
She  was  professed  in  1735,  and  died  in  the  prison  at  Compiegne  Jan.  SI, 
1794>  a  glorious  follower  in  the  footsteps  of  her  collateral  ancestor  the 
blessed  martyr  John  Anne,  who  suffered  death  for  his  priesthood  and  the 
Catholic  faith  at  York  on  March  16,  1588-9. 

Dame  Jane  Alexander,  born  of  Scotch  parentage  at  Tournai  in  17 14, 
prof.  1757,  accompanied  the  community  after  release  from  prison  to  Woolton, 
where  she  died  June  17,  1799. 

Dame  Elizabeth  Frances  Sheldon,  born  1720,  was  daughter  of  William 
Sheldon,  of  the  Manor  of  Lower  Ditchford,  co.  Warwick,  and  of  the  city  of 
Winchester,  Esq.,  by  his  second  wife,  Anastatia,  daughter  of  Bartholomew 
Smith,  of  Winchester,  Esq.  Her  father's  first  wife,  Catherine,  daughter  of 
Christopher  Roper,  5th  Lord  Teynham,  was  the  mother  of  the  two  nuns 
Catherine  and  Mary,  who  died  in  1723  and  1756  respectively.  Elizabeth 
was  professed  in  1740,  accompanied  the  nuns  to  Woolton  after  their  release 
from  prison,  and  died  at  Salford  Hall,  July  14,  1808. 

Dame  Margaret  Burgess,  born  1721,  prof.  1749,  and  her  sister  Dame 
Scholastica  Burgess,  who  died  at  Cambrai,  Sept.  16,  1770,  were  daughters 
of  Robert  Burgess,  of  Cronton,  in  Prescot,  co.  Lancaster,  a  Catholic  non- 
juror in  1 717,  who,  as  a  husbandman,  registered  a  small  leasehold  farm. 
Dame  Margaret  died  in  prison  at  Compiegne,  April  3,  1794.  Her  brother 
Thomas  removed  to  a  farm  called  the  Hawkslough  at  Clayton  Brook,  in 
the  parish  of  Leyland,  and  had  several  children,  of  whom  Dom  James  Bede 
Burgess,  O.S.B.,  born  in  1768,  died  in  1837  ;  Thomas,  the  third  son,  a 
joiner  in  Clayton-le- Woods,  married  Cecily  Gregson,  of  Gregson  Lane  in 
Brindle,  and  was  father  of  the  Rt.  Rev.  Thomas  Burgess,  Bishop  of  Clifton, 
born  1791,  died  1854;  Julia,  married  Edward  Swarbrick,  of  Blackburn, 
grocer,  and  was  mother  of  two  lay-sisters  of  that  name  who  died  at  Stan- 
brook  Abbey  ;  and  Ann,  wife  of  Mr.  Abbot,  was  mother  of  the  Rev.  Thomas 
Abbot. 

Dame  Elizabeth  Bernard  Haggerston,  born  1725,  was  daughter  of  Sir 
Carnaby  Haggerston,  of  Haggerston  Castle,  co.  Northumberland,  3rd 
Bart.,  by  Elizabeth,  daughter  and  heiress  of  Peter  Middelton,  of  Stockeld, 
co.  York,  Esq.  When  the  nuns  obtained  their  release  from  prison  and 
came  over  to  England,  in  May  1794,  Dame  Bernard  was  too  ill  to  proceed, 
and  was  conveyed  to  Sutton  Place,  Guildford,  co.  Surrey,  the  residence  of 
John  Webbe- Weston,  Esq.,  who  had  recently  married,  as  his  2nd  wife,  her 
niece  Mary,  eldest  daughter  of  William  Haggerston-Constable.  There  she 
succumbed  to  the  hardships  she  had  undergone,  and  was  buried  at  Holy 
Trinity,  Guildford,  July  16,  1795.  Her  eldest  brother,  Thomas,  succeeded 
to  the  baronetcy.  Her  second  brother,  William,  assumed  the  additional 
name  of  Constable  upon  succeeding  to  the  Everingham  estates  in  con- 
formity with  the  settlement  of  Sir  Marmaduke  Constable,  4th  and  last 
Bart.,  whose  sister  Anne,  daughter  of  Sir  Philip  Mark  Constable,  3rd  Bart., 
and  his  wife  Margaret,  daughter  of  Francis  Radcliffe,  1st  Earl  of  Derwent- 
water,  was  the  wife  of  William,  second  but  eldest  surviving  son  of  Sir 


CONSOLATION   AT   CAMBRAI,    1620-1793  15 

Thomas  Haggerston,  2nd  Bart.,  and  father  of  Sir  Carnaby  Haggerston, 
3rd  Bart.  William  Haggerston-Constable  married  the  Lady  Winifred 
Maxwell,  daughter  and  heiress  of  John,  Lord  Maxwell,  who  assumed  the 
title  of  Earl  of  Nithsdale  upon  the  death  of  his  father,  the  attainted  Lord 
Nithsdale,  and  from  him  descends  the  present  representative  of  the  family, 
the  Duchess  of  Norfolk,  eldest  daughter  and  coheiress  of  the  late  Lord 
Herries. 

Dame  Mary  Lucy  Blyde,  born  in  1729  at  Penistone,  co.  York,  was 
abbess  at  the  time  of  the  seizure  of  the  convent,  having  been  appointed  to 
that  dignity  in  the  preceding  year  upon  the  death  of  the  Abbess  Mary  Clare 
Knight,  Oct.  30,  1792,  and  so  continued  till  1802.  She  was  prof.  1756, 
and  died  at  Salford,  Aug.  12,  18 16. 

Sister  Anne  Frances  Pennington,  lay-sister,  born  in  1734  at  Garston,  in 
the  parish  of  Childwall,  co.  Lancaster,  died  in  the  prison  at  Compiegne, 
Feb.  6, 1794. 

Dame  Teresa  Joseph  Walmesley,  born  in  1739,  was  the  only  child  of 
Thomas  Walmesley,  of  London,  4th  son  of  John  Walmesley,  of  Wigan,  who 
was  son  of  John  Walmesley  by  his  second  wife,  Margaret,  dau.  of  William 
Plesington,  of  Dimples  Hall,  Esq.,  and  aunt  of  the  martyr,  the  Rev.  John 
Plesington.  She  was  prof.  1759,  and  died  in  the  prison  at  Compiegne,  Jan. 
21,  1794. 

Dame  Louisa  Hagan,  born  at  Bryantown  in  Maryland  in  1740,  was 
professed  in  1763,  returned  to  England  with  the  community,  and  died  at 
Salford,  June  6,  181 1. 

Dame  Elizabeth  Anne-Joseph  Knight,  born  in  1742,  was  a  younger  sister 
of  the  Abbess  Mary  Clare  Knight,  (born  1740,  prof.  1765,  elected  to  that 
dignity  in  the  year  of  her  death,  which  occurred  Oct.  30,  1792).  They  were 
daughters  of  Arnold  Knight,  of  Buslingthorpe,  co.  Lincoln,  by  his  wife 
Anne,  daughter  of  Marmaduke  Anne,  of  Frickley  Hall  and  Burghwallis 
Hall,  co.  York,  Esq.,  and  sister  of  Dame  Elizabeth  Anselma  Anne  above. 
Their  grandmother  Elizabeth  Anne,  nee  Plumpton,  married  2ndly  William 
Knight  (vide  C.R.S.  vol.  iv.),  who  subsequently  resided  at  Frickley  Hall. 
Their  brother  Alexander  Knight  settled  at  Sixhills  Grange,  co.  Lincoln, 
and  was  the  father  of  Sir  Arnold  James  Knight,  M.D.,  whose  son  Edmund 
became  bishop  of  Shrewsbury  in  1879.  Dame  Elizabeth  Anne-Joseph  was 
professed  in  1765,  came  over  with  the  community  to  Woolton,  and  died  at 
Salford,  March  2,  1813. 

Dame  Elizabeth  Anne  Teresa  Partington,  born  in  1744,  was  prof. 
1775,  daughter  of  Thomas  Partington,  of  Walton-le-Dale,  co.  Lancaster, 
and  first  cousin  to  Dom  John  Basil  Brindle,  O.S.B.,  and  his  sister  Dame 
Ellen  Mary  Placid  Brindle,  O.S.B.,  of  Paris,  came  with  the  community  to 
Woolton,  and  died  at  Salford,  Sept.  4, 1820.  She  was  sister  to  Dame  Mary 
Benedicta  below. 

Sister  Magdalen  Kimberley,  lay-sister,  born  in  1745  at  Hutington  [?], 
co.  Bucks,  professed  1767,  accompanied  the  community  to  England,  and 
died  at  Woolton,  June  17,  1802. 

Sister  Anne  Scholastica  Caton,  born  1749,  was  daughter  of  John  Caton, 
of  Broughton,  near  Preston,  co.  Lancaster,  yeoman,  and  his  wife  Anne 
Gregson,  both  of  very  good  Catholic  families.  Her  brother,  the  Rev. 
Thomas  Caton,  died  at  Cottam,  the  ancient  seat  of  the  Haydocks,  in  1826, 
aged  70.  She  returned  to  England  with  the  community,  and  died  at 
Salford,  Feb.  13,  1830. 

Dame  Mary  Benedicta  Partington,  born  1751,  prof.  1772,  sister  of  Eliza- 
beth above,  came  over  with  the  community,  and  died  at  Salford,  Dec.  28, 
1826. 

Dame  Margaret  Bernarda  Barnewall,  born  in  Dublin  in  1756,  of  an 
ancient  Irish  family,  after  her  release  from  prison  obtained  permission  to 


1 6  RECORDS  OF  THE  ABBEY  OF  OUR  LADY  OF 

join  the  Trappistines,  and  died  at  the  convent  at  Stapehill,  co.  Dorset, 
Aug.  20,  1835. 

Sister  Martha  Fryar,  lay-sister,  born  at  Winchester,  co.  Hants,  in  1761, 
returned  to  England  with  the  community,  and  died  at  Salford,  Jan.  2, 
1825. 

Dame  Martha  Agnes  Robinson,  born  at  Lisbon  in  1761,  of  a  good 
English  family  having  associations  with  Lisbon,  prof.  1781,  after  her  release 
from  prison  came  over  with  the  community,  was  abbess  1806-14,  and  again 
1818-22,  and  died  at  Salford,  June  II,  1830. 

Dame  Anne  Mary  Teresa  Shepherd,  born  at  Sefton  in  1762,  prof.  1782, 
came  of  the  very  highly  respected  Lancashire  Catholic  family  noted  in 
C.R.S.  vol.  vi.  p.  112.  After  her  return  to  England  she  was  abbess  at 
Woolton  1802-6,  and  died  at  Salford,  June  12,  1809. 

Dame  Helen  Augustina  Shepherd,  sister  to  above,  born  in  1764,  prof. 
1783,  came  over  with  the  community  to  Woolton,  was  abbess  18 14-18,  and 
died  at  Salford,  Feb.  12,  1818. 

Sister  Jane  Josepha  Miller,  lay-sister,  born  1766,  was  daughter  of  Joseph 
Miller,  of  Cottam,  co.  Lancaster,  by  Agnes,  daughter  of  Ralph  ffidler,  of 
ffidlers  in  Lea,  and  his  wife  Jennet,  daughter  of  Robert  Haydock,  of  Leach 
Hall  in  Bartell.  The  Millers  had  long  been  tenants  of  the  Haydocks  of  Cottam 
Hall,  and  from  them  was  descended  Bishop  John  Milner,  V.A.-M.D.,  who 
reverted  to  the  ancient  spelling  of  his  name.  She  was  clothed  at  Cambrai, 
and  after  her  release  from  prison  accompanied  the  nuns  to  Woolton,  where 
she  was  prof,  in  March,  and  died  July  15,  1796. 

Dom  George  Augustine  Walker,  born  in  1720,  son  of  George  Walker, 
yeoman,  who  in  17 17  was  residing  in  Aspull,  co.  Lancaster,  and  as  a 
Catholic  non-juror  registered  a  house  at  Deane,  to  which  subsequently  he 
must  have  removed,  as  his  son  declares  he  was  born  there.  He  was  pro- 
fessed at  Paris  in  1743,  and  became  president-general  of  the  English 
Benedictine  Congregation  in  1777,  an  office  which  he  held  till  death  in  the 
prison  at  Compiegne,  Jan.  13,  1794.  When  the  Revolution  had  commenced 
he  took  upon  himself  to  be  vicar  of  the  nuns  at  Cambrai  in  1790,  and  went 
to  prison  with  them. 

Dom  James  Higginson,  born  at  Standish  in  1764,  son  of  a  tenant  of 
the  Dicconsons,  of  Wrightington  Hall,  was  professed  at  the  Benedictine 
Monastery  at  Douay  in  1785,  became  socius  to  Fr.  Walker  at  Cambrai 
in  1792,  and  died  on  the  mission  at  Birtley,  co.  Durham,  Dec.  13,  1835. 

[The  following  extracts  from  the  Mairie  de  Compiegne  were  made  for 
Stanbrook  by  Mgr.  de  Teil,  Vice-postulator  of  the  Cause  of  the  Sixteen 
Martyrs  of  the  Carmel  of  Compiegne?^ 

MAIRIE   DE   COMPlfeGNE. 

(Oise) 

Extrait  du  registre  des  actes  de  l'Etat  civil  pour  l'Anne  1794. 

Deces  Marie  Anselme  Ann.  [In  margin.] 

L'An  second  de  la  Republique  franchise  une  indivisible  et  im- 
perissable,  le  quintidi  vingtcinq  Nivose  a  dix  heures  du  matin, 
Pardevant  moi  Joseph  Roger  notable  de  la  Commune  de  Compiegne 
y  demeurant  nomme  par  deliberation  du  Conseil  General  d'icelle 
du  vingt  sept  Brumaire  dernier  pour  recevoir  les  actes  destines 
a  constater  }es  naissances,  manages  et  deces  des  citoyens  de 
la  section  du  Nord  dudit  Compiegne,  districts  de  Compiegne,  de- 
partement  de  POise ;  sont  comparus  en  ladite  Commune,  les  citoyens 


CONSOLATION    AT    CAMBRAI,     1620-1793  1 7 

francois  Guay,  Commissaire  en  la  maison  de  reclusion  dudit  Compiegne, 
sise  rue  du  Salut  public  demeurant  en  cette  commune  age  de  trente  un 
ans,  Alexandre  Pierre  Gabriel  Scellier,  maire  de  cette  commune,  age 
de  quarante-deux  ans,  Pierre  Louis  Herbet,  agent  national  de  la  meme 
commune  age  de  quarante-six  ans  et  de  Pierre  Jean  Boissel  officier 
municipal  de  la  susdite  commune,  tous  les  quatre  demeurant  en  la 
section  du  Nord  dudit  Compiegne ;  le  premier,  place  de  la  revolution, 
le  dernier,  rue  de  Pierrefonds  et  les  deux  autres  rue  du  Vieux  Pont, 
lesquels  nous  ont  declare  que  la  citoyenne  Marie  Anselme  Ann,  native 
de  frickly  dans  la  province  de  yorkshire  en  angleterre,  arretee  a  Cambrai, 
departement  du  Nord,  le  treize  octobre  dernier  en  vertu  du  decret 
contre  les  etrangers  et  amene  en  ladite  maison  de  reclusion  dudit 
Compiegne  ou  elle  est  arrivee  le  vingt  trois  dudit  mois  d'Octobre  dernier 
suivant  le  proces  verbal  dudit  jour,  y  etait  morte  et  decedee  ce  jourd'hui 
vingt  cinq  nivose  present  mois  a  quatre  heures  du  matin  a  Page  de 
soixante-dix-neuf  ans,  d'apres  cette  declaration  je  me  suis  sur  le  champ 
transporte  en  ladite  maison  de  reclusion,  ou  etant  et  parvenus  dans  une 
salle  au  premier  sur  la  gauche  ou  logent  les  religieux  detenus,  je  me 
suis  assure  du  deces  de  ladite  Marie  Anselme  Ann,  ci-dessus  denommee 
et  j'ai  du  tout  fait  et  r^dige  sur  le  champ  le  present  acte  en  presence 
desdit  citoyens  Scellier,  Herbet  et  Boisset  temoins  ci-dessus  denommes 
qui  l'ont  certifie  conforme  a  la  verite  et  signe  avec  moi ;  fait  en  la  maison 
commune  dudit  Compiegne  les  jours  mois  etan  susdits. — signe  au 
registre  :  Boissel,  Herbet,  Scellier,  Maire. — D&ivre  sur  papier  libre 
pour  simple  renseignement.  Choved. 

Deces  Georges  Augustin  Walker.         [In  margin.] 

Aujourd'hui  quartidi  vingtquatre  Nivose  Tan  deuxieme  de  la 
r^publique  franchise,  une,  Indivisible,  et  Imperissable  a  cinq  heures  du 
soir,  pardevant  moi  Joseph  Roger  membre  du  Conseil  General  de  la 
Commune  de  Compiegne  y  demeurant,  nomme  par  deliberation  d'icelui 
du  vingt  sept  brumaire  dernier  pour  recevoir  les  actes  destines  a  constater 
les  naissances,  manages  et  deces  des  citoyens  de  la  section  du  nord 
dudit  Compiegne,  district  de  Compiegne  departement  de  l'Oise,sont  com- 
parus  en  ladite  commune  les  citoyens  Alexandre  Pierre  Gabriel  Scellier, 
Maire  de  cette  commune  age  de  quarante  deux  ans,  Pierre  Louis 
Hubert  agent  national  de  la  meme  commune  age  de  quarante  six  ans 
et  de  Pierre  Jean  Boissel  officier  municipal  de  la  susditte  commune  age 
de  cinquante  six  ans,  tous  les  trois  demeurant  en  la  section  du  Nord 
dudit  compiegne,  les  deux  premiers,  rue  du  Vieux  pont  et  le  dernier  rue 
de  Pierrefond,  lesquels  nous  ont  declare  que  Georges  Augustin  Walker 
citoyen  Anglais  pretre  catholique  des  dames  religieuses  anglaises  de 
Cambray  departement  du  Nord  detenues  en  cette  commune,  lequel  est 
natif  de  la  province  de  l'ancashie  en  angleterre,  age  de  soixante  treize 
ans,  et  etait  entre  a  la  maison  de  reclusion  dudit  Compiegne,  sise  rue 
du  Salut  Public,  le  quatre  frimaire  dernier  en  vertu  du  decret  qui 
ordonne  que  tous  les  etrangers  seront  mis  en  arrestation  y  etait  mort  et 
decede  ce  jourd'hui  vingt  quatre  Nivose,  present  mois  a.  deux  heures 
du  matin,  d'apres  cette  declaration  je  me  suis  sur  le  champ  transporte 
en  laditte  maison  de  reclusion  ou  etant  parvenus  dans  une  chambre  au 

XIII.  B 


1 8  RECORDS  OF  THE  ABBEY  OF  OUR  LADY  OF 

second  a  gauche  du  corridor  faisant  face  a  l'escalier  je  me  suis  assure 
du  deces  dudit  Georges  Augustin  Walker  ci-dessus  denomme,  et  j'ai 
du  tout  fait  et  redige  sur  le  champ  le  present  acte  en  presence  desdits 
citoyens  Scellier,  Herbet,  Boissel  temoins  ci-dessus  denommes  qui  l'ont 
certifie  conforme  a  la  verite  et  signe  avec  moi ;  fait  en  la  maison  com- 
mune dudit  Compiegne  les  jours  mois  etan  susdits. 

Signe  au  registre  :  Boissel,  Herbet,  Scellier  maire. 

Pour  copie  conforme  au  registre  delivree  sur  papier  libre   pour 
simple  renseignement. 

Compiegne,  le  huit  Janvier  mil  huit  cent  quatre  vingt  seize. 

Le  Senateur,  Maire 

L.  S.  Choved. 

Extrait  du  registre  des  actes  de  l'Etat  Civil  de  la  Ville  de  Compiegne 
pour  l'annee  1794. 

Deces  Pinnington  Anne  Francoise.        [In  margin.] 

Ce  jourd'hui  dix  huit  pluviose  Tan  second  de  la  republique  francaise, 
une  indivisible  et  imperissable,  a  neuf  heures  du  matin,  pardevant  moi 
Joseph  Roger  Membre  du  Conseil  General  de  la  Commune  de  Com- 
piegne y  demeurant,  nomme  par  deliberation  d'icelui  le  vingt  sept 
brumaire  dernier  pour  rediger  les  actes  destines  a  constater  les 
naissances,  manages  et  deces  des  citoiens  de  la  section  du  Nord 
dudit  Compiegne  district  du  meme  lieu,  departement  de  l'Oise, 
sont  comparus  les  citoiens  Alexandre  Pierre  Gabriel  Seillier,  Maire 
de  cette  commune  age  de  quarante  deux  ans,  Pierre  Louis  Herbet 
agent  National  de  la  meme  commune,  age  de  quarante-six  ans 
et  francois  Guay  commissaire  de  la  maison  de  reclusion,  juge 
en  la  section  du  Nord  dudit  Compiegne,  rue  du  salut  Public,  age 
de  trente  deux  ans,  tous  trois  demeurant  en  laditte  section,  de 
laditte  commune  les  deux  premiers  rue  du  Vieux  Pont  et  l'autre 
place  de  la  revolution,  lesquels  nous  ont  declare  que  la  citoienne 
Anne  francoise  Pinnington,  religieuse  anglaise,  demeurant  a  Cambray, 
district  du  meme  lieu  departement  du  nord  agee  de  cinquante  neuf  ans 
ou  environ,  native  de  Nooton,  Village  de  la  province  de  Lannghire  en 
Angleterre,  arretee  audit  Cambray  comme  etrangere  et  amenee  en  ladite 
maison  de  reclusion  dudit  compiegne  le  vingt  deux  octobre  dernier, 
suivant  le  proces  verbal  quy  en  a  ete  redige  ledit  jour  et  ou  elle  a  ete 
detenue  depuis  ce  temps,  y  etait  morte  et  deced^e  ce  jourd'hui  a  quatre 
heures  du  matin,  d'apres  cette  declaration,  je  me  suis  sur  le  champ 
transporte  en  laditte  maison  de  reclusion,  ou  etant  et  parvenu  dans  une 
salle  du  premier  a  gauche,  ou  logent  les  religieuses  detenues,  je  me  suis 
assure  du  deces  de  laditte  Anne  Francoise  Pinnington  et  j'ai  fait  et  redige 
sur  le  champ  le  present  acte  que  lesdits  citoiens  Alexandre  Pierre 
gabriel  Seillier,  pierre  Louis  herbet  et  Francois  Gay,  ont  certifie  con- 
forme a  la  verite  et  l'ont  tous  signe  avec  moi,  fait  en  la  maison  commune 
dudit  Compiegne  les  jour,  mois  et  an  susdits. 

signe  au  registre ;  Seillier  herbet,  Gay,  Roger. 


CONSOLATION    AT   CAMBRAI,    1620-1793  19 

Extrait  des  actes  de  l'Etat-Civil. 

De'ces  Burgess  Marguerite.  [In  margin.] 

Ce  jourdliui  quatorze  Germinal,  Tan  second  de  la  republique 
francaise,  une  indivisible  et  imperissable  a  cinq  heures  du  soir, 
pardevant  moi  Joseph  Roger  Membre  du  Conseil  general  de  la 
Commune  de  Compiegne  y  demeurant,  nomme  par  deliberation 
d'icelui  le  vingt  sept  brumaire  dernier  pour  recevoir  les  actes 
destines  a  constater  les  naissances,  Manages  et  d^ces  des  citoiens 
de  la  section  du  Nord  dudit  Compiegne,  district  du  raeme  lieu 
ddpartement  de  Poise,  sont  comparus  en  la  maison  commune 
susditte  de  Compiegne,  les  citoiens,  Alexandre  Pierre  Gabriel 
Scellier,  maire  de  cette  Commune,  age  de  quarante  deux  ans,  Pierre 
Louis  Herbet  agent  national  de  la  meme  commune  age  de  quarante 
six  ans  et  Louis  Cardon,  commissaire  de  la  Maison  de  Reclusion  sise 
en  la  section  du  nord  dudit  Compiegne  rue  du  Salut  public  age  de 
cinquante  ans,  tous  les  trois  demeurant  audit  Compiegne,  les  deux 
premiers  rue  du  Vieux  Pont  et  l'autre  rue  du  Plat  d'etain,  lesquels 
m'ont  declare  que  la  citoienne  Marie  Marguerite  Burgess,  religieuse 
anglaise  demeurante  ci-devant  a  Cambrai  district  d'idem  d^partement 
du  Nord,  agee  de  soixante  douze  ans  native  de  Wigan,  province  de 
l'Enkashire  en  angleterre,  ArrStee  audit  Cambrai  comme  etrangere 
le  treize  octobre  dernier,  et  amenee  en  ladite  maison  de  reclusion  dudit 
Compiegne,  le  vingt  deux  octobre  dernier,  suivant  le  proces  verbal  qui 
en  a  ete"  redige  ledit  jour  et  ou  elle  a  6t6  detenue  depuis  ce  temps,  y 
est  morte  et  decedee  aujourd'hui  a  deux  heures  de  relevee,  d'apres 
cette  declaration  je  me  suis  sur  le  champ  transporte  en  la  susdite 
maison  de  reclusion  ou  etant  et  parvenu  dans  une  des  salles  aupremier 
a  gauche  ditte  l'infirmerie  et  au  bout  de  la  grande  salle  ou  logent  les 
religieuses  detenues  je  me  suis  assure  du  deces  de  ladite  Marguerite 
Burgess  et  j'ai  sur  le  champ  fait  et  redige  le  present  acte  que  lesdits 
citoiens  Scellier  Herbet  et  Cardon  ont  certifie  conforme  a  la  verite  et 
l'ont  tous  signe  avec  moi,  fait  en  la  maison  Commune  dudit  Compiegne 
les  jour,  mois  et  an  susdit. 

Signe ;  Scellier,  herbet,  Cardon. 

[There  are  at  Stanbrook  two  manuscripts  in  different  handwriting, 
but  evidently  of  nearly  the  same  date,  giving  the  following  "Narrative" 
with  scarcely  an  alteration  of  a  word.  One  is  signed  by  the  writer, 
Dame  Ann  Teresa  Partington,  and  is  the  more  valuable  of  the  two, 
being  quite  original.  At  Stonyhurst  there  is  another  manuscript  copy 
of  this  same,  bound  up  with  other  matter.  The  nuns  at  Stanbrook, 
having  some  years  ago  collated  its  text  with  their  own  manuscripts,  found 
hardly  any  difference  in  words,  save  just  improvements  in  style  here  and 
there.  One  important  omission  in  their  manuscripts  was  found  supplied  in 
the  Stonyhurst  MS.,  i.e.  the  name  of  Dame  Margaret  Burgess,  the  fourth 
of  the  Community  who  fell  a  victim  to  prison  hardship,  expiring  there 
on  April  3,  1794.  Though  no  doubt  ever  existed  as  to  this  fact,  the 
Stanbrook  nuns  were  glad  to  find  the  missing  name.  Evidently  it  had 
escaped  the  memory  of  Dame  Ann  Teresa  Partington  when  writing  her 
Narrative  under  difficulties;    the   later   date,   April  $rd,    separating 


20  RECORDS  OF  THE  ABBEY  OF  OUR  LADY  OF 

D.  Margaret's  fate  from  that  of  the  other  three  nuns  in  January  and 
February.  D.  Margarefs  name  is  in  the  Necrology ',  and  her  death 
register^  made  by  the  prison  authorities^  is  given  above.  The  date  at 
which  the  Narrative  ivas  written  was  evidently  1796,  or  early  in  1797. 
This  manuscript  ivas  of  very  great  value  in  the  Process  of  the  Blessed 
Carmelite  Martyrs  of  Compiegne.] 

A  Brief  Narrative  of  the  Seizure  of  the  Benedictine  Dames  of  Cambray, 
of  their  Sufferings  while  in  the  hands  of  the  French  Republicans, 
and  of  their  arrival  in  England.  By  one  of  the  religious,  who 
was  an  eyewitness  to  the  events  She  relates. 

[Signed]        Ann  Teresa  Partington. 

In  the  Summer  of  the  Year  1793,  the  allied  armies  being  near  the 
gates  of  Cambray,  the  Religious  were  repeatedly  ordered  in  the  most 
threatening  manner  by  the  District  of  Cambray  to  lay  in  provisions  for 
Six  months  against  the  Siege  that  was  then  expected  to  take  place. 
They  accordingly  provided  themselves  with  such  a  Stock  of  Necessaries 
as  their  finances  would  allow  them  to  purchase.  From  the  commence- 
ment of  the  unhappy  troubles,  they  had  been  constantly  alarmed,  by  the 
visits,  or  decrees  of  the  Agents  in  the  Revolution  who  were  no  where 
more  outrageous  than  at  Cambray.  But  the  Nuns  not  being  conscious 
of  having  given  any  offence  were  willing  to  flatter  themselves  that  they 
were  in  some  safety.  However  on  Sunday  October  13th  1793  the 
District  of  Cambray  sent  four  of  their  Creatures  to  fix  the  public  Seal 
on  the  papers  and  effects  belonging  to  the  Nuns.  These  Commis- 
sioners arrived  at  the  Convent  about  half  past  eight  at  night.  The 
Religious  were  retired  to  their  Cells  having  to  rise  at  Midnight  to 
perform  their  Matins  Office  so  that  it  was  some  minutes  before  Lady 
Abbess  Lucy  Blyde  could  open  the  Inclosure  Door;  at  which  they 
seemed  displeased.  The  Very  Revd  Mr.  Walker,  who  out  of  a  motive 
of  charity  assisted  the  Nuns  as  their  Spiritual  Director;  was  only  just 
recovering  from  a  very  dangerous  illness  and  was  in  bed,  but  on  hearing 
what  was  going  forward  got  up  and  came  into  the  Convent. 

All  the  Nuns  being  assembled,  one  of  the  men  who  seemed  the 
most  cruel  of  the  Company  read  a  very  long  paper  the  purport  of 
which  was  that  all  the  Effects  belonging  to  the  Nuns  were  confiscated 
to  the  Nation.  Mr.  Walker  began  to  expostulate  with  them,  but  their 
brutality  soon  silenced  him.  They  then  proceeded  to  fix  the  seals 
on  all  the  Books,  papers,  &c,  belonging  to  the  Lady  Abbess  and 
Dame  Procuratrix  Dame  A.  T.  Partington,  threatening  them  all  the 
while  how  severely  they  should  be  punished  in  case  they  concealed 
the  smallest  article  of  their  property.  Having  secured  everything,  they 
told  the  Nuns  that  they  were  now  prisoners,  and  then  they  wrote  a 
long  account  of  their  proceeding,  at  the  close  of  which  they  added 
by  the  desire  of  the  Community  that  the  religious  wished  to  remain 
prisoners  in  their  Convent  under  a  Guard  rather  than  be  removed  to 
any  other  place  of  confinement.  This  paper  the  Lady  Abbess  and 
Procuratrix  signed.  They  went  out  of  the  Monastery  about  Eleven 
o'clock  to  put  the  public  Seals  on  everything  in  the  outward  buildings 


CONSOLATION    AT   CAMBRAI,    162O-I793  21 

and  apartments  one  of  which  was  appointed  for  the  use  of  the  Con- 
fessor, this  they  did  with  the  utmost  Severity.  They  then  arrested 
the  Revd  Messrs  Walker  and  Higginson,  the  last  mentioned  was  a 
young  religious  man  who  in  consideration  of  the  age  and  declining 
health  of  the  former  had  been  some  months  before  appointed  to  assist 
him.  To  prevent  them  from  having  any  Conversation  with  the  Nuns 
they  took  them  away  instantly.  It  was  near  Twelve  when  the  Guards 
conducted  them  to  prison.  Mr.  Walker  was  quite  broken  with  age  and 
infirmity.  The  Nuns  had  the  affliction  of  seeing  all  that  passed  from 
their  adjoining  Convent.  They  thought  they  were  dragging  them  to 
prison  for  immediate  execution,  but  Providence  kindly  reserved  them 
to  be  their  Support  in  another  place  of  Suffering.  What  the  religious 
felt  on  the  occasion  may  be  better  imagined  than  expressed. 

That  Night  they  confined  them  in  the  Town  house.  Next  morning 
they  were  removed  to  the  Bishop's  Seminary  which  formerly  belonged 
to  the  Jesuits  but  was  then  turned  into  what  they  called  a  Maison  de 
Detention.  There  they  remained  till  the  20th  of  Novr  1793,  deprived 
of  the  most  common  Necessaries.  They  were  once,  a  day  and  a  half, 
without  any  other  food  than  one  bit  of  Bread.  They  began  to  suspect 
that  their  death  was  to  be  effected  by  their  being  left  to  Starve.  No 
one  durst  serve  them  with  Victuals.  They  wrote  to  many  Inn  keepers 
and  assured  them  of  immediate  payment  for  the  scanty  Sustinence 
they  asked  for,  but  so  hateful  was  the  name  of  a  Priest  in  Cambray, 
and  the  people  so  terrified  at  what  they  saw  going  on,  that  no  answer 
was  ever  returned.  They  could  not  prevail  even  with  a  Barber  to 
venture  to  attend  them.  At  length  a  good  woman  Marie  Demal  who 
had  lived  Servant  with  the  Nuns,  hearing  of  their  distress,  had  the 
courage  to  visit  them  instantly  and  in  spite  of  every  danger  and 
difficulty  provided  Victuals  for  them  the  best  she  could  get.  She  con- 
tinued her  charitable  assistance  till  they  were  removed  to  Compiegne. 
Mr.  Walker  frequently  said  afterwards  that  she  had  saved  his  life. 

But  to  return  to  the  Nuns.  From  the  moment  the  Commissioners 
from  the  District  entered  their  house  on  Sunday  Night,  they  found 
themselves  Strictly  Guarded,  but  they  were  still  made  to  hope  that 
they  might  remain  in  their  Convent  as  they  had  desired,  even  some 
of  the  members  of  the  District  assured  them  in  the  most  Solemn 
Manner  that  there  was  no  danger  of  their  being  (?)  from  it.  That 
this  was  all  treachery  the  Nuns  were  afterwards  well  assured — for  the 
day  after  this  Solemn  promise  had  been  made  them,  Friday  the  1 8th  of 
Octr  1793,  they  were  seized  upon  by  a  body  of  light  horse  Guards,  part 
of  whom  surrounded  the  Street  Door  whilst  the  rest  entered  into  their 
Convent  with  a  crowd  of  blackguards  at  their  heels.  A  very  brutal 
Man  sent  by  the  District  of  Cambray  was  at  their  Head.  When  he 
came  up  to  the  Inclosure  Door  his  first  question  was,  have  you  laid  in 
a  provision  for  Six  months.  On  being  assured  that  that  had  been 
done,  he  seemed  for  an  instant  at  a  loss  what  to  say,  but  after  a  short 
pause  he  gave  orders  that  the  Nuns  should  be  totally  out  of  their 
house  in  half  a  quarter  of  an  hour  and  that  they  should  take  neither 
Trunk  nor  Box  with  them.  He  only  allowed  each  one  of  them  a 
small  bundle.     His  figure  and  manner  of  speaking  appeared  so  savage 


22  RECORDS  OF  THE  ABBEY  OF  OUR  LADY  OF 

and  insulting  that  the  Nuns  were  in  the  Greatest  Terror,  so  that 
amidst  the  hurry  and  Confusion  of  so  sudden  a  Calamity  overwhelmed 
with  sorrow  at  being  thus  turned  out  of  their  beloved  abode,  and  for 
want  of  sufficient  time  to  make  up  their  bundles,  many  of  the  Nuns 
went  away  with  only  the  Clothes  they  had  on.  At  this  afflicting  moment, 
the  future  want  of  every  necessary  found  no  place  in  their  Minds — they 
were  Stupified  with  grief.  The  Procuratrix,  however,  petitioned  to 
carry  off  a  small  Book  where  was  written  a  few  memorandums  very 
useful  to  her,  but  the  111  natured  Man  to  whom  she  addressed  herself 
wrested  the  Book  from  her  hands  telling  her  at  the  same  time  to  fetch 
Brandy  for  the  Hussars,  which  she  instantly  was  obliged  to  do,  while 
the  barbarous  man  was  running  about  the  house  with  a  club  in  his 
hand  ready  to  make  any  one  feel  the  weight  of  it  who  did  not  make 
haste  to  be  gone.  Thus  in  less  than  half  an  hour  they  were  completely 
turned  out  of  their  whole  property  without  being  able  to  learn  from 
any  one  what  was  to  be  their  fate.  They  thought  Death  would  soon 
have  followed  and  expected  every  moment  to  see  the  fatal  Gullotine. 

In  the  Street  they  found  one  coach  and  two  carts,  each  of  them 
Strongly  Guarded  by  a  detachment  of  Hussars  on  horseback  with 
Naked  Swords.  The  Nuns  were  soon  hurried  away — the  Hussars 
seemed  much  displeased  at  this  barbarous  usage.  Some  of  them 
Shed  Tears,  and  on  the  way  with  the  most  feeling  compasion,  They 
even  lent  their  Cloaks  to  those  of  the  religious  who  were  in  the 
uncovered  Carts  to  keep  them  from  Starving.  Through  the  whole 
dismal  journey  of  five  days,  they  did  all  they  could  to  soften  the 
hardships  they  saw  the  Nuns  exposed  to  on  all  Sides,  but  it  was  not 
in  their  power  to  hinder  the  populace  from  leading  the  religious  with 
insulting  language  wherever  they  past.  Besides  when  the  Nuns 
arrived  in  any  Town  to  pass  the  Night  they  were  guarded  by  the 
Soldiers  who  did  duty  at  the  prison  in  which  they  happened  to  be 
lodged ;  among  them  they  met  with  a  variety  of  insults,  insomuch  that 
they  always  dreaded  the  approach  of  Night.  The  Nuns  were  Twenty 
in  number  and  a  Novice  upon  probation  when  they  were  expelled  from 
their  Convent  (Viz) 

Mary  Anselm  Ann.        Margaret  Burgess.  Teresa  Walmesley. 

Jane  Alexander.  Elizth  Haggerston.  Louisa  Hagan. 

Elizth  Sheldon.  Mary  Blyde.  Abbess.      Elizth  Knight. 

Elizth  Partington.  Mary  Barnwall.  Ann  Shepherd. 

Mary  Partington.  Agnes  Robinson.  Helen  Shepherd. 

Lay  Sisters. 

Ann  Pennington.  Magd  Kimberley.  Martha  Friar. 

Louisa  Lefebevre.  Ann  Cayton.  Jane  Miller   Novice. 

The  Hussars  who  Conducted  them  did  not  at  first  know  whither  the 
Nuns  were  to  be  taken.  They  were  Strangers  to  the  Country;  had 
been  sent  for  from  some  distance  for  the  grand  purpose  of  carrying 
Prisoners  from  Cambray.  They  received  orders  every  Night  how  they 
were  to  proceed  the  following  day.  At  last  the  Nuns  found  that  the 
appointed  place  of  their  Captivity  was  Compiegne  where,  being  at  a 
distance  from  every  friend,  they  must  have  little,  or  no  hope  of 
recovering  any  part  of  their  large  property. 


CONSOLATION   AT   CAMBRAI,    1620-1793  2$ 

The  first  Night,  Friday,  they  were  lodged  in  a  very  ruinous  place 
at  Bapaume ;  it  had  the  appearance  of  having  been  a  Convent,  it  was 
almost  destroyed,  the  Windows  all  broken  &c :  The  violence  of  the 
rabble  was  so  great  here,  that  the  Nuns  were  very  happy  to  be  taken 
out  of  the  Carts  into  any  place  like  a  house.  The  Mayor  of  this  Town 
was  a  native  of  Cambray  and  was  well  known  to  the  Nuns,  one  of 
his  Sisters  having  had  her  education  among  them,  but  he  now  knew 
nothing  of  them  nor  showed  them  any  favour.  He  was  highly  displeased 
at  their  being  in  the  religious  dress,  and  said  the  people  of  Cambray 
had  acted  against  the  Law  by  not  making  them  Shun  a  dress  which 
the  law  had  prescribed. 

The  jailor  of  this  prison  seemed  a  quiet  man,  and  his  Daughter 
was  so  kind  as  to  buy  the  Nuns  two  faggots,  some  very  Brown  Bread, 
and  a  kettle  of  boiling  water.  They  made  Tea,  but  Sugar  and  milk 
were  delicates  not  to  be  thought  of,  or  at  least  not  to  be  had.  They 
were  so  exhausted  with  grief,  and  the  fatigue  they  had  gone  through 
that  day,  that  most  of  them  could  not  eat  the  Bread.  They  laid  their 
wearied  bodies  on  the  floor,  and  they  spread  a  few  bundels  they  had 
brought  with  them  to  Stretch  their  limbs  upon,  and  even  in  this  State 
they  were  frequently  disturbed  by  the  Guards  looking  through  the 
broken  Windows. 

The  next  night  (Saturday)  they  past  at  Peronne  in  the  Citidal. 
Here  they  were  Guarded  by  the  National  Troops,  whose  brutality  can 
hardly  be  described.  Nothing  could  be  more  disagreeable  than  their 
language  and  behaviour.  A  Woman  who  appeared  to  belong  to  one 
of  them  molested  the  Nuns  by  every  means  she  could.  However 
amongst  all  this  cruel  treatment  They  had  the  comfort  to  meet  with 
some  friends.  A  Woman  whose  Father  in  better  times  had  been 
employed  by  the  Nuns  had  the  courage  to  make  her  way  to  them 
in  the  Prison.  She  and  her  Husband  bought  for  them  Bread,  small 
Beer  and  a  few  Boiled  Eggs,  which  was  really  a  treat.  Some  of  the 
Nuns  had  eat  nothing  for  two  days.  Here  they  found  a  few  Bed-stocks 
full  of  dirty  straw,  on  which  the  Soldiers  had  Slept  apparently  for  some 
months.  The  Nuns  for  a  time  were  much  afraid  of  the  consequence 
they  might  procure  by  lying  down  upon  it :  at  last  excessive  weariness 
overcame  that  difficulty,  but  there  was  no  rest  to  be  found  in  this  place 
of  horror,  the  Soldiers  were  passing  to  and  fro  the  greater  part  of  the 
Night,  even  through  the  room  which  had  been  assigned  to  the  Nuns. 
Next  morning  by  the  favour  of  an  Irish  Lady,  who  was  there  in 
Arrestation,  the  Nuns  had  one  cup  of  Tea  before  the  Hussars  came 
to  summon  them  to  continue  their  tedious  Journey. 

On  Sunday  Night  they  rested  at  Ham.  On  their  arrival  there  was, 
as  they  expected  a  great  Stir  among  the  rabble,  each  one  crying  out 
Aristocrates  to  the  Guillotine,  but  this  Language  was  become  so  familiar 
to  the  Nuns,  that  it  had  lost  much  of  the  effect  it  had  at  first.  The 
Prison  they  were  lodged  in  being  at  the  Skirts  of  the  Town  they  got 
out  of  the  Carts  with  fewer  of  the  Mob  attending  them  than  usual. 
Not  to  be  insulted  to  a  great  degree  now  seemed  a  favour.  The 
Governor  of  this  place  happened  to  be  in  Town,  an  humane  Man. 
He  gave  orders  that  the  Nuns  should  have  a  room  to  themselves  and 


24  RECORDS  OF  THE  ABBEY  OF  OUR  LADY  OF 

allowed  them  clean  straw,  which  was  Spread  all  over  the  floor.  They 
were  happy  to  lye  down  upon  it,  and  the  Night  passed  without  any 
noise  or  Interruption.  They  were  also  permitted  to  buy  a  Candle, 
and,  what  was  more  to  their  purpose,  something  to  eat.  Next  morning 
the  Governor  calld  upon  them  and  on  parting  with  them  recommended 
himself  to  their  prayers.  They  attributed  this  shew  of  kindness  to  the 
good  will  of  a  poor  woman,  who  had  the  care  of  the  prison.  She  had 
lived  at  Cambray,  in  the  neighbourhood  of  the  Nuns,  and  she  seemed 
to  be  much  affected  on  seeing  them  in  their  present  distress.  It  gave 
her  particular  concern  to  see  them  go  in  Carts,  while  all  the  other 
prisoners  (a  few  men  excepted)  were  carried  in  Coaches  to  their  several 
destinations.  She  thought  as  every  one  did,  that  the  Nuns  were 
exposed  in  Carts  for  no  other  end,  than  that  they  might  be  the  more 
insulted. 

Monday  Night  they  stopt  at  Noyon.  It  is  impossible  to  describe 
the  fright  they  were  in  on  their  arrival  there  :  the  Carts  had  no  sooner 
Stop't  in  the  Market  place,  than  thousands  of  people  assembled  in 
the  most  riotous  manner  around  them.  For  Nuns  to  appear  in  the 
religious  Dress  was  at  that  time  the  worst  of  crimes.  Some  talked 
of  tearing  them  to  pieces,  others  said  they  would  bury  them  alive  with 
their  prescribed  Dress.  The  Hussars  repeatedly  endeavoured  to  speak 
in  their  favour  but  so  great  was  the  Noise  and  the  tumult  among  the 
populace,  which  in  a  Short  time  had  increased  to  a  dreadful  number, 
that  not  a  word  could  be  heard.  Not  only  the  streets,  but  the  windows 
and  the  tops  of  some  houses,  were  full  of  Spectators.  The  Hussars 
finding  it  impossible  to  keep  any  order,  Sent  for  the  Soldiers  quartered 
in  the  Town,  by  whose  assistance  the  Nuns  were  at  last  taken  out  of 
the  Carts,  half  dead  with  fear,  after  having  been  detained  in  the  Market 
place  near  an  hour,  amidst  a  variety  of  the  most  outrageous  insults 
and  threats.  One  instance  alone  may  shew  the  Temper  of  the  people 
in  their  regard;  one -of  the  Nuns  Mary  T.  Shepherd  when  she  was 
taken  out  of  the  cart  being  Scarcely  able  to  stand  fell  against  the  horse 
which  was  at  side  of  her.  The  Beast  immediately  Struck  her  at  which 
the  rabble  set  up  the  most  insulting  Shouts,  and  clap'd  their  hands 
for  joy. 

The  Soldiers,  who  came  to  assist  the  Hussars,  guarded  the  Nuns 
that  Night,  were  extremely  civil  to  them ;  one  of  them,  a  very  young 
man,  wept  most  bitterly  out  of  compassion ;  they  conducted  them  to 
a  decent  Inn  instead  of  the  common  prison,  and  they  allowed  them 
to  call  for  whatever  they  could  pay  for.  Two  Officers  took  particular  care 
of  them,  the  younger  of  whom  for  a  time  could  not  refrain  from  Tears. 
The  head  Officer  of  the  Hussars  came  twice  to  the  Inn  to  see  them,  but 
Nothing  could  revive  their  Spirits.  The  thought  that  they  must  again 
be  exposed  on  the  Carts,  was  too  distressing  to  admit  of  any  Comfort. 
Their  kindness,  however,  was  a  great-  alleviation  of  the  pungent  grief 
and  distress  of  the  Nuns.  It  is  three  Years  since  these  scenes  of 
horror  happened,  yet  the  writer  of  this  declares  that  her  Blood  Chills 
whenever  she  thinks  of  that  dreadful  day  :  Those  who  have  experienced 
such  distress  will  excuse  her  for  expressing  herself  so  feelingly  on  this 
Subject. 


CONSOLATION    AT   CAMBRAI,    1620-1793  25 

Gratitude  to  a  merciful  providence  over  us  in  all  our  distress 
prompts  me  to  remark  here,  that  tho  the  Mob  said  everything  Shock- 
ing— and  Surrounded  us  on  every  Side,  as  if  to  tear  us  into  a  thousand 
pieces,  and  on  one  occasion  cut  off  a  piece  of  one  of  our  Veils — Yet 
not  one  of  them  laid  a  hand  upon  any  of  us.  And  in  every  place  some 
were  found  who  shed  Tears  of  Compassion  over  us. 

The  Nuns  left  Noyon  about  Nine  on  Tuesday  morning.  They  had 
covered  their  Veils  with  coloured  Handkerchiefs  and  disguised  them- 
selves as  much  as  they  could  in  order  to  appear  as  they  sat  in  the 
Cart  like  the  French  Villagers,  who  wear  no  Hats.  This  precaution 
was  of  some  service,  for  on  the  road  the  people  seemed  at  a  loss  what 
to  make  of  them. 

About  four  in  the  afternoon,  the  Nuns  arrived  at  Compiegne  and 
there  the  Hussars  left  them,  after  having  said  much  in  their  favour  to 
the  Mayor,  and  two  other  Members  of  the  District,  who  came  attended 
by  the  National  Guards  to  receive  the  Prisoners. 

The  Hussars  were  Natives  of  Normandy,  most  of  them  Young 
Men,  about  nineteen  or  twenty  Years  of  age.  The  Nuns  were  the 
more  surprised  at  their  civility,  as  they  were  gidy  and  very  profane  in 
their  Language  to  one  an  other. 

The  prisoners  brought  from  Cambray  to  Compiegne  at  that  time 
were  fifty-two  in  Number,  the  Nuns  included.  They  were  all  con- 
fined in  one  house ;  it  had  been  a  Convent  formerly  belonging  to  the 
Nuns  of  the  Visitation,  but  was  then  a  common  prison.  The  Gentle- 
men of  the  District  of  Compiegne  very  frequently  Visited  the  prison  ; 
when  they  called  upon  the  Nuns  they  asked  them  a  hundred  questions, 
but  upon  the  whole  they  behaved  with  civility.  The  Procurator  Sindic, 
seeing  them  half  Starving,  had  the  goodness  to  write  twice  to  Cambray 
to  desire  the  Municipality  of  that  City  to  return  Some  part  of  their 
wearing  apparel,  but  they  sent  None.  The  Nuns  had  a  room  assigned 
to  them  in  the  Infirmary  of  the  Convent ;  the  adjoining  apartments  were 
occupied  by  prisoners  of  all  ranks  and  descriptions,  their  Number 
increased  daily,  they  were  chiefly  from  Cambray  and  its  environs. 
Whole  families  were  sometimes  brought  up  at  once.  It  seems  this 
place  had  been  fixed  upon  in  preference  to  Cambray  because  it  was 
more  within  the  reach  of  the  assassins  of  Paris,  who  were  then  deluging 
the  streets  of  that  Capital,  with  human  Blood. 

On  the  25  of  November  1793  a  great  number  of  prisoners  were 
brought  from  Cambray,  among  whom  were  The  Revd  Messrs  Walker, 
the  Young  Priest  his  Assistant,  and  the  Honble  Thos  Roper.*  It  is 
not  easy  to  express  what  the  religious  felt  when  Mr  Walker  appeared 
as  they  had  not  the  least  reason  to  hope  of  ever  seeing  him  again.  He 
also  seemed  much  affected.  The  pleasure  of  seeing  him,  was  however 
greatly  allayed  by  orders  which  were  immediately  given  that  he  should 
by  no  means  come  near  the  Nuns.    One  of  the  members  of  the  District 

*  Though  Henry  Roper,  the  8th  Lord  Teynham,  through  fear  conformed  to  the 
Anglican  Establishment  when  the  Chevalier  de  St.  George  raised  his  standard  in 
171 5,  members  of  this  hitherto  staunch  Catholic  family  continued  to  hold  the  Faith 
for  long  afterwards.  The  Hon.  Thomas  Roper  was  a  younger  son  of  Henry,  10th 
Lord  Teynham,  and  was  a  relative  of  the  Sheldon  nuns  at  Cambrai. 


26  RECORDS  OF  THE  ABBEY  OF  OUR  LADY  OF 

having  observed  to  his  colleagues  that  if  he  was  allowed  to  visit  the 
Nuns  some  part  of  religious  worship  might  probably  be  kept  up  among 
them,  which  he  said,  they  were  bound  to  root  out  entirely.  For  a 
time,  the  Nuns  saw  him  seldom  and  always  with  fear  and  great  appre- 
hension. I  have  reason  to  think,  that  it  cost  him  a  great  deal  to  be 
obliged  to  pass  his  time  with  a  set  of  men  whose  manners  and  conversa- 
tion were  shocking  to  common  decency. 

Soon  after  this  the  very  man  who  had  with  a  club  in  his  hand 
turned  the  Nuns  out  of  their  Convent  at  Cambray  was  sent  after  them 
to  prison.  He  was  removed  to  Paris  soon  after,  where,  it  was  said,  he 
lost  his  Head.  Such  was  the  fate  of  many  who  had  been  particularly 
active  in  promoting  the  unhappy  Revolution. 

For  a  time  the  gaol  allowance  was  a  pound  of  Bread  for  each  person 
per  day,  and  one  good  meal,  the  expense  of  which  was  to  be  defrayed 
by  the  prisoners  jointly,  the  rich  paying  for  the  poor,  and  strict  orders 
were  frequently  given  that  equality  should  be  observed,  according  to 
the  new  Republican  law.  That  no  one  might  escape  unnoted  the 
prisoners  were  called  over  twice  every  day. 

About  the  beginning  of  January  1794  most  of  the  Nuns  fell  sick. 
Eight  or  nine  were  confined  to  their  beds  at  the  same  time,  and  the 
rest  so  much  indisposed,  as  to  be  scarcely  able  to  help  their  dying 
Sisters.  A  good  woman  who  sold  milk  to  the  prisoners  took  great 
compassion  of  them,  and  came  to  assist  them,  but  in  a  short  time  fell 
dangerously  ill  herself :  this  unfortunate  accident  made  others  afraid  to 
come  near  them.  The  disorder  was  a  Fever  proceeding  (as  the  Doctor 
said)  from  great  hardships  and  chagrin.  They  had  still  only  one  room 
for  the  whole  Community  (twenty-one  in  number),  several  of  whom  were 
now  drawing  near  their  end.  Every  one  seemed  to  pity  them,  but  the 
fever  beginning  to  spread  among  the  prisoners,  each  one  feared  for  him- 
self. Upon  this  it  was  thought  proper  to  allow  the  Nuns  a  small 
adjoining  room,  and  the  prisoners  in  general,  who  were  about  an 
hundred  and  sixty,  were  permitted  to  walk  in  the  garden,  a  favour 
which  had  not  been  allowed  them  before.  The  windows  in  the  Nuns 
room  were  unnailed  that  they  might  open  them  for  a  little  fresh  air, 
but  it  was  the  middle  of  Winter,  and  the  weather  so  very  damp  and 
wet,  that  this  allowance  was  of  no  avail  to  them. 

On  the  12th  of  January,  about  2  o'clock  in  the  morning,  Mr.  Walker 
found  himself  very  111,  but  would  not  disturb  Mr.  Higginson  till  the  usual 
hour  of  rising.  Among  the  prisoners  was  a  Doctor  [Dufeuille]  from 
Cambray,  which  was  a  fortunate  circumstance  for  all  the  sick.  He  was 
called  about  7  o'clock  and  declared  Mr.  Walker's  case  to  be  dangerous. 
He  grew  worse  fast,  so  as  to  alarm  every  one,  for  the  prisoners  all 
esteemed  him.  He  fell  into  his  agony  in  the  evening,  and  expired 
near  2  o'clock,  having  been  ill  only  twenty-four  hours.  It  was  thought 
by  some  to  be  the  Gout  at  his  Stomach  that  so  suddenly  hurried  him 
off,  but  the  Doctor  always  affirmed,  that  the  many  hardships  he  had 
undergone,  and  the  want  of  necessaries  requisite  to  a  person  of  his  age 
and  weak  health,  had  not  a  little  contributed  to  his  death.  Many  of 
the  Nuns  were  at  that  time  too  ill  to  be  informed  of  this  catastrophe, 
but  the  distress  of  the  few  who  were  informed  of  it  was  great  beyond 


CONSOLATION    AT   CAMBRAI,    1620-1793  27 

expression.  The  circumstances  the  religious  were  then  in  made  his 
loss  to  be  severely  felt,  and  long  deeply  regretted  by  the  nuns.  He 
had  for  some  years  past  been  as  a  Father,  and  an  exemplary  friend, 
to  each  of  them,  having  remained  with  them  by  choice  in  the  hardest  of 
times,  even  when  his  life  was  in  danger,  and  when  he  might  have  lived 
comfortably  in  England.  During  his  long  confinement  he  was  never 
heard  to  let  fall  one  word  of  complaint,  tho'  few  had  suffered  so  much 
as  he.  He  died  as  he  had  lived,  a  good  religious  man.  The  writer  of 
this  well  remembers  that  sorrowful  day.  He  had  lived  73  years,  during 
twenty  of  these  he  had  resided  at  Rome,  and  had  received  distinguish- 
ing tokens  of  esteem  from  his  present  Holyness  Pius  the  VI.  The  last 
1 7  years  of  his  life  he  had  with  great  credit  to  himself  held  the  office 
of  President- General  of  the  English  Congregation  of  the  Order  of  St. 
Bennet. 

Next  morning,  January  14th,  while  Mr.  Walker's  corpse  was  still  in 
the  prison,  Dame  Anselm  Ann  died,  aged  79.  On  the  21st  of  the  same 
month,  Dame  Walmesley  breathed  her  last,  aged  55.  About  the  end 
of  the  same  month  Ann  Pinnington,  a  lay-sister,  who  till  then  had 
been  of  the  greatest  service  about  the  sick,  fell  dangerously  ill.  Her 
disorder  was  a  gangrene  in  her  arm  which  from  the  first  threatened  her 
life.  Nothing  could  be  had  in  the  prison  proper  to  apply  to  it,  nor 
would  the  Commissioner  who  was  over  them  that  day,  tho'  he  was  in 
the  prison  and  thoroughly  informed  of  the  nature  of  the  disorder,  allow 
anything  to  be  procured  from  the  town,  so  that  twenty  four  hours  had 
elapsed  before  anything  material  was  done.  In  the  meantime  the 
mortification  had  spread  prodigiously  and  her  life  was  despaired  of. 
She  expired  on  the  6th  of  Feb.  about  three  o'clock  in  the  morning 
aged  60. 

Towards  the  beginning  of  March  the  same  year,  the  surviving  Nuns 
began  to  recover  tho'  but  very  slowly. 

The  District  of  Compiegne  now  began  to  treat  the  prisoners  with 
great  severity — very  many  had  been  sent  from  Cambray.  The  District 
had  seized  all  their  property,  but  would  allow  nothing  towards  keeping 
them  from  starving.  On  the  6th  of  March  three  of  the  Members  of 
the  District  of  Compiegne  came  to  the  prison  escorted  by  a  detach- 
ment of  the  National  Guards.  The  prisoners  were  all  ordered  to 
assemble  in  one  large  room,  some  of  the  Nuns  were  still  confined  by 
sickness  so  that  only  a  part  of  them  could  attend — all  the  prisoners 
stood  like  condemned  criminals.  The  Procurator-Sindic  made  a 
long  harangue  putting  them  in  mind  that  they  had  hitherto  been 
served  with  one  meal  per  day,  but  that  nothing  had  been  paid  for 
so  liberal  a  treatment  (as  he  called  it).  That  the  people  of  Compiegne 
were  resolved  to  reimburse  themselves  one  way  or  other.  The  prisoners 
alleged  that  they  had  already  been  stript  of  everything  and  their  houses 
plundered,  that  to  think  of  forcing  more  from  them  was  cruel  in  the 
extreme.  These  expostulations,  true  as  they  really  were,  had  no  effect. 
The  Procurator-Sindick  again  and  again  told  them  that  if  the  sum  of 
.  .  .  french  livres  was  not  collected  amongst  them  and  sent  to  the 
District  before  10  o'clock  next  morning  they  should  be  punished  with 
the  greatest  severity.     The  prisoners   being   by  no   means   able   to 


28  RECORDS  OF  THE  ABBEY  OF  OUR  LADY  OF 

furnish  the  sum  demanded,  they  were  on  the  nth.  of  March  stinted 
to  coarse  brown  bread  and  water.  Many  of  the  Nuns  were  still  unwell 
when  this  severe  order  took  place,  some  of  them  were  even  confined 
to  their  beds.  Six  red  herrings,  which  they  happened  to  have  when 
this  command  was  given  out  was  all  they  had  for  three  days,  not  being 
allowed  to  buy  anything,  not  even  a  little  salt.  A  surgeon  of  Compiegne, 
who  had  attended  some  of  the  Nuns,  was  so  compassionate  as  to  go 
himself  to  the  District  when  the  Members  were  assembled  to  beg  as  a 
favour  they  would  permit  a  little  broth  to  be  sent  to  Dame  Alexander 
who  was  near  80  years  old,  and  had  been  confined  to  her  bed  about  6 
weeks  of  a  fever  which  terminated  in  an  hectic  fever  and  an  imposthume. 
He  was  refused,  on  which  as  they  were  told  tears  gushed  into  his  eyes. 
Be  that  as  it  may,  all  that  the  Nuns  got  by  the  charity  of  this  good 
man,  was  a  heap  of  compliments  of  condolence  from  the  Mayor,  and 
from  some  of  the  Magistrates,  but  they  gave  us  nothing. 

Their  wants  growing  every  day  greater,  they  applied  to  some  of 
the  inhabitants  of  Compiegne  for  needlework,  but  the  windows  of  the 
room  they  occupied  being  most  part  blockaded,  little  could  be  done 
materially  to  mend  their  condition.  In  order  to  raise  money  to  buy 
bread  they  contrived  privately  to  sell,  tho'  at  a  vast  loss,  a  few  gold 
crosses  e'tc  which  they  happened  to  have  about  them  when  they  were 
taken  from  Cambray. 

The  Magistrates  of  Compiegne,  finding  that  nothing  could  be  got 
from  the  District  of  Cambray,  were  every  day  more  and  more  impor- 
tunate with  the  prisoners  for  money,  which  they  had  not  to  give.  One 
day  they  came  to  take  away  their  beds,  which  consisted  of  each  a 
matress  and  one  blanket  j  a  charitable  friend  gave  them  money  to  leave 
the  Nuns  theirs  a  month  longer,  at  the  expiration  of  which  they  came 
again  &  made  ye  same  bustle,  but  another  friend  promised  to  pay  for 
them  a  month  longer,  and  thus  they  went  on,  always  under  the 
apprehension  of  being  obliged  to  lye  on  a  few  locks  of  straw. 

On  the  17  of  May,  1794,  at  8  o'clock  in  the  morning,  about  20 
Members  of  the  District  of  Compiegne,  and  six  or  seven  of  Robers- 
pierre's  creatures  from  Arras,  came  to  the  prison  escorted  by  120 
Guards.  The  prisoners  were  instantly  ordered  each  one  to  their  own 
quarters,  and  a  Guard  posted  at  every  door  in  the  prison.  A  soldier 
with  a  drawn  sword  was  also  stationed  within  the  Nuns'  room  and 
strictly  ordered  to  take  care  the  Nuns  did  not  open  a  window  nor  leave 
the  room  for  a  moment,  and  above  all  that  they  burnt  no  papers. 
Some  of  the  Nuns  turned  pale  and  almost  fainted,  which  the  Mayor 
observing,  he,  with  his  usual  good  nature  towards  them,  ordered  the 
Guard  to  sheath  his  sword.  An  officer  soon  after  made  his  round,  and 
asked  the  Guard  in  anger,  why  he  had  not  his  sword  drawn.  He  told 
him,  the  Nuns  were  affraid,  at  which  the  officer  began  to  scoff  and 
said  something  about  the  guillotine,  and  with  horrid  imprecations 
commanded  the  Guard  to  draw  his.  This  made  the  Nuns  more  affraid. 
While  they  were  in  this  situation,  from  time  to  time  they  heard  the 
jailer  call  the  prisoners  one  at  a  time,  the  men  first  and  then  the 
women,  to  a  lower  room,  but  no  one  returned.  The  Nuns  durst  not 
speak  to  each  other  for  fear  of  the  Guard.     After  they  had  been  in  the 


CONSOLATION    AT   CAMBRAI,    1620-1793  29 

most  cruel  suspense  about  nine  hours,  the  Nuns  were  called  down,  it 
was  then  5  in  the  evening.  Before  they  got  half  way  down  the  stairs, 
counter  orders  were  given,  and  one  of  the  Nuns,  Dame  A.  Robinson,  who 
could  speak  french,  was  ordered  down.  The  Nuns  therefore  returned 
with  a  Guard,  and  only  this  young  religious  was  conducted  to  the  room 
below.  The  Commissioners  immediately  began  to  search  her  pockets, 
but  the  Mayor  checked  them,  so  that  they  were  not  so  insolent  to  her 
as  they  had  been  to  others.  Nothing  of  value  being  found  about  them, 
they  were  dismissed,  and  the  whole  tribe  of  rough  fellows,  about  thirty 
in  number,  came  up  with  them  to  the  room  where  the  Nuns  ell  were. 
One  of  them  (who  was  a  fallen  priest)  could  speak  a  little  English. 
He  was  a  busy  man  on  this  occasion,  and  was  the  orator.  He  addressed 
the  Nuns  in  a  manner  which  seemed  the  most  proper  to  terrify  them, 
innumerating  the  punishments  that  would  certainly  be  inflicted  upon 
them  if  they  concealed  either  writing  or  anything  of  value  from  them. 
The  Procuratrix  produced  the  little  paper  money  they  had,  and  laid  it 
before  them.  The  Nuns  in  general  assured  them  that  all  their  writings  had 
been  taken  from  them  at  Cambray.  After  asking  many  questions  and 
talking  in  a  low  voice  to  each  other,  they  withdrew,  leaving  the  money 
upon  the  table,  which  however,  the  Nuns  durst  not  touch.  They  then  pro- 
ceeded to  search  all  the  prisoners  beds,  men  and  women,  pulling  the  straw 
and  everything  else  about  the  room.  They  took  everything  of  value, 
such  a  trifle  as  a  silver  thimble  did  not  escape  them.  In  the  course  of 
this  examination  they  pulled  the  womens  caps  off  their  heads  (some  of 
them  were  ladies  of  quality),  unpinned  their  gowns,  and  searched  them 
in  the  most  cruel  manner.  If  they  found  a  crucifix  or  a  reliquary  of 
gold  or  silver  they  took  it,  if  it  was  of  a  baser  metal,  they  broke  it  and 
sometimes  gave  the  bits  to  the  owner.  From  the  Hon.  Thos  Roper  and 
Revd  James  Higginson,  who  were  our  companions  in  prison,  they  took 
everything  they  could  find  (viz.  a  metal  watch  and  two  beautiful  gold 
repeating  watches  which  had  formerly  belonged  to  the  Rev  Fathers 
Walker  and  Welch — this  last  mentioned  gentleman  had  ended  his  life 
with  the  Nuns  at  Cambray  during  the  early  part  of  the  Revolution.* 

Having  stript  the  other  prisoners  of  everything  of  value,  they  were 
returning  to  the  Nuns'  room,  when  one  of  the  prisoners  addressed  the 
Mayor  as  follows :  Surely  sir,  you  are  not  going  to  search  those  poor 
Nuns  a  second  time.  You  know  how  barbarously  they  were  used  by 
the  people  of  Cambray,  and  at  present  you  are  well  assured  that  they 
live  in  the  greatest  poverty,  having  only  the  poor  pittance  which  they 
gain  by  their  needle  to  maintain  them.  The  Mayor  seemed  to  be 
pleased  with  the  person  who  spoke  in  their  favour,  and  after  a  short 
pause  turned  off,  called  the  Guard  out  of  the  Nuns'  room,  and  soon  after 
went  out  of  the  prison  attended  by  the  Administrators  of  the  District 
(as  they  called  themselves)  and  the  Guards.  This  was  one  of  the  most 
suffering  days  we  ever  passed,  tho'  in  those  times  of  universal  terror  the 
Nuns  experienced  many  sorrowful  ones. 

The  prisoners  from  the  time  I  am  speaking  of  were  treated  with 
greater  severity  than  they  had  ever  been  before.  They  were  in  the 
greatest  distress,  some  of  them  passed  days  and  weeks  with  no  other 

*  Aug.  20,  1790. 


30  RECORDS  OF  THE  ABBEY  OF  OUR  LADY  OF 

food  than  bread  &  water,  and  few  of  the  prisoners  at  Compiegne 
entertained  a  hope  of  escaping  a  public  execution,  yet  this  seemed  to 
have  no  effect  on  their  morals,  for  they  were  for  the  most  part  very  ill 
livers,  tho'  few  days  passed  but  one  or  other  of  them  was  taken  out 
of  the  Compiegne  prison  &  thrown  into  the  dungeon  to  be  ready  for 
execution.  Here  some  of  them  remained  till  the  death  of  Roberspierre, 
others  were  carried  to  Paris,  and  an  end  put  to  their  existence  by  the 
fatal  guillotine. 

About  the  middle  of  June,  1 794,  sixteen  Carmelite  Nuns  were  brought 
to  the  prison  and  lodged  in  a  room  which  faced  that  which  was  occupied 
by  us.  They  were  very  strictly  guarded.  They  had  not  been  long 
there  before  they  were,  without  any  previous  notice,  hurried  off  to  Paris 
for  no  other  crime  than  that  an  emigrant  priest,  who  had  been  their 
Confesser,  had  written  to  one  of  them.  In  this  letter  a  Bishop,  who 
was  also  an  emigrant,  had  unfortunately  desired  his  Compts  to  an  old 
gentleman  who  was  cousin  to  the  Nun  to  whom  the  letter  was  directed. 
He  was  a  man  of  great  property,  a  crime  not  easily  overlooked  in  those 
days.  This  Venerable  person  was  carried  to  Paris  with  the  Nuns.  A 
servant  who  attended  him  seemed  ready  to  die  of  grief,  and  the  good 
old  man  shed  tears  at  the  parting. 

The  Carmelite  Nuns  quitted  the  Compiegne  prison  in  the  most 
saint-like  manner.  We  saw  them  embrace  each  other  before  they  set 
off,  and  they  took  an  affectionate  leave  of  us  by  the  motion  of  their 
hands  &  other  friendly  gestures.  On  their  way  to  the  scaffold,  and 
upon  the  scaffold  itself,  as  we  were  told  by  an  eye-witness  of  credit 
Monsieur  Douai,  they  shewed  a  firmness  and  a  cheerful  composure 
which  nothing  but  a  spotless  conscience  and  a  joyful  hope  can  inspire. 
It  was  reported  that  they  sung  or  said  aloud  the  Litany  of  the  Blessed 
Virgin  untill  the  fatal  axe  interrupted  the  voice  of  the  last  of  them. 
They  suffered  on  the  16th  of  July,  the  feast  of  their  patronness  Our 
Lady  of  Mount  Carmel,  1794.  One  of  this  holy  community  happened 
to  be  absent  when  the  rest  were  taken  to  Paris.  She  concealed  herself 
in  different  places  till  the  death  of  the  tyrant  Roberspierre,  which 
happened  on  the  28th  of  July  1794.  When  this  monster  was  removed 
she  returned  to  her  friends  in  Compiegne-  &  frequently  visited  us  in 
prison.  She  gave  us  the  names  and  the  ages  of  her  Sisters  who  were 
put  to  death,  they  are  as  follows. 

Croisi  [Croissy]  agee  de  49  ans. 

Trozelle  [Trezel] 

Haunisset  [Hanisset] 

Le  Doine  \Lidoine\ 

Pellerat  \Pelras] 

Tourret  [T/touret] 

Piedecourt 

Brudeau  [Brideau] 

Brard 

Chretien 

Dufour 

Meuniere  [Maunier] 


49  ans. 

de  Paris. 

5i 

52 

de  Compiegne. 
de  Reims. 

42 

de  Paris. 

34 
79 
78 

de  Lazarts.     [Cajarc  (Lot).] 
de  Monij.     [Mony  (Ois).] 
de  Paris. 

de  Bedfort.     [Bel/ort] 

58 
52 

de  Bourt.     [Bourth  (Eure).] 
de  Evreux. 

de  Beaune. 

29 

de  Franciarde.        [St.      Denis 

(Paris).] 

CONSOLATION   AT   CAMBRAI,    1620-1793  31 

Soiron  55  de  Compiegne. 

Soiron  45  — 

Rousset  [Itoussef]  52  de  Compiegne.     [Fresne.] 

Vezolat  [  Verolot]  30  de  Compiegne. 

One  of  this  community  was  Novice  and  two  others  were  portresses 
or  extern  Lay-sisters. 

On  the  28th  of  July  1794,  the  same  year,  the  tyranny  of  Robers- 
pierre,  eight  days  after  the  Carmelites,  met  its  deserved  fate  at  Paris,  by 
his  being  overthrown  and  guillotined  with  20  of  his  infamous  adherents 
— the  populace  insulted  them  in  the  most  abusive  manner. 

Two  or  three  days  after  the  Carmelites  were  taken  to  Paris,  the 
Mayor  and  two  Members  of  the  District  of  Compiegne  called  upon 
us  in  the  prison,  we  were  still  in  our  religious  dress  which  he  had 
frequently  wished  us  to  change,  but  we  always  alleged  that  we  really 
had  not  money  sufficient  to  furnish  ourselves  with  any  other  clothes 
than  the  ragged  habits  we  then  wore.  The  same  day  he  returned  to  us 
again,  called  two  of  the  Nuns  aside,  and  told  them  that  they  must  put 
off  that  uniform,  as  he  called  it,  that  he  durst  no  longer  permit  them  to 
wear  that  prohibited  dress,  that  should  the  people  grow  riotous  we 
should  be  more  easily  concealed  in  any  other  dress  than  in  the  religious 
one.  The  truth  was  he  expected  like  the  Carmelites  we  should  soon 
be  conducted  to  Paris  for  execution,  and  he  was  affraid  he  might  be  put 
to  trouble  if  we  were  found  in  the  religious  garb.  Being  again  assured 
that  we  had  not  money  to  purchase  other  clothes,  he  went  himself  to 
the  room  which  the  good  Carmelites  had  inhabited  while  in  prison  and 
brought  some  of  the  poor  clothes  they  had  left  behind  them  there. 
These  he  gave  to  us,  telling  us  to  put  them  on  as  soon  as  possible. 
We  were  in  great  want  of  shoes,  the  Mayor  civilly  said  he  would  get  us 
what  we  wanted,  but  one  of  the  jailers  bluntly  told  the  Procuratrix  we 
should  not  want  shoes  long.  On  leaving  the  room  the  Mayor  turned 
to  Mr.  Higginson  and  said,  Take  care  of  your  companions — as  much 
as  to  tell  him,  Prepare  them  for  death,  for  he  had  nothing  else  in  his 
power  as  the  Mayor  well  knew. 

The  next  day  the  news  became  public  that  the  poor  Carmelites 
had  been  all  guillotined.  The  old  clothes  which  before  appeared 
of  small  value  were  now  so  much  esteemed  by  us  that  we  thought 
ourselves  unworthy  to  wear  them,  but  forced  by  necessity,  we  put 
them  on,  and  those  clothes  constituted  the  greatest  part  of  the  mean 
apparel  which  we  had  on  at  our  return  to  England.  We  still  keep 
them — a  few  articles  excepted,  which  we  have  given  to  particular 
friends. 

The  prisoners  at  Compiegne  were  still  importuned  to  pay  off  the 
old  debt  (as  they  called  it)  for  the  allowance  of  one  meal  per  day 
which  had  formerly  been  given  them  but  which  had  long  since  been 
withdrawn,  insomuch  that  during  many  months  before  we  had  leave 
to  quit  this  tedious  confinement  we  had  not  even  bread  given  us 
unless  we  could  pay  for  it. 

The  two  last  months  of  the  year  1794  and  the  beginning  of  the 
year  1795  Demg  extremely  severe,  we  had  a  great  deal  to  suffer  from 
wants  of  various  kinds,  especially  from  want  of  fuel,  as  no  one  had 


32  RECORDS  OF  THE  ABBEY  OF  OUR  LADY  OF 

a  sufficient  quantity  of  clothes  to  keep  herself  (tho'  the  youngest  of 
us)  moderately  warm.  The  room  we  inhabited  was  large  and  very 
cold,  but  no  entreaties  could  obtain  more  than  one  single  blanket 
for  each  Nun.  The  scarcity  of  provisions  also  encreased  in  a  dread- 
ful manner.  Bread  was  so  hard  to  be  got  that  no  one  inhabitant 
of  the  town  was  permitted  to  purchase  more  than  a  certain  fixed 
allowance  which  made  a  very  scanty  portion.  Guards  were  placed 
at  every  baker's  shop,  and  in  their  prescence  the  bread  was  weighed 
out  to  each  one  his  pittance  till  the  whole  poor  stock  was  distributed, 
but  commonly  there  was  not  a  sufficient  quantity  of  it  to  supply  more 
than  half  the  people  who  were  expecting  to  have  a  little,  so  that  no 
day  passed  without  some  tumult  in  the  town.  The  bread  for  the  most 
part  was  of  the  very  worst  and  most  disgusting  quality,  yet  we  thought 
ourselves  very  fortunate  when  we  could  buy  a  sufficient  quantity  of  it. 
Very  frequently  when  we  had  finished  one  poor  meal  we  had  not  a 
morsel  left  for  the  next. 

The  English  throughout  every  part  of  France  had  more  than  once 
petitioned  for  some  mitigation  of  their  sufferings  and  some  of  them 
had,  with  becoming  freedom,  pointed  out  the  absurdity  of  detaining 
in  confinement  so  many  innocent  sufferers,  for  the  apprehension  of 
whom  there  had  never  existed  a  pretence  of  justice.  At  last  it  was 
decreed  that  all  foreigners  should  have  an  allowance  of  two  livres 
paper  money  per  day.  Bread  was  then  sold  at  3  livres  per  pound. 
This  allowance  besides  its  being  irregularly  paid  was  utterly  insufficient 
to  subsist  upon  in  the  state  in  which  France  then  was,  paper  money 
being  then  reduced  to  a  very  low  rate  there.  We  received  this  allow- 
ance for  the  first  time  on  the  23rd  of  Dec.  1794.  It  was  then  counted 
to  make  the  value  of  twopence  halfpenny  or  at  most  three  pence  per 
day  English  money. 

Some  months  after  this,  the  prisoners  began  to  be  treated  with 
more  lenity  than  they  had  yet  experienced.  The  Honble  Tho8  Roper 
&  the  Rev.  James  Higginson  had  liberty  to  go  into  the  town.  This 
was  of  great  service  to  us.  Mr.  Roper  showed  himself  indefatigable 
in  using  every  means  possible  to  procure  victuals  and  fuel  for  us. 
He  carried  the  wood  himself  and  ran  from  shop  to  shop  to  buy  us 
bread.  But  notwithstanding  this  seeming  liberty,  the  prison  was  still 
very  disagreeable.  Tho'  the  soldiers  had  no  longer  power  to  command 
us  as  formerly,  yet  the  door  to  the  street  was  open  night  &  day,  so  that 
it  was  scarcely  possible  to  step  out  of  our  room  without  meeting  a 
crowd,  one  part  of  the  prison  being  turned  into  a  guard-house  all  came 
in  &  went  out  as  they  pleased.  The  garden  too  was  always  taken  up 
by  the  soldiers  and  the  rabble. 

About  this  time  the  Convention  frequently  ordered  the  prisoners 
of  war  to  be  sent  from  one  town  to  another  to  show  them  to  the 
people.  When  those  bodies  of  prisoners  passed  through  Compiegne, 
they  were  always  lodged  in  our  prison,  &  nothing  distressed  us  more 
during  the  whole  of  our  confinement  than  on  such  occasions  to  meet 
with  brave  Englishmen  in  want  of  the  most  common  necessaries  of 
life  &  to  see  them  treated  with  the  greatest  scorn  &  contempt  by 
the  most  despicable  of  the  French  Jacobins,  who  were  quite  elated 


CONSOLATION    AT   CAMBRAI,    1620-1793  33 

to  have  an  English  soldier  under  their  feet.  Whenever  these  prisoners 
arrived  all  was  noise  &  confusion  &  we  expected  nothing  less  than 
to  see  the  house  on  fire,  the  weather  being  remarkably  cold  they  burnt 
everything  they  could  lay  their  hands  on. 

Seeing  no  prospect  to  the  end  of  their  miseries  in  this  unhappy 
country  in  which  we  were  confined,  &  provisions  growing  so  scarce 
and  dear  that  it  became  quite  out  of  our  power  to  procure  them, 
we  at  last  resolved  to  apply  to  Paris  for  passports  to  return  to 
our  native  country.  The  Mayor  of  Compiegne  privately  advised  us  to 
take  this  step  &  assured  us  of  his  assistance.  Accordingly  a  peti- 
tion was  drawn  up  &  signed  by  the  whole  Community.  The  Mayor 
forwarded  it  to  the  Convention  at  Paris  and  seconded  it  by  a  letter 
in  our  favour.  About  ten  days  after,  our  liberty  was  announced  to 
us  by  the  District  of  Compiegne.  After  this  we  contrived  to  borrow 
(the  good  Carmelite  above  mentioned  assisting  us)  sacred  vessels  & 
ornaments  that  we  might  have  the  happiness  of  hearing  one  Mass, 
the  only  one  we  had  during  our  eighteen  months  confinement,  & 
we  were  in  the  greatest  fear  the  whole  time  of  it. 

In  order  to  raise  the  necessary  supplies  for  our  journey,  we 
contrived  privately  to  draw  money  from  England,  though  at  a  great 
loss,  by  the  way  of  Hambourg.  A  charitable  gentleman,  the  present 
Edwd  Constable  of  Burton,  Esq.  had  two  years  before  given  us  leave 
to  call  upon  him  for  money  what  we  might  want  in  case  we  came 
to  be  in  distress  which  he  seemed  to  foresee  would  happen.  The 
horses  being  for  the  most  part  taken  for  the  army,  we  found  it  very 
difficult  to  get  carts  to  transport  us  to  Calais.  After  many  delays, 
[and]  a  great  deal  of  trouble  and  expense,  the  whole  Community  left 
Compiegne  on  the  24th  of  April,  1795  in  two  carts,  four  of  the  eldest 
Nuns  having  gone  off  before  in  a  coach.  We  were  in  the  prison 
at  Compiegne  18  months  &  5  days.  In  our  journey  we  made 
Cambray  in  our  way,  but  had  not  courage  enough  to  cast  a  passing 
glance  at  our  dear  Convent,  which  from  the  time  we  were  driven 
out  had  been  turned  into  a  common  gaol,  (it  was  then  in  a  most 
ruinous  condition),  out  of  which  very  many  had  been  dragged  to 
the  guillotine — in  one  day  25  persons  were  dragged  to  the  market- 
place in  Cambray  and  there  guillotined,  among  whom  was  a  most 
pious  and  learned  priest,  Mr.  Tranchant  (who  had  frequently  sung 
Mass  in  our  church).  He  was  saying  Mass  in  his  own  house  & 
his  niece  serving,  they  were  immediately  hurried  to  prison  not  allow- 
ing him  time  to  take  off  his  vestments. 

We  found  that  all  our  houses  &  effects  had  been  publicly 
sold,  but  had  not  been  paid  for.  We  were  also  informed  that  our 
enemies  had  made  the  common  people  believe  that  the  prevailing 
scarcity  was  greatly  to  be  attributed  to  the  English  Nuns  having 
amassed  such  quantities  of  provisions.  This  was  made  an  accusa- 
tion against  us  by  the  very  people  who  had  ordered  us  to  prepare 
provisions  against  a  siege  or  to  be  expelled  the  town.  The  Rev. 
James  Higginson  went  six  or  seven  times  to  the  Town  House 
thinking  to  expostulate  with  the  District  upon  their  cruel  behaviour, 
and  to  assure  them  that  one  time  or  other  we  should  call  them  to 

XIII.  c 


34  RECORDS  OF  THE  ABBEY  OF  OUR  LADY  OF 

account,  but  he  was  refused  entrance.  Finding  therefore  nothing 
could  be  done,  the  Community  followed  Lady  Abbess  and  three 
old  religious,  who  as  I  said  before  set  off  from  Compiegne  a  few 
days  before  us.  We  found  them  at  Calais  where  they  had  been 
some  days,  we  rested  one  night,  and  the  next  morning,  May  2nd, 
the  whole  Community  sailed  from  Calais  in  a  Danish  vessel,  Captain 
Johnson.  We  happily  landed  at  Dover  the  same  evening  in  number 
sixteen  religious,  the  Rev.  James  Higginson  &  Mr.  Roper.  The  next 
day  being  a  Sunday,  we  rested  at  Dover,  and  reached  London  about 
10  o'clock  on  Monday  night  May  4th.  We  remained  at  the  Golden 
Cross,  Charing  Cross  London,  till  Wednesday  6th,  when  the  charitable 
Marchioness  of  Buckingham,*  hearing  that  our  situation  was  exceeding 
unpleasant  at  a  common  Inn,  sent  her  chaplain,  a  clergyman  of  the 
Established  Church,  to  inform  us  that  she  had  provided  a  house 
at  the  West  end  of  the  town  during  our  stay  in  London.  Here 
she  was  the  first  to  visit  us,  affording  us  every  comfort  in  her 
power;  and  the  respectable  clergyman  above  mentioned  copied  the 
example  of  his  noble  patroness.  We  experienced  many  instances 
of  civility  &  kindness  during  our  stay  in  London,  for  several  of 
which  we  are  indebted  to  persons  unknown  to  us,  but  the  Blessed 
Redeemer  of  man,  who  has  promised  to  repay  a  cup  of  cold  water 
given  in  alms  for  His  sake,  will  not  suffer  their  charity  to  go  un- 
rewarded. Gratitude  obliges  me  to  mention  here  one  friend  in 
particular,  Mr.  Coghlan,f  bookseller,  who  though  a  person  in  business 
and  possessed  of  no  great  riches,  yet  rendered  us  most  substantial 
services.  It  was  he  who  first  made  us  known  to  the  Marchioness 
of  Buckingham,  and  he  richly  deserves  our  thanks  for  many  other 
favours. 

The  Community  remained  in  London  about  1 2  days,  during  which 
time  Rev.  Mr.  Cowley,  \  the  President,  and  Rev.  Mr.  Brewer  §  decided 
that  we  should  take  the  management  of  a  school  for  the  education  of 
young  Catholic  ladies.  Nothing  but  the  great  desire  we  had  to  main- 
tain ourselves  and  to  be  no  burden  to  our  friends  or  to  society  in 
general,  upon  whom  Providence  has  permitted  us  to  be  reluctantly 
thrown,  could  have  prevailed  upon  any  of  us  to  have  undertaken 
such  a  charge,  worn  out  as  we  were  with  past  sufferings.     Superiors, 

*  Mary  Elizabeth,  only  d.  and  h.  of  Robert,  Earl  Nugent,  married  George,  2nd 
Earl  Temple,  who  was  created  Marquess  of  Buckingham  in  1784.  Her  father,  who 
had  conformed,  was  reconciled  to  the  Church  at  Bath,  at  Easter,  1788,  by  Dom 
Joserh  Cuthbert  Wilks,  O.S.B.,  and  died  in  the  following  October,  when  the  earldom 
of  Nuge  it  passed  to  his  son-in-law,  the  Marquess  of  Buckingham.  The  Marchioness 
in  1800  was  created  in  her  own  right  Baroness  Nugent,  with  remainder  to  her  second 
son,  Lord  George  Grenville-Nugent-Temple.  She  died  March  16,  181 3.  She  had 
befriended  many  of  the  French  emigre'  clergy,  and  several  of  the  English  communities 
which  came  over  to  England  after  the  Revolution. 

+  James  Peter  Coghlan,  the  eminent  Catholic  publisher,  died  Feb.  20,  1800, 
aged  68. 

X  Dom  William  Gregory  Cowley  was  president-general  of  the  English  Bene- 
dictine Congregation  from  1794  till  his  death  in  1799. 

§  Dom  John  Bede  Brewer  succeeded  Fr.  Cowley  as  president-general,  and  at  this 
time  had  charge  of  the  mission  at  Woolton,  near  Liverpool,  where  a  school  for  young 
ladies  had  been  established  through  his  instrumentality  and  under  his  supervision. 


CONSOLATION   AT   CAMBRAI,    162O-1793  35 

however,  informing  us  that  such  was  their  pleasure,  we  left  London 
in  three  companies  on  different  days  as  we  could  get  places  in  the 
stage  coach.  The  last  company  arrived  at  Woolton  May  21st,  1795, 
where  we  experienced  every  civility  &  kindness.  Mrs.  Porter  &  Dr. 
Brewer  entertained  the  whole  Community  for  a  week  at  their  house, 
with  great  good  nature  and  compassion,  rendering  to  each  one  every 
solace  possible.  We  got  settled  in  a  school  which  had  been  for  about 
six  years  under  the  superintendance  of  the  Rev.  Dr.  Brewer,  but 
the  managment  of  which  he  now  resigned  to  the  Nuns.  Here  we 
have  now  been  near  three  years,  during  which  time  we  have  found 
no  abatement  in  the  kindness  &  charitable  attention  showed  to  the 
Community,  not  by  our  friends  and  relations  only,  but  by  our  country- 
folk in  general.  We  are  not  less  grateful  for  the  allowance  of  a 
guinea  and  a  half  per  month,  for  each  religious,  which  in  common 
with  so  many  of  our  fellow  sufferers  we  have  received  from  govern- 
ment ever  since  our  arrival  in  our  native  country ;  &  we  shall  always 
think  ourselves  under  an  additional  obligation  of  praying  for  the 
welfare  of  England. 

We  had  not  been  long  settled  at  Woolton,  before  Edward  Con- 
stable of  Burton  &  Francis  Sheldon  of  Wycliffe,  Esquires,*  honoured 
us  with  a  visit.  They  paid  us  the  kindest  attentions.  They  brought 
with  them  a  French  priest,f  whom  Mr.  Constable  allowed  40^  per 
annum.  As  we  could  not  hear  Mass  anywhere  nearer  than  Mr. 
Brewer's  chapel,  he  offered  to  leave  the  French  priest  at  Woolton ; 
of  that  offer  we  joyfully  accepted,  &  he  has  since  remained  with  us. 
To  assist  the  Community  in  general  Mr.  Constable  has  also  made 
us  an  allowance  of  60  £  per  annum,  which  is  paid  quarterly;  &  we 
have  reason  to  hope  that  it  will  not  be  withdrawn,  till  something 
falls  to  enable  the  Community  to  live  without  it. 

[Bishop  Mi  bier's  account  in  the  Laity's  Directory  for  1796,  with 
additions  and  corrections  (in  brackets),  from  the  copy  preserved  at  Stan- 
brook  Abbey,  either  in  the  hand  of  Dame  Ann- Teresa  Partington,  or  in 
that  of  one  of  her  contemporaries.  On  the  binding  of  the  book  is  written  : 
"  Ann-Teresa  Partington."] 

The  Narrative  of  the  Sufferings  of  the  English  Communities  under 
the  dominion  of  the  French  Republicans,  continued  fro?n  the  Directory  of 
last  year,  page  13. 

The  English  Benedictine  Dames  of  Cambray. 

These  Ladies  had  acquired  a  great  reputation  for  their  method  of 
education,  for   their  performances  in  fine  needle-work  and  artificial 

*  Edward  and  Francis  Sheldon,  sons  of  Edward  Sheldon  and  Cecily  Constable, 
and  nephews  of  Dame  Elizabeth  Frances  Sheldon,  one  of  the  community,  succes- 
sively assumed  the  name  of  Constable  upon  coming  into  the  Burton  Constable  and 
Wycliffe  estates  under  the  will  of  their  uncle,  William  Constable. 

t  The  Abbe  Pernez,  of  whom  Mr.  Constable  wrote  from  Burton  Constable  under 
date  Aug.  5,  1795,  when  proposing  him  as  convent  chaplain  :  "  He  is  a  worthy  and 
respectable  ecclesiastic,  victim  to  Religion  &  honour  ;  a  well-behaved,  perfectly  good- 
tempered  man,  &  approved  in  every  way  by  the  Bishop  of  this  district  [Dr.  William 
Gibson,  V.A.-N.D.j  &  by  the  Bishop  of  St.  Pol  de  Leon." 


36  RECORDS  OF  THE  ABBEY  OF  OUR  LADY  OF 

flowers,  and  for  cutting  out  upon  vellum  various  ornaments  and  devices 
with  the  most  exquisite  taste  and  execution.  By  these  and  their  other 
resources,  they  lived  without  being  any  burthen,  but  rather  were  a 
benefit  to  the  country  in  which  they  were  placed,  whilst  their  principal 
attention  and  endeavours  were  bent,  by  the  exercises  of  religion  and 
the  practice  of  every  virtue,  upon  arriving  at  our  true  country  in  the 
heavenly  region.  It  was,  however,  the  will  of  the  Almighty  to  prepare 
them  all  in  general,  and  more  immediately  some  of  them,  for  this 
happiness  by  a  course  of  sufferings.  In  the  summer  of  the  year  1793, 
the  allied  armies  having  pushed  their  conquests  almost  to  the  gates  of 
Cambray,  these  poor  religious  were  advised,  for  a  double  purpose  of 
treachery,  to  lay  in  provisions  against  the  siege  that  was  then  expected 
to  take  place.  They  listened  to  this  advice,  and  accordingly  provided 
themselves  with  such  a  stock  of  necessaries  as  their  finances  would 
allow  them  to  purchase.  Not  being  conscious  of  having  given  any 
offence,  they  conceived  themselves  to  be  in  perfect  safety,  when,  on 
the  1 8th  of  October,  in  the  said  year,  they  were  surprised  by  a  body  of 
guards,  part  of  whom  surrounded,  whilst  the  rest  entered  into  their 
convent,  and  in  less  than  half  an  hour  hurried  them  out  of  the  same 
without  affording  them  the  means  of  taking  with  them  a  change  of 
clothes  or  any  other  necessaries.  The  appointed  place  of  their  captivity 
was  Compiegne,  which  was  more  within  reach  of  the  assassins,  who 
then  deluged  the  streets  of  Paris  with  human  blood,  than  Cambray 
was.  Thither  these  ladies,  whose  only  crimes  were  their  religion  and 
their  country,  were  carried  in  open  carts,  amidst  a  variety  of  insults  and 
barbarous  usage.  Their  place  of  confinement  in  this  town  was  the 
infirmary  of  the  convent  which  formerly  belonged  to  the  order  of  the 
Visitation,  whilst  an  adjoining  part  of  the  same  convent  was  occupied 
by  an  illustrious  band  of  christian  heroines,  worthy  to  have  lived  in  the 
primitive  ages  of  the  Church.  These  were  seventeen  (sixteen)  Carmelite 
Nuns,  formerly  of  the  convent  of  St.  Denis  (Compiegne)  and  the  sisters 
in  religion  of  Madame  Louise,  the  saint-like  aunt  of  Louis  XVI.,  who, 
on  that  account,  seemed  to  have  been  marked  out  by  Roberspere  and 
his  sanguinary  confederates  as  victims  for  the  guillotine.  They  were 
led  out  to  execution  a  few  days  [on  the  16th  July,  the  feast  of  our  Bd. 
Lady  of  Mount  Carmel  their  patroness,  1794,  nine  months]  after  the 
arrival  of  the  Cambray  Nuns  at  the  same  prison,  [they  had  been  in 
prison  with  us,  Cambray  Nuns,  about  6  weeks,]  and,  though  they 
could  not  converse  with  them  by  words,  yet  they  took  an  affectionate 
and  pious  leave  of  them  from  their  windows  by  the  motion  of  their 
hands  and  their  gestures.  On  their  way  to  the  scaffold,  and  upon  the 
scaffold  itself  they  showed  a  firmness,  and  a  cheerful  composure,  which 
those  who  braved  death  at  the  cannon's  mouth  have  rarely  exhibited, 
and  which  nothing  but  a  spotless  conscience  and  a  joyful  hope  can 
inspire.  They  invoked  the  Queen  of  Martyrs  to  assist  them  in  their 
conflict,  singing  the  litany  of  the  Blessed  Virgin  in  their  procession  to 
martyrdom,  and  until  the  fatal  axe  interrupted  the  voice  of  the  last  of 
them.  The  English  Nuns  were  for  a  long  time  in  daily  expectation  of 
meeting  the  same  fate.  They  observed  that  their  place  of  confinement 
was  blockaded  in  a  particular  manner,  which  generally  took  place  with 


CONSOLATION   AT   CAMBRAI,   1620-I793  37 

respect  to  such  bodies  of  prisoners  as  were  intended  for  execution,  and 
when  they  petitioned  for  a  supply  of  clothes  of  which  they  stood  greatly 
in  need,  their  keepers  in  the  most  wanton  and  undisguised  manner 
were  accustomed  to  tell  them  that  soon  they  would  7ieither  want  for 
dotlies  nor  for  anything  else.  At  length,  however,  a  parcel  of  left-off 
wearing  apparel,  which  had  been  the  executioner's  perquisite,*  was 
sent  to  them.  This  consisted  of  the  dresses  of  the  above-mentioned 
religious  sufferers.  Such  a  present,  however  despicable  in  the  eyes  of 
worldlings,  in  their  eyes  was  more  valuable  than  the  robes  of  royalty 
would  have  been ;  they  received  the  poor  clothes  upon  their  knees, 
kissing  and  bedewing  them  with  their  tears,  and  these  constituted  part 
of  the  mean  apparel  which  they  had  on  at  their  return  to  their  native 
country. 

Great  were  their  sufferings  during  their  tedious  confinement,  especially 
from  the  want  of  bread  and  fuel.  These  were  dealt  out  to  them  in  the 
most  scanty  proportions,  and  the  former  was  of  the  very  worst  and 
most  disgusting  quality.  Nor  was  it  in  their  power  by  their  needle- 
work, and  industry  in  other  respects,  materially  to  mend  their  condition, 
though  they  exerted  themselves  for  this  purpose.  They  were  twenty  in 
number  when  they  were  expelled  from  their  convent,  exclusive  of  their 
chaplain  Dom  Augustine  Walker,  president  of  the  English  monks,  who 
for  his  erudition  and  piety,  having  long  resided  at  Rome,  had  received 
distinguishing  tokens  of  esteem  from  his  present  Holiness,  and  exclusive 
of  another  reverend  gentleman  [Rev.  James  Higginson],  who,  in  con- 
sideration of  the  age  and  declining  health  of  the  former,  was  appointed 
to  assist  him.  Of  these,  during  the  rigours  of  their  confinement  departed 
this  life,  on  the  13th  of  Jan.,  1794,  the  Rev.  D.  President  Walker,  on 
the  14th  of  the  same  month  Dame  Anselma  Ann,  on  the  21st  ditto 
D.  Teresa  Walmesley,  on  the  6th  of  Feb.  D.  Ann  Pennington,  and 
about  the  end  of  March  D.  Margaret  Burgess  ;  so  that  now  only  fifteen 
nuns,  a  novice  upon  probation,  and  the  gentleman  who  had  assisted 
Dom  President,  were  left  of  this  once  flourishing  community. 

At  length  the  scarcity  of  provisions  encreasing  in  a  dreadful  manner 
throughout  every  part  of  France,  and  the  absurdity  of  detaining  in  con- 
finement so  many  innocent  sufferers,  for  the  original  apprehension  of 
whom  there  had  never  existed  a  pretence  either  of  justice  or  of  policy, 
being  perceived  by  the  rulers  of  that  unhappy  country,  these  ladies 
obtained  liberty  to  quit  their  confinement,  and  on  the  24th  of  April  in 
the  present  year  [1795]  procured  passports  to  return  to  their  native 
country. 

On  their  journey  they  made  Cambray  in  their  way.  Here  they 
found  that  their  listening  to  the  advice  that  had  been  given  them,  in 
preparing  provisions  against  a  siege,  was  made  an  accusation  against 
them,  and  the  common  people  were  made  to  believe  that  the  prevailing 
scarcity  was  greatly  to  be  attributed  to  the  English,  who  had  amassed 
such  quantities  of  provisions.  They  found,  however,  that  their  house 
and  effects,  though  sequestered  and  publicly  sold,  had  never  been  paid 
for,  nor  had  one  been  appointed  to  receive  the  purchase-money  for  the 

*  This  is  an  error  on  the  part  of  Milner,  and  is  erased  in  the  Stanbrook  copy. 
They  were  not  the  clothes  in  which  the  Carmelites  were  martyred — vide  p.  31. 


3&  RECORDS  OF  THE  ABBEY  OF  OUR  LADY  OF 

same.  This  circumstance  afforded  them  a  hope  that  they  might,  on  a 
later  day,  receive  some  compensation  for  their  great  losses. 

On  the  3«1  of  May  they  sailed  from  Calais,  and  on  the  4th  arrived 
in  London.  Their  arrival  here  was  no  sooner  known,  than  [the 
Marchioness  of  Buckingham]  a  lady,  still  more  distinguished  by  her  ex- 
tensive charities  than  by  her  station  in  life,  sent  the  chaplain  of  her  family 
[Rev.  Mr.  Holt,  a  native  of  Lancashire],  a  clergyman  of  the  Established 
Church,  to  inform  them  that,  conceiving  their  situation  at  a  common 
inn  to  be  exceedingly  inconvenient  and  unpleasant  to  them,  she  had 
provided  a  house  at  the  west  end  of  the  town  for  them  during  their 
residence  in  London.  Here  she  was  the  first  person  to  visit  them  and 
afford  them  every  comfort  in  her  power.  They  were  struck  with  such 
marks  of  divine  bounty  in  their  regard,  and  they  ceased  not  to  put  up 
their  prayers  in  behalf  of  the  immediate  instrument  of  it  and  of  her 
noble  relatives.  Nor  were  they  less  sensible  of  the  unaffected  com- 
passion and  substantial  services  which  they,  in  common  with  so  many 
others,  their  fellow-sufferers,  experienced  from  the  respectable  clergyman 
here  alluded  to,  who,  copying  the  example  of  his  noble  patrons,  has 
proved  himself  the  good  Samaritan  to  such  a  variety  of  sufferers  of  a 
different  religion,  and  many  of  them  of  a  different  country. 

Upon  an  invitation  from  the  Rev.  Dr.  Brewer,  these  ladies  have 
proceeded  to  Woolton,  near  Liverpool,  where,  after  qualifying  them- 
selves as  the  act  in  favor  of  Roman  Catholics  directs,  they  have  under- 
taken the  superintendence  of  a  school  for  the  education  of  catholic 
young  ladies,  which  they  mean  to  conduct  agreeably  to  their  much 
approved  plan  established  at  Cambray,  and  long  known  to  this 
country. 

[There  is  a  slip  of  paper  pasted  in  at  the  foot  of  page  7  of  the  Stan- 
brook  copy  of  the  Directory  for  1796,  on  which  is  written ,  probably  in  the 
hand  of  Dame  Agnes  Robinson^  though  it  may  be  thai  of  Dame  Ann- 
Teresa  Partington :] 

"The  Names  of  the  Carmelites  of  Compiegne  who  were  put  to 
death  among  whom  were  one  novice  "...  (the  rest  is  obliterated  by  the 
paste,  the  sense  evidently  being  that  Mary  of  the  Incarnation  furnished 
these  names,  as  the  next  sentence  is  :)  "  This  good  Carmelite  was  in 
the  summer  of  the  year  1814  living  in  the  town  of  Compiegne  with  a 
few  devout  companions  with  whom  she  was  concerting  to  form  a  little 
community  serving  God  according  to  the  severe  rule  of  the  Carmelites 
as  a  French  priest  informed  us  who  had  seen  her  in  Janry  1814." 

[The  following  Catalogue  is  transcribed  from  that  in  the  Archives 
Centrales  at  Lillet  "  Benedictines  de  Cambrai,"  Carton  1. 1 — ] 

A  CATALOGUE 

Of  Ye  Names  and  Ages 
Of  all  those  that  have  at  any  time  entred  into  this  Monastery  of  our 
Bd.  Lady  of  Consolation  in  Cambray,  as  well  of  such  as  have  been 
and  are  religious  profess'd,  as  of  such  as  have  lived  for  any  time  in  ye 
monastery  and  gone  away. 


CONSOLATION    AT   CAMBRAI,    162O-I793  39 

December  2.  In  ye  Year  1623. 

Entred  Mrs.  Helen  More  (in  religion  called  De.  Gertrude),  of  ye 
age  of  17.  great  grandchild  to  Sr.  Thomas  More. 

BorniMarch  25,  1606,  at  Low  Leyton,  Essex,  an  estate  belonging  to 
her  father,  Cresacre  More,  Esq.,  of  Barnborough  Hall,  co.  York ;  professed 
Jan.  1,  1625  ;  died  Aug.  17,  1633,  aged  27. 

After  her  death,  her  spiritual  writings  were  collected  and  arranged  by 
Father  Baker  for  publication,  but  they  did  not  actually  appear  till  long  after 
his  decease.  One  portion  arranged  by  him  was  issued  at  Paris  in  1657  under 
the  title  of  "  The  Holy  Practices  of  a  Divine  Lover,  or  The  Sainctly  Ideofs 
Devotions?  with  Dedication  to  Dame  Catherine  Gascoigne,Abbess  of  Cambrai, 
unsigned.  This  work  has  lately  been  re-edited  by  Dom  Hildebrand  Lane  Fox, 
O.S.B.  The  other  and  far  more  important  portion  of  the  collection  was 
printed  at  Paris  in  the  following  year  1658  with  a  dedication  to  Rd.  Mother 
Bridget  More,  then  Prioress  of  the  Paris  House,  signed  F.  G.  (Rev.  Francis 
Gascoigne,  brother  to  Dame  Catherine).  The  work  is  entitled  "  Confessiones 
Amantis,  or  A  Lover's  Confessions  and  Ideofs  Devotions?  In  the  beginning 
of  the  same  book  is  given  her  "  Apology  for  herself  and  her  Spiritual  Guide 
and  Directory  Very  Rev.  Father  Baker."  The  book  concludes  with  a  series 
of  fragments  of  devout  aspirations  and  reflections,  as  also  a  few  prayers  in 
verse  found  amongst  her  papers  after  death.  The  work  has  been  re-edited 
lately  by  Rev.  Dom  E.  Benedict  Weld-Blundell,  O.S.B.  Her  Life  was  written 
by  Father  Baker,  entitled  "  The  Life  and  Death  of  D.  Gertrude  More,  a 
Religious  Virgin  of  the  English  Cloister  of  Benedictin  Nunnes  in  the  Cittie 
of  Camdraie.  Dom  E.  Benedict  Weld-Blundell,  O.S.B.,  has  lately  edited 
this  manuscript  at  the  special  request  of  the  Lady  Abbess  of  Stanbrook, 
who  entrusted  to  his  hands  not  only  the  valuable  MS.  of  Part  I., bearing  the 
stamp  of  Lambspring,  which  had  for  a  long  period  been  carefully  preserved 
in  the  Stanbrook  library,  but  also  Part  II.,  until  then  thought  to  be  lost,  but 
which  had  just  been  identified  amongst  other  manuscripts  at  Ampleforth 
Abbey,  and  had  kindly  been  lent  to  Stanbrook  by  the  Abbot  for  the  purpose 
of  thus  publishing,  by  the  fusion  of  these  two  distinct  manuscripts,  the  first 
complete  edition  of  Father  Baker's  original  work.  This  was  in  1907,  Dom 
E.  B.  Weld-Blundell's  volume  appeared  in  1910. 

Do. 

Mrs.  Margarette  Vaversour,  (in  religion  Dame  Lucy),  daughter 
of  Sir  William  Vaversour  of  Haselwood,  in  Yorkshire,  Barenet.  She 
was  1 7  years  of  age. 

B.  1606,  at  Haslewood  Castle,  co.  York,  d.  of  William  Vavasour,  Esq., 
by  Anne,  d.  of  Sir  Thomas  Manners,  4th  s.  of  Thomas,  1st  Earl  of  Rutland. 
It  was  her  brother,  Sir  Thomas  Vavasour,  Knt.,  who  was  created  a  baronet 
in  1628,  and  died  in  his  father's  lifetime  in  1632.  Her  father  died  in  1637, 
aged  70.  She  was  professed  Jan.  1,  1625,  and  died  Aug.  25,  1679,  aged  73. 
Her  eldest  sister,  Mary,  was  twenty-five  years  abbess  of  the  convent  at 
Brussels,  and  died  in  office  in  1676,  aged  76. 

Do. 

Mrs.  Anne  Morgan  (in  religion  D.  Benet)  of  Weston  in  War- 
wickshire ;  aged  of  19. 

B.  1604,  at  Weston-sub-Weathley,  co.  Warwick ;  prof.  Jan.  I,  1625 ;  d. 
April  18,  1640.  Her  brother,  Col.  Thomas  Morgan,  of  Heyford  Hall,  co. 
Northampton,  and  of  Weston,  co.  Warwick,  raised  a  regiment  of  horse  for 
the  King's  service,  and  was  slain  at  the  first  battle  of  Newbury,  Sept.  20, 
1643.  His  daughter  Jane,  his  sole  heiress,  married  in  1637  Sir  John 
Preston,  of  The  Manor,  Furness,  co.  Lancaster,  1st  Bart. 


4©  RECORDS  OF  THE  ABBEY  OF  OUR  LADY  OF 

Do. 

Mrs.  Catherine  Gascoigne,  aged  of  22,  daughter  to  Sr.  John 
Gascoigne  of  Barnbow,  in  Yorkshire,  Baronet. 

B.  1600,  d.  of  Sir  John  Gascoigne,  of  Parlington  Hall,  Lasingcroft  Hall, 
and  Barnbow  Hall,  co.  York,  created  a  baronet  of  Nova  Scotia  in  1635,  by 
Anne,  d.  of  John  Ingleby,  of  Lawkland  Hall,  co.  York,  Esq.  Prof.  Jan.  1, 
1625;  elected  abbess  1629,  re-elected  till  1641,  and  again  1645  till  1673; 
died  May  21,  1676,  aged  76.  Her  sister  Anne  married  George  Thwenge,  of 
Heworth  Hall  and  Hilton  Castle,  co.  York,  Esq.,  and  was  mother  of  the 
priest,  Thomas  Thwenge,  who  was  martyred  at  York,  Oct.  23,  1680. 

Do. 

Mrs.  Grace  More  (in  religion  D.  Agnes)  aged  of  32. 

B.  I59i;d.  of  John  More,  of  Bampton,  co.  Oxon,  by  Mary,  d.  of  Thomas 
More,  of  More  Place,  Herts,  and  Barnborough  Hall,  co.  York,  grandson  of 
the  lord-chancellor.  Prof.  Jan.  1,  1625  ;  died  Mch.  4,  1655-6,  aged  64.  She 
translated  "  A  Treatise  of  the  Ruin  of  Proper  Love,  and  of  the  Building  of 
Divine  Love,"  written  in  French  by  Dame  Jeanne  de  Cambrai,  O.S.A.,  of 
which  an  imperfect  transcript  by  Dame  Susanna  Phillips  is  now  in  the  public 
library  at  Lille. 

Do. 

Mrs.  Anne  More,  aged  of  24.  Both  these  Mores  were  nighly 
related  to  Mrs.  Helen  More,  and  descended  from  Sr.  Thomas  More 
by  younger  Brs.  of  yt.  family. 

B.  1600,  d.  of  Edward  More,  of  Barnborough  ;  prof.  Jan.  1,  1625  ;  died 
Nov.  9,  1662,  aged  62.     She  was  cousin  to  Dame  Agnes  More. 

Do. 

Mrs.  Francis  Watson  (in  religion  D.  Mary)  aged  of  15  ;  she  was 
daughter  to  Mr.  Richard  Watson  in  Bedfordshire. 

B.  1608,  eldest  d.  of  Richard  Watson,  of  the  Park,  Ampthill,  co.  Bedford, 
Esq.,  by  Agnes,  d.  of  John  Whitbread,  of  Writtle,  co.  Essex,  Esq.,  and  sister 
of  John  Whitbread,  of  Writtle,  whose  wife,  Magdalen,  daughter  of  Nicholas 
Waldegrave,  of  Borley,  co.  Essex,  was  the  sister  of  Frances,  Countess  of 
Portland.  Richard  Watson's  estate,  Beckerings  Park,  or  the  Park,  parcel  of 
the  Honor  and  Manor  of  Ampthill,  was  sequestered  for  recusancy  in  1644, 
and  it  was  there  Fr.  Augustine  Baker  found  a  refuge  in  his  last  days. 
Frances  Watson  was  professed  Jan.  1,  1625,  and  died  June  10,  1660. 

1623  Dec.  2. 

Mrs.  Mary  Hoskins  aged  of  20  for  a  lay  Sr. 

B.  1603  ;  prof.  Jan.  1,  1625  ;  died  March  4,  1667,  aged  64.  "  Dorothie 
Hoskins,  her  book,  1630,"  appears  in  a  MS.  formerly  belonging  to  the  convent 
at  Cambrai. 

1623  Dec.  2. 

Mrs.  Jane  Martin  (in  religion  Sr.  Martha)  aged  of  35  for  a 
lay  Sr. 

B.  1588  ;  prof.  Jan.  1,  1625  ;  died  April  1,  1631,  aged  43. 

June,  10.  In  ye  Year  1624. 

Entred  Mrs.  Margarette  Yaxley,  aged  of  31,  (in  religion 
D.  Placida). 


Cath.  Rec.  Soc.  XIII. 


To  face  p.  40. 


CONSOLATION    AT   CAMBRAI,    162O-1793  41 

Daughter  of  Henry  Yaxley,  of  Yaxley  co.  Suffolk,  Esq.  ;  died  Nov.  25, 
1666.  Her  sister,  Dame  Mary  Viviana  Yaxley,  born  1603,  prof,  at  Brussels 
May  9,  1 62 1,  was  one  of  the  three  nuns  lent  by  that  convent  to  initiate  the 
community  at  Cambrai  ;  returned  to  Brussels  in  1650,  and  died  there 
Feb.  18,  1654.  Another  sister,  Ursula  Yaxley,  made  her  profession  in  the 
convent  of  Poor  Clares,  at  Gravelines,  in  1619. , 

id.  16. 

Entred  Mrs.  Anne  Timperly  (in  religion  D.  Scholastica,)  aged 
of  19,  she  was  daughter  to  Sr.  Thomas  Timperly  in  Suffolk. 

Born  at  Hintlesham  Hall,  co.  Suffolk  ;  prof.  1625  ;  died  June  13,  1640, 
aged  34. 

id.  16. 

Entred  Mrs.  Rebecca  Browne  for  a  lay  sister,  a  gentlewoman,  of 
a  good  family,  aged  20,  (called  in  religion  Str.  Flavia)  of  Durham. 

Died  Feb.  2,  1665. 

January  ye  10.  In  ye  Year  1625. 

Entred  ye  Honble.  Anne  Eure  (in  religion  D.  Magdalene)  aged 
of  15,  daughter  to  ye  Right  honble.  Baron  Eure  of  Malton  in  York- 
shire. 

Born  16 10,  at  Malton,  5th  dau.  of  William,  4th  Lord  Eure  of  Wilton, 
co.  Durham,  K.B.,  and  Bart.,  by  Lucy,  dau.  of  Sir  Andrew  Noel,  Knt.,  of 
Dalby-on-the-Wold,  co.  Leicester.     Died  Nov.  9,  1662,  aged  52. 

Item. 

Same  day  and  year. — Entred  ye  honble.  Catherine  Eure,  sister  to 
Mrs.  Anne,  and  with  Mrs.  Elizabeth  Bignall  these  two  last  went  away. 
[Mrs.]  Stratford,  aged  of  15. 

The  Hon.  Katherine  Eure  was  the  6th  and  youngest  dau.  of  Lord  Eure. 
9ber.  ye  2d. 

Came  Misses  Betty  and  Jane  Howard,  aged  of  14  &  11, 
daughters  to  Mr.  Howard  of  Corbie. 

Elizabeth  and  Jane  Howard  were  daughters  of  Sir  Francis  Howard, 
Knt,  of  Corby  Castle,  co.  Cumberland,  by  his  first  wife  Margaret,  dau.  of 
John  Preston,  of  the  Manor  in  Furness,  co.  Lancaster,  Esq.  Sir  Francis 
was  a  younger  son  of  Lord  William  Howard,  of  Naworth  Castle,  co.  Cum- 
berland, known  as  '  Belted  Will.'  Elizabeth  Howard  subsequently  married, 
Nov.  11,  1632,  Edward  Standish,  of  Standish  Hall,  co.  Lancaster,  Esq.,  and 
by  her  marriage  contract,  dated  June  18,  1632,  she  had  a  fortune  of  ,£1500. 
Her  sister  Jane  is  not  named  in  the  pedigree.  Their  brother  Col.  Thomas 
Howard  was  slain  at  Atherton  Moor,  co.  York,  June  28,  1643,  in  the  royal 
cause. 

June  21. 

Enter'd  Anthoes  Latchmore  (in  religion  D.  Mildred,)  aged  of  29, 
of  an  honest  family,  her  parents  were  wealthy. 

Born  1595  ;  prof.  1627  ;  died  April  18,  1663.  The  correct  spelling  was 
Lechmere. 

Augt.  ye  10. 

Enter'd  Mrs.  Jane  Cooke,  (in  religion  D.  Clare,)  aged  of  14,  shee 
was  borne  in  Cambridge. 

Born  161 1  ;  prof.  1627  ;  died  Sept.  21,  1685. 


42  RECORDS  OF  THE  ABBEY  OF  OUR  LADY  OF 

Septr.  22. 

Entre'd  Anne  Frere  aged  of  1 3  (in  religion  called  D.  Mechtild). 

Born  1612  ;  prof.  1628;  died  Jan.  26,  1676.  She  was  probably  a  sister 
or  near  relative  of  Dom  Joseph  Frere,  O.S.B.,  a  member  of  the  ancient 
family  of  that  name  seated  in  Essex,  who  died  in  1694,  aged  96. 

June  ye  18.  In  ye  Year  1626. 

Entre'd  Mrs.  Mary  Hunt,  aged  of  34  :  shee  went  away. 
August  22. 

Entered  Mrs.  Catherine  Vavasour,  aged  of  16,  sister  to  D.  Lucy 
before  named. 

Born  1610  at  Haslewood  Castle,  co.  York ;  prof,  under  her  own  name 
1628  ;  died  Aug.  18,  1676. 

August  29. 

Entre'd  Mrs.  Margaret  Hadock  aged  of  25  :  shee  went  away. 

Daughter  of  Cuthbert  Haydock,  and  sister  of  Robert  Haydock,  of 
Cottam  Hall,  co.  Lancaster,  Esq. 

December  23. 

Entre'd  Mrs.  Margarette  Cotton,  aged  of  19  of  Bedhampton  in 
Hampshire  (in  religion  called  D.  Winifride). 

Born  1607;  daughter  of  Richard  Cotton,  of  Warblington  and  Bedhamp- 
ton, co.  Southampton,  Esq. ;  prof.  1628  ;  died  Nov.  5,  1662. 

May  ye  first.  In  ye  Year  1628. 

Entre'd  Mrs.  Jane  Cellar,  aged  of  25  for  a  lay  Sr :  she  was  borne 
in  Wales. 

Born  in  the  parish  of  Acoppen,  co.  Mon.,  1603  ;  prof.  March  20,  1631; 
died  April  II,  1683. 

May  ye  10. 

Entre'd  Mrs.  Catherine  Brent,  (in  religion  D.  Christina)  &  her 
sister  Mrs.  Elizabeth  Brent  of  Sloake  in  Oxfordshire,  aged  ye  first  of 
27,  ye  second  of  21. 

Catherine,  born  1601  ;  prof.  Augt.  15,  1629  ;  abbess  1641-5  and  1677-81 ; 
died  Sept.  14,  1681.  Elizabeth,  born  in  Gloucestershire  1607  ;  prof.  Aug. 
15, 1629  ;  sent  to  found  the  convent  at  Paris  in  1652,  and  died  there  April  1, 
1660.  They  were  daughters  of  William  Brent,  of  Larkstoke,  co.  Gloucester, 
Esq.,  of  an  ancient  family  which  also  had  a  seat  at  Banbury,  co.  Oxford. 

Septr.  ye  5. 

Entre'd  Mrs.  Francis  Browne  (in  religion  D.  Ebba)  daughter  to 
Sr.  Peter  Browne  of  Kiddington  in  Oxfordshire,  Baronet — aged  of  19. 

Born  1609,  prof.  1629,  died  Sept.  22,  1631,  aged  22.  Her  father,  Sir 
Peter  Browne,  Knt.,  married  Margaret,  dau.  of  Sir  Henry  Knollys,  Knt., 
and  died  at  Northampton  of  wounds  received  at  the  battle  of  Naseby.  His 
eldest  son  Henry  was  created  a  baronet  by  Charles  II.,  July  1,  1659. 

Ye  same  day  &  year. 

Entred  Mrs.  Elinor  Timperly,  (in  religion  Str.  Teresa)  aged 
of  22,  sister  to  ye  before  mentioned  De.  Scholastica. 

Born  1606  ;  prof.  1630  ;  died  March  23,  1671. 


\€    Jjemi/iC  //a fly'. 


C  hrtfii  Jimen. 

+  labi/ifalfw  p&t  Co/ntrrsio/uut  filar um.  flUa- 
rum   *£>  oCtfieiih'am.  &r**i  !>**  Hf  SantUt 

£§,'uS    Secun/ttm  'T^gQiJam  SatiiHJtmi  tya/ris 
%  r,cX\*ft\  £i  tyerpifuuM.  yndusiojiem    (Jn. 


From  the  original  formula  of  vows  in  the  handwriting  of 
Dame  Bridget  More,  O.S.B. 


To  face  p.  43. 


Cath.  Rec.  Soc.  XIII. 


CONSOLATION    AT   CAMBRAI,    162O-1793  43 

December. 

Entred  Mrs.  Margaretta  Gascoigne,  aged  of  22,  sister  to  De. 
Catherine  Gascoigne  before  mentioned. 

Born  April  22,  1608,  at  Barnbow  Hall,  prof.  1629,  died  Aug.  16,  1637, 
aged  29.  Her  "Life"  was  written  by  Fr.  Augustine  Baker,  and  the  MS., 
thought  to  be  lost,  has  lately  been  found  at  Downside  Abbey. 

June  28.  1629. 

Entred  Mrs.  Brigitt  More  aged  of  19,  sister  to  ye  fore- 
mentioned  De.  Gertrude  More. 

Born  in  Herts,  1609;  prof.  Sept.  24,  1630 ;  sent  with  the  colony  of  nuns 
to  found  a  new  convent  at  Paris,  and  elected  first  prioress  on  Feb.  20,  1652, 
in  which  office  she  remained  till  1665  ;  died  there  Oct.  12,  1692,  aged  82. 

Ye  same  day  &  year. 

Entred  Mrs.  Mary  Percy  (of  ye  noble  family  of  ye  last  Earl  of 
Northumberland)  aged  of  33  for  a  lay  sister.  She  was  called  in  religion 
Sister  Hilda. 

Born  1596;  prof.  1631 ;  died  Feb.  6,  1670.  It  is  probable  that  she  was 
of  the  family  of  Percy  of  Beverley,  co.  York,  and  a  near  relative  of  Thomas 
Percy,  one  of  the  Gunpowder  Plot  conspirators,  grandson  of  Joselyn  Percy, 
4th  son  of  Henry,  Earl  of  Northumberland.  A  namesake,  Mary  Percy, 
daughter  of  Francis  Percy,  of  Scotton,  co.  York,  and  his  wife  Frances,  dau. 
of  Ralph  Vavasour,  a  younger  son  of  the  Haslewood  family,  was  professed 
at  Ghent,  Aug.  12,  1626. 

It  does  not  follow  from  a  nun's  profession  as  a  lay-sister  that  she  was 
relegated  to  the  menial  work  of  the  convent,  and  estranged  from  the  choir 
nuns.  Dowers  were  required  by  ecclesiastical  authority  to  safeguard 
common  life  and  common  property.  There  is  evidence  of  ladies  not  having 
the  required  dower  being  taken  as  lay-sisters. 

February  ye  first.  In  ye  year  1630. 

Entred  Mrs.  Hellen  Kenion  aged  of  26  for  a  lay  sister;  her 
parents  were  good  sufficient  people  in  Lancashire,  and  her  sister 
Margaret  also  a  lay  Sister. 

Helen  Kenyon  was  born  1604  ;  prof.  1632  ;  died  Nov.  10, 1657.  Margaret 
was  prof.  1632  ;  died  May  14,  1645. 

April  27.  In  ye  year  1631. 

Entred  Mrs.  Mary  Boult  (in  religion  called  Sr.  Bennet)  a  gentle- 
woman of  a  good  family,  aged  25  for  a  lay  Sr. 

Born  1606,  of  a  Devonshire  family,  and  probably  a  near  relative  of  the 
Rev.  John  Bolt,  the  chaplain  and  organist  at  the  English  Augustinian 
convent  at  Louvain  ;  prof.  1633  5  died  Oct.  10,  1659. 

June  13.  In  ye  year  1633. 

Entred  Mrs.  Elinor  Brent,  aged  of  22  (in  religion  called  D.  Ellin) 
sister  to  D.  Christina  &  D.  Elizabeth  Brent  before  mentioned. 

Born  161 1  ;  prof.  1635  5  died  May  5,  1688.  ^ 

August,  ye  3d. 

Entred  Mrs.  Elizabeth  Vaughan,  aged  of  21,  shee  went  away. 


44  RECORDS  OF  THE  ABBEY  OF  OUR  LADY  OF 

Aug.  13. 

Entred  Mrs.  Joane  Risdon  aged  of  24  (in  religion  called 
D.  Gertrude)  of  a  good  family  in  Devonshire. 

Born  1608,  3rd  dau.  of  Giles  Risdon,  of  Babeley  in  Parkham,  co.  Devon, 
Esq.,  by  Elizabeth,  dau.  and  coh.  of  William  Viell,  of  Trevorder,  co.  Corn- 
wall, Esq.,  and  his  wife  Jane,  dau.  of  Sir  John  Arundell,  of  Trerice,  in  that 
county ;  prof.  1635  ;  died  Jan.  26,  1675.  She  was  sister  to  Dom  Thomas 
Cuthbert  Risdon,  O.S.B. 

Aug.  ye  3rd.  [1634] 

Entred  Mrs.  Elizabeth  Smith,  aged  of  18  (in  religion  Barbara). 
She  was  natural  daughter  to  a  person  of  quality  in  England. 

Born  1616 ;  clothed  1634 ;  prof,  on  her  death-bed,  and  died  Feb.  24, 
1635. 

June  23.  In  ye  year  1638. 

Entred  Anne  Taverne  for  a  lay  Sister,  aged  of  35  :  She  was  borne 
of  honest  parents  in  ye  citty  of  Cambray. 

Born  1603  ;  prof.  1640 ;  died  Jan.  5,  1661. 
August  31. 

Entred  ye  Honble.  Mrs.  Lucy  Cary  aged  of  19  (in  religion  called 
De.  Magdalena)  and  her  Sister  Mrs.  Mary  Cary  aged  of  17,  daughters 
to  ye  Right  Honble.  Harry  Cary,  Viscount  of  Faukland,  some  time 
Vice  Roy  of  Ireland. 

Lucy,  born  1619;  prof.  1640;  died  Nov.  I,  1650.  Mary,  born  1621; 
prof.  1640 ;  died  Sept.  22,  1693.  They  were  sisters  to  Anne  dementia  and 
Elizabeth  Augustina  Cary.  Dame  Mary  of  St.  Winefride  Cary  went  with 
her  sister  Anne  Clementia  to  found  the  convent  at  Paris  in  Nov.  1651,  but 
returned  to  Cambrai  in  1652. 

Aug.  31. 

Likewise  entred  Mrs.  Barbara  Constable,  aged  of  21,  daughter 
to  Sir  Philip  Constable  of  Evringham  in  Yorkshire,  Baronet. 

Born  1617  ;  prof.  1640;  died  Jan.  26,  1684.  Her  father  was  created  a 
baronet  by  Charles  I.,  July  20,  1642,  and  was  a  severe  sufferer  in  the  royal 
cause.  Her  mother  was  Anne,  dau.  of  Sir  William  Roper,  Knt.,  of  Eltham 
and  St.  Dunstan's,  co.  Kent.  Two  of  Dame  Barbara's  brothers,  Philip  and 
Thomas,  were  Benedictines.  Two  of  her  works  have  been  referred  to 
elsewhere.  Another  is  preserved  at  Stanbrook  entitled  "  Gemitus  Pecatorum, 
or  the  Complaints  of  Sinners"  dated  at  end  Dec.  31,  1649,  of  which  a  tran- 
script is  at  Bergholt.  At  p.  2  she  states  that  she  was  nineteen  when  she 
entered  at  Cambrai,  which  does  not  necessarily  contradict  the  entry  in  the 
text,  as  it  may  include  the  date  of  her  first  crossing  over  to  the  Continent. 
She  also  says  that  her  mother  took  her  up  into  her  arms  when  a  new  born 
infant,  and  dedicated  her  wholly  to  the  B.V.  Mary. 

Aug.  31. 

Also  entred  Mrs.  Catherine  Gascoigne  (in  religion  called 
D.  Justina)  aged  of  15,  daughter  to  Sr.  Thomas  Gascoigne  of  Barnbow 
in  Yorkshire  Baronet,  &  neece  to  D.  Catherine  Gascoigne  afore 
mentioned. 

Born  March  I,  1623,  at  Barnbow  Hall ;  habit,  Jan.  25,  1639  ;  prof. 
April  15,  1640 ;  sent  to  Paris  to  join  the  new  convent  Feb.  6,  1652  ;  prioress 


CONSOLATION   AT   CAMBRAI,    162O-I793  45 

there  1665-90,  and  died  there  May  17,  1690.  Her  father  was  the  2nd 
baronet ;  and  her  mother  was  Anne,  dau.  of  John  Symeon,  of  Baldwins 
Brightwell,  co.  Oxon,  and  sister  of  Sir  George  Symeon,  Knt. 

Aug.  31. 

Also  entred  Mrs.  Mary  Tempest  aged  of  i6,  (in  religion 
De.  Euphrasia)  daughter  to  Mr.  Tempest  of  Broughton  in  Yorkshire. 

Born  1622,  dau.  of  Sir  Stephen  Tempest,  of  Broughton  Hall,  Knt,  by 
his  second  wife  Catherine,  dau.  of  Henry  Lawson,  of  Neesome,  co.  Durham, 
Esq.;  died  Feb.  14,  1689. 

Aug.  31. 

Also  ye  same  day  entred  with  ye  5  precedent  Mrs.  Francis  Lucy 
aged  of  16. 

Born  1621;  prof.  1640;  died  Jan  25,  1641. 

October,  27. 

Entred  Mrs.  Elizabeth  Cary  (in  religion  called  De.  Augustina) 
aged  of  21,  daughter  to  Viscount  Faukland  &  sister  to  Mrs.  Lucy  & 
Mrs.  Mary. 

Born  1617  ;  prof.  1640;  died  Nov.  17,  1682;  younger  sister  to  Anne 
Clementia. 

Oct.  29. 

Likewisee  entred  ye  honble.  Mrs.  Mary  &  Mrs.  Francis 
Stourton  aged  ye  first  of  14,  ye  other  of  12  for  pensionnars :  they 
were  daughters  to  ye  honble.  Baron  Stourton  of  Stourton ;  they  both 
went  away. 

Daughters  of  William,  10th  Baron  Stourton,  by  Frances,  dau.  of  Sir 
Edward  Moor,  of  Odyham,  co.  Southampton.  Frances  was  buried  at 
Stourton,  co.  Wilts,  Aug.  5,  1646,  and  Mary,  Sept.  27,  1672.  Lord  Stourton 
died  in  Aug.,  1685. 

March  ye  8.  In  ye  year  1639. 

Entred  Mrs.  Anne  Cary  aged  of  24  (in  religion  called  D. 
Clementia)  daughter  to  ye  Ld.  Viscount  Faukland  &  sister  to  Mrs. 
Lucy,  Mrs.  Elizabeth,  &  Mrs.  Mary  Cary. 

Born  161 5,  eldest  dau.  of  Sir  Henry  Cary,  K.B.,  elevated  to  the  peerage 
of  Scotland,  Nov.  10,  1620,  as  Viscount  Falkland,  and  his  wife  Elizabeth, 
only  dau.  and  heiress  of  Sir  Laurence  Tanfield,  chief-baron  of  the  Exchequer; 
habit  April  3,  1639 ;  prof.  1640 ;  sent  with  her  sister  Mary,  and  a  lay  sister, 
Ann  Scholastica  Hodson,  to  establish  a  filiation  of  the  convent  at  Paris  in 
Nov.,  165 1 ;  was  assisted  by  Queen  Henrietta  Maria,  to  whom  she  had  been 
maid  of  honour  at  the  court  in  England,  and  others,  and  in  Feb.,  1652,  was 
joined  by  more  sisters  from  Cambrai,  but  through  humility  would  not  take 
upon  herself  any  office  of  superiority,  and  in  consequence  Dame  Bridget 
More  was  elected  the  first  prioress  of  the  new  convent,  Feb.  20,  1652  ;  died 
at  Paris  April  26,  1671.  A  long  memoir  of  her  appears  in  Cath.  Rec.  Soc.  ix. 
339-46. 

She  wrote  the  life  of  her  mother,  which  was  revised  with  notes  by  her 
brother,  the  Hon.  Patrick  Cary,  and  remained  in  MS.  at  Cambrai  till 
the  Revolution  of  1793,  when  it  was  removed  with  the  valuable  library  of  the 
abbey  to  the  Archives  of  the  Department  of  the  North  in  Lille.  It  was 
eventually  published  by  Richard  Simpson,  Esq.,  under  the  title  of  "The 


4^  RECORDS  OF  THE  ABBEY  OF  OUR  LADY  OF 

Lady  Falkland  :  her  Life,  from  a  MS.  in  the  Imperial  Archives  at  Lille," 
London,  1861,  8vo. 

I)  N  " 

On  ye  same  day— Entred  Mrs.  Isabella  Gurney  (in  religion 
called  S.  Teresa)  aged  of  24  for  a  lay  Sister. 

Born  161 5  ;  prof.  1641 ;  died  Jan.  22,  1678. 
March  23. 

Entred  Mrs.  Issett  Mullens  aged  of  23  for  a  lay  Sister  (in 
religion  called  Sr.  Angela.) 

Born  1616  ;  prof.  1640;  died  Dec.  6,  1641.  She  was  probably  connected 
with  the  ancient  Catholic  family  of  Molyns  of  Mungewell  Manor,  co.  Oxford, 
of  whom  several  were  nuns  at  the  English  Augustinian  convent  at  Pans,  and 
one,  Francis,  was  chaplain  there. 

September  2. 

Entred  Mrs.  Mary  Hoghton  (in  religion  called  De.  Eugenia) 
aged  of  18,  daughter  to  Mrs.  Hoghton  of  Park  Hall  in  Lancashire  & 
neece  to  D.  Catherine  Gascoigne. 

Born  1621,  at  Park  Hall  in  Charnock  Richard ;  second  dau.  of  Lieut.-Col. 
William  Hoghton,  who  was  slain  at  the  first  battle  of  Newbury,  Sept.  20, 
1643,  by  Mary,  dau.  of  Sir  John  Gascoigne,  of  Barnbow,  co.  York ;  prof. 
1 64 1 ;  died  March  12,  170 1. 

September  2. 

Ye  same  day  also  entred  Mrs.  Anne  Hodson,  for  a  lay  sister,  aged 
of  18  of  honest  parents  of  ye  parish  of  Leland  in  Lancashire  (in  religion 
called  Sr.  Scholastica.) 

Born  1 62 1 ;  prof.  Feb.  24, 1642 ;  accompanied  Dame  Clementia  Cary  and 
her  younger  sister  Dame  Mary  to  establish  a  filiation  convent  in  Paris  in 
Nov.,  1 65 1,  and  died  there  May  31,  1690. 

April  ye  17.  In  ye  year  1640. 

Entred  Mrs.  Catherine  Sheldon  daughter  to  Mr.  Sheldon  of 
Beoly  in  Warwickshire,  aged  of  22. 

Born  1617;  dau.  of  William  Sheldon,  of  Beoley,  co .  Worcester,  and 
Weston,  co.  Warwick,  Esq.,  by  Elizabeth,  dau.  of  William,  2nd  Lord  Petre  ; 
prof.  1642 ;  died  April  18,  1650.  Her  parents  were  married  in  April,  1612. 
Her  eldest  brother  Ralph  was  the  famous  antiquary,  and  through  his  muni- 
ficence was  known  as  the  Great  Sheldon.  Another  brother,  Edward,  was  a 
Benedictine. 

October  28.  In  ye  year  1642. 

Entred  Mrs.  Mary  Lusher,  aged  of  18,  for  a  lay  sister  (in  religion 
called  Sr.  Francis.)  Her  father  being  of  a  younger  family  was  an 
apothicary  in  London;  her  mother  by  younger  Brs.  was  descended 
from  Sr.  Thomas  More. 

Born  1624;  prof.  1644;  died  July  28,  1687.  Henry  Lusher  of  London, 
apothecary,  signed  his  short  pedigree  at  the  Visitation  1634.  He  claimed 
descent  from  the  Surrey  Lushers,  through  his  father,  Richard  Lusher  of  North 
Elmham,  Norfolk,  his  mother  being  Anne,  daughter  of  Thomas  Whale 
[?  Whall]  of  Norwich.  He  returned  his  six  children,  by  Frances,  daughter  of 
Edward  More  of  Haddon,  Oxon,  as— (1)  Thomas;  (2)  Edward;  Mary; 
Elizabeth  ;  Anne ;  and  Bridget.    {Harl.  Soc.  xvii.  71.) 


CONSOLATION   AT  CAMBRAI,    162O-1793  47 

June  ye  16.  In  ye  year  1644. 

Entred  Mrs.  Mary  Appleton  aged  of  20  (in  religion  called  D. 
Marina)  daughter  to  Sir  Harry  Appleton  Bart,  in  Essex. 

Born  1624,  dau.  of  Sir  Henry  Appleton,  2nd  Bart.,  of  South  Bemfleet,  co. 
Essex,  by  Joan,  dau.  of  Edward  Sheldon,  of  Beoley,  and  consequently  first 
cousin  to  Dame  Catherine  Sheldon ;  prof.  1646  ;  went  to  the  new  convent 
in  Paris  in  Feb.,  1652,  but  returned  with  Dame  Mary  Cary  to  the  mother-house 
at  Cambrai ;  elected  abbess  1681,  and  died  in  office  Jan.  29, 1694.  Her  brother 
Laurence  was  prior  at  Lambspring. 

March  10.  In  ye  year  1646. 

Entred  Mrs.  Elizabeth  Roper  aged  of  14  (in  religion  called  D. 
Benedicta)  daughter  to  Mr.  Roper  of  Tenham  of  ye  Ld.  Tenhams 
family  but  of  a  younger  house. 

Born  1 63 1,  dau.  of  Anthony  Roper,  of  Eltham,  co.  Kent,  and  fourth 
cousin  to  Christopher  Roper,  4th  Baron  Teynham  ;  took  the  habit  in  1647  ; 
prof,  on  her  death-bed,  and  died  March  6,  1648. 

August  24. 

Entred  Mrs.  Cecilia  Hall,  aged  of  19,  &  her  sister  Mrs.  Catherine 
Hall  aged  of  12,  daughters  to  Mr.  Hall  of  High  Meadow  in  Gloucester- 
shire. Mrs  Catherine  was  called  in  religion  sometimes  D.  Maura 
sometimes  D.  Catherine. 

Cecily,  born  May  22, 1625,  third  dau.  of  Benedict  Hall,  of  High  Meadow, 
co.  Gloucester,  Esq.,  by  Anne,  dau.  of  Sir  Edward  Wintour,  of  Lydney, 
co.  Gloucester,  Knt,  and  his  wife  Anne  Somerset,  dau.  of  Edward,  4th  Earl 
of  Worcester  ;  prof.  1648  ;  died  March  13,  165 1.  Catherine  was  born  about 
1634;  prof.  165 1  ;  abbess  1673-7;  died  March  17,  1692. 

In  ye  year  1647. 
Came  Mrs.  Elizabeth  Gertrude  Hodson  aged  of  21. 

Born  in  the  parish  of  Leyland,  Lancashire,  in  1626,  and  younger  sister 
of  Sister  Anne  Scholastica  Hodson ;  prof,  as  a  lay-sister  March  1,  1650  ; 
followed  her  sister  to  Paris  in  Feb.  to  assist  in  the  foundation  of  that 
convent,  died  there  Oct.  7,  1652,  and,  as  the  community  had  then  no  burial- 
place  of  their  own,  was  interred  at  Port  Royal. 

May  ye  3rd.  In  ye  year  1648. 

Entred  Mrs.  Mary  Roper,  aged  of  14  :  she  went  away. 
Born  1634,  sister  to  Elizabeth  Benedicta,  the  novice. 

July  ye  4th. 

Entred  Mrs.  Anne  Middleton  (in  religion  D.  Benedicta)  aged  of 
17,  daughter  of  Sr.  Peter  Middleton  of  Stockhold  in  Yorkshire. 

Born  1 63 1  ;  prof.  1650 ;  died  Aug.  5,  1688. 

July  ye  4th. 

Entred  likewise  Mrs.  Mary  Stapleton  (in  religion  D.  Etheldred) 
aged  of  23,  daughter  to  Mr.  Stapleton  of  Carleton  in  Yorkshire,  neece 
to  Mrs.  Catherine  Gascoigne. 

Born  at  Quosque  Hall,  1624,  dau.  of  Gilbert  Stapleton,  subsequently  of 
Carlton,  Esq.,  by  his  2nd  wife  Ellinor,  dau.  of  Sir  John  Gascoigne,  Bart.; 
prof.  1650 ;  died  Aug.  6,  1668  {vide  Waugh,  Downside  I\ev.,  July,  1909). 


48  RECORDS  OF  THE  ABBEY  OF  OUR  LADY  OF 

August  ye  5th.  In  ye  year  1649. 

Entred  Mrs.  Elizabeth  Lusher  aged  of  20  for  a  lay  Sister;  shee 
was  sister  to  Sister  Francis. 

Born  1629;  prof.  1651  ;  died  May  7,  1684.     See  under  1642. 

March  24.  In  ye  year  1651. 

Entred  Mrs.  Brigett  Lusher  aged  of  18,  for  a  lay  sister ;  she  was 
sister  to  ye  afore  mentioned  Sr.  Francis  and  Sr.  Elizabeth. 

Born  1633;  prof.  1653;  died  March  12,  1690. 

July  ye  5th.  In  ye  year  1652. 

Entred  Mrs.  Margaret  Smith,  aged  of  16;  she  was  sister  to  ye 
now  Bishop  Smith. 

Born  1636,  daughter  of  Bartholomew  Smith,  of  The  Sohe,  Winchester, 
Esq.,  and  sister  of  Bishop  James  Smith,  V.A.-N.D. ;  prof.  ;  died  Augt.  14, 
1680.     Her  father  was  high-sheriff  of  Hants  in  1654. 

September  18. 

Entred  Mrs.  Elizabeth  Shafto  aged  of  20,  daughter  to  Mr. 
Shafto  of  .  .  .  (in  religion  called  D.  Gertrude). 

Born  1632,  sister  to  Dom  Placid  Shafto  and  Dom  Celestine  Shafto, 
O.S.B.,  and  daughter  of  Edward  Shafto,  of  Bavington  Hall,  co.  Northumber- 
land, Esq.,  by  Margaret,  dau.  of  Edward  Errington,  of  The  Grange,  co. 
Northumberland,  Esq. ;  prof.  1653  ;  died  Augt.  8,  1654. 

June  ye  7th.  In  ye  year  1653. 

Entred  Mrs.  Clare  Radcliffe,  (in  religion  called  D.  Brigitt)  aged 
of  22  &  her  sister  Mrs.  Ursula  Radcliffe  aged  of  20,  daughter  of  Sr. 
Edward  Radcliffe  of  Diulston  in  Northumberland,  Baronet ;  sisters  to 
ye  first  Earl  of  Derwentwater. 

Glare,  born  1631  ;  prof.  1655  ;  died  Augt.  11,  1681.  Ursula,  born  1633  ; 
prof.  1655  ;  died  Oct.  30,  1689.  They  had  four  aunts,  daughters  of  Sir 
Francis  Radcliffe,  of  Dilston  Castle,  1st.  Bart.,  who  were  Poor  Clares  at 
Gravelines,  and  two  nieces  Augustinian  nuns  at  Louvain. 

7bre.  ye  5th. 

Entred  Mrs.  Dorothy  Fleetwood  aged  of  27;  she  is  gone  away. 

She  was  the  youngest  daughter  of  Sir  Richard  Fleetwood,  of  Calwich 
Hall,  co.  Stafford,  1st  Bart.,  by  Anne,  dau.  of  Sir  John  Peshall,  of  Horsley, 
co.  Stafford,  1st  Bart.  She  became  the  second  wife  of  Thomas  Barnfleld, 
of  Wolverhampton  and  Dunston,  by  whom  she  had  a  son  James  Barnfleld, 
aged  four  in  1663. 

June  20.  Year  1654. 

Entred  Mrs.  Francis  Timperly  aged  of  19 :  she  went  away. 

Daughter  of  Michael  Timperley,  of  Hintlesham,  co.  Suffolk,  Esq.,  and 
his  wife  Frances,  dau.  of  Sir  Henry  Bedingfeld,  of  Oxburgh,  co.  Norfolk, 
Knt.,  was  taken  by  her  brother  Dom  Henry  Gregory  Timperley,  O.S.B.,  to 
the  convent  of  the  Blue  Nuns  at  Paris  in  Sept.,  1660.  There  she  took  the 
habit,  and  died  Nov.  19,  1661,  aged  26.     Vide  C.R.S.^  viii. 

July  20. 

Entred  Mrs.  Joane  Trevelyan  aged  of  31,  (in  religion  called  Sr. 


CONSOLATION    AT   CAMBRAI,   162O-1793  49 

Catherine)  for  a  lay  Sister,  daughter  to  Mr.  Trevelyan  of  a  very  ancient 
family  in  Cornwall  and  a  gentleman. 

Born  1623,  apparently  dau.  of  John  Trevelyan,  of  Basill,  co.  Cornwall, 
Esq.,  and  his  wife  Mary,  dau.  and  coheiress  of  George  Arundell  {vide 
C.R.S.  viii.) ;  prof.  1656,  died  July  3,  1682. 

In  ye  year  1655. 

Entred  (July  5th.)  Mary  Barbara  Breton,  aged  of  19,  borne 
in  ye  citty  of  Cambray  of  good  honest  parents,  for  a  lay-sister. 

Born  1636 ;  prof. ;  died  Sept.  28,  1689. 
October  ye  first. 

Entred  Mrs.  Francis  Gascoigne,  aged  of  18,  Sister  to  D.  Justina 
before  mentioned. 

Born  Oct.  31,  1637,  dau.  of  Sir  Thomas  Gascoigne,  of  Barnbow  Hall,  co. 
York,  2nd.  Bart.,  and  sister  of  Dame  Catherine  Justina  de  S.  Maria  Gas- 
coigne who  left  this  convent  to  assist  in  the  foundation  of  that  at  Paris  in 
1652  ;  prof.  1657  ;  died  Sept.  21,  1708. 

November  ye  8th.  In  ye  year  1660. 

Came  Mrs.  Dorothy  Fen  wick,  aged  of  30  (called  in  religion  Sr. 
Alexia)  for  a  lay  sister ;  she  was  a  gentlewoman  borne  of  a  good  family 
in  Northumberland. 

Born  1630 ;  daughter  of  Roger  Fen  wick,  of  Shortflat  and  By  well,  co. 
Northumberland,  Esq.  (3rd  son  of  Sir  William  Fenwick,  of  Wallington),  by 
Margaret,  dau.  of  Sir  William  Blakiston,  of  Gibside.  Her  father  was 
married  Feb.  26,  1626-7,  ar*d  died  Feb.  23, 1635-6.  Her  nephew  Sir  Robert 
Fenwick  was  knighted  at  Windsor  May  17, 1683,  and  died  in  1691,  when  his 
children  were  brought  up  protestants.  Sir  Robert  had  two  brothers  Bene- 
dictines, Dom  Wm.  Austin  Fenwick  and  Dom  Ludovick  Laurence  Fenwick, 
and  two  sisters,  Thomasine  and  Mary,  Augustinians,  another  sister,  Dorothy, 
becoming  the  wife  of  Charles  Tumour,  eldest  son  of  Sir  Charles  Tumour, 
godson  of  Charles  II.     Sister  Alexia  died  June  29,  1689. 

same  day. 

Entred  Mrs.  Mary  Errington,  aged  of  18,  (in  religion  called  D. 
Agnes.)  Also  her  sister  Mrs.  Margaret :  she  went  away.— &  Mrs. 
Dorothy  Cook  who  dyed  a  postulant. 

Mary  Errington,  born  1642,  was  dau.  of  Nicolas  Errington,  of  Ponteland, 
co.  Northumberland,  Esq.,  by  his  first  wife  Margaret,  second  dau.  of  Roger 
Widdrington,  of  Cartington,  co.  Northumberland,  Esq. ;  prof.  1662  ;  died 
June  4,  1662.  Her  sister  Margaret  was  still  unmarried  at  the  time  of  the 
Visitation  of  Northumberland  in  1666. 

December  ye  19.  In  ye  year  1666. 

Came  Mrs.  Anne  Gill  aged  of  26  and  Mrs.  Elizabeth  Shelton, 
for  a  pensionar  at  1 1  years  old  :  ye  latter  went  away. 

Anne  Gill,  born  1640 ;  prof.  1668  ;  died  Feb.  1,  1692. 

February  ye  15.  In  ye  year  1667. 

Came  Mrs.  Elizabeth  Legg  (in  religion  D.  Mary,)  aged  of  23, 
daughter  to  lott  Legg  &  neere  relation  to  ye  Lord  Dartmouth;  she 
was  borne  in  Ireland. 

XIII.  D 


50  RECORDS  OF  THE  ABBEY  OF  OUR  LADY  OF 

Born  1643;  prof.  1669;  died  June  22,  1691.  The  reference  to  Lord 
Dartmouth  shows  that  the  entry  must  have  been  made  at  a  much  later 
period  than  is  professed,  for  George  Legge,  governor  of  Portsmouth,  was 
only  elevated  to  the  peerage  in  Dec,  1682.  In  1687  he  was  appointed 
admiral  of  the  fleet  sent  to  intercept  the  Prince  of  Orange  ;  and  after  the 
Revolution  he  was  sent  to  the  Tower,  where  he  died  Oct.  25,  1691. 

November  ye  19th.  In  ye  year  1669. 

Honorable  Lady  Barbara  Cambell  (in  religion  D.  Melchiora) 
enter'd  this  Monastery  aged  of  46  ;  she  had  been  professed  &  lived  at 
ye  English  Benedictines  at  Bruxelles  about  27  years,  she  stayed  here 
just  seven  years  &  then  returned  back  to  ye  house  of  her  profession 
where  she  died  a  few  years  after.  She  was  daughter  to  ye  Earl  of 
Argyle  in  Scotland,  was  a  woman  of  a  good  capacity ;  but  having  a 
scruple  to  have  left  ye  house  of  her  profession  she  decided  to  go  back, 
&  was  presently  condescended  to,  tho'  she  had  not  been  so  easily 
admitted  of  for  she  had  importun'd  ye  Superiors  of  our  Congregation 
almost  12  years  together  to  come  hither  before  they  would  admit  of 
her ;  being  for  several  reasons  unwilling  to  take  a  person  profess'd  of 
another  house  &  under  a  different  Government.  Ye  day  after  she 
came  into  ye  house  she  came  into  ye  quire  where  all  ye  religious  of  our 
Convent  were  present  with  lighted  candells,  the  Veni  Creator  sung, 
Rd.  F.  Confessor  brought  ye  Bd.  Sacrament  to  ye  quire  door  where 
before  it  she  renewed  her  vows  promising  obedience  to  ye  Congre- 
gation. Ye  paper  was  write,  sealed  &  signed  by  her,  &  kept  in  our 
depositum  till  ye  day  before  she  went  away,  when  by  order  of  our  Rd. 
F.  President  ye  dames  of  ye  Councill  being  assembled  at  ye  parloir  our 
Rd.  F.  Confessor  &  Mr.  Edward  Thimbleby,  Prevost  of  St.  Geries,  in 
ye  towne,  being  at  ye  grate  for  witnesses;  ye  paper  was  brought 
thither  &  read  to  her  &  she  was  asked  by  Mr.  Thimbleby  if  she 
desired  to  have  it  cancelPd:  she  answered  yes  &  having  given  her 
reasons  for  her  desire  to  return,  ye  paper  was  presently  tore  &  burnt 
with  a  candle  there  ready  for  yt  end,  &  shee  declared  to  be  at  liberty. 
Consequently  departed  ye  next  morning. 

Dame  Barbara  Melchiora  Campbell,  born  1624,  youngest  daughter  of 
Archibald  Campbell,  7th  earl  of  Argyll,  by  his  first  wife,  the  Lady  Anne 
Douglas,  dau.  of  William,  7th  earl  of  Morton,  at  the  age  of  three  years  was 
entrusted  to  the  care  of  Lady  Mary  Percy,  abbess  of  the  English  Bene- 
dictines at  Brussels,  and  was  placed  in  the  convent  school  June  8,  1628. 
Thence  after  fourteen  years  she  passed  to  the  novitiate,  received  the  habit 
Dec.  28,  1642,  under  the  religious  name  of  Melchiora,  and  was  professed 
Jan.  6,  1644.  She  had  two  sisters  nuns,  one  in  the  convent  of  Berlaymont, 
contiguous  to  the  English  convent  at  Brussels,  and  the  other  professed  in 
the  convent  of  La  Cambre.  As  early  as  1657  she  petitioned  to  be  admitted 
into  the  abbey  at  Cambrai,  but  it  was  not  until  Nov.  19,  1669,  that  she  was 
permitted  to  enter.  Soon  after  her  reception  she  desired  to  return  to  her 
old  convent,  but  the  Lady  Abbess  Vavasour  would  not  have  her  back  till 
she  had  remained  at  Cambrai  at  least  seven  years.  After  the  expiration  of 
this  term,  with  the  consent  of  Dame  Catherine  Maura  Hall,  the  abbess  of 
Cambrai,  and  with  dimissorial  letters  dated  Nov.  28, 1676,  from  the  president- 
general  of  the  English  Benedictines,  Dom  Gregory  Benedict  Stapleton,  she 
returned  to  Brussels,  where  she  resided  till  her  death  in  1688. 

The  Rev.  Edward  Thimbleby,  provost  of  the  cathedral  of  St.  Gery  in 


CONSOLATION   AT   CAMBRAI,    1620-1793  5 1 

Cambrai,  was  a  younger  son  of  Richard  Thimbleby,  of  Irnham  Hall,  co. 
Lincoln,  Esq.,  and  his  wife  Mary,  dau.  of  Edward  Brookesby,  of  Shoby,  co. 
Lincoln,  Esq.,  by  Eleanor,  dau.  of  William  Vaux,  3rd  Lord  Vaux  of  Har- 
rowden,  and  died  July  17, — (date  uncertain,  according  to  Dodd.  Ch.  Hist.  iii. 
479,  about  1690). 

May  21.  In  ye  year  1670. 

Came  D.  Mary  Anna  Ayvay,  a  novice  from  ye  English  Benedictines 
at  Dunkerk,  aged  of  16,  having  taken  ye  habit  there  at  15.  Her  motive 
of  removall  from  thence  hither  was  ye  desire  she  had  to  be  in  our  Con- 
gregation &  govern'd  by  ye  order  she  profess'd.  Shee  came  in  ye  Dun- 
kerk habit  which  was  chainged  for  ours  at  ye  quire  dore  with  ye  cere- 
monys  of  desiring  her  admittance,  all  ye  religious  present,  ye  litanies  & 
Veni  Creator  sung. 

Born  1654;  prof.  1672;  died  April  20,  1713.  She  was  a  few  years 
younger  than  the  Franciscan,  Fr.  James  Alban  Ayray. 

November  ye  19. 

Entred  Mrs.  Mary  Conquest  (in  religion  D.  M.  Benedict)  aged 
of  1 1  years,  daughter  to  Mr.  Conquest  in  Bedfordshire. 

Born  1659 ;  prof.  1677;  died  Nov.  19, 1686.  Daughter  of  John  Thimbleby 
Conquest,  of  Houghton  Conquest,  co.  Beds,  Esq.,  by  Eleanor,  5th  dau.  of 
Benedict  Hall,  of  High  Meadow,  co.  Gloucester,  Esq.,  and  consequently 
niece  of  Dames  Cecily  and  Catherine  Hall.  Her  sister  Teresa  was  a 
Benedictine  nun  elsewhere. 

December  ye  15. 

Entred  Mrs.  Cecilia  Hussey,  aged  of  18,  daughter  to  Mr.  Hussey 
of  Marnhull  in  Dorcetshire,  with  her  little  sister  Mrs.  Susanna  aged  of 
10  &  J.     This  latter  went  away. 

Cecily,  born  1652,  was  the  only  child  of  George  Hussey,  Esq.,  of  Nash 
Court  in  Marnhull,  who  purchased  that  manor  in  165 1,  by  his  first  wife 
Elizabeth,  dau.  of  Charles  Walcot,  of  Walcot  Hall,  co.  Salop,  Esq. ;  prof. 
1672  ;  abbess  1705-10  ;  died  April  9,  1721.  Her  half-sister  Susan  was  by 
her  father's  second  wife,  Grace,  dau.  of  Sir  Lewis  Dives,  of  Bromham,  co. 
Bedford. 

January  ye  18.  In  ye  year  1671. 

Entred  Mrs.  Anna  Maria  Thompson,  aged  of  15 :  shee  went 
away. 

September  ye  2 1 . 

Entred  Mrs.  Dorothy  Hoghton  (in  religion  D.  Scholastica)  aged 
of  15,  daughter  to  Mr.  Hoghton  of  Park  Hall  in  Lancashire,  neece  to 
D.  Eugenia  before  mentioned. 

Born  1656,  eldest  dau.  of  John  Hoghton,  of  Park  Hall  in  Charnock 
Richard,  Esq.,  by  his  second  wife  Elizabeth,  dau.  and  sole  heiress  of  Edward 
Ditchfield,  of  Ditton  Hall,  co.  Lancaster,  Esq. ;  prof.  1674 ;  abbess  1694- 
1701,  and  again  1710-13  ;  died  Aug.  2,  1726.  Her  brother  William  married 
Elizabeth,  dau.  and  heiress  of  Robert  Dalton,  of  Thurnham  Hall,  and  his 
eldest  son  John  assumed  the  name  of  Dalton  about  17 10. 

September  ye  30. 

Mrs.  Susanna  Phelypes   aged  of  23,  daughter  to  Sr.  James 


52  RECORDS  OF  THE  ABBEY  OF  OUR  LADY  OF 

Philips  of  Stoake  Charity  Baronet,  &  his  lady  Elizabeth  Titchbourne 
ye  ancient  seate  of  ye  Phelypes  was  Barrington  in  Somersetshire. 

Born  1648,  eldest  dau.  of  Sir  James  Phelips,  of  Stoke  Charity,  co.  South- 
ampton, 3rd.  Bart.,  by  Elizabeth,  3rd.  dau.  of  Sir  Richard  Tichborne,  of 
Tichborne  Hall,  co.  Hants,  Knt.  and  Bart.,  by  Susanna,  dau.  and  coheiress 
of  William  Waller,  of  Stoke  Charity,  Esq. ;  prof.  1673  ;  died  Dec.  4,  1705. 

Ye  same  day. 

Entred  with  her,  Mrs.  Elizabeth,  her  sister,  aged  of  19,  &  Mrs. 
Mary  Cox  aged  of  29,  these  two  latter  went  away  again. 

Elizabeth  Phelips,  baptized  at  Stoke  Charity  Jan.  27,  165 1,  became  heir 
to  her  brother  Sir  James  Phelips,  4th  and  last  Bart.,  who  joined  James  II.  in 
Ireland  in  Jan.,  1688-9,  and  died  at  Cork  March  18,  1689-90  ;  she  married 
(settlement  after  marriage  dated  April  16, 1702)  George  Bolney,  of  Testwood, 
and  subsequently  of  Winchester,  co.  Southampton,  Esq.,  who  died  in  1736, 
and  her  will  was  dated  June  20  of  that  year. 

Mary  Cox,  dau.  of  Sir  John  Cox,  of  whom  see  under  1699. 

Ye  same  day. 

Entred  Mrs.  Anne  Moore  (in  religion  D.  Magdalena,)  aged  of  13, 
daughter  to  Sr.  Henry  Moore  of  Fawley  in  Berkshire,  Knight  Baronet. 

Born  1698,  dau.  of  the  2nd  baronet  according  to  the  above  statement, 
but  Burke,  Extinct  Baronetage,  says  she  was  grand-daughter,  that  is,  dau. 
of  Francis  Moore  (Sir  Henry's  eldest  son,  who  died  before  his  father,  June 
3,  1683),  by  Frances,  dau.  and  sole  heir  of  Alexander  Jermyn,  of  Cordington, 
co.  Sussex,  Esq.;  prof.  1675;  cued  Dec.  12,  17 19.  Sir  Henry  died  about 
1690,  and  was  succeeded  by  his  grandson  Sir  Richard,  and  the  baronetcy 
became  extinct  upon  the  death  of  the  tatter's  son  Sir  Thomas  Michael  Moore, 
6th  Bart.,  of  Fawley,  April  10,  1807,  who  was  interred  under  a  large  marble 
slab  in  the  chapel  (now  the  refectory)  of  the  convent  at  Stapehill,  Dorset. 

August  30.  1674. 

Entred  Mrs.  Francis  Pulleyn  (in  religion  D.  Placida,)  aged  of  21, 
daughter  to  Mr.  Pulleyn  in  York.  Her  mother  was  Mrs.  Elizabeth 
Saville  by  whose  little  nephew  marrying  ye  Lord  Thomas  Howard, 
Placida  comes  to  be  allied  to  ye  new  Duke  of  Norfolk. 

Born  1653,  dau.  of  .  .  .  Pulleyn,  of  .  .  .  co.  York,  Esq.,  by  Elizabeth, 
sister  of  Sir  John  Savile,  of  Copley,  co.  York,  Bart.  It  was  Mrs.  Pulleyn's 
niece,  Mary  Elizabeth  Savile,  who  married  Lord  Thomas  Howard.  Prof. 
1677  ;  left  upon  her  mother's  death  in  1675,  but  returned  in  the  following 
year,  and  was  professed  in  Feb.,  1677  ;  died  Jan.  16,  1720  {vide  under 
1676). 

Ye  same  day. 

Entred  Mrs.  Hall,  Dowager  of  High  Meadow  in  Gloucestershire, 
who  had  lived  in  this  Monastery  a  retired  life,  having  her  priest  Revd. 
F.  Anselm  Williams,  a  professed  Monk  of  St.  Malloes,  when  yt  monastery 
had  belonged  to  ye  English  Congregation,  &  three  servants  ;  her  daughter 
Rd.  Mother  Catherine  Maura  Hall  was  at  yt  time  Abbess  of  yt  convent. 
Shee  died  ye  20  of  March  in  ye  year  &  lys  buried  under  a  tombstone 
amongst  our  deceased  religious,  with  ye  Epitaph  we  shall  hereafter 
write  down.  Her  daughter  M.  Cath.  Maura  dying  some  years  after  lyes 
buried  in  ye  same  tomb. 


CONSOLATION   AT  CAMBRAI,    1620-1793  53 

Anne,  dau.  of  Sir  Edward  Wyntour,  of  Lydney,  whose  relationship  with 
the  earls  of  Worcester  has  been  given  under  the  notice  of  Dame  Cicely  Hall, 
was  the  widow  of  Benedict  Hall,  of  High  Meadow.  She  died  March  20, 
1676,  aged  79.  Her  chaplain,  Dom  Anselm  Williams,  O.S.B.,  subsequently 
founded  the  mission  at  Bath,  and  died  there  in  1693. 

April  ye  30.  In  ye  year  1676. 

Entred  Mrs.  Mary  Crookshank,  Mrs.  Betty  Moone,  &  Mrs. 
Betty  Ayray,  ye  two  last  for  pensionnars,  all  three  went  away. 

December  ye  13. 

Entred  Mrs.  Betty  Farmour  aged  of  10  &  a  half,  for  a 
pensionnar  :  she  went  away. 

Born  1665,  <*au.  of  Richard  Fermor,  of  Tusmore,  co.  Oxon.,  Esq.,  by 
Frances,  dau.  of  Sir  Basil  Brooke,  of  Madeley  Court,  co.  Salop,  Knt.,  by 
Frances,  dau.  of  Henry,  4th  Lord  Mordaunt.  She  married  in  1687  Stephen 
Tempest,  of  Broughton  Hall,  co.  York,  Esq.,  and  died  Dec.  29,  1738, 
aged  73. 

The  same  day. 

Entred  for  a  second  time  Mrs.  Francis  Placida  Pulleyne  who 
had  performed  more  than  a  year  noviceship  ye  first  time  she  came, 
but  was  obliged  upon  her  Mother's  death  to  goe  into  England  to  settle 
her  temporal  business,  &  returning  again  was  professed  ye  February 
following. 

Vide  under  1674. 

Also  Elizabeth  Camplin  for  a  lay-sister. 

Prof,  under  her  own  name  in  1678  ;  died  Nov.  II,  1705. 

June  ye  2nd.  In  ye  year  1677. 

Entred  Mrs.  Joan  Hoghton  ;  went  away. 

2nd  dau.  of  John  Hoghton,  of  Park  Hall,  and  sister  of  Dame  Dorothy 
Scholastica.  She  married  Richard  Walmesley,  of  Showley  Hall,  co. 
Lancaster,  Esq.,  and  died  Nov.  13,  1722. 

July  ye  17. 

Entred  Mrs.  Catherine  Swinburne  &  her  sister  Mrs.  Anne ;  all 
these  three  came  for  pensionnars  &  went  away. 

The  two  eldest  of  the  13  daurs.  of  Sir  John  Swinburne,  of  Capheaton, 
co.  Northumb.,  1st  Bart.,  by  Isabel,  d.  and  h.  of  Henry  Lawson,  of  Brough 
Hall,  co.  York,  Esq.  Cath.  became  a  nun  at  Saumur.  Anne  became  the 
wife  of  Nich.  Thornton,  of  Nether  Witton,  co.  Northumberland,  Esq. 

August. 

Entred  Mrs.  Elizabeth  Collingwood,  aged  of  18,  &  her  mayde 
Anne  Batmanson  aged  of  29,  for  a  lay  sister,  ye  first  went  away. 

Elizabeth  Collingwood,  daughter  of  George  Collingwood,  of  Eslington,  co. 
Northumberland,  Esq.,  by  Agnes,  dau.  and  coh.  of  John  Fleming,  of  Rydal, 
co.  Westmoreland,  Esq.,  had  uncles  Thomas,  a  Jesuit,  and  Roger  Anselm, 
a  Benedictine,  and  two  brothers  Robert  and  Charles,  Jesuits.  Her  eldest 
brother  George  was  executed  at  Liverpool,  Feb.  25,  17 16,  for  taking  part  in 
the  Rising  of  1715. 

Anne  Batmanson's  brother  William,  if  not  her  father  likewise,  lived  on  a 
farm  at  Ushaw,  co.  Durham,  now  the  site  of  Ushaw  College  ;  prof.  1680 ; 
died  Feb.  1,  1701. 


54  RECORDS  OF  THE  ABBEY  OF  OUR  LADY  OF 

October  15.  In  ye  year  1678. 

Entred  Mrs.  Mary  Errington  &  her  Sister  Mrs.  Margaret  for 
pensionnars  &  went  away. 

Daughters  of  Mark  Errington,  of  Ponteland,  co.  Northumberland,  Esq., 
by  Anne,  dau.  of  Gilbert  Stapleton,  of  Carlton  Hall,  co.  York,  Esq.,  and 
sister  and  eventual  heiress  of  Sir  Miles  Stapleton,  1st  Bart. 

June  ye  13.  In  ye  year  1681. 

Entred  Mrs.  Catherine  Kenet  and  her  Sister  Isabella,  aged  of 
30,  &  27,  daughters  to  Mr.  Kenet  of  Coxhoe  in  Bishoprick. 

3rd  and  4th  daughters  of  John  Kennett,  of  Coxhoe  Hall,  Esq.,  by  Troth, 
dau.  of  Sir  Thomas  Tempest,  of  Stella  Hall,  co.  Durham,  Bart.,  son  of  Sir 
Nicolas  Tempest,  of  Stella,  1st  Bart.,  by  Isabel,  dau.  of  Robert  Lambton,  of 
Lambton  Castle.  Catherine,  prof,  under  her  own  name,  1683;  died  May  5, 
1700.  Isabella,  likewise  prof,  under  her  own  name,  1683;  died  Feb.  21, 
1733- 
Ye  29  of  October. 

Entred  Mrs.  Mary  Dodd  aged  of  29,  for  a  lay  sister,  &  Mrs. 
Catherine  Agatha  Fazakerly,  aged  of  23 ;  she  had  been  3  years  a 
novice  at  ye  Augtines.  at  Paris. 

Mary  Josepha  Dodd,  born  1652  ;  prof.;  died  Dec.  8,  1715.  Catherine 
(in  religion  Agatha)  Fazakerley,  born  1658,  dau.  of  Nicholas  Fazakerley,  of 
Fazakerley  Hall,  co.  Lancaster,  Esq.,  (by  Winefrid,  dau.  of  Edward  Tarleton, 
of  Aigburth  Hall,  co.  Lancaster,  Esq.),  and  grand-daughter  of  Capt.  Nicholas 
Fazakerley,  who  was  slain  in  the  royal  cause  at  Liverpool  in  Oct.,  1643,  was 
prof.  1683  ;  died  Sept.  20,  1726. 

June  ye  26.  In  the  year  1682. 

Entred  Elizabeth  Smith  (in  religion  Sr.  Martha),  aged  of  22  for 
a  lay  sister. 

Prof.;  died  Sept.  7,  1737. 

October  ye  3d.  In  ye  year  1683. 

Entred  Mrs.  Dorothy  Widrington  aged  of  17,  daughter  to  cap- 
tain Edward  Widdrington,  a  younger  Br.  to  ye  Lord  Widdrington,  & 
Mrs.  Shaftoe,  aged  of  30. — Both  went  away. 

Dorothy  Widdrington's  father  Edward,  second  son  of  William  1st  Lord 
Widdrington,  of  Widdrington  Castle,  Northumberland,  who  fell  fighting  in 
the  royal  cause  at  the  battle  of  Wigan  Lane,  Augt.  25,  165 1,  and  died  a  day 
or  two  later,  married  Dorothy,  elder  dau.  and  coheir  of  Sir  Thomas  Horsley, 
of  Horsley  Castle,  co.  Northumberland,  Knt.,  and  was  slain  in  the  service 
of  James  II.  at  the  battle  of  the  Boyne,  July  1,  1691.  Miss  Shaftoe  was  one 
of  the  five  daughters  of  George  Shaftoe,  of  Bavington,  co.  Northumberland, 
gent. 

July  ye  5th.  In  ye  year  1684. 

Entred  Mrs.  Elizabeth  Hoghton,  aged  of  1 7  ;  gone  away. 

3rd  dau.  of  John  Hoghton,  Esq.,  and  sister  of  Dorothy  and  Joan. 
July  ye  20. 

Entred  Mrs.  Mary  Swinburne,  aged  of  20,  daughter  to  Sr.  John 
Swinburne,  Baronet  of  Capheaton  in  Northumberland,  &  her  sister 


CONSOLATION   AT   CAMBRAI,    1620-1793  55 

Mrs.  Isabella  aged  of  19;  this  latter  went  about  ye  middle  of  her 
Noviceship  into  England  to  be  cured  of  as  it  was  thought  ye  Kenill 
&  dyed  there  &  was  ye  first  Catholic  buried  in  St.  James'  Chappell 
when  our  monks  were  chaplains  to  K.  James  ye  2nd.  of  Blessed 
memory.     She  was  buried  in  our  habit. 

3rd  and  4th  twin-daurs.  of  Sir  John.  "Mary,"  an  error  for  Margt., 
became  abbess  1 701-5  and  1713  till  death,  Apr.  20, 1 741.  Isabel,  Sr.  Gertrude, 
died  April  1,  temp.  James  II. 

May  ye  29.  In  ye  year  1685. 

Honorable  Dorothy  Widdrington  aged  of  19,  (in  religion  called 
D.  Agnes)  daughter  to  ye  Right  Honorable  Baron  Widdrington,  of 
Widdrington  Castle,  in  Northumberland,  peere  of  England,  &  ye  Lady 
Charlotte  Bertie,  neece  to  ye  Earl  of  Lindsay. 

Born  1666,  3rd  dau.  of  Sir  William  Widdrington,  2nd  Lord  Widdrington, 
by  Elizabeth,  dau.  and  heir  of  Sir  Peregrine  Bertie,  Knt.,  of  Eveden,  co. 
Lincoln,  younger  son  of  Robert,  first  earl  of  Lindsey,  who  fell  in  the  royal 
cause  at  the  battle  of  Edgehill,  Oct.  23,  1642  ;  prof.  1687 ;  died  Feb.  18, 
1733.  Her  parents  were  married  at  St.  Paul's,  Covent  Garden,  Jan.  2, 
1653-4. 

Ye  same  day. 

Entred  Mrs.  Mary  Williams,  aged  of  at,  daughter  to  Sir  Thomas 
Williams  Knight;  shee  died  when  shee  was  a  postulant  &  is  buried 
amongst  our  religious. 

September  ye  7.  In  ye  year  1686. 

Entred  Mrs.  Winifride  Knightly,  aged  of  1 7  ;  she  fell  sick  as 
soon  as  shee  came  to  ye  house,  &  after  six  weeks  in  a  malignant 
feaver  shee  died  &  is  buried  amongst  our  religious. 

November  ye  11. 

Entred  Mrs.  Brigitt  Meynell,  aged  of  14,  (in  religion  called  Mary 
Teresa)  daughter  to  Mr.  Meynell  of  Killvington  in  Yorkshire. 

Born  1672,  dau.  of  Roger  Meynell,  of  North  Kilvington  Hall,  Esq.,  by 
Mary,  dau.  of  Sir  John  Middelton,  of  Thurntoft,  second  son  of  Sir  Peter 
Middelton,  of  Stockeld,  co.  York  ;  prof.  1689  ;  died  July  4,  1697. 

June  ye  2d.  In  ye  year  1688. 

Entred  Mrs.  Margarette  &  Mrs.  Monica  Jenison,  (in  religion 
D.  Augustina,)  ye  first  aged  of  18  went  away,  ye  second  aged  of  15. 
They  were  daughters  to  Mr.  Jenison  of  Wallworth  in  Bishoprick. 

Daughters  of  John  Jenison,  of  Walworth  Castle,  co.  Durham,  Esq.,  by 
his  second  wife,  Elizabeth,  dau.  of  Thomas  Pierson,  of  Newcastle-on-Tyne, 
Esq.  Margaret  was  born  July  4,  1670.  Monica  Augustina,  baptized  May 
4,  1673  j  prof.  1693  ;  died  April  5,  1747. 

7bre  21. 

Entred  Mrs.  Jane  Crane  aged  of  17,  went  away. 

Dau.  of  Francis  Crane,  of  Woodrising,  co.  Norfolk,  Esq.,  by  the  Hon. 
Mary  Widdrington,  dau.  of  William,  1st  Lord  Widdrington. 


56  RECORDS  OF  THE  ABBEY  OF  OUR  LADY  OF 

About  7bre.  In  ye  year  1691. 

Mary  Gandelier,  borne  of  honest  parents  in  a  village  in  ye 
diocese  of  Cambray,  was  admitted  to  be  a  lay-sister  by  the  convent 
where  she  had  faithfully  and  laboriously  served  ye  space  of  .  .  .  years. 
Aged  of  20  she  was  an  out  Sr.  6  years,  then  desired  &  received  ye  black 
veyle.  She  retired  from  her  village  upon  an  accident  which  was  yt. 
haveing  desired  a  little  boy  their  neighbour  to  helpe  her  to  bring  up  ye 
cowes  he  was  drowned  in  a  bog,  upon  wh.  his  parents  troubled  her  for 
a  sum  of  money  to  be  rid  of  their  importunity  she  came  hither. 

December  ye  16. 

Entred  Elizabeth  Taylour  (in  religion  called  Sr.  Bennet,)  aged 
of  2  7,  for  a  lay-sister. 

Prof. ;  died  Feb.  10, 1707. 

May  ye  5th.  In  ye  year  1692. 

Entred  Mrs.  Margaret  Chilton,  (in  religion  called  D.  Gertrude) 
aged  of  21. 

Born  1 67 1  ;  prof.  1694  ;  died  April  10,  1733. 

August  ye  4th. 

Entred  Mrs.  Anne  Sinclaire,  of  Lord  Sinclaire's  House  in  Scot- 
land aged  of  24,  she  went  away. 

A  relative  of  Henry,  8th  Baron  Sinclair.  It  was  probably  she  who  went 
from  here  to  the  convent  of  the  Blue  Nuns  at  Paris,  and  took  the  veil  in 
1693,  kut  did  not  persevere. 

March  23.  In  ye  year  1693. 

Entred  Mrs.  Dorothy  Englefield,  aged  of  17,  (in  religion  called 
D.  Benedicta)  daughter  to  Mr.  Englefield  of  White  Knights  in 
Berkshire. 

Born  1676,  dau.  of  Anthony  Englefield,  of  White  Knights,  Esq.  (grand- 
son of  Sir  Francis  Englefield,  of  Englefield,  co.  Berks,  and  Wotton  Basset, 
co.  Wilts.,  1  st  Bart),  and  his  wife  Alice,  dau.  of  Thomas  Stokes,  of  London, 
Esq.;  prof.  1695  '>  died  July  3,  1725. 

August  ye  3d. 

Entred.  our  Convent  my  Lady  Dowager  Crosland,  widdow  to  Sr. 
Jordan  Crossland  Knight,  aged  of  66,  (to  lead  a  retired  life)  with  her 
two  Grandchildren  viz:  Mrs.  Dorothy  Langdale  aged  of  16,  (in 
religion  D.  Constantia)  &  Mrs.  Joan  Crossland  for  a  pensionnar 
aged  of  14 :  she  went  away. 

Dame  Bridget  Crosland  was  a  dau.  of  John  Fleming,  of  Rydal  Hall,  co. 
Westmoreland,  Esq.,  and  sister  and  coheiress  to  William  Fleming,  Esq. 
Dorothy  Constantia  Langdale,  born  1677,  was  dau.  of  Philip  Langdale,  of 
Houghton  Hall,  co.  York,  Esq.,  by  Bridget,  dau.  of  Sir  Jordan  Crosland, 
Knt.,  of  Helmsley,  co.  York,  constable  of  Scarborough  Castle.  She  was 
niece  to  Fr.  Henry  Crosland,  S. J.,  born  1655,  who  died  in  1724,  and  the 
Rev.  George  Crosland,  born  in  March,  1665,  who  died  Oct.  12,  1729,  and 
was  buried  in  the  chapel  at  Haslewood  Castle,  late  the  residence  of  his  sister 
Jane,  wife  of  Sir  Walter  Vavasour,  3rd  Bart.  She  was  professed  1695  and 
died  Jan.  28,  1760. 


CONSOLATION   AT   CAMBRAI,    1620-1793  57 

Ye  same  day. 

Entred  3  of  Mr.  Meynell  of  Killvington  daughters  :  Mrs.  Mary 
(in  religion  called  D.  Mary  Benedicta),  aged  of  16,  Mrs.  Elizabeth, 
aged  of  17,  Mrs.  Jane  aged  of  15,  for  pensionnars :  the  two  latter  went 
away. 

Sisters  of  Bridget,  who  came  in  1686.  Mary  Benedicta,  born  1677; 
prof.  1695;  died  Feb.  4,  1764.  Elizabeth  married  Peter  Middelton,  of 
Stockeld,  Esq.,  and  Jane  became  the  wife  of  Marmaduke  Palmes,  of 
Naburn,  co.  York,  Esq. 

May  ye  21.  In  ye  year  1694. 

Entred  Mrs.  Susan  Bruning,  aged  of  22,  daughter  to  a  young 
Br.  of  .  .  .  borne  in  ye  Indies,  shee  went  away. 

Her  father,  Francis  Bruning;  who  died  at  Surinam  in  the  West  Indies  in 
1698,  was  a  younger  son  of  Anthony  Bruning,  of  Wymering,  co.  Hants, 
Esq.,  by  his  second  wife,  Mary;  2nd  dau.  of  Francis  Hyde,  of  Pangbourne, 
co.  Berks,  Esq. 

October  ye  10. 

Entred  Mrs  Mary  Trowlope  aged  of  28,  for  a  lay  sister :  she 
went  away. 

October  ye  13. 

Entred  Mrs.  Catherine  Chillton  aged  of  22  (in  religion  called 
Catherine  Teresa.) 

Born  1672,  sister  of  Margaret,  who  entered  in  1692;  prof.  1696;  died 
March  10,  1739. 

April  ye  27.  In  ye  year  1695. 

Entred  Mrs.  Michelle  De  Latre  (in  religion  called  D.  Ethel- 
dreda)  aged  of  22. 

Born  1673,  dau.  °f  John  and  Mary  De  Latre,  of  London  ;  prof.  1697  ; 
died  March  8,  17     .     Three  of  her  brothers  became  Benedictines. 

August  ye  10. 

Entred  Mrs.  Margaret  Harrington  aged  of  11  (in  religion 
D.  Maura,)  daughter  to  Mr.  Harrington  of  Egbourth,  his  ancient  Seate 
Huyton  Hay  in  Lancashire. 

Born  1684,  dau.  of  John  Harrington,  of  Huyton  Hey  and  Aigburth  Hall, 
co.  Lancaster,  Esq.,  by  Dorothy,  dau.  and  heiress  of  Edward  Tarleton,  of 
Aigburth  Hall,  Esq. ;  prof.  1701  ;  died  Feb.  6,  1720. 

In  September. 

Entred  her  sister  Anne  for  a  pensionnar,  aged  of  12;  she  went 
away  in  May  1698. 

Upon  the  death  of  her  brother  Charles  Harrington,  Esq.,  in  1720, 
Aigburth  Hall  and  the  manor  of  Huyton  passed  to  the  Molyneux  family 
of  New  Hall,  in  West  Derby,  co.  Lancaster. 

October  ye  30.  In  ye  year  1696. 

Entred  Mrs.  Teresa  Blake,  aged  of  15,  for  a  pensionnar,  gone 
away. 


58  RECORDS  OF  THE  ABBEY  OF  OUR  LADY  OF 

May  ye  27.  In  ye  year  1697. 

Entred  Mrs.  Elizabeth  Kennet  daughter  &  heiress  to  Mr. 
Cuthbert  Kennet  of  Coxhow  in  Bishoprick  of  Durham,  aged  of  12, 
for  a  pensionar.  She  was  after  some  stay  here  sent  by  her  friends 
order  to  Paris  where  after  having  past  neere  two  years  shee  desired 
to  return  hither  again  &  was  called  in  religion  D.  Mary  Agnes.  She 
gave  6oo;£  sterling  to  build  an  infirmary,  &  100^  for  silver  candle- 
sticks in  ye  church,  besides  a  plentifull  portion. 

Born  1685,  dau.  and  heiress  of  Cuthbert  Kennett,  of  Coxhoe,  co.  Durham, 
Esq.,  and  his  wife  Frances,  dau.  of  Richard  Towneley,  of  Towneley  Hall, 
co.  Lancaster,  Esq. ;  prof.  1702  ;  died  Feb.  6,  1723. 

March  ye  12.  In  ye  year  1698. 

Entred  Mrs.  Ellin  Lestrange  aged  of  21 — for  an  out  sister 
(called  in  religion  Sr.  Teresa.)  She  was  borne  in  Dublin  in  Ireland 
of  honest  &  very  good  Catholic  parents. 

Ellen  Teresa  L'Estrange  was  born  1677  ;  received  1700;  died  Jan.  7,  .  .  . 

May  ye  3d. 

Entred  Elizabeth  Ryder,  aged  of  29,  for  a  lay  sister  (in  religion 
called  Sr.  Scholastica.) 

Born  1669;  prof.  1700;  died  Augt.  20,  1722. 

Ye  same  day. 

Entred  Elizabeth  Home  aged,  of  24,  for  a  lay  Sister :  she  went 
away. 

June  ye  8th. 

Entred  Mrs.  Perpetua  Hesketh,  aged  of  18,  she  went  away, 
&  Mrs.  Francis  Howett  aged  of  13,  (in  religion  called  D.  Mary 
Winifride.) 

Perpetua,  born  1680,  dau.  of  Thomas  Hesketh,  of  Maynes  Hall  in  Little 
Singleton,  co.  Lancaster,  Esq.,  by  Margaret,  dau.  of  George  Talbot,  of  New 
Hall  in  Salesbury,  co.  Lancaster,  Esq.,  married  Edward  Holland,  of  Sutton, 
co.  Lancaster,  gent.  Frances  Hawett,  born  1685,  dau.  of  Thomas  Hawett, 
of  Ormskirk,  co.  Lancaster,  Esq.,  and  his  wife,  a  dau.  of  Hugh  Holland,  of 
Roby,  gent.,  was  niece  of  Dom  Edmund  Hawett,  O.S.B. ;  prof.  1702  ;  died 
Dec.  4,  1734;  and  her  sister  Jane  married  in  1709  John  Westby,  of  White 
Hall,  in  Upper  Rawcliffe,  co.  Lancaster,  Esq. 

7bre  [Sept.]. 

Entred  Mrs.  Anne  Hoghton  aged  of  12,  for  a  pensionar; — gone 
away. 

Dau.  of  William  Hoghton,  of  Park  Hall,  co.  Lancaster,  Esq.,  by  Eliza- 
beth, dau.  and  coh.  of  Robert  Dalton,  of  Thurnham  Hall,  in  the  same 
county,  Esq.     Her  eldest  brother  John  assumed  the  name  of  Dalton. 

June  ye  22.  In  ye  year  1699. 

Entred  Mrs.  Mary  Bradshaich  aged  of  16,  for  a  pensionar 
she  gone  away. 

August  ye  3d. 

Entred  Mrs.  Elizabeth  Prichard,  aged  of  15  for  a  pensionar 
gone  away. 


CONSOLATION   AT   CAMBRAI,    1620-1793  59 

August  25. 

Entred  Madame  la  Baronne  de  Bussie,  Dowager  of  Bussie,  to 
retire  herselfe  for  a  time,  aged  of  63 ;  shee  stayed  about  four  years 
with  her  maide  &  then  went  away. 

November  21. 

Entred  Mrs.  Mary  Cox  aged  of  20:  shee  went  away.  &  Mrs. 
Mary  Toldewine  for  a  lay  sister,  aged  of  24,  (in  religion  called 
Sr.  Mary  Magdalene.) 

Mary  Cox  was  daughter  of  Gabriel  Cox,  of  Farmingham  Lodge,  co. 
Kent,  Esq.,  by  Elizabeth,  daughter  of  Richard  Sneade,  of  Eaton  Bishop 
and  Broxwood  Court,  co.  Hereford,  Esq.,  and  his  wife  Elizabeth  Napier. 
Her  father  died  in  exile  at  the  court  of  James  II.  at  St.  Germains.  He  was 
son  of  Sir  John  Cox,  who  was  slain  at  the  battle  of  Solebay,  May  27,  1672, 
being  then  in  command  of  the  Duke  of  York's  flag-ship  "  Prince."  Sir  John's 
father,  Richard,  lost  his  life  in  the  royal  service  at  the  battle  of  Newby. 

Sr  Mary  Magdalen  Toldewine,  born   1675  5  Pr°f«  l7°l  >  died  Jan.  31, 
I749- 
November  ye  2t. 

Entred  ye  Honorable  Jane  Widdrington,  daughter  to  ye  Right 
Honble.  Ld.  Widdrington  of  Widdrington  Castell  theretofore  maide  of 
honor  to  her  Majesty  Catherine  of  Portugall,  Queen  to  Charles  the  2nd. 
of  England,  whose  court  shee  left  [and]  all  ye  honors  &  preferments  she 
did  &  might  have  enjoyed  in  the  world,  which  actually  smiled  upon 
her  at  ye  very  time  she  forsooke  it,  to  come  &  lead  a  retired  life  in 
this  our  Monastery  with  her  sister  D.  Agnes.  Ye  Chappell  of  yd. 
[?  ye]  dead  in  our  garden  is  one  monument  of  her  piety,  ye  building 
of  it  cost  her  100^  sterling. 

Born  at  Berwick,  Jan.  26,  1661-2,  and  dau.  of  William,  2nd  Lord 
Widdrington,  governor  of  Berwick,  and  his  wife  Elizabeth,  dau.  of  Sir 
Peregrine  Bertie,  of  Eveden,  co.  Lincoln,  Knt.,  3rd  son  of  Robert,  first 
earl  of  Lindsey. 

June  ye  14th.  In  ye  year  1701. 

Entred  Mrs.  Mary  Horton,  aged  of  9,  for  a  pensionar  gone  away. 
August  ye  5. 

Entred  Mrs.  Elizabeth  Johnson,  aged  of  16,  for  a  pensionar, 
gone  away. 

December  1st. 

Entred  Mrs.  Elizabeth  Rigmaiden,  aged  of  14,  for  a  pensionar, 
gone  away. 

Probably  sister  to  Dom  Simeon  Benedict  Rigmaiden,  O.S.B.,  a  col- 
lateral branch  of  the  ancient  Lancashire  family  of  Rigmayden,  of  Wedacre 
Hall. 

May  ye  8th.  In  ye  year  1702. 

Entred  Mrs.  Elizabeth  Hoghton,  aged  of  16,  for  a  pensionar, 
gone  away. 

Dau.  of  William  Hoghton,  of  Park  Hall,  Esq.,  and  his  wife  Elizabeth, 
dau.  and  coh.  of  Robert  Dalton,  of  Thurnham  Hall,  co.  Lancaster,  Esq., 
married,  1st,  Edward  Errington,  of  Walwick  Grange,  co.  Northumberland, 
Esq.,  and  2ndly,  Edward  Charlton,  of  Hesleyside,in  the  same  county,  M.D. 


60  RECORDS  OF  THE  ABBEY  OF  OUR  LADY  OF 

October  17. 

Entred  Mrs.  Mary  Mansfield  aged  of  20.  (in  religion  D.  Maria 
Gertrude.) 

Born  1682,  dau.  of  Richard  Mansfield,  of  Ballinamultina,  co.  Waterford, 
Esq.,  who  married,  in  168 1,  Dorothea,  dau.  of  Matthew  Hore,  of  Shandon, 
in  the  same  county.  Her  grandfather,  Walter  Mansfield,  suffered  much 
during  the  Commonwealth.     She  was  prof,  in  1704,  and  died  May  18,  17. . . 

December  ye  20. 

Entred  Mrs.  Brigitt  Coffine,  aged  of  24  (in  religion  D.  Brigitte.) 

Prof.  1704  ;  died  April  24,  1758.  She  is  named  in  the  will  of  her  cousin, 
Miss  Mary  Coffin,  of  Ramsden  Heath,  co.  Essex,  Jan.  7,  1726,  who  had 
inherited  the  manor  of  Chawreth  from  her  grandmother,  Mrs.  Audeley,  of 
Ramsden  Belhouse. 

June  22,  1703. 

Entred  Mra  Mary  Middleton  aged  of  12,  for  a  pensionar,  gone 
away. 

Daughter  of  Peter  Middelton,  of  Stockeld,  co.  York,  Esq.,  and  his  wife 
Elizabeth,  dau.  of  Marmaduke,  3rd  Lord  Langdale.  She  subseqently  went 
to  the  English  Augustinian  convent  at  Paris,  where  she  was  professed  in 
171 1,  under  the  name  of  Magdalen  Teresa,  and  died  in  1773.  Her  aunt 
Elizabeth  Mary  Middelton  was  professed  in  the  same  convent  in  1685,  and 
died  in  1727. 

June  ye  23. 

Entred  Mrs  Mary  Gascoigne  aged  of  15,  Mrs  Elizabeth 
Plumpton,  aged  of  12,  and  Mr8  Margaret  Grimstone,  aged  of  14 
for  a  pensionars.  All  gone  away.  Mrs  Plumpton  went  away  July  2 1 . 
1709. 

Mary,  dau.  of  John  Gascoigne,  of  Parlington  Hall,  co.  York,  Esq.  (by 
Mary,  dau.  and  heir  of  Roger  Widdrington,  Esq.),  and  sister  of  Sir  Edward 
Gascoigne,  5th  Bart.,  returned  to  the  convent  to  become  a  nun — vide 
under  1712. 

Elizabeth  Plumpton,  born  May  26,  1692,  was  the  eldest  daughter  and 
eventual  coheiress  of  Robert  Plumpton,  of  Plumpton  Hall,  co.  York,  Esq.,  by 
his  first  wife  Anne,  dau.  and  con.  of  Nathaniel  West,  of  Borwick  Hall, 
co.  Lancaster,  Esq.,  grandson  of  Thomas  West,  2nd  Lord  Delawarr.  Mrs. 
Plumpton's  mother,  Elizabeth  West,  had  been  previously  married  to  Robert 
Sayer,  of  Worsall,  co.  York,  Esq.,  and  after  Mr.  West's  death  married 
thirdly  George  Leyburne,  of  Cunswick  Hall,  co.  Westmoreland,  and  Nateby 
Hall,  co.  Lancaster,  Esq.  Elizabeth  Plumpton  was  twice  married,  first,  to 
Marmaduke  Anne,  of  Frickley  Hall,  co.  York,  Esq.,  marriage  settlement 
dated  1  &  2  March,  1716,  and,  secondly,  to  William  Knight,  Esq.,  of 
Kingerby,  co.  Lincoln,  subsequently  of  Frickley,  and  had  issue  by  both 
husbands.  Elizabeth  Plumpton's  brother  John,  born  April  27,  1693,  mar- 
ried Elizabeth,  2nd  dau.  of  John  Gascoigne,  of  Parlington,  Esq.,  and  sister 
of  Sir  Edward,  5th  Bart.,  and  had  a  son  Robert,  born  April  23,  1721,  after 
whose  death  at  Cambrai,  Aug.  8,  1749,  unmarried,  the  Plumpton  estates 
passed  to  the  heirs  of  Elizabeth  and  her  sister  Frances  {vide  under  1714). 

Margaret  Grimston  was  a  grand-daughter  of  William  Grimston,  of 
Grimston  Garth,  co.  York,  Esq.  (by  his  second  wife,  a  daughter  of  Sir 
Robert  Strickland,  of  Thornton  Briggs,  co.  York),  one  of  whose  daughters 
married  as  his  second  wife  Philip  Langdale,  of  Houghton  Hall,  named  under 
the  next  entry. 


CONSOLATION   AT   CAMBRAI,    162O-1793  6l 

May  ye  19,  1704.  In  ye  year  1704. 

Entred  M™  Ursula  Langdale,  aged  of  21,  for  religion,  gone 
away. 

Dau.  of  Marmaduke  Langdale,  of  Langthorpe,  eld.  son  of  Philip  Lang- 
dale,  of  Houghton  Hall,  co.  York,  Esq.,  by  his  first  wife,  Bridget,  dau.  of 
Sir  Jordan  Crosland. 

June  ye  19.  In  ye  year  1705. 

Came  Mra  Mary  Howett,  aged  of  18,  for  a  pensionar  gone  away. 

Sister  to  Dame  Frances  Mary  Winefred  Hawett — vide  under  1698. 

July. 

Entred  Mrs  Alathea  Swinburne,  aged  of  1 7,  daugter  to  Sr  John 
Swinburne  of  Capheaton  (in  religion  called  D.  Mary  Teresa.)  Shee 
founded  a  Mass  to  be  sayd  in  our  Church  for  her  life  time  daily  and  a 
year  after  her  death  to  be  continued  and  did  many  other  things  for  ye 
conveniancy  &  advantage  of  ye  Convent. 

Item — Entred  Mra  Elizabeth  Forcer  &  her  sister  Mary,  aged 
of  1 6  &  11 :  gone  away. 

Alethea,  13th  dau.  of  Sir  John  Swinburne,  created  bart.  1660,  and  his 
wife  Isabel,  dau.  and  sole  heiress  of  Henry  Lawson,  of  Brough  Hall,  co.  York, 
Esq.,  by  Cath.,  d.  and  h.  of  Sir  William  Fenwick,  of  Meldon,  co.  Northum- 
berland, Knt. ;  prof.  1707  ;  died  May  24,  1762.     She  had  11  brothers. 

Elizabeth  and  Mary  Forcer  were  daughters,  by  his  first  wife  Alethea, 
dau.  of  Charles,  Lord  Fairfax,  (and  his  wife  Bridget,  dau.  of  Basil  More,  of 
Barnborough  Hall,  co.  York,  Esq.),  of  John  Forcer,  of  Old  Elvet,  eldest  son 
and  heir  of  George  Forcer,  of  Harberhouse,  co.  Durham,  Esq.,  by  Isabel, 
dau.  of  John  Swinburne,  of  Capheaton,  Esq.  Elizabeth  died  Aug.  21,  1728, 
and  was  buried  in  St.  Michael-le- Belfry,  York.  Mary  died  at  Gilling  Castle, 
the  Yorkshire  seat  of  Lord  Fairfax,  in  1760. 

July  ye  2nd  In  ye  year  1706. 

Entred  Mre  Elizabeth  O'More  (in  religion  called  D.  Maria 
Joseph,)  aged  of  32.  Shee  had  been  here  some  years  before  &  taken  ye 
habit  but  went  away  &  was  a  postulant  at  ye  Benedictines  at  Paris, 
then  a  Novice  at  ye  Benedictines  at  Gaunt,  after  which  she  went  into 
England  &  having  stayd  6  years  she  grew  weary  of  the  world  &  came 
out  of  England  in  order  to  have  come  hether  but  took  up  at  ye 
Teresians  at  Antwerp  when  shee  did  more  than  a  year's  noviceship 
being  much  edified  with  the  religious  comportment  of  those  Nuns 
which  made  her  enter  amongst  them ;  but  perceiving  it  was  not  her 
vocation  to  be  there  &  thinking  herself  obliged  to  follow  her  first 
vocation  shee  resolved  to  come  &  present  herselfe  here  which  shee  did 
&  was  admitted.  Shee  was  born  in  England,  but  her  father  was  de- 
scended from  ye  O'more  in  Ireland.  It  was  her  great  Grand  Father 
who  stood  out  against  Queen  Elizabeth  for  7  years  together  maintening 
an  army  at  his  expense  for  ye  defence  of  his  nation  &  Catholic  religion. 
Her  father  in  ye  time  of  Oates'  Plots  died  in  confinement  for  ye  true 
religion. 

Born  1674  ;  prof.  1708;  died  Augt.  7,  1720. 


62  RECORDS  OF  THE  ABBEY  OF  OUR  LADY  OF 

June  ye  15. 

Entred  M™  Sara  Hodgkins,  aged  of  14,  for  a  pensionar :  gone 
away  June  16,  171 1. 
June  ye  15. 

Also  entred  Mrs  Elizebeth  Trap  aged  of  13 :  gone  away  June 
16,  1711. 

Elizabeth,  2nd  dau.  of  Francis  Trappes-Byrnand,  of  Nidd  Hall,  co.  York, 
Esq.,  by  Elizabeth,  sister  and  coheiress  of  Ralph  Appleby,  of  Linton,  co. 
York,  Esq.,  and  Mary,  his  wife,  dau.  of  John  Tempest,  of  Broughton  Hall, 
co.  York,  Esq.  She  was  baptized  at  Nidd  Hall,  Augt.  4,  1693,  and  was 
buried  there  Feb.  17,  1729. 

Item. 

Entred  Mrs  Elizabeth  Darling,  aged  of  34,  for  a  lay-sister,  gone 
away. 
Item. 

Entred  Mr8  Catherine  Comblin,  for  a  lay-sister,  aged  of  20; 
gone  away. 

June  23.  In  ye  year  1707. 

Entred  Mrs  Jane  Paston,  aged  of  13;  gone  away  16  of  June — 
1711. 

Daughter  of  John  Paston,  of  Horton  Court,  co.  Gloucester,  Esq.,  by 
Frances,  daughter  of  Sir  Henry  Tichborne,  3rd  Bart.,  of  Tichborne, 
co.  Hants,  by  Mary,  daughter  of  William  Arundell,  Esq.,  and  niece  of 
Thomas,  Lord  Arundell  of  Wardour. 

Item. 

M"  Lucy  Howard,  aged  of  27,  entred  in  August  &  went  soon 
after. 

Daughter  of  William  Howard,  of  Corby  Castle,  co.  Cumberland,  Esq., 
by  Jane,  daughter  of  John  Dalston,  of  Acornbank,  co.  Westmoreland,  Esq., 
and  sister  of  Elizabeth  Howard  who  came  in  171 1.  Her  father  died  in 
1708. 

September  ye  21.  In  ye  year  1708. 

Entred  Mrs  Mally  Butler,  aged  of  9  years  for  a  pensionar  & 
went  away. 

Mary  Butler  is  frequently  mentioned  in  the  diary  of  Thomas  Tyldesley, 
the  Jacobite,  as  "  cos.  Malley  Butler."  She  was  dau.  of  Henry  Butler,  of 
Rawcliffe  Hall,  co.  Lancaster,  Esq.,  by  his  first  wife,  Magdalen,  grand- 
daughter and  ultimately  heiress  of  Sir  John  Girlington,  of  Thurland  Castle. 

December. 

Entred  Mrs  Mary  Slaughter,  aged  of  31,  for  a  lay-sister:  gone 
away. 

Apparently  dau.  of  Bellingham  Slaughter,  of  Cheney  Court,  co.  Here- 
ford, Esq.,  by  Winifred,  dau.  of  John  Berington,  of  Winsley,  co.  Here- 
ford, Esq. 

January  ye  17.  In  ye  year  1709. 

Entred  MrB  Anne  Plumpton,  aged  of  12,  (in  religion  D.  Mary 
Angela)  daughter  to  Mr  Plumpton  of  Plumpton. 

Born  April  25,  1697,  sister  to  Elizabeth,  vide  under  1703;  prof.  1713; 
died  Dec.  20,  1779. 


DAME  ANNE  MARY  ANGELA  PLUMPTON,  O.S.B. 

From  a  portrait  at  Burghwallis  Hall,  the  seat  of  Major  Ernest  Lambert 

Swinburne  Charlton  Anne.    The  veil  and  wimple  at  some  later  period 

have  been  repainted  in  place  of  the  original  Benedicline  head-dress. 


To  face  p.  Gz 


Cath.  Rec.  Soc.  XIII. 


CONSOLATION    AT   CAMBRAI,    1620-1793  63 

Item. 

Mrs  Rebecca  Hewett,  a  widdow  aged  of  38,  for  a  lay-sister: 
she  went  away. 

June  ye  7. 

Entred  Mrs  Barbara  Howley,  aged  of  16  for  a  pensionar:  gone 
away. 

August  ye  29. 

Entred  Mra  Cecilia  Plumpton  &  her  sister  Jane:  they  are 
twins  &  both  aged  of  9  &  a  half:  gone  away. 

Born  March  5,  1 699-1 700,  daughters  of  Robert  Plumpton,  Esq.,  and 
sisters  of  Elizabeth  Plumpton,  vide  under  1703.  Their  mother,  Anne  West, 
died  June  19,  1705,  and  their  father  married  secondly,  Juliana,  dau.  of 
Thomas  Appleby,  of  Linton-upon-Ouse,  and  relict  of  Rowland  White,  Esq. 
She  died  June  II,  1708,  s.p.,  after  which  three  more  of  the  girls  were  sent  to 
Cambrai,  and  their  father  married  thirdly,  Isabel,  dau.  of  William  Anderton, 
of  Euxton  Hall,  Esq.,  and  his  wife  Mary,  dau.  of  William  ffarington,  of 
Worden  Hall,  co.  Lancaster,  Esq.,  by  whom  he  had  no  issue.  Cecily  re- 
turned, was  professed  in  171 7  under  the  name  of  Bernarda,  and  died 
April  28,  1768.    Jane  died  a  spinster,  May  3,  1726. 

September  4. 

Entred  Mrs  Margaret  Trapps  of  Nid  in  Yorkshire,  aged  of 
little  more  than  1 1 — gone  away. 

Sister  of  Elizabeth  Trappes,  and  3rd  dau.  of  Francis  Trappes-Byrnand  ; 
born  1697  ;  married  George  Crathorne,  of  Ness  Hall,  co.  York,  Esq. 

September  ye  27. 

Entred  M1*8  Anne  Warvick,  aged  of  31,  daughter  to  Mrs  War- 
vick  of  Warwick  in  Cumberland. 

Dau.  of  Thomas  Warwick,  of  Warwick  Hall,  Esq.,  by  Frances,  dau.  of 
John  Dalston,  of  Acornbank,  co.  Westmoreland,  Esq.;  prof.  May  31,  171 1, 
under  name  of  Benedicta ;  died  March  15,  1754. 

December  ye  3.  In  ye  year  17 10. 

Entred  M"  Anne  Caven,  aged  of  20,  for  a  pensionar:  gone 
away. 

yber  ye  30.  In  ye  year  17 11. 

Entred  Mrs  Elizabeth  Howard,  aged  of  26  for  high  pensionar, 
for  a  short  time ;  daughter  to  Mr  Howard  of  Corbie  in  Cumberland : 
gone  away. 

Sister  of  Lucy,  who  came  in  1707. 
October  ye  20. 

Entred  Mrs  Betty  Middleton  aged  of  9  &  a  half:  daughter  to 
Mr  Peter  Middleton  of  Stockhohl  in  Yorkshire,  by  his  2nd  lady  ye 
lord  Langdale's  daughter. 

Elizabeth,  dau.  of  Peter  Middelton,  of  Stockeld  Park  and  Myddelton 
Lodge,  co.  York,  Esq.,  who  was  imprisoned  in  York  Castle  in  July  1686, 
for  refusing  to  take  the  protestant  oath  of  allegiance,  married  Sir  Carnaby 
Haggerston,  of  Haggerston  Castle,  co.  Northumberland,  3rd  Bart.,  and  her 
second  son  William  inherited  the  Middelton  estates  upon  the  death  of  her 
brother  William  in  1763. 


64  RECORDS  OF  THE  ABBEY  OF  OUR  LADY  OF 

November  ye  n.  In  ye  year  171 2. 

Came  M™  Mary  Gascoigne,  daughter  to  Sir  John  Gascoigne 
of  Partington  in  Yorkshire  little  little  neece  Venered  Mother  Catherine 
Gascoigne  &  Thomas  Gascoigne  who  died  at  Lambspring  was  her 
great  grand  father.  She  had  been  formerly  a  pensionar  &  went  away, 
but  after  some  years  shee  had  been  staying  in  England  she  generously 
contemed  ye  vanities  of  ye  world,  &  obtained  her  father's  &  mother's 
consent  &  returned  to  ye  our  Monastery  in  ye  22  year  of  her  age,  & 
brought  along  with  her  two  of  her  sisters  Mrs  Elizabeth  &  MrB  Anne 
for  pensionars  aged  of  19  &  18.  Their  father  is  second  brother  to 
Sr  Thomas  Gascoigne  of  Barnbow  in  Yorkshire.  Mrs  Elizabeth  & 
M™  Anne  gone  18  of  July  1715. 

Vide  under  June  23,  1703,  where  it  will  be  seen  that  Mary  Gascoigne's  age 
is  at  variance  with  the  present  entry.  She  appears  to  have  been  born  in 
1690-1.  Her  father,  Mr.  John  Gascoigne,  was  the  younger  son  of  George 
Gascoigne,  Esq.,  2nd  son  of  Sir  Thomas  Gascoigne,  2nd  Bart.  Her 
brother  Edward  succeeded  as  5th  Bart.  She  took  the  name  of  Paula  in 
religion,  was  prof,  in  17 14,  and  died  Jan.  17,  1746. 

July  ye  26.  In  ye  year  17 13. 

Entred  Mrs  Mary  &  Mrs  Elizabeth  Jenison,  two  sisters  one 
aged  of  17  ye  other  of  15;  daughters  to  Mr  John  Jenison  of  Little 
Wallworth. 

Daughters  of  John  Jenison,  of  Low  Walworth,  co.  Durham,  Esq.,  and 
his  wife  Sarah,  daughter  of  Mr.  Williams,  of  Combe,  co.  Hereford.  Mary 
married  Francis  Hutton,  of  Woodham,  co.  Durham,  gent.,  and  Elizabeth 
became  the  wife  of  John  Hutton,  brother  to  Francis,  and  died  s.fi.  Their 
father,  born  Oct.  2,  1667,  died  Aug.  23,  1739,  and  their  mother  died  May  15, 
1742. 

July  ye  4th.  In  ye  year  17 14. 

Came  MM  Teresa  Allein  &  her  sister  Francis,  ye  first  of  14,  ye 
second  of  9,  bourgeoises  of  Cambray.  The  Magistrates  desired  they 
should  be  here  for  a  short  time  for  some  particular  reasons,  which 
mi  lady  Abbess  condescended  to  for  to  oblige  ye  Magistrates. 

July  ye  27. 

Came  Mrs  Anne  Aston  for  a  lay-sister,  aged  of  26. 

Prof.  1716;  died  Nov.  10,  1734. 
August  25. 

Came  Mrs  Frances  Plompton,  aged  of  14,  daughter  to  Mr 
Plompton  of  Plompton  in  Yorkshire. 

Born  Dec.  23,  1702,  and  sister  to  Elizabeth  Plumpton,  vide  under  1703, 
married  George  Palmes,  of  Naburn  Hall,  co.  York,  Esq. 
7bre  ye  3th 

1 7 14 — Came  Mr8  Mary  Stourton,  daughter  to  ye  honorable 
Charles  Stourton,  &  neece  to  ye  Right  honorable  Ld  Edward  Stourton 
Peere  of  England,  aged  of  13  yeares :  gone  away  July  14 — 17 18. 

Dau.  of  Charles  Stourton  (younger  son  of  William,  nth  Baron  Stourton, 
by  Elizabeth,  dau.  of  Sir  John  Preston,  1st  Bart.,  of  the  Manor  of  Furness, 
co.  Lancaster,  and  Preston  Patrick  and  Under  Levens,  co.  Westmoreland), 


CONSOLATION    AT   CAMBRAI,    162O-1793  65 

by  Catherine,  dau.  of  Richard  Frampton,  of  Bilson,  co.  Dorset,  Esq.     Her 
brother  Charles  succeeded  as  14th  Lord. 

Ye  same  day. 

Came  Miss  Molly  Hussey,  daughter  to  Mr  Hussey  of  Mam  hall 
in  Dorcetshire  &  neece  to  Mother  Cecilia  Hussey,  aged  of  1 2  years ; 
went  ye  29  of  7bre  17 18. 

Dau.  of  John  Hussey,  of  Nash  Court  in  Marnhull,  Esq.,  by  Mary,  dau. 
of  Thomas  Burdet,  Esq. 

July  13.  In  ye  year  17 15. 

Entred  Mrs  Catherine  &  Ellen  Gascoigne  aged  one  of  16, 
&  ye  other  of  13.  Sra  to  D.  Mary  Paula  &  neeces  to  our  venered 
Mother  Catherine  Gascoigne,  daughters  to  Sr  John  Gascoigne  of 
Partington  in  Yorkshire;  Mre  Ellen  went  away  July  20 — 17 19. 

Daughters  of  John  Gascoigne,  of  Parlington  Hall,  Esq. — vide  under 
June  23,  1703,  and  Nov.  II,  17 12.  Catherine, born  in  1699,  was  prof,  under 
the  religious  name  of  Josepha  in  1717 ;  was  abbess  1741-69,  when  she 
resigned  on  account  of  illness,  being  succeeded  by  Dame  Agnes  Ingleby  ; 
she  died  Jan.  25,  1774. 

May  ye  8.  In  ye  year  17 16. 

Came  Mrs  Mary  Watford,  aged  of  14  years  &  5  months  went 
away  20  July  1720. 

July  ye  17. 

Entred  Mr8  Brigit  Naylor  for  a  lay-sister,  aged  of  16,  (in  religion 
Sr  Mary  Joseph)  gone  away. 

Born  at  Scarisbrick,  Lancashire,  sister  to  Dom  William  Placid  Naylor, 
O.S.B.,  and  aunt  to  Dom  John  Joseph  Placid  Naylor,  O.S.B.,  son  of  her 
brother  Charles.     Her  family  is  referred  to  C.R.S.  vol.  v.  210  n. 

7ber  18— 1 7 16. 
9bre  18. 

Came  M™  Landale  to  ye  fathers  apartment  where  she  died  Sber 
23 — 171 7,  in  child  bed;  she  &  her  son  lies  buried  in  our  burying 
garden  in  her  Grand  Mothers  ye  Lady  Crasland  Grave. 

Bridget,  daughter  of  Sir  Jordan  Crosland,  was  the  wife  of  Philip  Lang- 
dale,  of  Houghton  Hall,  co.  York,  Esq.  Her  daughter  Dame  Dorothy 
Constance  was  at  this  time  a  nun  in  the  convent.  Her  husband  was  the 
son  of  Sir  William  Langdale,  of  Langthorpe,  Knt.,  by  his  first  wife,  Ursula, 
daughter  of  Robert  Stapleton,  Esq. 

7bre  23.  In  ye  year  17 17. 

Entred  MrB  Mary  Chorley  aged  of  23,  daughter  to  Mr  Richard 
Chorley  of  Chorley  Hall  in  Lancashire,  who  suffered  death  at  Preston 
for  having  taken  arms  to  bring  in  his  true  &  lawfull  King  James  the 
third,  in  ye  raign  of  Georges  prince  of  Hanover  &  pretended  King 
of  England. 

The  age  is  apparently  an  error,  as  she  was  baptized  at  Chorley,  Aug.  28, 
1696,  being  the  third  dau.  of  Richard  Chorley,  Esq.,  by  Catherine,  only 
dau.  of  John  Walmesley,  of  Buckshawe,  co.  Lancaster,  Esq.,  bv  his  first 
XIII.  E 


66  RECORDS  OF  THE  ABBEY  OF  OUR  LADY  OF 

wife,  Anne,  dau.  of  Laurence  Breres,  of  Buckshawe,  Esq.  Her  father,  who 
was  executed  at  Preston,  Feb.  9,  17 16,  for  joining  the  Chevalier  de  St. 
George,  was  buried  on  the  same  date  at  Chorley.  One  of  her  brothers  was 
a  Benedictine,  and  two  others  Jesuits. 

August  ye  i8t 

— Came  Mrs  Anne  Jenison,  aged  of  16,  daughter  to  Mr  Jenison 
of  Wallworth ;  went  away. 

Vide  under  Sept.  30,  1720.  Anne  Ursula,  youngest  daughter  of  John 
Jenison,  of  Low  Walworth,  Esq.,  and  his  wife  Sarah  Williams,  was  born 
Oct.  2i,  1700.  She  went  to  the  Blue  Nuns  at  Paris,  where  she  took  the 
veil  in  1722,  and  died  in  1770.     Vide  C.R.S.  vol.  viii.  p.  375. 

July  13.  In  ye  year  17 18. 

Came  Mra  Catherine  Brooke,  aged  of  13,  daughter  to  Mr. 
Brooke  of  Medeley;  went  away,  July  ye  17 — 1720. 

Dau.  and  coheiress  (her  only  brother  Basil  having  died  young)  of 
Comberford  Brooke,  of  Madeley  Court,  co.  Salop,  and  Comberford  Hall, 
co.  Stafford,  Esq.,  by  Rose,  dau.  of  Sir  John  Austen,  of  Bexley  Court,  co. 
Kent,  2nd  Bart.  She  married  John  Smithman,  of  Little  Venlock,  Esq., 
had  two  sons  and  three  daughters,  and  died  in  1737. 

Ye  same  day.  Came  Mrs.  Mary  Stanford,  aged  1 1 ;  went  to 
ye  French  house  18  January  1721. 

Eldest  daughter  of  William  Stanford,  of  Abbot's  Salford,  commonly  called 
Salford  Hall,  co.  Warwick,  Esq.,  by  Mary,  eldest  daughter  of  Richard  Bet- 
ham,  of  Rowington  Hall,  in  the  same  county,  Esq.  As  Salford  Hall  is  so 
intimately  connected  with  the  life  of  the  community,  which  found  a  shelter 
under  its  venerable  roof  from  1807  until  1838,  a  brief  notice  of  its  history  is 
expedient.  Salford  was  a  possession  of  the  Abbey  of  Evesham,  which  in 
1543  was  granted  by  Henry  VIII.  to  Sir  Philip  Hobby,  who  in  the  last  year  of 
the  king's  reign  sold  the  manor  of  Abbot's  Salford  to  Anthony  Littleton. 
The  tatter's  daughter  and  heiress  married  John  Alderford,  but  dying  child- 
less her  husband  married  secondly,  in  July,  1579,  Elizabeth,  daughter  of 
Peter  Dormer,  of  Nubottell,  and  relict  of  Edward  Morgan,  and  by  her  had 
two  daughters  and  coheiresses,  Eleanor  and  Margaret.  Alderford  rebuilt 
the  hall  in  1602,  incorporating  parts  of  the  older  building,  and  died  in  1606. 
His  elder  daughter,  Eleanor,  married  Charles  Stanford,  second  son  of  Sir 
Robert  Stanford,  of  Perry  Hall,  co.  Stafford,  son  of  Sir  William  Stanford, 
justice  of  the  King's  Bench,  and  his  younger  daughter,  Margaret,  married 
Sir  Simon  Clarke  or  Woodchurch,  of  Woodchurch,  co.  Kent,  who  thus 
became  possessed  of  Salford  Priors.  Charles  Stanford,  whose  wife  brought 
him  Abbot's  Salford,  completed  the  building  of  the  hall,  and  commemorated 
the  event  by  hanging  up  a  bell  on  the  top  of  the  house  bearing  the  inscription, 
"Charles  Stanford,  Esqre.,  Ellinor,  1610."  Their  eldest  son,  John,  suc- 
ceeded to  the  estate  and  married  Frances,  daughter  of  Sir  John  Peshall,  of 
Horsley,  co.  Stafford,  1st  Bart.,  and  sister  to  Dorothy,  wife  of  William  Stan- 
ford, of  Perry  Hall,  cousin  of  John  Stanford.  A  younger  son  joined  The 
English  Discalced  Carmelites,  Fr.  Edmund  of  St.  Martin  Stanford,  and 
died  April  10,  1635.  John  Stanford  died  in  1649,  leaving  sons,  William, 
who  married  Dorothy,  daughter  of  Clement  Paston,  of  Appleton,  co.  Norfolk, 
Esq.,  and  died  s.fi.,  and  John,  who  married  Mercy,  second  daughter  of 
Francis  Sheldon,  of  Abberton,  co.  Wigorn,  Esq.  The  latter  had  a  son, 
William,  and  four  daughters,  Dorothy,  wife  of  .  .  .  Savage,  of  Bagend,  co. 
Wigorn,  Esq.,  Mercy,  wife  of  Thomas  Chambers,  of  Studley,  Esq.,  Frances, 
and  Penelope.    The  son,  William,  who  registered  his  estate  as  a  Catholic 


CONSOLATION   AT  CAMBRAI,   1620-1793  67 

non-juror  in  171 7,  and  was  living  at  Salford  Hall  in  1730,  was  the  father  of 
the  young  girl  who  came  to  the  school  at  Cambrai  in  17 18.  William  had 
four  sons,  John,  William,  Charles,  and  Robert,  who  all  died  s.p.f  and  two 
daughters,  Mary,  as  above,  and  Frances.  The  youngest  son,  Robert,  the 
last  of  the  family,  died  in  1785,  bequeathing  Salford  Hall  to  his  wife  Mary 
for  life,  with  remainder  to  John  Stanford  Berkeley,  second  son  of  Robert 
Berkeley,  of  Spetchley,  co.  Worcester,  Esq.,  and  in  case  of  his  death  to  the 
said  Robert  Berkeley  for  the  term  of  his  life  only,  after  which  it  was  to  go  for 
ever  to  the  Eyston  family  of  East  Hendred,  co.  Berks.  Mrs.  Stanford  most 
generously  offered  the  community  at  Woolton,  which  was  a  house  quite 
uncongenial  to  the  tastes  and  requirements  of  the  monastic  profession,  Sal- 
ford Hall  and  grounds  rent  free,  and  lent  them  one  hundred  pounds  free  of 
interest  towards  the  expense  of  removal.  From  the  earliest  times  there  had 
been  a  chapel  in  the  house,  and  at  this  period  Pere  Louvel,  a  French 
emigre^  resided  in  it,  and  served  the  chaplaincy.  The  registers  only  com- 
mence in  1763,  though  the  list  of  Benedictine  chaplains  can  be  traced  from 
1727.  Mrs.  Stanford  also  offered  to  pay  the  chaplain's  stipend  of  twenty- 
five  guineas  whether  the  nuns  should  prefer  to  bring  their  own  with  them,  or 
to  retain  the  services  of  M.  Louvel.  Mrs.  Stanford  died  at  her  house  in 
College  Green,  Gloucester,  on  May  24,  1812.  "She  was  a  woman  of 
superior  cast  of  mind,"  said  a  local  print,  "  universal  charity  and  a  high 
sense  of  philanthropy  were  the  ruling  principles  of  her  life,  and  the  tears 
of  the  poor  best  bespeak  their  loss,  who  had  so  constantly  partook  of  her 
unbounded  benevolence."  Meanwhile  John  Stanford  Berkeley  had  pre- 
deceased his  father,  Robert  Berkeley,  who  concurred  in  everything 
Mrs.  Stanford  had  done,  and  continued  to  allow  the  community  to  occupy 
Salford  Hall  until  the  nuns  purchased  Stanbrook  Hall,  near  Worcester,  to 
which  they  removed  in  1838 .  Upon  Robert  Berkeley's  death  Salford  passed 
to  the  Eyston  family  in  accordance  with  the  will  of  its  last  squire,  Robert 
Stanford. 

July  24. 

Came  Mra  Anne  Engleby  (went  away  August  27 — 1721)  &  Mr8 
Anne  Penny,  one  aged  of  14,  ye  other  of  18. 

Margery  Anne  Ingleby  appears  in  the  pedigree  as  being  baptized  June 
6,  1702.  She  was  the  eldest  daughter  of  John  Ingleby,  of  Lawkland  Hall 
and  Clapdale  Hall,  co.  York,  Esq.,  by  Troath,  daughter  of  William  Brad- 
shaigh,  of  Bishop  Middleham,  co.  Durham,  Esq.  She  did  not  marry,  and 
was  buried  at  Clapham,  June  17,  1773.  For  her  sisters  Mary  Alathea  and 
Isabel  vide  under  1721. 

7ber  22. 

Came  Mn  Elizabeth  Fairclouth,  &  Mary  Dweryhouse,  ye 

first  aged  of  20,  ye  2nd  of  17,  for  lay-sisters;  they  came  out  of 
Lancashire. 

Elizabeth  Fairclough  was  professed  under  her  own  name  in  1720, 
and  died  Dec.  9,  1744.  Several  of  the  family  became  Benedictines.  Sr 
Mary  Josepha  Dwerihouse  was  also  professed  in  1720,  and  died  Oct.  26, 
1726.  She  was  dau.  of  Thomas  Dwerihouse,  yeoman,  of  Greasindale,  in 
Garston,  of  a  staunch  recusant  family. 

Ye  same  day.  Came  Mrs.  Mary  Conquest,  of  Horton  Conquest 
in  Bedfordshire,  neece  D.  M.  Benedict  Conquest  and  little-neece  to  Rd. 
Mother  Catherine  Hall,  aged  of  13.     Went  away. 

She  was  one  of  the  four  daughters  of  Benedict  Conquest,  of  Houghton 
Conquest  Hall,  Esq.,  by  Anne,  daughter  of  the  Rev.  John  Birch,  rector  of 
Houghton  Conquest,  and  subsequently  became  Mrs.  Wright.     Her  father 


68  RECORDS   OF  THE   ABBEY  OF  OUR  LADY  OF 

was  the  son  and  heir  of  John  Thimbleby  Conquest,  Esq.  (eldest  son  and  heir 
of  Richard  Conquest,  of  Houghton  Conquest,  Esq.,  by  Elizabeth,  daughter 
of  Richard  Thimbleby,  of  Irnham  Hall,  co.  Lincoln,  Esq.,  lady  of  the  bed- 
chamber to  Queen  Henrietta  Maria,  through  which  marriage  Irnham 
eventually  came  to  the  Conquests),  and  his  wife  Eleanor,  5th  daughter  of 
Benedict  Hall,  of  High  Meadow,  co.  Gloucester,  Esq.  Her  brother  Bene- 
dict in  1753  inherited  the  Irnham  estate  from  his  cousin  (twice  removed) 
Mary,  daughter  and  heiress  of  John  Thimbleby,  of  Irnham,  Esq.,  by  Doro., 
dau.  of  Robert,  3rd  Lord  Petre,  and  widow  of  Thomas  Giffard,  of  Chillington 
Hall,  co.  Stafford,  Esq.  He,  however,  died  on  Oct.  27  of  the  same  year, 
1753,  and  his  only  son  Benedict  Conquest  dying  unmarried  at  the  age  of  20, 
the  estates  passed  to  his  only  dau.  Mary  Christina,  who  married  Henry,  8th 
Lord  Arundell  of  Wardour.  The  latter  had  two  daughters  and  coheiresses, 
Mary  Christiana,  who  married  her  cousin,  James  Everard,  9th  Lord  Arundell 
of  Wardour,  and  Eleonor  Mary,  wife  of  Charles,  7th  Lord  Clifford  of 
Chudleigh. 

7ber  26. 

Came  Mra  Francis  Hussey,  &  her  sister  Grace,  aged  of  9  &  1 1 ; 
neeces  to  M.  Cecilia;  went  away  20  July  1720. 

Daughters  of  John  Hussey,  of  Nash  Court  in  Marnhull,  co.  Dorset,  Esq., 
by  Mary,  dau.  of  Thomas  Burdet,  of  Thames-Ditton,  co.  Surrey,  Esq. 
Frances  is  named  in  the  will  of  her  father  in  1736. 

8ber  ii.  In  ye  year  17 19. 

Came  Mra  Martha  Dodd,  aged  of  20,  for  a  lay-sister;  gone  away. 
Probably  a  niece  of  Sr.  Mary  Josepha  Dodd. 

gber  jyjg  ye  30. 

Came  Mrs  Dorothy  Moore  for  religion  aged  of  36,  Sr  to  Sir 
Richard  Moore  of  Fawley  in  Barkeshire;  gone  away  14  of  May  1720. 

Dau.  of  Francis  Moore,  eldest  son  of  Sir  Henry  Moore,  of  Fawley,  co. 
Berks,  2nd  Bart.,  and  sister  of  Sir  Richard,  the  3rd  Bart.  Her  mother 
was  Frances,  dau.  and  sole  heiress  of  Alexander  Jermin,  of  Cordington, 
co.  Sussex,  Esq.  She  returned  Sept.  27,  172 1,  was  professed  under  her  own 
name,  and  died  Aug.  17,  1726. 

9ber  ye  9th. 

Came  ye  honorable  Alathea  Widdrington,  aged  of  14,  daughter 
to  ye  Right  Honorable  ye  Lord  William  Widdrington  of  Widdrington 
Castle,  neece  to  D.  Agnes  Widdrington;  went  away  August  2d  1723. 

Born  April  21,  1705,  dau.  of  William,  4th  Lord  Widdrington,  by  his 
first  wife  Jane,  eldest  dau.  of  Sir  Thomas  Tempest,  of  Stella,  co.  Durham, 
4th  Bart.,  and  sister  and  heiress  of  Sir  Francis  Tempest,  5th  Bart. ;  went 
to  York  Bar  convent  in  17 13,  whence,  after  her  father's  conviction  of  high- 
treason  in  17 16  and  subsequent  pardon,  she  came  to  Cambrai ;  left  as  above, 
but  returned  Jan.  27,  1725,  and  was  prof,  under  the  name  of  Augustina  in 
1726  ;  died  Aug.  24,  1775. 

August  1. 

17 19.  Came  Mrs  Burcke  aged  of  16,  daughter  to  Captain  Burcke; 
gone  away. 

Aug.  12.  In  ye  year  1720. 

Came  Mrs  Winkley,  aged  of  21 ;  went  ye  12  9ber  1720. 

Jane,  bapt.  Dec.  12,  1697,  dau.  of  Edward  Winckley,  of  Banister  Hall, 
co.  Lancaster,  Esq.,  and  his  first  wife  Mary.     Her  brothers  Thomas  and 


CONSOLATION    AT   CAMBRAI,    1620-1793  69 

James  having  become  priests,  and  Edward  dying  s.p.  in  1750,  this  junior 
branch  of  the  Winckleys  of  Winckley  Hall  became  extinct.  A  sister,  Anne 
Austin,  O.S.B.,  died  at  Paris  in  1759.  Her  father,  who  died  in  1742,  married 
secondly  Winifred,  daughter  of  Thomas  Tyldesley,  Esq.,  of  Myerscough 
Lodge,  the  Jacobite  diarist. 

7ber  30- 

Came  Mrs  Catherine  &  Mrs  Jane  Stourton  aged  of  14  &  13,  & 
Mra  Tatham  aged  of  14.    Ye  last  died  pensionar  7  August  1722. 

Catherine  and  Jane  Stourton  were  daughters  of  the  Hon.  Charles 
Stourton,  son  of  William,  nth  Lord  Stourton.  They  were  sisters  to  Mary, 
vide  under  Sept.  8,  17 14. 

At  ye  same  time. 

Came  Mrs  Anne  Jenison  for  a  second  time,  aged  of  23 :  gone 
away. 

Vide  under  Aug.  1,  1717.     Here  is  a  further  discrepancy  in  her  age. 

8bern. 

Came  Mrs  Magdelene  Kenyon,  aged  of  16. 

Mrs.  Susannah  Kennion  (Kenyon),  a  widow  residing  in  Bath,  co.  Somer- 
set, registered  as  a  catholic  non-juror  an  estate  at  Preshute,  co.  Wilts,  in  17 17. 

&**  14. 

Came  Mr8  Dorothy  Southcoate,  neece  to  D.  Agnes  Widdring- 
ton  aged  of  13,  (went  away  7  July  1723)  &  the  young  M1"8  Honoria 
Richardson  aged  of  15 ;  went  away  27  August  1721. 

Dorothy,  dau.  of  Edward  Southcote,  of  Blytheborough,  co.  Lincoln, 
Esq.,  by  Catherine,  dau.  of  William,  2nd  Lord  Widdrington,  came  from 
the  convent  at  York  Bar,  where  she  went  in  17 16.  Her  mother  died  at 
Cambrai  in  1758. 

9ber  ye  1 1. 

Came  Mre  Ellen  Pullein,  aged  of  14  neece  to  Rd  Fr  Pullein, 
gone  away. 

She  must  have  been  grand-niece  of  Dom  Michael  Pulleyne,  O.S.B.,  born 
Oct.  26,  1653,  son  of  Robert  Pulleyne,  of  Birstwith,  in  the  parish  of  Hamps- 
thwaite,  co.  York,  who  died  Feb.  3,  1723.  She  returned  and  was  professed 
under  the  name  of  Placida,  and  died  July  6,  1786. 

July  -21.  In  ye  year  1721. 

Came  MM  Monica  Jenison,  aged  of  18,  &  Mrs  Mary  Ingleby 
aged  of  14,  with  her  sister  Isabella  aged  of  13. 

Monica  Jenison  was  sister  to  Mary,  Elizabeth,  and  Anne,  vide  under 
1 7 13-17-20. 

Mary  Alathea  Ingleby,  baptized  March  25,  1707,  and  Isabel  Ingleby, 
bap.  Jan.  5,  1708,  were  sisters  of  Margery  Anne  Ingleby,  vide  under  1718. 
Mary  Alathea  died  a  spinster,  and  was  buried  April  23,  1761.  Isabel,  pro- 
fessed under  the  name  of  Agnes  in  1736,  was  elected  abbess  in  1769,  and 
died  in  that  office  March  1,  1789. 

July  ye  4th. 

Came  Miss  Teresa  Mackdonell,  aged  of  7,  gone  away. 


70  RECORDS  OF  THE  ABBEY  OF  OUR  LADY  OF 

7W  27. 

Came  M1"8  Dorothy  Moore  aged  of  37 ;  ye  same  yt  went  away 
in  May  1720. 

Vide  under  Oct.  30,  17 19. 

May  18,  In  ye  year  1722. 

Came  back  Mrs  Honoria  Richardson,  aged  of  1 7  &  her  mayde 
Sara  Ellerbie,  aged  of  20 :  gone  away. 

Sarah  Ellerby  was  subsequently  professed  as  a  lay-sister  under  the  name 
of  Alexia,  and  died  Dec.  12,  1774. 

August  9.  In  ye  year  1723. 

Came  Miss  Betty  Dallison  aged  of  10  &  a  half. 

Apparently  niece  or  grandniece  of  Dom  Charles  Gregory  Dalison, 
O.S.B.,  and  his  sisters  Dames  Bridget  Mary  Joseph  Dalison,  and  Mary 
Martha  Dalison,  O.S.B.,  of  Brussels,  son  and  daughters  of  Sir  Charles 
Dalison,  of  Laughton,  co.  Lincoln,  and  his  wife  Elizabeth,  daughter  and 
coheiress  of  Robert  Smith,  of  Lincoln. 

7ber  29. 

Came  Mrs  Marguerite  Thornton  &  her  two  sisters  Betty  & 
Nancy,  aged  of  13,  10,  &  9. 

Grandaughters  of  Nicholas  Thornton,  of  Netherwitton,  co.  Northumber- 
land, Esq.,  and  his  wife  Anne,  daughter  of  Sir  John  Swinburne,  of  Cap- 
heaton,  1st  Bart.  Their  father's  estate  was  confiscated  after  the  Rising 
of  1715. 

May  ye  18.  In  ye  year  1724. 

Came  Mrs  Mary  Meynell,  neece  to  D.  M.  Benedict,  aged  of  13 
daughter  to  Mr  Meynell  of  Kilvington,  in  Yorkshire. 

Dau.  of  Roger  Meynell,  of  North  Kilvington,  co.  York,  Esq.,  by  Anne, 
dau.  of  Edward  Charlton,  of  Hesleyside,  co.  Northumberland,  Esq.  She 
married  Thomas  Selby,  of  Biddleston  Hall,  co.  Northumberland,  Esq. 

May  ye  15—1723. 
Came  Teresa  De  Pery  of  ye  towne  .  .  .  now  Sr  Bathilda ;  she 
was  profess'd  January  25 — 1725. 

Sister  Bathildis  Du  Pery  died  Oct.  20,  1773. 

January  ye  27.  In  ye  year  1725. 

Came  ye  honorable  Alathea  Widdrington,  a  second  time, 
daughter  to  ye  right  honorable  William  Widdrington. 

Vide  under  17 19. 

July  ye  30. 

Came  Mra  Anne  Baits,  aged  of  14. 

Prof,  under  name  of  Josepha  Bate  ;  died  April  23,  1758. 

August  ye  5  th. 

Came  Mrs  Jane  Stratford  aged  of  16. 


CONSOLATION   AT   CAMBRAI,    1620-1793  7* 

gbre.  ye  2d.  In  ye  year  1725. 

Came  Mrs.  Betty  &  Jane  Howard  aged  of  14  &  11,  daughters 
of  Mr.  Howard  of  Corbie. 

Daughters  of  Thomas  Howard,  of  Corby  Castle,  co.  Cumberland,  Esq., 
by  Barbara,  dau.  of  Sir  John  Lowther,  Viscount  Lonsdale.  Elizabeth  died 
unmarried  in  1799;  Jane  married  Francis  Warwick,  of  Warwick  Hall,  co. 
Cumberland,  Esq.,  and  died  s.p.  in  1778. 


GRAVE  LIST 

[Drawn  up  by  one  of  the  nuns  shortly  before  the  Revolution,  and  contain- 
ing evident  clerical  errors.] 

YE  GRAVES  OF  OUR  DEAD  SISTERS  IN  YE  BURIALL  GARDEN. 

In  ye  middle  row  in  ye  way  to  ye  chappelL 

i°  M.  Knightley  (8ber  28—1686)  &  Misse  Tatham  (7  August 
1722.) 

20  D.  Mary  Legg— June  22 — 1691. 

3°  D.  Benedicta   Middleton  (August  5 — 1688;)  in  ye  same 
grave  lies  D.  M.  Teresa  Meynell  5  July — 1673  [July  4,  1697]. 

4°  D.  Mary  Benedicta  Conquest  9^  19—1686. 

50  Madame  Hall  &  her  daughter,  M.  Catherine  Hall — March 
17 — 1692. 

Madame  Anne  Hall,  died  March  20,  1676.     Vide  in  Catalogue  under 
Aug.  24,  1646,  for  Dame  Catherine  Maura  Hall. 

6°  D.  Eugenia  Houghton  March  12 — 1701 ;  in  ye  same  grave 
D.  Francisca  Gascoigne  7ber  21—1708. 

7°  D.  Clare  Cooke  7ber  21—1685. 

8°  D.  Lucy  Vavasor— August  25—1685  [1679]. 

9°  D.  Catherine  Vavasor— August  28  [18]— 1676. 

io°  D.  Ellin  Brent— May  15  [5]— 1688. 

First  row  in  ye  right  hand. 

i°  D.  Margaret  Smith— August  14—1680;  in  ye  same  grave 
D.  Mary  Joseph  Moore— xber  1720. 

20  Sr  Mary  Magdalene  Williams  a  scholar,  May  30 — 1686. 
in  ye  same  grave  D.  Maura  Harrington  February  6 — 1720. 


72  RECORDS  OF  THE  ABBEY  OF  OUR  LADY  OF 

3°  D.  Euphrasia  Tempest  Feb.  14—1689;  in  her  same  grave 
lies  D.  Benedicta  Englefield  died  July  3—1725. 

4°  D.  Anne  Gill— Feb.  1— 1692. 

5°  D.  Augustina  Cary  9ber  17— 1683  [1682];  in  her  grave  her 
sister  D.  Maria  Cary  7ber  22 — 1693. 

6°  D.  Mechtilde  Frere  January  26 — 1676. 

7°  Our  Rd  Lady  Marina  Appleton  January  29—1694. 

8°  D.  Gertrude  Risdon  January  26—1675. 

9°  D.  Barbara  Constable  January  26—1684;  in  ye  same  grave 
lies  D.  Magdalene  Moore  Decber  12— 17 19. 

io°  D.  Teresa  Timperly  March  23 — 167 1  ;   in  ye  same  grave 
D.  Susanna  Phillips. 

D.  Susanna  Phelips  died  Dec.  4,  1705. 

ii°  D  &  Clare  Radcliffe  11  of  August  1681 ;  in  ye  same  grave 
lies  her  sister  Ursula  Radcliffe,  8ber  31  [30],  1689. 

Rd  Mother  Cecilia  Hussey  who  died  April  9  1721  buried  next 
ye  Radcliffes. 

Died  D.  Mary  Agnes  Kennett  [Feb.   6J  1723  buried  next 
D.  Maura. 


The  third  row  on  ye  left  hand. 
i°  Str  Alexia  Fenwick  died  June  29—1689. 

20  Str  Catherine  Trevelyan  died  July  3—1682 :  in  her  grave 
Str  Mary  Joseph  Dodd. 

Sr  M.  J.  Dodd  died  Dec.  8,  1715. 

3°  Str  Barbara  Breton  died  7ber  28—1689. 

4°  Str  Bridgit  Lusher  died  March  12—1690.    Sr  Scholastica 
Reeder  died  August  30 — 1722  in  ye  same  grave. 

50  Str  Elizabeth  Lusher  died  May  27—1684. 

6°  Str  Francis  Lusher  died  July  28—1687 ;  Sr  Benet  Taylor 
died  Feb  10 — 1707  in  ye  same  grave. 

7°  Str  Teresa  Gurney  died  January  22—1678. 


CONSOLATION    AT   CAMBRAI,    1620-1793  73 

8°  Str  Hilda  Percy  died  February  6—1670:  Str  Elizabeth 
Camplin  died  11  9ber  1705  buried  in  ye  same  grave. 

90  Str  Joane  Cellar  died  April  n— 1683. 

io°  Str  Etheldred  Stapleton  died  6  of  August  1668.  Str  Anne 
Batmanson  died  February  2 — 1701 ;  in  ye  same  grave. 

Aug*  2d  1792 — Died  in  our  Monastery  of  our  Lady  of  Comfort  in 
Cambray  D.  Catherine  Joseph  Throgmorton  aged  (as  is  con- 
jectured) 97.  She  was  professed  of  the  Rule  of  Sfc  Augustine  in  the 
English  house  of  the  Fossi  Sfe  Victor  in  Paris,  where  she  remained 
several  years,  but  falling  deranged  in  her  intellect  she  was  transfured 
to  this  house,  where  she  is  said  to  have  been  for  above  60  years.  She 
was  buried  the  day  following  in  our  Burial  ground. 

Catherine  Throckmorton  was  dau.  of  Sir  Robert  Throckmorton,  3rd 
Bart.,  of  Coughton  Court,  co.  Warwick,  by  Mary,  dau.  of  Sir  Charles  Yate, 
of  Buckland,  co.  Berks,  3rd  Bart,  (by  Frances,  dau.  of  Sir  Thomas  Gage, 
of  Firle  Place,  co.  Sussex,  2nd  Bart.),  and  sister  and  heiress  of  Sir  John 
Yate,  4th  and  last  Bart.,  who  died  unmarried  at  Paris  in  1690.  She  and 
her  sister  Elizabeth  went  to  the  English  Augustinian  convent  at  Paris 
in  17 1 3,  where  they  were  professed  in  the  following  year.  Within  seven 
years  her  intellect  seems  to  have  given  way,  and  eventually  it  was  thought 
better  that  she  should  come  to  reside  at  Cambrai.  She  was  known  at  Paris 
under  the  name  of  Mary  Catherine. 

August  3d  1792 — died  about  3  p.m.  Dame  Mary  Christina 
Hooke,  Abbess  of  our  Nuns  of  Our  Lady  of  Comfort  Cambray. 

Born  in  Dublin  in  1715 ;  daughter  of  the  eminent  historian  Nathaniel 
Hooke  and  his  wife  Mary  Barnes;  prof.  1734;  abbess  1789  till  death  Aug. 
3,  1792.  Her  brother,  the  Rev.  Luke  Joseph  Hooke,  D.D.,  baptized  at  St. 
Paul's,  Dublin,  Sept.  28,  17 14,  was  educated  at  St.  Gregory's  Monastery  at 
Douai,  whence  he  went  to  the  Irish  College  in  the  Rue  de  Lombards  at 
Paris,  where  he  was  granted  Letters  of  Naturalisation  in  1735.  After 
taking  his  degrees  at  the  Sorbonne  he  was  raised  to  the  chair  of  divinity, 
and  in  1774  to  that  of  Hebrew.  He  was  also  appointed  librarian  to  the 
Mazarin  College,  but  died  in  the  same  year,  1774. 

A  Catalogue  of  ye  names  of  ye  Religious  Dames 

and  Sisters  professed  of  this  Convent  of  our  Blessed 

Lady  of  Consolation  in  Cambray  who  are  dead. 

Requiescant  in  pace. 

The  first  day  of  Aprill  1631  departed  in  peace  our  dear  Sister 
Jane  Martha  Martin,  a  lay  sister  &  one  of  ye  first  profes'd  of  ye 
monastery  in  ye  43  year  of  her  age  &  seventh  of  her  profession. 
Shee  had  ye  proffer  to  marry  a  gentleman  of  a  good  estate  in  England, 
but  shee  rather  chose  to  lead  an  humble  life  in  Religion,  than  to  appeare 
great  in  ye  world,  therefore  refused  ye  offer  made  her  &  prevailed 
with  the  gentleman  who  would  have  married  her,  to  bestow  his  wealth 
upon  a  Seminary  of  English  in  Flanders,  which  he  did  at  his  death 


74  RECORDS  OF  THE  ABBEY  OF  OUR  LADY  OF 

oblidging  ye  sayd  seminary  to  provide  for  her  &  settle  her  as  she 
should  desire.  And  she  chose  out  of  humility  &  yt  shee  might  not 
be  too  chargable  to  them  whom  she  esteemed  her  benefactors,  (tho' 
in  effect  she  had  been  theirs)  to  be  a  lay-sister  &  as  she  had  lived 
in  ye  world  very  purely  &  innocently,  so  shee  lived  in  religion  very 
painfully  &  obediently,  in  both  piously  &  charitably.  And  after 
many  daily  infirmities  &  eight  months  sickness  suffered  with  resigna- 
tion &  edification,  she  died  as  we  have  cause  to  believe  most  happily. 
Requiescat  in  pace.     Amen. 

In  ye  year  163 1  ye  22  of  7ber  died  D.  Francis  Ebba  Browne, 

daughter  to  Sr  Peter  Browne  of  Kiddington  in  Oxfordshire,  in  ye  2d 
year  of  her  profession  &  22  of  her  age,  during  which  three  years,  her 
noviceship  included,  she  so  much  profited  in  ye  continual  practice  of 
prayer  &  patience  y*  shee  left  behind  her  a  good  odor  of  virtue,  being 
so  truly  pious  &  humble  y*  shee  could  say  on  her  death-bed,  being 
asked  therunto,  yfc  since  shee  had  profess'd  our  H.  Rule,  shee  did  not 
remember  y*  ever  shee  did  deliberately  desire  to  please  any  creature  or 
desire  any  praise  from  any.  And  indeed  she  lived  so  wholly  abstract 
of  all  terrene  &  humane  solace  &  content  and  so  attentive  to  God  in 
her  soule  yt  neither  business  in  health,  nor  pains  in  sickness  could 
divert  her  thoughts  &  affections  from  him,  but  pass'd  on  her  life  like  a 
true  pilgrime  thus  to  Jerusalem,  to  seek  &  see  Jesus,  ye  sum  of  all  her 
desires  &  ye  centre,  &  ye  reward  of  all  her  sighs  &  labours.  Requiescat 
in  Pace. 

In  ye  year  1633  ye  17  of  August,  died  D.  Gertrude  More,  of  ye 

noble  family  of  Sr  Thomas  ye  famous  Martyr  of  happy  memory.  Shee 
it  was  who  erected  this  Community  &  was  ye  first  y*  was  profess'd  in 
this  house  where  she  afterwards  lived  with  a  great  deal  of  zeale, 
prudence  &  piety,  as  will  appeare  in  her  life  writ  more  at  large,  shee 
left  many  examples  worthy  her  blood  &  vocation,  particularly  in  her 
last  grievous  sickness  (being  indeed  very  terrible)  which  shee  embraced 
with  much  patience  &  conformity  to  ye  Will  of  God,  showing  such  an 
admirable  confidence  in  his  mercy  y*  shee  seem'd  only  to  be  sensible 
y*  shee  was  so  long  detain'd  from  ye  union  &  fruition  of  his  divine 
Majesty  to  which  she  had  ever  tended,  desiring  truely  to  be  dissolv'd 
that  she  might  live  in  Christ  Jesus.  In  fine  she  fought  ye  good  fight 
&  dyed,  as  we  have  reason  to  hope,  most  happily  ye  28  of  her  age,  &  10 
of  her  profession.     Requiescat  in  Pace. 

In  ye  year  1635.  ye  february  24  died  Sr  Elizabeth  Barbara 
Smith  daughter  naturall  of  an  English  Baronet.  She  lived  in  her 
father's  house  without  being  known  eyther  by  herself  or  others  to  be 
his  daughter  though  she  was  maintain'd  by  him  very  handsomely,  but 
for  a  disguise  shee  was  call'd  ye  neece  to  a  gentleman  who  lived  in  ye 
house  &  who  'twas  thought  gave  her  the  maintainence  &  education 
becoming  a  gentlewoman,  till  at  length  her  brother  ye  Baronet's  eldest 
son  fell  deeply  in  love  with  her  (for  she  was  very  beautifull,  of  a  good 
carriage  &  of  an  innocent  harmless  conversation)  ye  young  gentleman 


Ancient  More  seal  quartering  Cresacre,  formerly  an 
heirloom  at  Barnborough  Hall,  but  now  preserved 
at  Stonyhurst  College,  and  reproduced  by  the  kind- 
ness of  the  late  re&or,  Fr.  Herman  Walmesley,  S.J. 


Cath.  Rec.  Soc.  XIII. 


To  face  p.  74. 


CONSOLATION   AT   CAMBRAI,    162O-I793  75 

not  dreaming  she  was  so  neare  related  to  him ;  but  by  good  fortune 
his  father  discovering  his  affection  for  ye  young  lady,  soon  prevented 
his  son's  design  of  marriage  with  her  &  consulting  her  pretended  uncle 
who  was  ye  priest  of  ye  family,  it  was  by  them  judged  best  to  prevent 
all  misfortune  &  keep  her  still  best  unknown,  to  send  her  over  to  a 
monastery  for  education,  shee  being  yet  young  ;  and  accordingly  they 
sent  her  to  this  our  Convent  of  our  Blessed  Lady  in  Cambray,  in 
which  shee  took  to  religion,  &  lived  very  edifyingly  in  her  noviceship, 
so  y*  all  had  great  hopes  shee  would  make  a  good  member  of  ye 
Com  unity,  when  accidentally  shee  got  a  fall  down  staires,  which  shee 
received  such  a  hurt  from,  y*  shee  suffer'd  very  much  with  a  great 
patience,  &  at  length  by  her  sickness  shee  was  brought  to  her  end, 
shee  embraced  death  chearfully  &  dyed  wholy  resigned  to  God's 
divine  will  with  much  internall  peace  and  confidence  in  her  creator 
who  had  so  mercyfully  drawn  her  out  of  ye  vanities  of  the  world, 
before  shee  had  ye  misfortune  to  know  them,  shee  died  in  ye  6th 
month  of  her  probation,  having  on  her  death  bed  often  beg'd  ye 
favour  of  her  profession  and  obtained,  being  dispensed  with.  And 
soon  after  went  to  keep,  as  we  hope,  ye  solemnity  in  Heaven  with  ye 
Saints  &  Angels.     Requiescat  in  Pace. 

On  ye  16  of  August  in  ye  year  1637  our  dear  Sr  Dame  Margaret 
Gascoigne  departed  ys  life  in  ye  29  of  her  age  &  8  of  ,her  profession. 
She  was  daughter  to  Sr  John  Gascoigne  Baronet  of  Barnbow  in  York- 
shire, shee  esteeming  yl  innocence  &  native  goodness  shee  had  de- 
rived from  her  parents  to  be  insufficient,  therefore  laboured  for  more 
purity  of  heart  &  perfection  of  divine  love  in  Religion,  which  by 
means  of  prayer  constantly  prosecuted  shee  obtained,  shee  led  a 
most  abstract  life  in  religion  and  having  chearfully  and  courageously 
trampled  under  foote  all  yt  the  world  calls  great,  &  forsaken  with  a 
generous  contempt  not  only  what  advantages  her  birth  &  education 
offer'd  her  in  ye  world,  but  also  forsaken  her  parents  &  country,  shee 
applyed  herselfe  in  a  profound  solitude  &  silence  to  religious  duties  in 
this  Convent  as  appeares  by  ye  story  of  her  life  writ  in  another  place. 
Her  natural  propension  to  serve  God  was  of  ye  best,  and  knowing  yfc 
al  selfe-seeking  &  propriety  was  all  nature  could  intend,  if  it  were  not 
reformed  by  grace,  her  whole  endeavours  were  to  comit  herselfe  totally 
to  ye  divine  guidance,  y*  shee  might  truely  become  virtuous  in  ye 
sight  of  God,  &  conformable  to  his  Bd  Will.  Her  exemplary  & 
most  comfortable  death  gives  us  great  hopes  y*  shee  now  enjoys  y*  in- 
separable union  with  her  Spouse  our  Saviour  which  wth  all  her  heart 
shee  incessantly  sought  after.     Requiescat  in  pace. 

On  ye  18  of  April  in  ye  year  1640  our  Dr  Sr  D.  Bennet  Morgan, 

daughter  to  Mr  Morgan  of  Weston  in  Warwickshire  departed  this  life 
in  ye  36  year  of  her  age  &  1 7  of  her  profession,  shee  was  one  of  the 
first  nine  that  entered  this  monastery  &  were  the  beginners  of  it, 
wherein  shee  lived  with  edification  to  all,  ever  continuing  in  her  primi- 
tive zeale,  still  striving  by  ye  helps  of  religion  to  perfect  her  soule. 
Her  life  was  free  from  offence  to  her  sisters,  &  her  conversation  very 


76  RECORDS  OF  THE  ABBEY  OF  OUR  LADY  OF 

innocent,  and  her  endeavours  to  please  God  very  great  whilst  sense 
remained  which  allmighty  God  permitted  should  faile  her  some  years 
before  her  death,  which  it  is  believed  she  had  some  kind  of  foresight 
of,  for  ye  night  before  her  infirmity  seazed  her,  shee  was  heard  by 
one  of  ye  religious  y*  was  very  neare  her,  to  rise  several  times  from 
her  bed,  in  ye  night  time,  and  casting  herselfe  on  her  knees,  to  pray 
very  devoutly  to  All:  God,  particularly  shee  was  heard  to  make  in  a 
moderate  voice  many  acts  of  resignation  to  God's  will,  leaveing  herselfe 
to  be  disposed  of  as  he  knew  most  for  his  own  honor  &  ye  good  of  her 
soule.  In  ye  time  of  her  indisposition  as  well  as  before,  she  lived 
inoffensively  to  her  religious  Sisters  &  evidenc'd  in  all  oocasions  yfc 
shee  was  naturally  of  a  devout  spirit ;  on  a  time  when  one  of  ye 
religious  was  speaking  to  a  person  newly  enter'd  ye  house  in  order  to 
be  religious  (D.  Benet  being  present)  and  giving  a  relation  in  obscure 
terms  how  &  at  what  time  shee  fell  into  her  distemper,  D.  Bennet  who 
till  then  had  satt  silent  presently  answered  saying  :  yes  indeed  the  night 
you  mention  was  ye  very  night  I  died  &  I  have  been  dead  ever  since  : 
words  very  remarkable.  In  fine  ye  day  come  when  All.  God  was 
pleased  to  take  her  out  of  this  world  by  a  natural  death,  she  cali'd  to 
ye  religious  who  had  care  to  tend  her  &  desir'd  very  earnestly  shee 
would  permit  her  to  put  on  her  cowl,  for  says  shee,  this  day  I  am  to 
appeare  before  a  great  King,  as  indeed  shee  did,  for  a  very  slight  indis- 
position to  all  others  sight,  took  her  out  of  this  world,  on  y*  very  day 
to  make  her  appearance  before  the  King  of  Kings,  &  we  have  all 
reason  to  hope  her  death  was  pretiosa  in  conspectu  Domini  &c.  Re- 
quiescat  in  Pace. 

In  yd  year  1 640  on  the  7  of  May,  departed  this  life,  Rd  Mother 
Francis  Gawen,  in  ye  64  year  of  her  age,  &  40  of  her  profession. 
She  was  professed  in  ye  English  monastery  at  Bruxelles  of  ye  order 
of  our  H.  Father  St  Beiiet  &  one  of  ye  first  companie  who  began  yfc 
monastery,  in  which  shee  lived  23  years  after  her  profession,  &  from 
thence  shee  came  hither  to  Cambray  to  begin  this  of  ye  same  order  & 
of  ye  English  Congregation,  which  with  much  zeale  of  regular  obser- 
vance &  with  great  care  &  motherly  affection  to  every  one  she 
govern'd  in  ye  office  of  Abbesse  for  ye  space  of  6  years  ever  more 
earnestly  desiring  &  labouring  to  advance  ye  progress  of  ye  Comunity 
in  all  respects.  Afterwards  resigning  her  office  she  betook  herselfe 
to  a  private  life  wherein  for  ye  remainder  of  her  days  shee  much  edified 
her  religious  Sisters  with  good  examples  of  humility  and  obedience 
practising  amongst  them  in  her  life  &  conversation  what  she  had 
before  taught  them  with  great  zeale,  &  being  overtaken  with  old  age 
&  infirmity  when  shee  had  patiently  endured  ye  difficulties  &  pains 
of  long  sickness,  shee  died  as  we  have  cause  to  hope  happily  in  our 
Lord.     Requiescat  in  Pace.     Amen. 

On  ye  13  of  June  in  ye  year  1640  our  Dr  Sr  D.  Anne  Scholastica 
Timperley,  daughter  to  Sr  Thomas  Timperley  in  Suffolk.  Shee 
endur'd  with  much  patience  &  a  wonderfull  resignation  a  long  & 
terrible  sickness  which  continued  for  ye  most  part  of  a  whole  year, 


CONSOLATION    AT    CAMBRAI,    162O-I793  77 

y*  shoe  might  by  many  tribulations  enter  into  ye  Kingdom  of  heaven ; 
for  by  God's  Providence  shee  was  brought  into  so  great  inward  desola- 
tion (being  full  of  most  grievous  pains  &  voyed  of  all  comfort)  as  made 
her  say :  "  Deus  meus  ut  quid  dereliquiste  me  ?  "  &  so  was  led  through 
fire  &  water  unto  Eternall  rest :  shee  lived  very  laudably  in  religion 
wherein  shee  was  an  honor  to  her  family,  an  example  &  comfort  to 
her  religious  Sisters  to  whom  her  life  wld  have  been  most  gratefull  as 
her  death  was  precious  in  ye  sight  of  our  Lord  who  had  bestowed  on  her 
great  talents  both  of  nature  &  grace  with  which  shee  faithfully  coope- 
rating &  diligently  corresponding  to,  hath  inevited  (as  we  may  justly 
hope)  to  be  of  their  number  of  whom  it  is  sayd  yt  inter  [sanctos]  sors 
illorum  est.  Shee  was  a  true  pattern  of  prudence  zeale  &  constancy 
in  all  ye  duties  of  religion.  God  grant  y*  we  who  shee  has  left  behind 
her  in  y*  miserable  world,  may  imitate  her  virtues.  Requiescat  in  Pace. 
Amen.     Shee  died  in  ye  35  of  her  age  &  16  of  Religion. 

On  ye  25  of  January  in  ye  year  1641  our  dr  Sr  D.  Francisca  Lucy 
departed  ys  life  in  ye  20  year  of  her  age  &  first  of  her  profession,  in  yfc 
short  time  after  her  entry  in  religion,  shee  profited  much  in  ye  virtues 
of  humility,  patience  &  resignation,  which  two  last,  her  much  weak- 
ing  &  frequent  sickness  gave  her  much  occasion  to  practice,  as  shee 
did  with  true  devotion,  not  permitting  ye  infirmity  of  her  body  to 
depress  her  mind,  but  raising  to  God  by  a  careful  prosecution  of 
prayer  &  exteriorly  comporting  herselfe  according  to  a  charitable  & 
sweet  conversation,  thereby  meriting  ye  same  from  all  her  religious 
sisters  of  whom  shee  was  well  beloved,  &  her  death  regretted.  Re- 
quiescat in  Pace.     Amen. 

On  ye  6th  day  of  december  in  ye  year  1641  departed  ys  life  our 
dr  Sister  Isette  Angela  Mullins,  a  converse  sister.  It  is  credibly 
reported  of  her  y*  whilst  a  secular  person  shee  led  a  very  devout  life  & 
had  a  vision  of  ye  soules  in  Purgatory  &  of  what  they  suffered,  after 
which  shee  grew  (as  ye  world  calls  it)  pensive  and  thougtfull ;  addicted 
herselfe  to  prayer  &  devotion  &  having  a  vocation  to  dedicate  herselfe 
to  God  in  religion,  shee  came  to  this  our  Convent  in  which  ye  short 
time  shee  lived  a  religious  woman  shee  gave  good  testimonys  of  a 
most  fervent  devotion  &  much  purity  of  heart  truely  seeking  &  intend- 
ing God,  who  to  make  her  more  pleasing  to  himselfe  permitted  her  to 
bear  ye  crosses  of  affliction,  in  particular  of  a  tedious  sickness  in  which 
&  in  many  occasions  shee  showed  much  patience  &  true  resignation, 
giving  us,  by  her  virtue  &  innocent  life,  cause  to  hope  her  death  was 
but  an  entry  into  the  true  life  so  earnestly  desired  by  her.  Requiescat 
in  Pace.  Amen.  Shee  died  in  the  25  of  her  age  &  first  of  her 
profession. 

The  21  of  December  in  ye  year  1645  departed  this  life,  our  Rd 
Mother  Pudentiana  Deacon,  first  religious  in  ye  English  monastery 
at  Bruxelles,  where  shee  lived  1 5  years  to  ye  edification  of  her  Sisters 
carefully  observing  regular  discipline  from  whence  obedience  sent  her 
with  two  more  to  begin  ys  our  convent  of  our  Bd  Lady  of  Consolation 


78  RECORDS  OF  THE  ABBEY  OF  OUR  LADY  OF 

at  Cambray,  shee  being  a  woman  of  a  very  "good  witt,  judgment  & 
understanding,  was  thought  fitt  by  her  superiors  &  others  to  give  help 
in  a  business  of  y*  consequence  as  ye  beginning  of  a  monastery  which 
shee  diligently  performed  joyning  a  great  zeal  of  regular  observance 
with  a  motherly  affection  to  all  &  care  of  all,  as  our  H.  Rule  ordains 
for  ye  cellerier  which  office,  as  also  Mrs  of  ye  novices  shee  laudably 
performed  for  divers  years  togeather  after  ye  beginning  of  this  monas- 
tery. And  having  also  executed  ye  office  of  Prioresse  very  religiously 
&  humbly  for  ten  years  togeather,  at  length  shee  felle  into  great  bodily 
infirmities  which  shee  suffered  with  a  remarkable  patience  &  also  had 
an  unwearied  desire  of  doing  good  to  all  &  serving  ye  community 
to  her  power  which  shee  did  perseverantly  to  ye  very  last  in  ye  office 
of  Prioress.  Her  end  was  pious  &  peaceable  in  ye  64  of  her  age. 
Requiescat  in  Pace.     Amen. 

On  ye  6th  of  March  1648  Sister  Benedicta  Roper  departed  this 
life  in  ye  n  month  of  her  Noviceship  &  in  ye  1 7  of  her  age,  haveing 
lived  allmost  two  years  in  this  community,  an  innocent  sweet  humble 
life,  pleasing  to  God,  with  much  edification  &  content  of  all  y*  saw 
her  &  convers'ed  with  her.  In  time  of  health  shee  was  harmless  cheer- 
full  &  very  regular ;  in  time  of  sickness  she  had  an  unshaken  patience, 
in  both,  resigned  to  God  &  at  all  times  obedient  humble  &  submissive 
to  her  superiors :  some  few  days  before  her  pious  death  shee  suppli- 
cated to  this  Holy  Community  for  her  profession,  which  obtained,  shee 
made  it  conditionally  to  ye  great  content  of  her  mind,  and  as  we  have 
just  cause  to  believe  to  ye  great  benefit  of  her  soule.  And  having 
render'd  her  vows  to  God,  shee  most  willingly  &  resignedly  render'd 
up  her  soule  into  his  hands,  whome  shee  sought  &  sighed  after.  Shee 
was  daughter  to  a  younger  brother  of  ye  Ropers  of  Elltham.  Requi- 
escat in  Pace.     Amen. 

On  ye  18  of  April  1650  died  our  dearest  sister  Dame  Catherine 
Sheldon,  daughter  to  Mr  Sheldon  of  Beoly  in  Warwickshire,  whose 
life,  even  before  shee  enter'd  into  religion  was  very  exemplar.  Shee 
seemed  to  show  a  disgust  of  ye  vaine  pleasures  &  transitory  pastimes 
of  ye  world,  even  in  ye  midst  of  them,  &  her  grave  sober  &  discreet 
comportment,  gained  her  ye  love  &  esteem  of  all  yt  convers'd  with  her. 
Shee  might  have  had  a  very  considerable  portion  in  ye  world  if  shee 
would  have  stayed  with  her  parents,  who  designed  to  have  settled  her 
in  it  very  advantagiously,  but  All :  God  who  designed  her  wholly  for 
himselfe  permitted  y*  all  ye  treaties  made  by  her  parents  to  engage  her 
in  ye  world  were  strangly  &  sometimes  surprisingly  broken  of,  &  came 
to  nothing.  And  at  length  by  the  forceable  &  sweet  conduct  of  ye 
spirit  of  God,  she  enter'd  this  holy  state  of  religion  with  great  courage. 
And  after  her  profession  shee  lived  ye  life  of  a  true  child  of  our 
H.  Father  S*  Benedict,  humble,  obedient,  solitary  &  quiet;  her  in- 
terior solidly  settled  in  God,  her  exterior  modest,  sober,  pleasing  & 
gratefull  to  all  especially  such  as  knew  her  more  intimely.  Shee  had 
always  a  great  love  for  regular  observances,  particularly  the  office  of  ye 
quire,  &  a  true  &  exact  observer  of  'em  as  far  as  her  health  would 


CONSOLATION   AT   CAMBRAI,   1620-1793  79 

permit.  And  tho'  All.  God  tryed  her  with  many  interior  conflicts 
&  temptations  yet  shee  constantly  adhear'd  to  him  &  became  victorious 
by  her  great  confidence  in  God  her  maker  whom  she  loved  and  faith- 
fully served,  practising  true  &  solid  virtue  in  her  life  time,  &  at  her 
death  became  a  perfect  holocaust  wholy  offer'd  up  to  her  beloved 
to  whom  shee  most  peaceably  &  intirely  resignedly  render'd  up  her 
soule  to  him  whom  shee  so  seriously  had  sought  during  her  abode 
in  this  vaile  of  tears.     Requiescat  in  Pace. 

On  ye  first  of  november  1650  our  dr  Sr  Dame  Lucy  Magdalene 
Cary  (departed  this  life,)  daughter  to  ye  Ld  Henry  Vicount  Falkland, 
sometime  Vice  Roy  of  Ireland.  Shee  had  been  some  years  brought 
up  &  liv'd  in  heresy  during  which  time  she  was  carried  away  with  the 
vanities  of  ye  world,  but  we  have  reason  to  believe  yt  All:  God  had 
regard  to  ye  prayers  &  tears  of  ye  lady  her  mother,  who  never  ceas'd 
to  implore  Heaven  for  ye  conversion  of  her  children,  being  a  woman 
of  an  extraordinary  piety  as  will  appear  in  ye  relation  of  her  life 
written  by  a  person  who  knew  her  very  well.  In  fine  our  D.  Magdalena 
cheerfully  abjured  her  heresy  after  shee  had  been  convinced  of  her 
errors  by  a  Rd  Father  of  our  Holy  Congregation,  a  great  friend  of  ye 
Lady  her  mother  and  cast  herselfe  into  ye  lapp  of  ye  Holy  Catholic 
Church,  wherein  she  liv'd  even  during  her  secular  state,  a  very  obe- 
dient, pious  &  zealous  member,  quitting  ye  vanities  of  ye  world  to 
exercise  in  her  mother's  house  more  than  ordinary  mortifications  & 
such  as  indeed  were  rather  to  be  admired  than  imitated  in  such  a 
state.  But  as  for  her  obedience  to  her  mother  after  her  conversion, 
shee  may  be  a  pattern  to  all  children  towards  parents  which  shewes 
ye  efficacy  of  Divine  Grace  in  her  soule,  for  of  an  obstinate,  haughty 
disdainfull  sneering  Lady  (her  own  mother  'scaped  not  her  affronts) 
she  became  as  soon  as  a  convert  to  our  Holy  faith,  a  dutifull,  obedient 
child  to  her  who  was  ye  best  of  mothers,  &  ye  most  charitable  of 
Ladies  to  her  neighbours.  Shee  was  accustomed  to  frequent  ye  Court 
both  of  K.  James  ye  first  tho'  shee  was  then  very  young  and  likewise 
in  ye  time  of  K.  Charles  ye  first  shee  was  much  regarded  in  his  court, 
but  immediately  after  her  conversion  she  retired  herselfe  from  thence 
to  live  with  ye  Lady  her  mother,  where  she  contemned  what  ye  world 
might  think  of  her  suddain  and  extraordinary  change,  &  leaving  her 
vaine  attire  &  dressing,  about  which  shee  had  been  accustomed  to 
spend  dayly  several  howers,  shee  now  cloathed  herselfe  in  decent,  but 
very  homely  dresse,  giving  herselfe  to  ye  practice  of  very  many  virtues. 
At  length  All:  God  very  forcibly  inviting  her  to  seek  &  labour  for 
perfection,  shee  enter'd  into  religion,  wherein  for  the  space  of  1 1  years, 
shee  lived  an  infirme,  sickly  &  suffring  life,  God  leading  her  by  ye  way 
of  ye  crosse  to  ye  end  of  her  life,  which  shee  concluded  with  a  most 
truely,  humble  &  sincere  acknowledgment  of  her  own  nothing,  &  of 
God's  infinite  goodness  &  providence  to  her  as  also  with  an  abandone- 
ment  &  total  resignation  of  herselfe  into  ye  arms  of  his  fatherly  piety, 
having  lead  an  obedient  humble  life,  all  ye  time  shee  had  been  in 
religion  without  any  regard  to  what  shee  had  been  or  might  have  been 
in  ye  world,  which  she  would  never  speak  of  except  of  such  passages 


80  RECORDS  OF  THE  ABBEY  OF  OUR  LADY  OF 

as  would  humble  &  confound  her  being  in  a  particular  manner  very 
sensible  of  ye  many  faults  her  jeering  witt  had  made  her  fall  into 
before  her  conversion,  which  afterwards  shee  did  endeavour  to  satisfy 
for.  In  fine,  worn  out  with  infirmity,  patiently  supported  for  ye  love 
of  God,  by  which  we  have  cause  to  hope  shee  has  through  God's  mercy 
purchased  a  great  crown,  she  peaceably  departed  this  life  leaving  us 
her  religious  sisters  a  good  example  of  humility,  patience  &  obedience. 
Requiescat  in  Pace.     Amen. 

The  13  of  march  165 1  departed  this  life  our  dr  Sr  Dame  Coecilia 
Hall,  daughter  of  Mr  Hall  of  High  Meadow  in  Gloucestershire. 
Shee  was  called  very  young  by  All:  God  to  ye  holy  state  of  religion, 
which  vocation  of  hers,  she  was  permitted  by  her  pious  parents  to 
comply  with,  (her  honorable  mother's  dayly  prayer  &  request  to  All. 
God  was  yt  shee  might  not  be  ye  mother  of  a  lost  soule)  &  in  order 
thereto  she  left  her  country  and  parents  to  whom  shee  was  truly  dear, 
&  came  to  this  our  monastery ;  but  shee  stayed  not  long  because  her 
health  was  so  bad  shee  could  not  comply  with  regular  duties  which 
was  ye  reason  why  shee  returned  to  England  for  ye  recovery  of  her 
strength  in  her  natural  ayre,  where  she  remained  some  years  in  which 
time  she  had  a  full  view  as  well  of  ye  miseries,  as  of  ye  pleasures  of  ye 
world,  for  her  abode  in  England  was  in  ye  time  of  ye  civil  wars,  so  y1 
shee  saw  much  misery,  yet  being  young  &  her  father  having  a  plentifull 
estate  &  all  things  corresponding,  shee  was  in  ye  occasions  of  being 
drawn  to  vanity,  being  in  a  crowd  of  company  where  shee  wanted  not 
admirers,  which  to  a  person  less  steadfast  in  devotion,  might  have 
shok'd  a  vocation,  but  shee  had  a  right  judgment  of  things  &  con- 
sidered well  how  transitory  &  fading  worldly  pleasures  are  &  how  little 
content  such  things  as  the  world  calls  great,  and  hunts  so  much  after 
can  give  ye  soule  at  ye  hour  of  death.  Penetrated  with  these  &  ye 
like  considerations  &  moved  with  ye  love  of  God  &  a  great  desire 
to  please  him  in  ye  most  perfect  manner  shee  was  able,  shee  took  a 
generous  resolution  to  forsake  &  bid  adieu  for  ever  to  friends,  relations 
&  country  &  make  an  intire  sacrifice  of  herselfe  to  God  her  maker 
who  as  shee  most  rationally  esteemed  had  ye  justest  claim  to  her :  to 
effect  this,  having  now  recovered  in  some  sort  her  health,  she  again 
with  much  earnestness  supplicated  to  be  received  into  this  community. 
And  being  admitted,  she  did  with  much  fervor  goe  through  her  novice- 
ship  &  made  her  profession,  to  ye  content  of  ye  convent  &  to  her  own 
great  comfort,  after  which  shee  immediately  fell  sick  &  continued  in 
an  infirme  &  suffering  condition  neere  three  years  which  shee  made 
good  use  of  to  ye  benefit  of  her  soule,  still  praising  God  in  her  corporal 
infirmities.  At  length  by  a  violent  defluxion  shee  was  cast  into  her 
bed  &  suffered  great  pains  for  some  weekes ;  in  fine  being  advertised 
by  ye  physicians  of  her  approaching  death  shee  received  ye  news  with 
great  cheerfullness  &  embraced  death  with  a  contented  mind  which,  as 
we  have  cause  to  hope  was  but  a  translation  into  a  better  world,  ye 
reward  of  such  as  have  courage  to  contemn  this  for  ye  love  of  God 
who  never  failes  to  recompense  those  y*  leave  father  &  mother  & 
adhere  to  him  with  all  their  heart. 


CONSOLATION    AT   CAMBRAI,    1620-1793  8l 

The  18  of  february  1654 — [apparently  the  date  upon  which  the 
foregoing  obituaries  were  written]. 

In  the  year  of  our  Lord  1726,  on  the  2nd  Day  of  August,  in  the 
Monastery  of  Our  Blessed  Lady  of  Consolation,  of  the  English  Con- 
gregation of  Benedictines  at  Cambray,  having  previously  received  all 
the  accustomed  rites  of  the  Church,  died  the  Very  Revd  Lady  Abbess, 
Dame  Scholastica  Houghton,  of  Parke  Hall,  in  the  70th  year  of  her 
age,  52  of  her  religious  profession,  and  the  3rd  of  her  jubilee.  She  was 
a  Lady  highly  distinguished  in  the  World  by  her  descent  from  an  Antient 
and  good  family,  but  still  more  highly  distinguished  by  the  many 
virtuous  actions  which  she  herself  had  performed.  The  exalted 
qualities,  which  she  had  abundantly  received  from  the  partial  kindness 
of  Nature  &  grace,  it  was  her  constant  study  and  business  through 
every  period  of  her  Life  to  employ  in  advancing  the  Interests  of  re- 
ligion and  the  happiness  &  edification  of  her  Sisters.  Under  circum- 
stances peculiarly  unfavourable  &  difficult,  it  was  her  Lot  to  discharge 
the  office  of  Procuratrix  for  the  space  of  thirteen  years,  afterwards  that 
of  Prioress  for  the  space  of  1 1,  &  lastly  that  of  Abbess  for  8 ;  and  she 
discharged  them  all  with  equal  integrity  and  credit.  Sinking  at  length 
under  the  continual  cares  &  Labours  of  her  charge,  she  calmly  closed 
her  eyes  on  this  world,  and  passed  into  Eternity  amidst  the  supplications 
&  tears  of  her  disconsolate  Sisters.  We  earnestly  request  the  assistance 
of  your  charitable  sacrifices  and  prayers  for  the  repose  of  her  soul. 
R.I.P. 

A  Register 

of  such  Benefactors  as  have  notably  advanced  the  Spiritual 
or  Temporal  Good  of  this  Convent  of  our  B.  Lady  of  Con- 
solation Cambray  since  the  beginning  hereof  &  profes- 
sion of  the  Ist  Religious  which  was  January  Ist  1625. 

A.D.  1624   deceased  the  R*  Honble  Rvd  Anthony  de  Winge 

Abbot  of  Liessie  (Latiensis)  to  whom  we  are  obliged  not  only  for  his 
great  temporal  charity  wh.  he  particularly  shewed  to  the  Convent ; 
But  also  withall  devout  Christians  for  his  care  &  expenses  he  was 
at  in  setting  forth  the  Spiritual  Works  of  his  Predecessor  the  Venb,e 
Abbot  Blosius,  so  useful  for  all  devout  people  but  especially  for  all 
Religious  persons. 

Next  followed  the  3  Venerable  Fathers  Leander  a  S.  Martino 
[Jones,  ob.  1635],  Bennet  Jones  [ob.  1639]  &  Austin  Baker  but 
this  collection  tells  more  of  them  than  the  Register,  wh.  as  to  them  I 
let  allone.     This  Father  Austin  died  in  1639  [1641]. 

AD.  1635,  died  the  Most  Noble  Antony  Montmorency  of  the 
Illustrious  family  of  the  Monmorency's  France,  Abbot  of  S.  Andrew's 
in  Cambresis  of  the  H.  O.  of  S.  Bennet,  it  was  he  who  first  gave  us  the 
house  we  live  in.  He  was  during  his  lifetime  a  good  friend  &  Benefactor. 
Next  comes  R.  Father  Clem*  Reyner  [ob.  165 1],  first,  because  he  got 
from  Rome  the  confirmation  of  the  old  Refuge.  Secondly,  In  the 
time  that  he  was  President  (I  use  the  words  of  the  Register)  was  laid 

XIII.  F 


82  RECORDS  OF  THE  ABBEY  OF  OUR  LADY  OF 

the  foundation  of  our  Church  &  Choir,  towards  the  building  of  wh. 
he  gave  us  500^  Sterling.  Likewise  he  gave  us  a  considerable  Relic 
of  the  Holy  Cross,  wh.  is  set  in  a  great  silver  Crucifix.  May  God 
reward  him  for  his  Charity. 

A.D.  1665.  Jan.  13.  [  Weldon  says  Jan.  21]  died  the  V.  R.  F.  Will. 
Walgrave  who  as  well  in  the  time  he  was  Confessor  as  afterwards, 
till  his  Death,  did  in  divers  manners  very  effectually  express  his  Charity 
&  affectionate  Zeal  for  the  good  of  this  Convent,  not  only  being  ready 
to  suffer  inconveniences  himself  on  that  account,  but  also  giving  many 
considerable  presents  for  the  accommodation  of  the  Infirmary  &  other 
places.  He  discharged  considerable  debt  for  the  purchase  of  a  house 
&  bought  another.  In  fine  he  intended  us  many  other  charities  but 
that  Death  prevented  him  for  all  wh.  we  ought  to  pray  for  him. 

Next  follows  F.  Rudesind  [Barlow  >  ob.  1656]  but  with  no 
particular  but  what  is  related.  April  15.  1666.  V.  R.  F.  John 
Meutise  departed  this  life.  He  was  our  Confessor  in  the  Year 
1633.  &  continued  8  years  to  be  so,  in  which  time  &  principally  by 
his  care  &  discipline  Our  Church  &  Choir  were  built  &  likewise 
our  vital  pensions  were  much  by  his  care  &  assistance  procured  & 
settled,  which  for  many  years  was  our  chief  subsistance  He  bore  a 
great  affection  to  our  Convent  much  tendering  the  good  thereof,  for 
wh.  &  for  many  friendly  offices,  we  are  obliged  [to  have  a  grateful 
memory  of  him,  as  of  a  worthy  friend  &  benefactor. 

A.D.  1667.  Aug.  13.  [  Weldon  says  Aug.  6].  V.  R.  F.  Paul 
Robinson  died  who  had  obliged  this  Convent  by  many  Donations 
given  at  several  times  in  rents  &  ready  money,  to  the  value  of  more 
than  500^  Sterling,  besides  the  very  many  more  friendly  offices  of  great 
importance  for  which  he  deserves  to  be  gratefully  remembered  by  us. 

Dec.  5.  [Weldon  says  Sept.  12]  1667.  Very  Rd  F.  Goderic  Blunt 
departed  this  life,  being  Prior  of  S*  Gregory's  in  Douay.  He  did  for 
several  years  together  give  us  10^  Sterling,  per  annum,  &  in  the 
1658  he  gave  to  us  the  sum  of  130^  Sterling,  according  to  his  Will 
signified  at  his  profession.  He  was  always  ready  to  do  any  friendly 
office,  so  that  we  may  with  just  reason  place  him  in  this  number  of  our 
Benefactors. 

A.D.  1663.  Dec.  24.  New  Style.  [Buried  at  Dilston,  Dec.  18.] 
Departed  this  life  our  Honble  Benefactor  Sir  Ed-  Radcliffe  of  Diul- 
ston  in  the  County  of  Northumberland  Baronet,  who,  having  here  in 
this  Convent  2  Daughters  Religious,  was  a  very  good  friend  to  our 
house.  Likewise  on  the  28.  of  Dec.  1668.  [Buried  at  Di/slon,  Dec.  19] 
departed  this  life  his  Lady,  the  Honble  Eliz.  Radcliffe  wife  of  the  above 
said  Sir  Edward.  She  was  a  Noble  Benefactress  to  this  Convent  giving 
us  in  her  lifetime  900^  Sterling  to  establish  for  our  Convent  a  per- 
petual of  54^  per  annum  &  at  her  death  gave  us  50^  Sterling  more. 

A.D.  1643.  Mr  Morgan  of  Weston  in  Warwickshire  departed 
this  life,  who  out  of  charity  gave  to  this  Convent  200^"  Sterling.  He 
had  a  sister  professed  at  the  beginning  of  this  house,  being  one  of  the 
first  9,  but  she  died  some  years  before  her  brother. 

This  was  the  gallant  Colonel  Thomas  Morgan,  of  Weston-under-Wethele, 
co.  Warwick,  who  raised  a  regiment  of  horse  for  the  king  at  his  own  ex- 


CONSOLATION   AT  CAMBRAI,   1620-1793  83 

pense,  and  was  slain  at  the  first  battle  of  Newbury,  Sept.  20,  1643.  He 
married  Jane,  daughter  of  Sir  Richard  Fermor,  of  Somerton,  co.  Oxon,  Knt., 
by  his  first  wife  Jane,  daughter  of  Rowland  Lacon,  of  Willey,  co.  Salop, 
Esq.,  and  his  daughter  Mary  became  a  Carmelite  nun  at  Antwerp.  The 
colonel  was  buried  with  his  wife's  family  at  Somerton. 

A.D.  1685.  Aug.  8.  Departed  this  life  Mr  Lupine  a  Low  Country 
man  &  Canon  of  S.  Gery's  in  the  town  of  Cambray,  who  was  a  most 
constant  friend  to  this  house  for  above  40  years  together.  He  did  for 
more  than  7  years  together  say  our  second  Mass  on  all  Sundays  &  H. 
Days  &  very  frequently  on  the  Week  Days  when  desired.  He  gave  us 
very  considerable  things  useful  both  for  our  Church  &  Monastery.  He 
went  once  to  Bruxsels  to  negotiate  a  business  of  great  importance  to 
our  Convent  &  lived  there  very  sparingly  to  save  us  charges  &  he  was 
in  all  occasions  ready  to  pleasure  us.  He  left  us  a  this  death  a  legacy 
of  25^,  tho'  we  have  not  yet  received  it,  but  our  obligations  are  the 
same  to  him  for  charity  &  good  will. 

A.D.  July  17.  Departed  this  life  Mr  Edward  Thimbelby  Prevot 
&  Canon  of  S.  Gery's  in  Cambray.  He  was  a  good  friend  to  us  for 
many  years  together  on  several  occasions,  in  his  life  he  gave  us  20^  & 
at  his  death  60^"  more. 

Mra  Prudence  Poynts  left  us  at  her  death  ioo;£  Ster.  A.D.  1690, 
March  17,  Sir  James  Philipps  of  Stoke-Charity  in  Hampshire 
Baronet  departed  this  life.  At  his  death  he  left  us  100^  Sterling  & 
his  sister  Mra  Charity  Philipps  left  us  ^50.  Their  family  have  been 
good  friends  to  our  Congrat.  Anno  1701,  Feb.  16,  New  Style,  M™ 
Lettuce  Tasburgh  of  Flixton  departed  this  life;  She  gave  us  at 
several  times  100^. 

Sir  James  Phelips,  4th  and  last  Bart.,  of  Stoke  Charity,  co.  Southampton, 
joined  the  army  of  James  II.  in  Ireland  in  Jan.  1688-9,  and  died  at  Cork 
March  18,  1689-90.  His  sister  Charity  died  unmarried  at  Stoke  Charity, 
Aug.  29,  1674. 

Letitia  Tasburgh  was  one  of  the  seven  daughters  of  Sir  John  Tasburgh, 

**Knt.,  of  Flixton  Abbey,  co.  Suffolk,  by  Letitia,  dau.  and  heiress  of  James 

Cressye,  Esq.,  and  her  brother  Cressye  Tasburgh,  of  Bodney,  co.  Norfolk, 

Esq.,  married  the  widow  of  Sir  Thomas  Phelips,  2nd  Bart.,  uncle  of  the 

4th  Bart. 

A.  1698.  Jan.  28,  New  Style,  died  Sir  Thos  Gascoigne  of 
Barnbow  in  Yorkshire  Baronet  he  gave  to  the  Monastery  at  his  death 
200^  Sterling  &  had  been  in  his  lifetime  a  good  Benefactor  giving 
very  often  considerable  Alms  to  us.  Likewise  his  Father  Old  Sir 
Thomas  who  died  at  Lambspring  was  our  good  Benefactor,  he  gave 
us  several  charities,  &  in  respect  &  kindness  to  his  Daughter  &  niece, 
he  settled  upon  their  lives  10 £  yearly  for  each  which  we  received  for 
many  years  together  during  his  nieces'  life  &  still  receive  for  his 
daughter ;  our  Convent  has  great  obligations  to  that  Family,  who  from 
i8t  beginning  [have]  been  good  Benefactors  to  us. 

Sir  Thomas  Gascoigne,  of  Barnbow,  Parlington,  and  Lasingcroft,  3rd 
Bart,  aged  43  at  the  Visitation  of  Yorkshire  in  1666,  married  Elizabeth,  dau. 
of  William  Sheldon,  of  Beoley,  co.  Worcester,  and  Weston,  co.  Warwick, 
Esq.,  by  Elizabeth,  dau.  of  William,  2nd  Lord  Petre,  but  died  s.p.f  and  the 


84  RECORDS  OF  THE  ABBEY  OF  OUR  LADY  OF 

title  and  estates  passed  to  his  nephew  Thomas,  son  of  his  brother  George; 
His  father,  Sir  Thomas,  2nd  Bart.,  died  at  the  Benedictine  monastery  at 
Lambspring,  of  which  his  brother  John  was  abbot,  May  12,  1686,  aged  93. 
his  daughter,  Dame  Frances,  died  in  1708  ;  and  his  niece  was  Dame  Mary 
Eugenia  Hoghton,  who  died  in  1701. 

An.  1676.  March  20.  died  Mrs  Hall  of  High-Meadows  in  this 
our  Monastery  where  she  had  retired  herself  2  years  before  her  death. 
Her  life  was  very  pious  wh  she  concluded  with  a  happy  end.  She 
was  a  good  friend  &  Benefactor  to  our  Convent  &  lies  buried  amongst 
our  Religious  near  her  Daughter  &  Grand  Daughter,  who  had  both 
been  examplar  Religious  in  this  Monastery  &  her  youngest  Daughter 
who  was  Abbess  when  she  died,  lies  buried  in  the  same  grave  with  her 
with  this  following  Epitaph. 

M.      S. 

Ornatissimae  Matronae  Dfiae 

Annas  Hall  Anglae 

Illustri  Marchionum  Wigorniensium 

In  Anglia  Stemmate  oriundae 

Et 

D.  Benedicti  Hall  de  High  Meadows 

In  agro  Glocestriensi  Torparchae 

Conjugi  et  Viduae 

quae 

Ultima  pcene  Senectute  Patriae  simul 

&  Seculo  renuntians,  ut  sibi 

vacaret  et  Deo,  ex  hoc 

Monrio  in  ccelum 

Migravit  Mart:  20 — 

An:  Salutis  1676 

JEt  suae  79. 

What  follows  is  on  the  same  stone. 

In  spem  Resurrectionis 
Hie  dormit 
R.A  D.  Catherina  Hall  hujus  Monrii  quondam  Abbatissa 
Fuit  insigni  patientia  et  prudentia  ordinata,  suavitate 
morum  multum  amabilis,  immortalem  animam  Patri  Crea- 
tori  sanctissime  reddidit,  mortale  quod  a  Creatura  habuit 
Matri  in  hoc  tumulo  jacenti  pia  gratitudine  restituit  die 
17.  Martii  An  1692 

The  Venble  &  Illustrious  Arch**  Francis  Vanderburgh  deserves 
a  place  amongst  our  Benefactors.  He  was  a  man  of  much  sanctity  & 
particularly  devoted  to  the  B.  V.  Mary,  indefatigable  in  his  Pastoral 
functions ;  being  very  zealous  he  much  reformed  the  Pastors  of  his 
diocese  &  purged  it  from  heretics  5  he  called  for  this  end  a  provincial 
council  in  the  year  1631  in  which  he  presided  in  his  Archiepiscopal 
palace ;  he  did  many  things  in  his  lifetime  worthy  of  eternal  memories 
the  adorning  the  Episcopal  chapel  in  the  Metropolitan  church  enlarging 
the  Episcopal  palace  with  necessary  buildings,  he  gave  (many  things  of 


CONSOLATION    AT   CAMBRAI,    162O-1793  85 

great  worth  both  to  churches  in  the  country  &  almost  to  all  the  churches 
throughout  his  whole  diocese.  But  he  was  especially  zealous  for  the 
Education  of  Youth,  frequently  expressing  how  much  he  believed  all 
Pastors  are  obliged  to  take  care  of  the  instruction  of  Young  Persons, 
on  which  he  said  depended  the  whole  good  of  Religion.  In  this  view 
he  built  &  founded  the  house  called  "  Des  Filles  de  S.  Agnes  "  in  this 
Town  of  Cam  bray  for  ioo  poor  Girls,  natives  of  the  Town  who  should 
have  their  whole  maintenance  &  learning  for  7  years  together  &  then  sent 
away  well  clad.  Likewise  they  are  obliged  to  give  instructions  to  all 
others  who  shall  come  by  day  indifferently  rich  &  poor. 

Also  he  founded  the  Dominical  School,  so  called  because  that  poor 
boys  are  to  be  instructed  there  every  Sunday,  who  have  not  means  to 
go  to  Colleges;  &  to  encourage  them  to  come  to  their  Catechisms 
every  such  boy  as  comes  on  that  account  receives  at  his  going  from 
the  catechism  a  penny  &  a  loaf  of  bread  He  made  many  more  such 
foundations  &  at  his  death  he  left  many  pious  legacies  to  a  great  many 
monasteries  &  some  considerable  alms  to  every  chapel  of  his  Diocese 
where  there  was  any  Image  of  our  B.  Lady  He  was  a  good  friend  to 
this  our  Monastery  of  our  B.  Lady,  to  which  he  left  10^  a  year  at  his 
death,  having  favoured  it  all  his  lifetime. 

It  was  he  that  admitted  this  Convent  into  his  Diocese  &  gave  us 
leave  to  live  subject  to  our  Congregation  only  he  reserved  to  himself 
that  right  of  visiting  in  person  which  authourity  he  never  made  use 
of  neither  has  any  of  his  Successors  ever  done  it,  leaving  us  entirely 
to  our  own  Superiors  &  having  on  all  occasions  showed  much  kindness 
&  civility  to  this  our  Convent,  in  an  especial  manner  this  present 
Archbishop  M^  Fenelon  who  frequently  bestows  considerable  charities 
on  us  &  grants  us  the  honour  &  favour  of  his  protection. 

Many  more  things  might  be  said  of  the  pious  life  of  our  Venble 
Archbishop  Vanderburg  which  are  to  be  seen  in  his  life  by  Mr  Louis 
Foulon  Canon  of  the  Metropolitan  Church  of  Cambray  who  have 
written  simply  of  the  great  &  heroical  actions  of  this  incomparable 
Prelate  who  was  the  79th  bishop  7th  Archbp  &  10th  Duke  of  Cambray 
having  been  ist  Bp  of  Gant  before  his  promotion  to  Cambray. 

He  died  piously  in  our  Lord  at  Mons  in  Hainault  the  23  of  May 
1644  aet  77  Archiepiscopatus  28  &  was  buried  with  great  solemnity  in 
the  Church  of  the  V  R  FF  of  the  S.  of  J. 


NO.  II 

TWO  LISTS  OF  INFLUENTIAL  PERSONS 

APPARENTLY  PREPARED  IN  THE  INTERESTS  OF 

MARY,  QUEEN  OF  SCOTS,  1574  and  1582 

EDITED   BY  JOHN    BANNERMAN   WAINEWRIGHT 

(Record  Office,  Dom.  Eliz.  XCIX,  55,  CLVII,  90) 

The  transcripts  of  these  lists  and  the  materials  for  this  introductory  note 
have  been  supplied  by  the  Rev.  J.  H.  Pollen,  SJ.  For  the  notes  of  identi- 
fication the  Editor  is  solely  responsible. 

The  first  list  belongs  to  the  year  1574.  It  is  written  in  a  small  paper 
book  of  twenty  leaves  endorsed  Recusants  names  ;  but  it  actually  contains 
the  names  of  various  noblemen,  knights,  and  gentry  of  England  and  Wales 
(together  with  those  of  three  Scotsmen),  roughly  grouped  as  "  Catholicks  " 
and  "  Heretikes." 

The  second  list  belongs  to  the  year  1582.  It  is  written  on  two  pages, 
and  is  endorsed  Memorial  the.  It  contains  the  names  of  various  noblemen 
and  knights  of  England  divided  into  Catholic,  Indifferent,  and  Protestant. 

On  the  outside  leaf  of  the  first  list  is  written  : — 

"  Sr  tyas  ot  euouk  eht  etats  fo  eht  eneuq.  d. 
Ducats  12000 
365 
60000 
72000 
36000 


4380000  ducados  iada  anno" 

Of  this  entry  no  explanation  is  attempted.  On  the  fly-leaf  are  the 
following  entries : — 

,,  ffrom  wynkfilde  to  bukstones — 12  mil. 

miles  jto  Congleton — 12  mil.     to  latham  therle  of 

50  [Darbies  house — 20  mil    to  lirpole  6  or  8  mile  /. 

mi  /from  chatsworth  to  congleton — 16  mi 

42  \and  so  to  lirpole  as  before 
miles  (fr°m  Sheffilde  over  the  moores  to  glossoppe — 16  miles 

g  -jto   bery   8   miles    to    blagebourne — 12    miles    to    wyrepole 

4  [12  or  14  miles. 

The  distances  seem  for  the  most  part  singularly  underestimated.  Lirpole 
of  course  is  Liverpool,  bery  Bury,  and  blagebourne  Blackburn.  Wyerpool 
or  Wyer  Water  was  in  those  days,  and  until  Fleetwood  was  built,  an  im- 
portant harbour  for  vessels  of  moderate  burden.  The  important  thing  to 
remark,  however,  is  that  Mary,  Queen  of  Scots,  was  imprisoned  in  the  Earl 
of  Shrewsbury's  manor  at  South  Wingfield,  Derbyshire,  for  some  months 


TWO   LISTS   OF  INFLUENTIAL   PERSONS  87 

in  1569,  and  was  removed  thence  to  Tutbury,  and  thence  to  Coventry,  and 
thence  to  Chatsworth,  and  thence  to  Lord  Shrewsbury's  house  in  Sheffield, 
where  she  was  in  1574. 

It  seems,  therefore,  in  the  highest  degree  probable  that  the  first  list  was 
drawn  up  by  some  adherent  of  Queen  Mary,  to  be  used  in  her  cause. 

When  we  come  to  the  second  list,  the  probability  becomes  a  practical 
certainty.  Its  archetype  is  undoubtedly  the  paper  of  1 5 7 1 ,  now  in  the  Vatican 
Archives,  which  is  printed  in  Prince  A.  LabanofPs  Lettres  de  Marie  Stuart 
(London,  1844),  iii.  251-3.  This  is  a  list  of  English  peers,  which  (as  it  seems 
from  the  confession  of  Robert  Higford,  the  Duke  of  Norfolk's  secretary)  was 
drawn  up  by  Ridolfi,  and  submitted  by  him  to  the  Duke  to  be  annotated. 
Against  certain  names  the  Duke  wrote  P.  for  propitius,  against  others  H. 
for  hostis,  and  against  others  N.  for  neuter.  In  the  printed  list  occasionally 
N  is  followed  by  the  sign  4- ,  which  seems  to  express  a  doubt  whether  the 
N  should  not  be  H. 

Father  Pollen  has  found  lists  similar  to  the  above  relating  to  Scotland, 
and  has  published  them  in  the  Scottish  Historical  Society's  volume,  Papal 
Negotiations  with  Mary,  Queen  of  Scots. 

Among  the  "articles to  be  ministered  to  [B.  Thomas]  Cottam,  [B.  Luke] 
Kirby,  and  others,  of  late  *  committed  to  the  Tower,"  is  the  following :  f — 
"  Whether  have  you  not  heard  of  some  Catalogues  of  names  of  the  principal 
favourers  of  the  Romish  religion  within  this  realm  have  been  delivered  to 
the  Pope,  and  what  principal  persons  do  you  remember  to  have  been  con- 
tained in  the  said  catalogue  ?  " 

Of  some  such  catalogue  our  first  list  appears  to  be  a  rough  draft.     As  it 
does  not  recognise  neutrals,  it  includes  under  the  name  of  Catholics  very 
many  to  whom  the  designation  is  wholly  inapplicable. 
In  the  following  notes : — 
D.N.B.  means  The  Dictionary  of  National  Biography. 
H.S.P.  means  Harleian  Society  Publications. 
C.R.S.  means  the  publications  of  this  Society. 
N.  &r*  Q.  means  Notes  and  Queries. 

The  Calendars  of  State  Papers  Foreign  or  Domestic  are  alluded  to  by 
the  first  year  which  each  covers — e.g.  Cal.  Dom.  1547,  Calendar 
of  State  Papers   Domestic  1547-80,  and  Cal.  Dom.  Add.   1566, 
Calendar  of  State  Papers  Domestic  Addenda  1566-79. 
Camden  Misc.  IX.  means  the  paper  on  Letters  of  the  Bishops  to  the 
Privy  Council,  published  in  the  IXth  Camden  Miscellany  (London, 
1895),  and  Cal.  Cecil  MS S.  refers  to  the  Calendar  of  Cecil  MSS. 
preserved  at   Hatfield,  and  published   by  the    Historical    MSS. 
Commissioners. 
It  has  also  seemed  advisable  to  use  the  following  abbreviations  : — 
Baines  =  Baines  (E.),  History  of  Lancashire  (London,  &c,  1836). 
Berry,  Bucks  =  Berry  (W.),  Bucks  Genealogies  (London,  1837). 
Berry,  Hants  =         „  Hants  „  (      „         1833). 

Berry,  Sussex=        „  Sussex  „  (      „         1830). 

Berry,  Surrey •=       „  Surrey  „  (       „         1837). 

Blomefield=Blomefield  (F.),  Norfolk  (London,  1805-10). 
Bradney  =  Bradney  (J.),  Monmouthshire  (London,  1904-7). 
Brayley  =  Brayley  (W.  E.),  Surrey  (London,  1878-81). 
Camm  =  Camm  (B.),  op.  cit. 
Cal.  Inner  T.  Pec.  =  Calendar  of  Inner  Temple  Records  (London,  1896- 

1901). 
Cokayne  =  Cokayne  (G.  E.),  Complete  Peerage  (London,  1887-98). 

*  4  Dec.  1580. 

t  Camm  (B.),  Lives  of  the  English  Martyrs  (London,  1904-5),  ii.  506. 


88  TWO   LISTS   OF   INFLUENTIAL   PERSONS 

Cokayne,  i?.  =  Cokayne  (G.  E.),  Baronetage  (Exeter,  1900-1909). 
Cox=Cox  (J.  C),  Churches  of  Derbyshire  (Chesterfield,  &c,  1875—9). 
Dasent  =  Dasent  (J.  R.),  Acts  of  the  Privy  Council  (London,  1890-1907). 
Foster,  G.  V.  Y.  =  Foster  (J.),  Glover's    Visitation  of  Yorks  (London, 

1875). 
Foster,  D.  V.P.  —  Foster  (J.),  Durham  Visitation  Pedigrees  (London, 

1887). 
Foster,  G.I. R.=  Foster  (J.),  Gray's  Inn  Register  (London,  1889). 
Gachet  =  two  articles  in  Commission  Royale  d'Histoire,  Compte-Rendu 

des  Stances,  ire  Serie  iii.  et  xvi.  (Bruxelles). 
Gage  =  Gage  (J.),  Hengrave  (London,  1822). 
Gillow  =  Gillow  (J.),  Bibliographical  Dictionary  of  English  Catholics 

(London,  &c,  1885-1902). 
Hamilton  =  Hamilton    (A.),    Chronicle    of  the   English    Augustinian 

Canonesses  of  St.  Monica's,  Louvain,  1548-1625  (Edinburgh,  1904). 
Hasted  =  Hasted  (E.),  Kent  (Canterbury,  1778-99). 
Howard  =  Howard  (J.  J.),  Hervey's  Visitation  of  Suffolke  (Lowestoft, 

&c,  1866-76). 
Knox=Knox  (T.  F.),  First  and  Second  Diaries  of  the  English  College, 

Douay  (London,  1878). 
Manning  and  Bray  =  Manning  (O.)  and  Bray  (W.),  Surrey  (London, 

1804-14). 
Marshall  =  Marshall  (G.  W.),  Visitation  of  Wilts  (London,  1882). 
MJ.T.  =  Members  of  the  Inner  Temple  (London,  1877). 
Metcalfe,  Northants=  Metcalfe  (W.  C),  Visitation  of  Northamptonshire 

(London,  1887). 
Metcalfe,  Suffolk**  Metcalfe  (W.   C),   Visitation  of  Suffolk  (Exeter, 

1882). 
Metcalfe,    Worcs.—  Metcalfe    (W.   C),    Visitations  of   Worcestershire 

(Exeter,  1883). 
Nash  =  Nash  (T.),  Worcestershire  (London,  &c,  1781-2). 
Nicholas  =  Nicholas  (T.),  Annals  of  Counties  and  County  Families  of 

Wales  (London,  1871-2). 
Pollen  =  Pollen  (J.  H.),  Acts  of  the  English  Martyrs  (London,  1891). 
Proost  =  an  article  in  the  Messager  des  Sciences   Historiques  (Gand, 

1865). 
Rec.  Line.  Inn  Adm.  =  Records  of  Lincoln's  Inn,  Admissions  (London, 

1896). 
Rudder  =  Rudder  (S.),  Gloucestershire  (Cirencester,  1779). 
Sharp  =  Sharp  (Sir  C.),  Memorials  of  the  Rebellion  of  1569  (London, 

1840). 
Shaw=Shaw  (W.  A.),  Knights  of  England  (London,  1906). 
Strype,  ^4.  =  Strype  (J.),  Annals  (Oxford,  1824). 
Strype,  P.=  „         Parker  (Oxford,  1821). 

Strype,  W.=         „  Whitgift  (Oxford,  1822). 

Surtees  =  Surtees(R.),  Durham  (London,  1825-40). 
Vict.  Hist.  =  The  Victoria  Histories  of  the  various  Counties  now  being 

published. 
Vivian,   Cornwall^  Vivian   (J.    L.),   Visitations  of  Cornwall  (Exeter, 

1887). 
Vivian,  Devon =  Vivian  (J.  L.),  Visitations  of  Devon  (Exeter,  1895). 
Weaver,  Heref  =  Weaver  (F.  W.),  Cooke's  Visitation  of  Herefordshire 

(Exeter,  1886). 
Weaver,    Somerset = Weaver    (F.    W.),    Visitations    of   Somersetshire 

(Exeter,  1885). 


TWO   LISTS   OF   INFLUENTIAL   PERSONS  89 

FIRST  LIST. 

[Page  1.]         Catholicks  (a)  in  Inglonde  1574. 

1  Erie  of  Worcester  (b)  (1). 

2  Erie  of  Southampton  (b)  (2). 

3  Erie  of  Oxforde     veir  (b)  (3). 

4  Erie  of  Comberlande  (6)  (4). 

5  Earle  of  Arondell  (b)  (5). 

6  Marques  of  Winchester  (paulet)  (b)  (6). 

1  Lorde  Montacute     +(b)  (7). 

2  Lorde  lomley     -f  (b)  (8). 

3  Lorde  giles  paulet  (9). 

4  lorde  chid  pawlet     +(10). 

5  lorde  pagett     -{-(b)  (n). 

6  lorde  darcy  north     +(12). 

(a)  See  Introduction  above,  p.  87. 
(£)  See  Cokayne. 

(1)  William  (Somerset),  one  of  the  Commissioners  for  the  trial  of  the  Queen  of 
Scots  in  October  1586,  3rd  Earl  of  Worcester.     {D.N.B.  liii.  247.) 

(2)  Henry  (Wriothesley),  2nd  Earl  of  Southampton.    {D.N.B.  Ixiii.  152.) 

(3)  Edward  (de  Vere),  one  of  the  Commissioners  for  the  trial  of  the  Queen  of 
Scots  in  October  1586,  17th  Earl  of  Oxford.     {D.N.B.  lviii.  225.) 

(4)  George  (Clifford),  one  of  the  Commissioners  for  the  trial  of  the  Queen  of 
Scots  in  October  1586,  3rd  Earl  of  Cumberland.     {D.N.B.  xi.  59.) 

(5)  Henry  (Fitzalan),  12th  Earl  of  Arundel.     {D.N.B.  xix.  88.) 

(6)  John  (Paulet),  2nd  Marquess  of  Winchester. 

(7)  Anthony  (Browne),  one  of  the  Commissioners  for  the  trial  of  the  Queen  of 
Scots  in  October  1586,  1st  Viscount  Montague.     {D.N.B.  vii.  40.) 

(8)  John  (Lumley),  one  of  the  Commissioners  for  the  trial  of  the  Queen  of  Scots 
in  October  1586,  6th  or  7th  Baron  Lumley.     {D.N.B.  xxxiv.  272.) 

(9)  Lord  Giles  Paulet,  3rd  son  of  the  1st  Marquess  of  Winchester,  was  admitted 
to  Gray's  Inn  1544;  married  Mary,  d.  of  Nicholas  Trappes,  and  had  one  son 
and  two  daughters.  He  lived  at  Cottles,  Wiltshire.  (Marshall,  92 ;  Foster, 
G.LR.  17.) 

(10)  Lord  Chideock  Paulet  (4th?),  son  of  the  1st  Marquess  of  Winchester,  lived 
at  Wade  near  Warblington,  Hampshire.  He  was  married,  and  had  issue,  according 
to  Burke's  Peerage,  which,  (erroneously,  if  Marshall  is  to  be  trusted,)  makes  him 
3rd  son.  He  was  Receiver  of  Hampshire,  and  Captain  of  Portsmouth  from  1552  to 
1562.  He  retained  Elizabeth's  confidence  to  some  extent,  for  on  10  January  1567 
he  was  appointed  head  of  a  commission  to  inquire  into  concealed  lands  belonging 
to  suppressed  religious  houses  in  Hants  and  Berks.  In  1569  he  refused  to  subscribe 
the  Act  of  Uniformity  ;  and  in  1578  he  was  a  recusant,  residing  at  the  Spittle-without- 
Bishopsgate,  London,  where  mass  was  being  said.  (Dasent ,  iv.-vii.  ;  Cal.  Dom. 
1547,  207,  287,  348  ;  Cal.  Dom.  Add.  1566,  550-1.) 

It  is  probable  that  both  Lord  Giles  and  Lord  Chideock  died  not  very  long  after 
the  date  of  this  document. 

(11)  Thomas  (Paget),  3rd  Baron  Paget.     {D.N.B.  xliii.  59.) 

(12)  Edward  (Dacre),  styling  himself  Lord  Dacre  of  Gillsland  or  of  the  North,  is 

auite  ignored  by  Cokayne.  His  brother  Leonard,  who  had  been  receiving  1200 
ucats  a  year  from  the  King  of  Spain,  died  at  Brussels,  12  Aug.  1573.  Up  to  his 
brother's  death  Edward  Dacre  had  been  receiving  720  ducats  a  year,  but  this  allow- 
ance was  then  increased  to  1200  ducats.  On  1  Dec.  1574  Thomas  Wilson,  the 
English  Ambassador,  formally  demanded  the  expulsion  of  Edward  Dacre  and  various 
other  English  refugees  from  Spanish  territory,  and  this  demand  was  repeated  in  a 
letter  from  Queen  Elizabeth,  dated  3  July  1575.  He  resided  at  Namur,  but  after- 
wards came  to  Rheims.  The  date  of  his  death  has  not  been  ascertained.  (Knox, 
157,  161-4,  298  ;  Proost,  284-6;  Gachet,  xvi.  19-21.) 


8 

9 

IO 

ii 

12 

13 

14 

J5 

1 

Worce 

2 

War: 

3 

Suff 

4 

Suff 

5 

Suff 

6 

Suff 

7 

|-Darb 

8 

90  TWO   LISTS   OF  INFLUENTIAL   PERSONS 

lorde  Stafforde  (b)  (13). 

lorde  harbart  erle  of  Wor  sonne  (b)  (14). 

lorde  talbot  (b)  (15). 

lorde  wharton  (b)  (16). 

lorde  Vaus  (b)  (17). 

lorde  monteigle     -\-(b)  (18). 

lorde  Compton     -f  (£)  (19). 

lorde  Sturton     +(b)  (20). 

lorde  henry  br  to  the  late  d  of  norf :  (b)  (21). 

Sr  Ihon  Arondell     +(22). 

Sr  Ihon  Throgmarten  (23). 

Sr  Rob*  Throgmrten     +  (24). 

Sr  Thos  cofwallis     +(25). 

Sr  henry  beningfild     +(26). 

Sr  Ihon  Sulliarde     +(27). 

Sr  Raulfe  Chamberleine  (28). 

Sr  Thorns  Stanley     +(29). 

(&)  See  Cokayne. 

(13)  Edward  (Stafford),  one  of  the  Commissioners  for  the  trial  of  the  Queen  of 
Scots  in  October  1586,  3rd  Baron  Stafford. 

(14)  Edward  (Somerset),  4th  Earl  of  Worcester. 

(15)  Francis  Talbot,  1st  s.  and  h.  ap.  of  George,  6th  Earl  of  Shrewsbury. 

(16)  Thomas  (Wharton),  2nd  Baron  Wharton.     {D.N.B.  lx.  416.) 

(17)  William  (Vaux),  3rd  Baron  Vaux  of  Harrowden.     {D.N.B.  lviii.  196.) 

(18)  William  (Stanley),  3rd  Baron  Monteagle. 

(19)  Henry  (Compton),  one  of  the  Commissioners  for  the  trial  of  the  Queen  of 
Scots  in  October  1586,  1st  Baron  Compton.     {C.R.S.  ii.  27,  180,  181.) 

(20)  John  (Stourton),  one  of  the  Commissioners  for  the  trial  of  the  Queen  of 
Scots  in  October  1586,  9th  Baron  Stourton. 

(21)  Lord  Henry  Howard,  afterwards  1st  Earl  of  Northampton.  {D.N.B. 
xxviii.  28.) 

(22)  For  Sir  John  Arundell,  called  "the  great  Arundell  of  Cornwall,"  son  and 
grandson  of  knights  of  the  same  name,  see  D.N.B.  ii.  141,  as  corrected  and  sup- 
plemented by  N.  6°  Q.y  nth  Series,  iii.  415,  491. 

(23)  Sir  John  Throckmorton.  {D.N.B.  lvi.,  s.v.  Throckmorton,  Francis.)  He 
was  knighted  21  Aug.  1565.     (Shaw,  ii.  72.) 

(24)  Sir  Robert  Throckmorton,  e.s.  of  John  Throckmorton,  of  Weston  Under- 
wood, Warwickshire,  by  Agnes,  d.  of  Thomas  Wilford,  of  Lenham,  Lancashire,  was 
knighted  in  or  before  1564,  in  which  year  he  was  a  J. P.,  and  declined  to  subscribe  to 
the  Act  of  Uniformity  in  1569.  (Hamilton,  94:  Cal.  Dom.  1547,  363,  366;  Cam- 
den Misc.  ix.  7.) 

(25)  Sir  Thomas  Cornwallis.     {D.N.B.  xii.  242.)     See  also  Gage. 

(26)  Sir  Henry  Bedingfield.     {D.N.B.  iv.  113.) 

(27)  Sir  John  Sulyard,  of  Wetherden,  Suffolk,  High  Sheriff  of  Norfolk  and 
Suffolk,  1555-6,  knighted  1557  ;  married  (1)  Elizabeth,  d.  of  Sir  Edmund  Beding- 
field, of  Oxborow  [Oxburgh] ;  (2)  Elizabeth,  d.  of  Sir  John  Jerningham,  of  Somerley- 
ton,  by  whom  he  had  two  sons,  Edward  and  Thomas,  both  recusants ;  and  (3)  Alice, 
d.  of  Humphrey  Carvell,  of  Wignall  St.  Mary's,  Norfolk.  (Metcalfe,  Suffolk,  70, 
168;  Dasent,  v.;  Shaw,  ii.  76.) 

(28)  Sir  Ralph  Chamberlayne,  of  Gedding,  Suffolk,  was  an  officer  in  the  Navy, 
knighted  2  October  1553.  He  was  Vice- Admiral  of  the  Narrow  Seas,  1556-8. 
(Dasent,  vi. ;  Shaw,  ii.  66.) 

(29)  Sir  Thomas  Stanley,  of  Winswick,  Derbyshire,  2nd  s.  of  Edward,  3rd 
Earl  of  Derby,  K.G.,  was  knighted  2  October  1553;  married  Margaret,  d.  and 
co-heir  of  Sir  George  Vernon  of  the  Peak;  was  in  the  Tower  1572  for  a  supposed 
conspiracy  on  behalf  of  the  Queen  of  Scots,  and  died  in  1576.  (Burke,  Peerage  ; 
C.R.S.  \.  59;  Shaw,  ii.  66.) 


Darb 

9 

Sr 

Kent 

IO 

Sr 

Norff 

ii 

Sr 

Camb 

12 

Sr 

York 

J3 

Sr 

York 

14 

sr 

Lancash 

15 

sr 

Surrey 

16 

sr 

TWO   LISTS   OF  INFLUENTIAL   PERSONS  91 

Thorns  Gearret     +  (30). 
warrhm  S*  leger     +(31). 
Xpofer  heidon  (32). 
Ihon  Colton  (33). 
Gervais  Clifton     -f  (34). 
Willm  Inglebye  (35). 
Ihon  Southworth     +(36). 
henry  Weston  (37). 

(30)  Sir  Thomas  Gerard,  of  Bryn,  Lancashire,  Etwall,  Derbyshire,  &c,  ancestor 
of  the  Lords  Gerard,  was  knighted  2  October  1553.  In  1558  he  was  High  Sheriff  of 
Lancashire.  He  was  in  the  Tower  1 571-1572  for  a  supposed  conspiracy  on  behalf 
of  the  Queen  of  Scots,  and  again  23  August  1586  to  16  October  1588  for  supposed 
complicity  in  the  Babington  plot.  At  the  latter  date  he  was  removed  to  the  Counter 
in  Wood  St.  He  married  Elizabeth,  d.  and  co-h.  of  Sir  John  Port  of  Etwall.  He 
died  in  September  1601.  Both  he  and  Lady  Gerard  were  recusants  in  1587. 
(Strype,  A.  III.  ii.  597  ;  Gillow,  ii.  424-6;  C.R.S.  i.  59,  ii.  passim ;  Shaw,  ii.  67.) 

(31)  Sir  Warham  St.  Leger.    (D.N.B.  1.  167.) 

(32)  Sir  Christopher  Heydon,  of  Baconsthorpe,  Norfolk,  was  knighted  in  or  after 
1549,  and  succeeded  his  grandfather  at  Baconsthorpe  in  1551.  High  in  the  confi- 
dence of  Queen  Mary,  he  was  also  a  persona  grata  with  Queen  Elizabeth,  and  was 
appointed  a  commissioner  for  the  repression  of  piracy  in  1565.  He  married  (1) 
Anne,  d.  of  Sir  William  Drury,  of  Halstead,  Suffolk,  who  died  7  Sept.  1561  ;  (2) 
Temperance,  d.  of  Sir  Wimond  Carew,  of  Antony,  Cornwall,  who  died  9  Oct.  1577  ; 
and  (3)  Agnes,  d.  of  Robert  Crane,  of  Chilton,  Suffolk,  who  survived  him,  and  married 
Sir  Edward  Clere.  He  died  10  Dec.  1579.  (Blomefield,  vi.  507 ;  Shaw,  ii.  64  ; 
Dasent,  iv.-xu,  xxxii.  152;  Howard,  i.  146.) 

(33)  Sir  John  Cotton,  of  Land  wade,  Cambridgeshire,  was  knighted  2  Oct.  1553  ; 
married  Isabel,  d.  of  Sir  William  Spencer  of  Althorp,  and  died  1593.  He  signed 
the  Act  of  Uniformity  as  a  J.  P.  in  1569.  (Shaw,  ii.  67;  H.S.P.  xli.  22;  Camden 
Misc.  ix.  24,  25.) 

(34)  Sir  Gervase  Clifton,  of  Clifton,  Nottinghamshire,  b.  about  April  1516,  was 
knighted  on  or  before  15  Nov.  1538,  and  was  "generally  styled  Gentle  Sir 
Gervase."  He  seems  to  have  been  in  high  favour  with  Queen  Elizabeth.  He 
married  (1)  Mary,  d.  of  Sir  John  Neville,  of  Chete,  Yorks  ;  and  (2)  Winifred,  d. 
and  co-h.  of  William  Thwaites,  of  Oulton,  Suffolk,  and  widow  of  Sir  George  Pierre- 
point,  of  Holme.  He  was  a  J.P.,  described  by  the  Protestant  bishop  as  "  in  religion 
very  cold,"  in  1564.  He  died  about  20  Jan.  1587/8.  (Thoroton,  Nottinghamshire 
(London,  1797),  i.  107 ;  Shaw,  ii.  51  ;  Camden  Misc.  ix.  72.) 

(35)  Sir  William  Ingilby,  of  Ripley,  Yorks,  was  knighted  23  Sept.  1545,  Trea- 
surer of  Berwick,  January  1557/8  to  July  1562,  High  Sheriff  1564.  As  Joint  Vice- 
Steward  and  Joint  Vice-Constable  of  Knaresburgh  Castle  with  Francis  Slingsby 
under  the  Earl  of  Cumberland,  he  refused  to  be  drawn  into  participation  with  the 
Northern  Rising  of  1569.  He  married  Anne,  d.  of  Sir  William  Mallory,  of  Studley. 
Their  4th  son  was  the  Ven.  Francis  Ingilby.  (Foster,  G.V.Y.  283;  Shaw,  ii.  57; 
Dasent,  vii.  113;  Cal.  Dom,  Add.  1547,  467;  Cal.  Dom  Add.  1566,  passim; 
Pollen,  304  ;  Camden  Misc.  ix.  72.) 

(36)  Sir  John  Southworth,  of  Samlesbury,  near  Blackburn,  Lancashire,  was 
knighted  in  September  1547.  Two  of  his  sons  (respectively  the  2nd  and  4th), 
John  {C.R.S.  vi.  158 «.)  and  Christopher  {C.R.S.  i.  74,  ii.  passim,  vi.  158  «.), 
were  priests.  In  addition  to  C.R.S.  iv.  180,  see  Baines,  i.  535,  538,  539,  iii.  354 ; 
Shaw,  ii.  61  ;  Dasent,  xiii.-xv. 

(37)  Sir  Henry  Weston,  b.  1535  (s.  of  Sir  Francis  Weston,  K.B.,  of  Sutton 
Place,  Woking,  Surrey,  who  was  executed  for  adultery  with  Queen  Anne  Boleyne), 
was  restored  in  blood  1550,  served  at  the  siege  of  Calais  1557-8,  was  created  K.B. 
15  Jan.  1558/9,  and  twice  entertained  Queen  Elizabeth  at  Sutton  Place.  He 
married  Margaret  (or  Dorothy),  d.  of  Sir  Thomas  Arundell,  K.B.,  of  Dorset,  and 
dying  11  April  1592  was  buried  in  the  Church  of  the  Holy  Trinity,  Guildford. 
{D.N.B.  Ix.  360 ;  Brayley,  i.  248 ;  Manning  and  Bray,  iii.  123  ;  Shaw,  i.  153.) 


92  TWO    LISTS    OF   INFLUENTIAL   PERSONS 

Surrey  17     Sr  Edwarde  bray  (38). 

Yorksh  f  18     Sr  Wm  babthorpe  of  babthorp  (39). 

est        I  19     Sr  Mrmaduke  cunstable  of  everingham  (40). 

Ridg     [  20     Sr  Ihon  cunstable  of  cunstable  burton  (41). 

nor  wales  21     Sr  Rice  griffith  of  Carnarvonshire  (42). 

Derbyshire  22     Sr  Ihon  Salisbery  (43). 

flintshire  23     Sr  tho  Hanmer  (44). 

Yorksh  24  [  Sr  edwarde  gore  of  Stetinam  (45). 

nor  25  j  Sr  Wm  fairefax  of  gillinge  (46). 

Rid.  26  [  Sr  Rich  chomley  of  Rokesly  (47). 

(38)  Sir  Edward  Bray  (e.  s.  of  Sir  Edward  Bray,  sometime  Lieutenant  of  Calais 
Castle,  and  M.P.  for  Surrey,  jby  Beatrice  Shirley,  his  2nd  wife)  was  knighted 
18  July  1560.  He  was  M.P.  for  Helston,  Cornwall,  1570-1,  and  was  in  the  Queen's 
Bench  prison  for  debt  in  1577.  He  married  (1)  Mary,  d.  of  Simon  Elvington,  of 
Northton  ;  (2)  Elizabeth,  d.  of  William  Roper,  of  Eltham,  Kent,  who  was  buried  at 
Eyton  Bray  in  Aug.  1560;  (3)  Magdalene,  d.  of  Sir  Thomas  Cotton,  who  was  buried 
at  Shere,  8  March  1563  ;  and  (4)  Mary,  whose  parentage  is  unknown.  She  survived, 
and  married  Edmund  Tilney,  master  of  the  revels.  He  was  buried  at  Shere,  Surrey, 
10  May  1581.    (Berry,  Surrey,  37  ;  Shaw,  ii.  71  ;  Dasent,  x.  93.) 

(39)  Sir  William  Babthorpe, 'of  Babthorpe,  Yorks,  e.  s.  of  a  knight  of  the  same 
name,  was  knighted  18  July  1560,  and  having  married  (1)  Barbara,  d.  of  Sir  Robert 
Constable,  of  Everingham,  and  (2)  Frances,  d.  of  Sir  Thomas  Dawney,  of  Sezay,  was 
imprisoned  in  1580,  and  died  in  the  spring  of  1581.  The  second  Lady  Babthorpe 
was  a  recusant  in  1587.  He  is  described  in  1564  as  "Justice  of  Peace  and  no 
favourer  of  religion."  (Foster,  G.V.Y.  598;  Shaw,  ii.  71;  Simpson,  Edmund 
Campion  (edn.  1896),  29,  236 ;  Strype,  A.  II.  ii.  359,  III.  ii.  597  ;  Camden  Misc. 
ix.  71.) 

(40)  Sir  Marmaduke  Constable,  of  Everingham,  Yorks  (e.  s.  of  Sir  Robert,  and 
brother-in-law  of  the  preceding),  was  knighted  in  September  1547.  He  took  the 
Queen's  side  in  the  Northern  Rising  of  1 569,  and  became  a  member  of  the  Council 
of  the  North  in  May  1574.  He  married  Jane,  d.  of  Christopher,  Lord  Conyers,  and 
died  before  1582.     (Foster,  G.  V.  Y.  198  ;  Shaw,  ii.  62  ;  Cal.  Dom.  Add.  1566.) 

(41)  Sir  John  Constable,  of  Constable  Burton,  Yorks  (e.  s.  of  a  knight  of  the 
same  name),  admitted  to  Gray's  Inn  1544,  was  knighted  2  October  1553.  He 
married  (1)  Margaret,  d.  of  John,  Lord  Scrope ;  and  (2)  Katharine,  d.  of  Henry, 
Earl  of  Westmorland.  He  seems  to  have  been  a  Protestant.  He  died  before  1584. 
(Shaw,  ii.  68  ;  Foster,  G.I.R.  17  ;  G.  V.  Y.  57,  58  ;  Camden  Misc.  ix.  71.) 

(42)  Sir  Rice  Griffith  of  Penrhyn,  Sheriff  of  Carnarvonshire  1567,  M.P.  for 
Carnarvon  1555,   was  knighted  Feb.  22   1546/7.     (Shaw,  ii.   60;  Nicholas,  344, 

349-) 

(43)  There  is  no  Sir  John  Salisbury  of  Derbyshire  to  be  discovered  by  such 
contemporary  documents  as  have  been  accessible  to  the  present  writer.  One  John 
Salisbury,  knighted  22  Feb.  1546/7,  was  one  of  the  two  Receivers  of  Wales  in  1560. 
He  was  of  Llewenny,  Denbighshire,  and  died  about  1566.  He  married  Katharine 
Tudor,  by  whom  he  had  issue.  It  is  possible  that  the  writer  of  the  list  here  anno- 
tated confused  Denbighshire  and  Derbyshire,  and  had  not  heard  of  Sir  John's  death. 
(See  D.N.B.  under  Salisbury  (Thomas)  and  Clough  (Richard) ;  Shaw,  ii.  60.) 

(44)  Sir  Thomas  Hanmer,  of  Hanmer,  Flintshire,  knighted  22  Feb.  1546/7,  by 
his  2nd  wife  Catherine,  d.  of  Sir  Thomas  Mostyn,  was  father  of  the  first  Bart.  He 
died  18  April  1619.     (Shaw,  ii.  60;  Cokayne,  B.  i.  152.) 

(45)  Sir  Edward  Gower,  of  Stittenham,  Yorks,  knighted  in  1527,  who  married 
Margery,  d.  of  Sir  Robert  Constable,  of  Flamborough,  must  have  died  before  or  soon 
after  this  list  was  drawn  up.     (Shaw,  ii.  46 ;  Foster,  G.  V.  Y.  226.) 

(46)  Sir  William  Fairfax,  of  Gilling,  Yorks,  admitted  to  Gray's  Inn  1544, 
knighted  21  July  1560,  married  a  daughter  of  Sir  [?  Richard]  Stapleton,  of  Notting- 
hamshire. He  became  a  Member  of  the  Council  of  the  North  in  November  1582. 
(Shaw,  ii.  71  ;  Foster,  G.I.R.  17  ;  G.  V.  Y  39  ;  Cal.  Bom.  Add.  1580,  80.) 

(47)  Sir  Richard  Cholmeley,  of  Roxby,  Yorks,  knighted  11  May  1544,  was  High 
Sheriff  of  Yorkshire  1556-7,  and  governor  of  Scarborough  Castle  from  1557  to  his 


TWO   LISTS    OF   INFLUENTIAL   PERSONS  93 

Yorksh  27  f  Sr  Wm  Bellassis  of  newbrough  howse  (48). 

nor  Rid.  sS\  Sr  Thorns  Danby  (49). 

glamorgansh  29     Sr  Edwarde  Stradlinge  (50). 

carmardn  30     Sr  henry  Iones  (51). 

staffordsh  31     Sr  Thorns  fitherbert     +(52). 

chessh  32     Sr  Roland  Stanley  (53). 

Monmouth  Sr  Charles  Somerset     +  (54). 

death,  which  occurred  in  or  just  before  May  1583.  He  married  (1)  Margaret,  d.  of 
William,  Lord  Conyers  ;  and  (2)  Katharine,  d.  of  Henry,  Earl  of  Westmorland,  and 
widow  of  John,  Lord  Scrope.  He  was  in  trouble  in  1565  ;  but  not  apparently  on 
account  of  religion.  (Shaw,  ii.  55  ;  Foster,  G.V.Y.  220;  Cal.  Dom.  1581,  109; 
Dasent,  vii.) 

(48)  Sir  William  Bellasis,  or  Belasyse,  of  Newborough,  Yorks,  father  of  the  first 
baronet,  was  knighted  in  1557,  and  was  sometime  High  Sheriff  of  Yorks.  He 
married  Margaret,  sister  of  Sir  William  Fairfax  above  (n.  46),  and  died  13  April 
1604,  aged  81.  (Shaw,  ii.  70;  s.v.  William  Bellows;  Foster,  G.V.Y.  39,  232; 
Cokayne,  i.  43  ;  Cal.  Dom.  1598,  530.) 

(49)  Sir  Thomas  Danby,  of  Thorpe  Perrow,  Yorks,  was  a  brother  of  Christopher 
Danby,  one  of  those  implicated  in  the  Northern  Rising  of  1569,  and  was  himself  con- 
sidered "  ill-affected  in  religion."  Knighted  Sept.  1547,  he  was  at  one  time  High 
Sheriff  of  Yorks.  He  married  Margaret,  d.  of  Ralph  (Neville),  Earl  of  Westmor- 
land, and  was  living  in  1585.  (Shaw,  ii.  61  ;  Foster,  G.V.Y.  263-4;  Cal.  Dom. 
1595,  530  ;  Cal.  Dom.  Add.  1566,  181.) 

(50)  Sir  Edward  Stradling.     (D.N.B.  lv.  13.) 

(51)  Sir  Henry  Johnes,  of  Abermarlais,  Carmarthenshire,  knighted  19  Oct. 
1555,  Sheriff  1574  and  1584,  M.P.  1553,  I554»  1558,  1563;  was  suspected  of 
Catholic  leanings  in  1572.  He  married  Elizabeth,  d.  of  Matthew  Herbert,  of  Swan- 
sea.    (Shaw,  ii.  68 ;  Cal.  Dom.  1547,  454;  Nicholas,  268,  274,  277.) 

(52)  Sir  Thomas  Fitzherbert,  of  Norbury,  Derbyshire,  is  the  subject  of  a  notice 
in  Gillow,  which  however  may  be  briefly  supplemented  here.  He  was  knighted  22 
Feb.  1546-7,  and  was  High  Sheriff  of  Staffordshire  1547  and  J555-  Committed  to  the 
Fleet  in  London,  27  Nov.  1561  ;  he  was  still  there  inApril  1570.  On  2  May  1574  he 
was  released  for  two  months,  and  on  26  July  1581  he  was  ordered  to  be  let  out  on 
bail  for  the  summer.  Being  very  ill  he  received  leave  to  remain  out  of  prison 
18  June  1582,  and  again  31  August  1586.  In  October  and  November  of  the  pre- 
vious year  he  was  at  Hampstead.  In  October  1586  he  was  accused  of  connexion 
with  the  Northern  Rising  of  1569  (whereas,  as  we  have  seen,  he  appears  to  have 
been  in  the  Fleet  at  the  time),  of  harbouring  priests  and  Jesuits,  of  complicity  with 
Anthony  Babington,  and  of  allowing  Fr.  Persons  to  say  Mass  at  Norbury.  He  was 
summoned  before  the  Council  26  March  1587,  and  imprisoned  at  Wisbech, 
whence  he  was  released  on  bail,  29  June  1589.  He  was  imprisoned  again  at 
Broughton,  March  1589-90,  and  passed  thence  into  the  custody  successively  of  the 
Archbishop  of  Canterbury  and  Sir  John  Hart,  late  Lord  Mayor  of  London.  Sent 
to  the  Tower  at  his  own  expense  as  close  prisoner,  10  Jan.  1 590-1,  he  was  threat- 
ened with  paralysis,  and  allowed  to  walk  about  within  the  confines  of  the  Tower, 
9  June,  but  died  2  Oct.  1591.  (Gillow;  C.R.S.  i.  49;  Cal.  Dom.  1547,  524; 
Dasent,  viii.  xiii.-xxi. ;  Cal.  Dom.  1581  ;  Vict.  Hist.  Derby ,  ii.  23  sqq. ;  Strype,  W. 
i.  529.) 

(53)  Sir  Roland  Stanley,  of  Hooton,  Cheshire,  knighted  2  Oct.  1553,  was  High 
Sheriff  of  Cheshire  in  1576.  He  married  (1)  Margaret,  d.  of  Hugh  Aldersey,  of 
Cheshire  (by  whom  he  was  the  father  of  Sir  William  Stanley,  the  well-known 
Catholic  adventurer) ;  and  (2)  Ursula,  d.  of  Sir  Thomas  Smith.  Though  a  suspect  in 
1580,  he  remained  on  the  commission  of  the  peace  for  Cheshire  in  1585,  and  became 
in  some  degree  responsible  for  the  martyrdom  of  Ven.  Thomas  Holford.  He  died 
1612,  aged  96.     {D.N.B.  liv.  82  ;  H.S.P.  xviii.  215  ;  Shaw,  ii.  67.) 

(54)  Sir  Charles  Somerset,  of  Troy  and  Dixton,  Monmouthshire,  knighted  in 
January  1572/3,  M.P.  for  the  county  1571  and  1572,4th  son  of  Henry,  2nd  Earl 
Worcester  ;  married  Mary,  d.  of  Thomas  Brayne,  of  the  Forest  of  Dean.  His  name 
occurs  in  the  Concertatio  Ecclesia.     (Shaw,  ii.  75  ;  Bradney,  i.  23  ;/ Nicholas,  765.) 


Darbishire 

Northampt 

Northamp 

Worcester 

(2.)  norff 

i 

norff 

2 

norff 

3 

norff 

4 

norff 

5 

94  TWO   LISTS   OF   INFLUENTIAL   PERSONS 

Sr  Humphery  Bradburne  (55). 

Sr  Iohn  Spenser  (56). 

Sr  Antonie  Sturley  (57). 

Sr  Iohn  burne  +(58)  turne  to  the  14th  leafe.  * 

Mr  henry  Jerninghm  (59). 

francs  Southwell  (60). 

Richarde  Southwell  (61). 

Roger  townsende  (62). 

michele  townsende  (63). 

(55)  Sir  Humphrey  Bradborne  (or  Braidburie),  of  Ashbourn,  Derbyshire,  s.  of 
John  Bradbourne,  and  Elizabeth,  d.  and  co-heir  of  Richard  Cotton,  of  Ridware, 
Staffordshire,  was  knighted  18  May  1544.  In  1564  he  is  described  as  a  J.P.  and  an 
adversary  to  religion.  He  was  Sheriff  in  1563  and  1574.  He  married  Elizabeth, 
d.  of  Sir  William  Turville,  of  Newhall,  Leicestershire,  and  died  17  April  1581. 
(Cox,  iii.  389-91  ;  Camden  Misc.  ix.  43  ;  Shaw,  ii.  56.) 

(56)  Sir  John  Spencer,  of  Althorp,  Northants,  ancestor  of  the  Earls  of  Sunder- 
land, Dukes  of  Marlborough,  &c,  was  knighted  2  Oct.  1553.  In  1564  he  was  a 
J.P.  of  Northants  and  a  great  "  letter  "  of  Protestantism,  and  became  a  commissioner 
of  musters  for  Northants  in  1569,  and  High  Sheriff  in  1584.  In  the  latter  capacity 
he  was  ordered  to  arrest  ' '  William  Parsons,  a  Jesuit."  He  married  Katharine,  d. 
of  Sir  Thomas  Kitson,  of  Hengrave,  Suffolk,  and  died  19  June  1608.  (Cokayne, 
i.  69 ;  Metcalfe,  48  ;  Shaw,  ii.  67  ;  Cal.  Dom.  1581,  207  ;  Camden  Misc.  ix.  36.) 

(57)  Sir  Anthony  Stirley,  or  Strelley,  of  Beauchief  Abbey,  Derbyshire,  knighted 
3  Oct.  1547  ;  was  sometime  Governor  of  Harlech  Castle,  in  co.  Merioneth,  and  died 
about  1580,  leaving  a  son  and  heir,  Anthony.  (Shaw,  ii.  63  ;  Cal.  Dom.  1 581,  577  ; 
Cox,  i.  79.) 

(58)  Sir  John  Bourne,  on  the  accession  of  Queen  Mary  became  Principal  Secre- 
tary of  State  (an  office  which  he  resigned  just  before  the  close  of  the  reign  to  Dean 
Boxall)  and  a  Member  of  the  Privy  Council  (which  post  he  retained  to  her  death). 
He  was  uncle  to  Gilbert  Bourne,  the  last  Catholic  Bishop  of  Bath  and  Wells,  and 
possessed  the  manor  of  Battenhall,  in  the  parish  of  St.  Peter,  Worcester,  and  other 
property  in  Worcestershire.  He  was  knighted  2  Get.  1553.  On  Elizabeth's  acces- 
sion he  retired  to  Battenhall,  and  soon  after,  as  High  Steward  of  Worcester  Cathedral, 
embarked  on  a  quarrel  with  Sandys,  the  new  Protestant  Bishop  of  Worcester,  an 
ancient  enemy,  which  landed  him  in  the  Marshalsea  1563,  from  which  he  emerged 
at  the  cost  of  his  principles  and  dignity.  He  died  in  1570,  leaving  at  least  two 
sons,  Anthony  and  Thomas,  both  of  whom  were  recusants.  The  second  is  men- 
tioned in  the  Concertatio  Ecclesice.  It  is  surprising  how  little  is  known  of  this  states- 
man. This  list  obviously  assumes  him  to  be  still  alive.  (Shaw,  ii.  66 ;  Dasent, 
iv.-vi. ;  Cal.  Dom.  1547,  223  ;  Strype,  A.  i.  ch.  xxxv. ;  Vict.  Hist.  Worcestershire, 
ii.  47.  sqq. ;  Nash,  i.  593-4- ) 

(59)  Henry  Jerningham,  e.  s.  of  Sir  Henry  Jerningham,  of  Costessy,  Norfolk 
{D.N.B.  xxix.  349),  and  Mary  his  wife,  d.  of  Sir  Edward  Baynham,  of  Beding- 
field,  Suffolk.  Married  (1)  Eleanor,  d.  of  William,  Lord  Dacre  of  Gillsland ;  and 
(2)  Frances,  d.  of  Sir  John  Jerningham,  and  widow  of  Thomas  Bedingfield,  Esq. 
He  died  15  June  1619,  and  was  buried  at  St.  Margaret's,  Westminster.  (Blome- 
field,  ii.  415  J  but  see  C.R.S.  vii.  431.) 

(60)  Francis  Southwell,  2nd  son  of  Sir  Robert  Southwell,  Master  of  the  Rolls, 
married  Barbara,  widow  of  Richard  Catlyn,  Sergeant-at-law,  and  d.  of  John  Spencer, 
of  Norwich,  and  died  10  Nov.  1582.  (See  H.S.P.  xxxii.  261,  263;  Blomefield, 
viii.  377,  469,  470.  The  D.N.B.  liii.  293  wrongly  says  that  Sir  Robert  left  no 
children.) 

(61)  Richard  Southwell,  eldest  brother  of  Ven.  Robert  Southwell  {D.N.B.  liii. 
294) ;  married  Alice,  2nd  d.  of  Sir  Thomas  Cornwallis  (n.  25  above).  {H.S.P. 
xxxii.  260.) 

(62)  Roger  Townshend.  {D.N.B.  lvii.  130;  C.R.S.  ii.  239;  Cal.  Cecil  MSS. 
iv.  267.) 

(63)  Michael  Townshend  remains  unidentified.  Possibly  Thomas  Townshend, 
of  Braconash,  a  magistrate  suspected  in  1587.    (Strype,  A.  III.  ii.  460.) 


norff 

6 

norff 

7 

norff 

8 

norff 

IO 

norff 

1 1 

12 

Suff 

13 

Suff 

14 

norff 

15 

Cumb 

16 

Suff 

17 

Suff 

18 

TWO  LISTS   OF  INFLUENTIAL   PERSONS  95 

Willm  paston  (64). 

Clement  paston  (65). 

nicolas  browne  of  elsinge  (66). 

Xforus  lowell  (of  hoorlinge)  (67). 

Charles  walgrave  (68). 

Robert  downes  (69). 

George  downes  (70) 

Ihon  downes  (71). 

Raulfe  downes  (72). 

Philip  paris  (73). 

Thorns  doile  (74). 

Roger  nit  en  (75). 

(64)  William  Paston.     {D.N.B.  xliv.  8.) 

(65)  Clement  Paston.     (D.N.B.  xliv.  1.) 

(66)  Nicholas  Browne,  of  Elsing,  Norfolk,  is  doubtless  the  e.  s.  of  William 
Browne  (e.  s.  of  Sir  Anthony  Browne,  D.N.B.  vii.  38),  by  Anne,  d.  and  co-heir  of 
John  Hastings,  Esq.,  of  Elsing.  (Blomefield,  viii.  201.)  Anthony  Brown  of  Elsing 
was  a  recusant  1 592.     ( Cal.  Cecil  MSS.  iv.  268. ) 

(67)  Christopher  Lovell,  if  he  had  any  existence,  was  probably  a  son  of  Sir 
Thomas  Lovell,  of  Harling,  Norfolk,  by  Elizabeth,  d.  of  Sir  Philip  Paris,  of  Little 
Linton,  Cambridgeshire.  She  was  a  recusant  in  1587.  [See  note  560  post.]  The 
1st  and  3rd  sons  of  the  above  marriage,  Thomas  and  Robert,  were  recusants  in  I578, 
and  Robert  was  sent  to  Wisbech  Castle  in  1590,  and  was  a  recusant  described  as  of 
Beech  Amwell  in  1 592.  (See  H.S.P.  xxxii.  191  ;  Dasent,  x.  312,  333,  342,  xix.  10 ; 
Cal.  Cecil  MSS.  iv.  268  ;  Strype,  A.  460,  497- ) 

(68)  Charles  Waldegrave,  e.  s.  of  Sir  Edward  Waldegrave,  (as  to  whom  see 
D.N.B.  lix.  13,  and  The  Month  for  Sept.  1909,  "Flotsam  and  Jetsam"),  married 
Jeronyma,  sister  of  Henry  Jerningham  (note  59  above),  by  whom  he  became  ancestor 
of  the  Earls  Waldegrave,  and  died  25  January  1580. 

(69)  Robert  Downes,  e.  s.  of  John  Downes,  of  Great  Melton,  Norfolk,  admitted 
to  Lincoln's  Inn  19  April  1564,  was  imprisoned  in  the  King's  Bench  and  indicted 
at  the  Essex  Assizes  for  hearing  Mass  in  156 1.  He  was  a  recusant  throughout  his 
life,  and  got  into  trouble  in  1578,  1580,  and  1590,  being  imprisoned  at  Norwich  in 

1580,  and  at  Wisbech  Castle  in  1590.  He  married  Margaret  Kempe,  of  Essex,  and 
died  in  1594  or  1595.  {H.S.P.  xxxii.  109;  Rec.  Line.  Inn  Adm.  71  ;  Dasent, 
x.  310,  313,  342,  xix.  10;  C.R.S.  i.  so,  52  ;  Cal.   Cecil  MSS.    iv.  268;  Cal.  Dom. 

1 581,  88,  290,  318  ;  Strype,  A.W.  ii.  342.) 

(70)  George  Downes,  2nd  son,  brother  of  the  above,  was  a  recusant  in  1592. 
{H.S.P.  xxxii.  109;  Cal.  Cecil  MSS.  iv.  268.) 

(71)  John  Downes,  of  Hepworth,  Suffolk,  and  of  Boughton,  Norfolk,  probably 
the  son  of  Robert  (above,  n.  69),  was  a  recusant  in  1578  and  1586  and  1 592.  {H.S.P. 
xxxii.  109  ;  Dasent,  x.  310,  312  ;  Cal.  Cecil  MSS.  iv.  268  ;  Cal  Dom.  1581,  319  ; 
Strype,  P.  ii.  155.) 

(72)  One  Ralph  Downes  was  mayor  of  King's  Lynn  in  1556.  Another  was 
admitted  to  Lincoln's  Inn  14  May  1564,  and  was  there  in  1580.  (Strype,  A.  II.  ii. 
343  ;  Rec.  Line.  Inn  Adm.  i.  71.) 

(73)  Philip  Paris,  of  Little  Linton,  Cambridgeshire,  was  e.  s.  of  Sir  Philip  Paris 
(knighted  1553),  and  father  of  the  recusant  Ferdinando  Paris,  of  Norton,  Norfolk. 
{H.S.P.  xli.  37  ;  Blomefield,  vii.  116,  119;  Cal.  Dom.  1581,  v.  319;  Dasent,  x. 
310,  xviii.  415.) 

(74)  Probably  Henry  Doyly,  of  Shotesham,  Sheriff  of  Norfolk  and  Suffolk  in 
1573,  an(l  of  Norfolk  in  1590.  He  was  suspected  of  popery  in  1587.  He  married 
Anne,  d.  and  sole  heir  of  Edmund  White,  of  Shotesham,  and  died  in  May  1 597. 
(Blomefield,  v.  508  ;  H.S.P.  xxxii.  113  ;  Strype,  A.  III.  ii.  460.) 

(75)  Roger  Martin,  b.  1537,  e.  s.  of  Richard  Martin,  of  Long  Melford,  Suffolk, 
by  Ann  Eden,  of  London,  his  first  wife,  entered  Lincoln's  Inn  14  March  1545/6.  He 
married  (1)  Ursula,  d.  of  Sir  Thomas  Jermyn,  of  Rushbrooke,  Suffolk,  who  was 
buried  at  Melford,  30  April  1562  ;  and  (2)  Margaret,  d.  of  Walter  Bowles,  Esq.,  of 


Suff 

19 

hampsh 

20 

hampsh: 

21 

Wilsh 

22 

hamp 

23 

hamp 

24 

Kent 

25 

Camb 

26 

lincol 

27 

Suff 

28 

essex 

29 

96  TWO   LISTS   OF  INFLUENTIAL   PERSONS 

Ihon  Daniell  (76). 
George  Cotton  (77). 
henry  shelley  (78). 
Thorns  Gawen  (79). 
beniamin  tichborne  (80). 
hierosme  ticheborne  (81). 

finche  (82). 
Ihon  Cotton  (83). 

dymocke  (84). 
henry  drury  suffok  (85). 
Ihon  peters  essex  (86). 

Pembrokeshire,  who  was  buried  at  Melford,  16  April  1578,  and  himself  died  3  August 
161 5.  He  was  a  recusant  throughout  his  long  life,  and  so  was  his  eldest  son 
Richard.  He  was  imprisoned  at  Ipswich  in  1578,  and  at  Wisbech  in  1590.  In  1586 
he  agreed  to  pay  40  marks  a  year  for  his  recusancy.  In  1598  he  is,  probably  by 
mistake,  described  as  of  Northants.  {Rec.  Line.  Inn  A  dm.  i.  55  ;  Parker  (Sir  W.), 
Long  Melford  (London,  1873),  124  ;  Metcalfe,  Suffolk.  52,  152  ;  Strype,  A.  II.  ii.  343, 
677,  III.  ii.  422 ;  Dasent,  x.  313,  xi.  47,  xix.  10,  xxviii.  589.) 

(76)  John  Daniel,  e.  s.  of  Edmund  Daniel,  of  Acton,  Suffolk,  was  imprisoned  as 
a  recusant  at  Bury  St.  Edmunds  in  1578.  He  married  Margaret,  d.  and  co-heir  of 
Edmund  Tyrrel,  Esq.,  of  "  Beches  "  in  Essex.  He  and  his  wife  each  paid  ^"20 
a  year  as  a  fine  for  their  recusancy.  He  died  without  issue  15  Sept.  1597.  (Dasent, 
x.  313,  xi.  254;  Metcalfe,  Suffolk,  132  ;  C.R.S.  i.  118;  Strype,  A.  III.  ii.  422.) 

(77)  George  Cotton,  of  Warblington,  Hants  (who  married  Mary,  sister  of  William 
Shelley,  of  Michelgrove),  spent  a  long  time  in  prison  in  the  Fleet,  at  Ely,  at  Banbury 
Castle,  and  elsewhere  for  his  religion,  and  between  1587  and  1607  paid  ,£260  a  year 
in  fines  for  his  recusancy.  He  died  8  Jan.  1609/10.  {N.  &■»  Q.,  10th  Series,  iv.  56, 
1 14,  xi.  382.) 

(78)  Henry  Shelley,  e.  s.  of  Thomas  Shelley,  of  Mapledurham,  near  Petersfield, 
Hants,  entered  the  Inner  Temple  November  1559,  was  imprisoned  at  the  White 
Lion,  Southwark,  14  June  1579  to  11  June  1581,  and  died  in  1585.  (N.  <5r»  Q.  10th 
S.  ii.  155,  457  J  MJ.T.  33.) 

(79)  Thomas  Gawen,  e.  s.  of  William  Gawen,  of  Northington  in  Alvediston, 
Wilts,  entered  the  Inner  Temple  Nov.  1559.  He  married  Katharine,  sister  of 
Charles  Waldegrave  (above,  n.  68).  He  was  imprisoned  at  Ely  as  a  recusant,  1589-90. 
His  daughter  Mary  Frances  became  a  Benedictine  nun  at  Brussels,  1602.  {M.I.T. 
,33  ;  Gillow,  ii.  407  ;  Dasent,  xviii.  415.) 

(80)  Benjamin  Tichborne,  1st  Baronet,  educated  at  Winchester  College. 
(Cokayne,  B.  i.  160-161 ;  Kirby  (T.  F.),  Winchester  Scholars  (London,  &c,   1S88), 

13D 

(81)  Jerome  Tichborne  is  unknown.  Possibly  to  be  identified  with  Chideock 
Tichborne  {D.N.B.  lvi.  374  ;  Gillow,  v.  544),  or  with  the  latter's  father,  Peter  of 
Porchester,  or  his  uncle,  Nicholas  of  Hartley  Maudit,  who  died  after  nine  years'  im- 
prisonment in  Winchester  gaol  in  1589,  and  was  probably  father  of  Ven.  Thomas 
Tichborne. 

(82)  Probably  Henry  Finch.     {D.N.B.  xix.  12.) 

(83)  John  Cotton,  e.  s.  of  Sir  John  Cotton  (above,  n.  33),  was  knighted  23  July 
1603.  He  married  (1)  Elizabeth,  d.  of  Thomas  Caryll ;  (2)  Elizabeth,  d.of  Sir  Hum- 
phrey Bradborne  (above,  n.  55) ;  and  (3)  Anne,  d.  of  Sir  Richard  Hoghton,  Bart. 
{H.S.P.  xli.  22  ;  Shaw,  ii.  115.) 

(84)  Robert  Dymoke.    {D.N.B.  xvi.  295.) 

(85)  Henry  Drury,  of  Ickworth,  Suffolk,  a  fugitive  beyond  sea  1576,  was  im- 
prisoned at  Ipswich  and  Bury  St.  Edmunds  in  1578,  and  was  removed  thence  by 
reason  of  the  plague  in  1579.  He  paid  ^20  a  year  as  a  fine  for  recusancy.  He 
died  about  1585.  His  son  Henry  imprisoned  in  London  1586-7,  and  at  Banbury  or 
Broughton  1589-90,  died  at  Antwerp  about  1594.  (Dasent,  x.  313,  xi.  47,  xviii. 
415  ;  Cal.  Dom.  1581,  218,  232 ;  C.R.S.  ii.  276  ;  Strype,  A.  II.  ii.  596,  III.  i.  609, 
ii.  422  ;  Cal.  Dom.  1591,  533.) 

(86)  John  Petre,  was  e.  s.  of  Sir  William  Petre  {D.N.B.  xlv.  95  ;  Gillow,  v.  297), 


Suff 

30 

norff 

3i 

norff 

32 

Yorksh 

33 

Yorksh 

34 

Yorks 

35 

York 

36 

lanca 

37 

York 

38 

York 

39 

Sussex 

40 

TWO   LISTS   OF  INFLUENTIAL   PERSONS  97 

Kitson   +(87). 

Bastard  (88). 

deringe  (89). 
Robert  Rocley  (90). 
martin  Anne  (91). 
Thorns  Drax  (92). 
gamaleon  Drax  (93). 
Wm  Thorneborough  (94). 
Thorns  wentworth  (95). 
francs  Wortley  (96). 
lancolet  Gildrich  (97). 

by  Anne,  widow  of  John  Tyrrell,  of  Heron,  and  d.  of  Sir  William  Browne,  Lord 
Mayor  of  London.  Lady  Petre  was  a  recusant  in  1588.  He  was  created  first  Baron 
Petre,  of  Writtle,  Essex.     (Cokayne  ;  Strype,  A.  III.  ii.  597.) 

(87)  Sir  Thomas  Kitson,  of  Hengrave,  Suffolk,  b.  9  Oct.  1539,  was  knighted 
5  August  1578,  having  twice  entertained  Queen  Elizabeth  at  Hengrave  in  that 
year.  He  married  (1)  Jane,  d.  of  William,  Lord  Paget,  who  died  in  1558;  and  (2) 
in  1560  Elizabeth,  d.  of  Sir  Thomas  Cornwallis,  of  Brome  (above,  n.  25).  He  was 
suspected  of  harbouring  the  priest  Hugh  Hall  in  1583.  Lady  Kitson  was  a  recusant 
1588,  and  was  indicted  for  recusancy  in  1599,  but  was  probably  acquitted.  Sir 
Thomas  died  28  Jan.  1601/2.  (Gage  ;  Shaw,  ii.  79  ;  Cal.  Dotn.  1581,  449  ;  Strype, 
A.  III.  ii.  597.) 

(88)  Francis  Bastard,  of  West  Winch,  Norfolk,  and  Newington,  Middlesex, 
patron  of  the  living  of  Bawsey,  Norfolk,  in  1 5  5 1 ,  was  committed  to  Newgate,  10  Jan. 
1583/4,  and  found  guilty,  20  Jan.,  of  hearing  a  Mass  and  not  going  to  church  for  a 
whole  year.  He  was  in  prison  in  or  near  London,  30  Sept.  1588.  He  married 
Ursula,  d.  of  John  Dethick,  of  Wormegay.  (C.R.S.  ii.  237,  284  ;  Strype,  A.  III.  ii. 
600  ;  Blomefield,  viii.  346  ;  H.S.P.  xxxii.  20.) 

(89)  Alexander  Dering,  of  Kent,  married  Katharine,  d.  of  Richard  Hovell,  of 
Stratford  Halley,  Norfolk,  widow  of  Francis  Fisk,  of  Bisham,  Norfolk,  and  of 
Edward  Mordaunt,  of  Hempsted,  Essex.  His  house  was  ordered  to  be  searched  for 
vestments,  books,  and  other  "massing  tools,"  9  June  1576.  [H.S.P.  xxxii.  161, 
xlii.  209  ;  Cal.  Dotn.  1547,  524.) 

(90)  Robert  Rockley,  of  Rockley,  Yorks,  married  Jane,  d.  of  Sir  William  Fairfax, 
and  died  before  1 585.     (Foster,  G.  V.  Y.  343.) 

(91)  Martin  Anne,  of  Frickley,  Yorks,  married  (1)  Elizabeth,  widow  of  Robert 
Nevill,  of  Ragnall,  Yorks  ;  and  (2)  Frances,  d.  of  Ralph  Aungier,  of  Redness,  Yorks, 
and  died  before  1585.     (Foster,  G.  V.Y.  360.) 

(92)  and  (93)  Thomas  and  Gamaliel  Drax,  the  1st  and  7th  sons,  respectively,  of 
Thomas  Drax,  of  Woodhall,  Yorks,  were  both  alive  in  1585.  Thomas  married 
Jane,  d.  of  Sir  John  Davenport,  of  Broomhill,  Cheshire,  and  died  without  issue,  him 
surviving.  Gamaliel  married  Isabel,  d.  of  John  Middleton,  of  Middleton,  Westmor- 
land, widow  of  John  Middleton  of  Stockeld.  (Hunter,  South  Yorkshire  (London, 
1828-31),  ii.  10S  ;  Foster,  G.V.Y.  342.) 

(94)  William  Thornborough,  e.  s.  of  Sir  William  Thornborough,  of  Hampsfiekl, 
Cartmel,  Lancashire,  and  Selside,  Westmorland,  married  Etheldreda,  d.  of  Sir 
Thomas  Carus,  of  Halton,  Justice  of  the  King's  Bench,  and  both  were  arrested  at 
Limehouse,  near  London,  with  the  wife  of  the  Justice,  and  others,  including  Mrs. 
Thornborough's  brother,  at  the  latter's  house,  preparing  to  hear  Mass,  4  April  1574. 
{C.R.S.  vi.  251-2  ;  Strype,  P.  ii.  365-6.) 

(95)  Thomas  Wentworth,  of  Wentworth  Woodhouse,  Yorks,  ancestor  of  the 
Earls  of  Strafford,  married  Margaret,  d.  and  h.  of  William  Gascoigne,  of  Gawthorpe, 
Yorks,  was  High  Sheriff  of  Yorkshire  1583,  and  died  Feb.  14,  1586/7.  (Cokayne, 
i.  30;  Foster,  G.V.Y.  375.) 

(96)  Francis  Wortiey,  of  Wortley,  married  (1)  Mary,  d.  of  Robert  Swyft,  of 
Rotherham  ;  (2)  Frances,  d.  of  Thomas  Burdet,  of  Burthwaite.  (Foster,  G.V.Y. 
592  ;  H.S.P.  xvi.  302.) 

(97)  Lancelot  Gildridge,  of  Beddington,  Sussex,  married  Margaret,  d.  of  Henry 
Shelley,  of  Mapledurham,  near  Petersfield,  Hants.  (H.S.P.  liii.  193  ;  Berry,  Sussex, 
155.) 

XIII.  G 


Sussex 

4i 

Sussex 

42 

war 

43 

Kent 

44 

heref 

45 

heref 

46 

Devon 

47 

Worcest: 

48 

98  TWO   LISTS   OF   INFLUENTIAL   PERSONS 

Willm  Shelley  (98). 

Gage  ffirle  (99). 
Ardan  waferer  (100). 
Robt  Dorrell  (101). 
Thorns  Croftes  (102). 

ligens  (103). 

fights  (104). 
Raulfe  Sheldon  (105). 

(98)  For  William  Shelley,  of  Michaelgrove,  Clapham,  Sussex,  see  JV.  6°  (?., 
10th  Series,  iii.  441,  492;  iv.  55,  114,  492.  He  entered  the  Inner  Temple  in 
November  1555.     {M.I.T.  23.) 

(99)  For  John  Gage,  of  Firle,  Sussex,  see  N.  &*  Q.  10th  Series,  vi.  468,  vii. 
102,  viii.  241,  and  n.  388  below. 

(100)  Arden  Waferer  entered  the  Inner  Temple  in  Nov.  1554,  and  in  process  of 
time  became  a  counsellor-at-law  and  utter  barrister.  In  1569  he  appeared  before 
the  Star  Chamber  and  confessed  that  though  he  M  useth  to  come  to  the  Temple 
Church  and  walk  about  the  Roundell  there  he  had  never  received  the  communion 
since  the  beginning  of  the  reign.  In  consequence  he  was  expelled  from  the  Inner 
Temple  and  disbarred  in  1570.  His  house  in  Chancery  Lane,  London,  was  searched 
in  August  1584  and  August  1586.  On  the  first  occasion  certain  books  and  papers 
were  found  ;  on  the  second,  three  sprigs  of  palm  with  crosses  bound  on  them.  He 
had  among  his  pupils  John  Sherwood,  afterwards  S.J.,  a  younger  brother  of  B. 
Thomas  Sherwood.  From  his  name,  and  from  the  fact  that  he  had  a  brother  named 
Francis  (who  was  a  Member  of  the  Inner  Temple  and  afterwards  a  priest),  it  is  prac- 
tically certain  that  he  was  a  son  of  Francis  Waferer,  of  London,  who  married  Mary, 
4th  d.  of  Thomas  Arden,  of  Park  Hall,  Crudworth,  Worcestershire.  In  that  case 
he  was  first  cousin  to  the  martyr  Edward  Arden,  one  of  the  Prcetermissi.  He  married 
Edith,  e.  d.  of  Sir  Thomas  Metham,  of  Metham,  Yorks  (by  his  2nd  wife  Edith,  d. 
of  Nicholas  Palmer,  of  Naburn),  as  to  whom  see  the  Catholic  Encyclopedia,  x.  237. 
{Cal.  Inner  T.  Rec.  I.  1.  to  liv. ;  Cal.  Dom.  1581,  198,  282,  345  ;  Cal.  Dom.  1547, 
655  ;  H.S.P.  xii.   181-2  ;  Pollen,  8  ;  Foster,  G.V.Y.  253.) 

(101)  Unidentified.  Probably  a  mistake  for  George  Darrell  or  Dorrell,  J. P.  of 
Cale  Hill,  who  died  2  July  1578.     {H.S.P.  xlii.  187.) 

(102)  Thomas  Croft,  of  Ocle  Park,  3rd  son  of  Richard  Croft,  of  Croft  Castle, 
Herefordshire,  by  Katharine,  d.  of  Sir  Richard  Herbert,  of  Montgomery,  and  brother 
Df  Sir  James  Croft,  Lord-deputy  of  Ireland  and  comptroller  of  the  household  to  Queen 
Elizabeth,  was  a  recusant  in  1564  and  1592.  He  was  very  probably  the  father  of 
the  Thomas  and  Alexander  Croft  mentioned  in  Cal.  Bom.  1547,  682,  and  the  an- 
cestor of  the  Catholic  family  of  Croft  of  Llanfair  Cilgoed,  Monmouthshire.  (Weaver, 
Heref.  21  ;  Cal.  Cecil  MSS.  iv.  265  ;  Camden  Misc.  ix.  19.) 

(103)  William  Lingen,  of  Thavies  Inn,  one  of  the  nine  Inns  of  Chancery,  was  the 
second  son  of  John  Lingen,  of  Sutton  and  Stoke  Edith,  Herefordshire.  He  was 
committed  to  Newgate,  10  January  1583/4,  and  on  the  following  20th  Jan.  was 
found  guilty  of  having  heard  Mass,  and  not  having  gone  to  church  for  a  year.  He 
seems  to  have  been  liberated  on  paying  a  fine,  but  in  August  1586  he  was  re-arrested 
by  the  Constable  of  Shoreditch,  when  he  was  on  his  way  to  Cambridge,  and  was 
lodged  in  the  Gatehouse,  from  which  he  was  released  12  Nov.  1586.  However,  he 
was  in  prison  again  in  or  near  London,  30  Sept.  1588.  He  married  Cecily,  sister  of 
Ven.  John  Ingram.  His  son  Edward,  also  a  recusant,  was  attainted  of  treason  in 
1594,  but  pardoned  4  May  1604.  (C.R.S.  ii.  237,  260,  267,  283  ;  Cal.  Dom.  1581, 
345;  N.  6°  Q.  10th  Series,  iii.  443;  Burke,  Landed  Gentry  under  "Burton"; 
Strype,  A.  III.  ii.  Coo.) 

(104)  John  Fitz,  of  Fitzford,  Devon,  born  about  1529,  a  member  of  the  Inner 
Temple  1551,  called  to  the  Bench  1568,  M.P.  Tavistock  1554,  married  Mary,  d.  of 
Sir  John  Sydenham,  of  Brampton,  Somersetshire,  and  died  in  1589.  (Vivian, 
Devon,  342  ;    Cal.  Inner  T.  Rec.  i.  171,  175  ;  M.I.T.  12.) 

(105)  Ralph  Sheldon,  b.  1537,  of  Beoly,  Worcestershire  (grandfather  of  Edward 
Sheldon,  D.N.B.  Hi.  23),  was  an  intimate  friend  of  Fr.  Persons,  S.J.  (See  as  to  this 
C.R.S.  ii.)     Committed  to  the  Marshalsea  in  August  1580,  he  was  removed  on  the 


norff 
Kent 
Kent 

49 
51 

York 

52 

Midle 
Sussex 
Sussex 

53 
54 

55 

Norff 
Darbie 

56 

Darbie 

TWO    LISTS   OF   INFLUENTIAL    PERSONS  99 

michell  corbet  (106). 
Anthony  Rop  (107). 
baker  (108). 
Ihon  Vavesour  haslewood  (109). 
Edward  harbort  of  hendley  (no). 
George  Gage  (in). 
Alexander  Culpeper  (112). 
Willm  gawdy  Srieant  (113). 

Eyre  of  hassop  (114). 

Tunsted  of  Tunsted  (115). 

following  1  November,  on  account  of  his  health,  to  the  custody  of  the  Dean  of  West- 
minster. He  conformed  3  January  1 580/1,  but  on  31  Dec.  1583  Hugh  Hall,  the 
Marian  priest  (condemned  with  Edward  Arden),  who  saved  his  life  by  betraying  his 
benefactors,  confessed  to  having  said  Mass  in  his  house,  and  in  1587  and  1594  Ralph 
Sheldon  was  again  in  trouble,  in  the  latter  year  owing  to  the  treachery  of  his 
nephew,  Richard  Williams.  He  was  dropped  from  the  commission  of  the  peace  for 
Worcestershire,  though  the  Protestant  bishop  commends  his  wisdom,  about  1587- 
The  benefit  of  his  recusancy  was  granted  to  one  David  Drummond,  4  May  1610. 
He  married  Anne,  d.  of  Sir  Robert  Throgmorton,  of  Coughton,  Warwickshire,  and 
died  30  March  1613.  (Dasent,  xii.  166,  254,  301,  xv.  137;  Nash,  i.  64,  66; 
Cal.  Cecil  MS S.  iv.  618  ;  Cal.  Dom.  1585,  142,  449;  Cal.  Dom.  1591,  passim  ;  Cal. 
Dom.  1603,  591  ;  Strype,  A.  III.  ii.  458.) 

(106)  Probably  Miles  Corbet,  e.  s.  of  John  Corbet,  of  Sprouston,  Norfolk.  He 
was  knighted  at  Cadiz  in  1596,  and  married  ( 1 )  Catherine,  d.  of  Sir  Christopher 
Heydon  (above,  n.  32),  and  (2)  Catherine  (nJe  Sanders),  widow  of  John  Spilman  of 
Narburgh.  He  died  in  1607.  (Blomefield,  x.  459-60;  Shaw,  ii.  92;  H.S.P. 
xxxii.  85.) 

(107)  Anthony  Roper,  of  Farningham,  Kent,  2nd  s.  of  William  Roper,  of  Eltham, 
and  grandson  of  B.  Thomas  More,  married  Anne,  d.  of  Sir  John  Cotton  (above,  n. 
33),  and  died  23  July  1597.     (Hasted,  Kent,  i.  302  ;  H.S.P.  xlii.  82.) 

(108)  Sir  Richard  Baker,  son  of  Sir  John  Baker,  Chancellor  of  the  Exchequer, 
of  Sissinghurst,  Kent,  entered  the  Inner  Temple  in  Feb.  1552/3,  and  was  called  to 
the  Bench  1568.  He  was  knighted  at  Dover,  31  August  1573,  after  having  enter- 
tained Queen  Elizabeth  in  that  year.  He  was  High  Sheriff  of  Kent  1562,  and 
1582;  M.P.  for  Horsham  1554/ and  Shoreham  1557.  He  also  entertained  Fr. 
Persons,  S.J.,  in  the  same  year  that  he  entertained  Elizabeth.  (C.R.S.  ii.  23  ;  D.N.B. 
iii.  14 ;  H.S.P.  xlii.  64  ;  Shaw,  ii.  75  ;  M.I.T.  14.) 

(109)  John  Vavasour,  of  Hazlewood,  Yorks,  married  Helen,  d.  of  Sir  Nicholas 
Fairfax,  of  Gilling.     He  was  alive  1584.     (Foster,  G.  V.  Y.  237.) 

(no)  Unidentified.  Perhaps  the  Edward  Herbert  admitted  to  Gray's  Inn  in 
1563.     (Foster,  G.I.R.  32.) 

(in)  George  Gage,  3rd  surviving  son  of  Sir  Edward  Gage,  K.B.,  of  Firle, 
Sussex  (brother  of  John  above,  n.  99).  A  magistrate  of  Sussex,  suspected  of  popery, 
1573.     (Berry,  Sussex,  295  ;  Strype,  A.  II.  ii.  22.) 

(112)  Sir  Alexander  Culpeper,  of  Bedgebury,  Kilndown,  Kent,  was  knighted 
12  August  1573  at  Rye,  and  married  Maria,  d.  of  William,  Lord  Dacre.  He  was 
a  recusant,  imprisoned  at  Wisbech,  1588.     (Shaw,  ii.  75;  H.S.P.  xlii.  63;  Strype, 

W.  i.  529;  Strype,  A.  III.  ii.  597;  Cal.  Cecil  MS S.  iv.  264;  Cal.  Dom.  1581, 
460-1.) 

(113)  Though  not  mentioned  in  the  pedigree  this  was  a  4th  son,  half-brother  of 
the  Thomas  Gawdy,  serjeant-at-law,  who  died  in  1566,  and  of  Sir  Thomas  Gawdy, 
the  judge ;  and  brother  of  Sir  Francis  Gawdy.  He  entered  the  Inner  Temple  in 
November  1555,  and  died  unmarried.  {H.S.P.  xxxii.  125-7;  D.N.B.  xxi.  79  and 
81;  M.I.T.  24.) 

(114)  Possibly  Stephen  Eyre,  of  Hassop,  who  married  Anne,  d.  and  h.  of  Thos. 
Blackwall  of  Shirley  (Genealogist  (N.S.),  vii.  129);  but  more  likely  Thomas  Eyre, 
who  was  a  recusant,  and  married  a  daughter  of  John  Fitzherbert.  (Cox  (J.  C.), 
Three  Centuries  of  Derbyshire  Annals  (London,  1890),  i.  263.) 

(115)  Robert  Tunstead,  of  Tunstead,  Wormhill,  Derbyshire,  left  England  in  1583 


100  TWO    LISTS    OF   INFLUENTIAL    PERSONS 

Darbie  Mover  ell  (116). 

(3.)  Yorkshire,  north  contrie,  Est  Ridinge. 

58  Thorns  Grimpston  of  grimpston  (117). 

59  Mrmaduk  grimpston  his  sonne  (118). 

60  Robt  wright  of  ploughlande  (119). 

61  Wm  Wright  his  sonne  (120). 

62  Wm  thorpe  of  thorpe  (121). 

63  George  brighm  of  brighm  (122). 

64  Iohn  S*  quintine  of  gansted  (123). 

65  gabriel  S*  quintine  harpam  (124). 

66  Brian  lace  of  foulton  (125). 

67  Wm  Constable  of  Cathorpe  (126). 

68  Raulfe  haselbye  of  Dalton  (127). 

69  peter  vasasour  of  spaldington  (128). 

70  Anthony  monkton  of  cavill  (129). 

to  avoid  persecution  and  went  to  France.     His  brother,  John,  Bailiff  of  the  High 
Peak  in  1591,  had  till  lately  also  been  a  recusant.     His  brother,  Anthony,  a  refugee 
mentioned  in  the  Concertatio,  was  still  abroad  in  1594.     {Genealogist  (N.S.),  viii 
176;  Cox,  op.  cit.  i.  272;  C.R.S.  iv.   120,  121;  Cal.  Dom.  1581,  193;  Cal.  Dom 

1591,5440 

(116)  Probably  Francis  Meverell,  of  Thro wly  (?  Tro way),  Derbyshire.  {Genea 
logist,  iii.  181.) 

(117)  and  (118)  Thomas  Grimston,  of  Grimston,  married  Dorothy,  d.  of  Marma 
duke  Thwaites  of  Smeaton,  and  was  living  in  1584.     Their  eldest  son,  Marmaduke 
married  (1)  Frances,  d.  of  George  Gill,  of  Widdiall,  Herts,  and  (2)  Elizabeth,  d.  of 
William  Hungate.     He  was  knighted  17  April  1603.     (Foster,  G.V.Y.  184;  Shaw 
ii.  101.) 

(119)  and  (120)  Robert  Wright,  of  Plowland,  Holderness,  married  (1)  Anne,  d 
of  Thos.  Grimston  above,  and  (2)  Ursula,  d.  of  Nicholas  Rudston,  of  Hayton,  and 
was  living  in  1584.  His  eldest  son  by  his  first  wife,  William,  entered  the  Inner 
Temple  in  November  1564,  and  married  Anne,  d.  of  Robert  Thornton,  of  Newton 
in  Rydale.  One  William  Wright  died  in  prison  at  York,  23  July  1584.  His  two 
sons  by  his  second  wife,  John  and  Christopher,  were  attainted  for  the  Gunpowder 
Plot.     (Foster,  G.  V.  Y.  145  ;  C.R.S.  v.  191  ;  M.I.T.  54.) 

(121)  William  Thorpe,  of  Thorpe,  married  (1)  Anne,  d.  of  Sir  Christopher  Hild- 
yard,  and  (2)  Elizabeth,  d.  of  William  Estoft  or  Ostoft,  and  (3)  Elizabeth,  d.  of  John 
Constable,  of  Fridmarsh.  Probably  the  great-grandfather  by  his  first  wife  of  Ven. 
Robert  Thorpe.     (Foster,  G.  V.  Y.  52-3.) 

(122)  George  Brigham,  of  Brigham,  e.  s.  of  Theobald  Brigham,  by  a  daughter  of 
(Edward)  Roos,  of  Routh,  had  died  unmarried  before  1584.     (Foster,  G.  V.  Y.  167.) 

(123)  John  St.  Quintin,  of  Ganstead,  married  Margaret,  d.  and  co-h.  of  Ralph 
Buckton,  of  Hemswell,  near  Driffield.     (Foster,  G.V.Y.  127.) 

(124)  Gabriel  St.  Quintin,  of  Harpham,  married  Dorothy,  d.  of  Sir  George  Griffith, 
of Wichnor.     (Foster,  G.V.Y.  162-3.) 

(125)  Bryan  Lacy,  of  Folkton,  married  Elizabeth,  d.  of  Gregory  or  George 
Conyers,  of  Whitby.  (Foster,  G.V.Y.  161  ;  Gillow,  iv.  86,  87.)  To  be  distinguished 
from  the  venerable  martyr  of  this  name. 

(126)  William  Constable,  of  Catfoss  (living  1585),  married  (1)  Bridget,  d.  of 
Robert  Skerne,  of  Wilton,  and  (2)  Jane  Fowbery.     (Foster,  G.V.Y.  306.) 

(127)  Ralph  Asselby,  or  Asslaby,  of  Dalton,  married  Frances,  e.  d.  of  Sir  Ralph 
Ellerker,  of  Risby.     {H.S.P.  xvi.  109.) 

(128)  Peter  Vavasour,  of  Spaldington,  e.  s.  of  John  Vavasour,  by  Katharine,  his 
1st  wife,  d.  and  co-h.  of  William  Ilson,  of  Gunby,  died  unmarried.  (Foster,  G.V.  Y. 
116.) 

(129)  The  head  of  the  family  at  this  time  appears  to  have  been  Christopher 
Monkton,  of  Cavell,  who  married  Frances,  d.  of  George  Hussey,  of  Duffield.  He 
was  living  in  1584.     (Foster,  G.V.Y.  134.) 


TWO    LISTS   OF   INFLUENTIAL    PERSONS  IOI 

71  Thos  Saltmars  of  Saltmars  (130). 

72  Tho  methm  of  methm  (131). 

73  Iho  Rynestone  of  hathon  (132). 

74  francs  methm  of  wygenthorp  (133). 

75  leonard  chamberlen  of  thorolly  (134). 

76  M'maduk  cunstable  of  cliff  (135). 

77  tho  methm  of  grenehak     +(136). 

78  Xpofer  thwynge  of  hogett  (137). 

79  Tho  dolman  of  pokington  (138). 

80  Robt  Sotheby  of  pokington  (139). 

81  Wm  Sotheby  his  sonne  (140). 

82  M'maduk  threlkolf  of  esthorp  (141). 

83  Wm  ellerkar  of  ellerkar  (142). 

84  george  creswell  of  kelinge  (143). 

85  rich  longeley  of  grimbthorp  (144). 

86  rich  darley  of  buttergraim  (145). 

87  Antho  Hungate  of  calton  (146). 

(130)  Thomas  Saltmarshe,  of  Saltmarshe,  married  Margaret,  d.  of  Sir  Robert 
Constable,  of  Everingham.     (Foster,  G.V.Y.  100.) 

(131)  Thomas  Metham,  of  Metham,  heir  of  Sir  Thomas  Metham  (as  to  whom 
see  the  Catholic  Encyclopedia,  x.  237) ;  married  Katharine,  d.  of  Sir  William 
Bellasis,  and  died  1610.  He  was  uncle  to  Ven.  Thomas  Metham,  SJ.  One  Thomas 
Metham,  of  Great  Milton,  Norfolk,  was  a  recusant  in  1592.  (Cal.  Cecil  MSS*  iv. 
269  ;  Foster,  G.  V.  Y.  253  ;  H.S.P.  xvi.  205  ;  C.A'.S.  v.) 

(132)  John  Rudston,  of  Hayton  (living  1584),  married  Margaret,  d.  of  John  Trol- 
lope,  of  Thornley,  in  the  bishopric  of  Durham.    (Foster,  G.V.Y.  127.) 

(133)  Francis  Metham,  of  Wiggenthorpe,  married  Dionisia,  d.  of  Sir  Thomas 
Waterton.     (Foster,  G.  V.  Y.  253.) 

(134)  Leonard  Chamberlayne,  of  Thoraldby,  married  Katharine,  d.  of  Roger 
Chomeley  of  Brassby.     (Foster,  G.  V.  Y.  176.) 

(135)  Marmaduke  Constable,  of  Cliffe,  married  Frances,  2nd  d.  and  co-h.  of 
Sir  Ralph  Bulmer,  and  was  alive  in  1612.     (Foster,  G.V.Y.  506.) 

(136)  Probably  Thomas  Metham,  of  Barnehill  (living  1584),  who  married  Joan, 
d.  of  William  Thornton,  of  East  Newton  in  Rydale.     (Foster,   G.  V.  Y.  106.) 

(137)  Christopher  Thweng,  of  Huggate  in  the  Wold,  was  living  in  1584.  (Foster, 
G.V.Y.  230.) 

(138)  Thomas  Dolman,  of  Pocklington  (living  1584),  married  Elizabeth,  sister 
and  heir  of  the  whole  blood  to  Peter  Vavasour  (above,  n.  128).     (Foster,  G.V.Y.  86.) 

(139)  Robert  Sotheby,  of  Pocklington  and  Birdshall  (living  1584),  married 
Grace,  d.  of  John  Vavasour,  of  Weston.     (Foster,  G.V.Y.  170.) 

(140)  William  Sotheby  was  not  son,  but  youngest  brother  of  the  above.  William 
Sotheby  married  a  Wentworth  of  Elmswell.     (Foster,  G.  V.  Y.  170.) 

(141)  Marmaduke  Thirkeld,  of  Haysthorpe  (Esthorpe),  married  a  daughter  of 
Sir  William  Hinton.     (Foster,  G.V.Y.  120.) 

(142)  William  Ellerker,  of  Ellerker  (living  1 584),  married  Elizabeth,  d.  of  Thomas 
Wentworth,  of  Howley.     (Foster,  G.V.Y.  1 10.) 

(143)  George  Cresswell,  of  Nunkeeling  (living  1584),  married  (1)  Margaret,  d. 
of  John  Dorrington,  of  Escrick,  and  (2)  Anne,  d.  of  William  Swinhoe,  of  Cornhill, 
Northumberland.     (Foster,  G.V.Y.  149.) 

(144)  Richard  Langley,  of  Owsthorpe  (living  1584),  married  Agnes,  d.  of  Richard 
Hansby,  of  Malton.  He  died  in  prison  for  his  faith  at  York,  I  Dec.  1586.  (Foster, 
G.V.Y.  117;  C.A'.S.  v.  192.) 

(145)  Richard  Darley,  of  Buttercrambe,  J. P.  (living  1584),  married  Isabel,  d.  of 
Thomas  Beaumont,  of  Lascelles  Hall.     (Foster,  G.  V.  Y.  87.) 

(146)  Anthony  Hungate,  2nd  s.  of  William  Hungate,  of  Hungate,  married  Isabel, 
d.  of  Richard  Hansby,  of  New  Malton.     (Foster,  G.V.Y.  115.) 


88 

89 

90 

Stiff— 

91 
92 

lancashire 

93 

oxfordsh 

94 

oxf 
oxfo 

95 
96 

oxf 

Shropsh 

Shrop 

Cheshire 

97 
98 

99 
100 

chesh 

IOI 

cambr 

102 

102  TWO    LISTS    OF    INFLUENTIAL    PERSONS 

michell  constable  of  drax  (147). 

Wm  maine  of  rostonne  (148). 

hillary  cunstable  of  hatefild  holdernes  (149). 

francs  hadenby  of  hadenby  (150). 

Robt  fare  (151). 

Allein  (152). 
Rch  owen  (153). 
Robt  chamberlen  (154). 
Ihon  chamberlen  (155). 
Wm  chamberlen  (156). 
Roland  baker  (157). 
Roland  boucle  (158). 
Randulfe  bruerton  (159). 
wm  bruerton  (160). 
Robt  Cotton  (161). 

(147)  Michael  Constable,  of  Drax,  West  Riding,  sixth  son  of  Sir  Robert  Constable, 
of  Everingham,  married  a  daughter  of  Sir  William  Hilton.     (Foster,  G.  V.Y.  179.) 

(148)  William  Mayne,  of  Rowlston,  had  died  in  1584  without  issue.  (Foster, 
G.V.Y.  150.) 

(149)  Hilary  Constable,  of  Hatfield,  aged  28  in  3  Eliz.,  married  and  had  issue, 
and  died  14  Eliz.     (Foster,  G.  V.  Y.  506.) 

(150)  Francis  Haldenby,  of  Haldenby  (living  1585),  married  Elizabeth,  d.  of 
Sir  John  Wentworth,  of  Elmsall.     (Foster,  G.  V.  Y.  305.) 

(151)  Unidentified.  There  was  a  Farre  family  of  Beccles.  One  William  Pheare 
or  Phaer  was  in  the  Tower  in  1570  and  1 571-     (C.R.S.  i.  57.) 

(152)  George  Allen,  of  Rossall,  Lancashire,  elder  brother  of  William,  Cardinal 
Allen,  was  born  about  1529,  married  Elizabeth,  d.  of  William  Westby,  of  Mowbreck 
Hall,  and  died  9  August  1579.     (See  Allen  pedigree  in  Hamilton.) 

(153)  Richard  Owen,  of  Godstow,  married  Mary,  d.  of  Sir  Leonard  Chamberlain, 
of  Shirburn,  Oxfordshire,  Captain  of  Guernsey,  and  was  imprisoned  in  the  Fleet, 
from  which  he  was  discharged  n  Nov.  1582.  He  was  at  Wisbech  in  1588.  He 
was  also  in  prison  for  recusancy  in  1592,  probably  at  Wisbech.  His  son  Christopher 
died  in  the  English  College,  Rome.  (C.R.S.  ii.  120,  132,  151,  299  ;  H.S.P. v.  128; 
CaL  Cecil  MSS.  iv.  270  ;  Gillow,  v.  223 ;  Strype,  IV.  i.  529.) 

(154)  Robert  Chamberlain,  of  Shirburn,  e.  son  of  Francis  Chamberlain,  Captain 
of  Guernsey,  e.  son  of  Sir  Leonard  last  above  mentioned,  married  Alice,  d.  and  co-h. 
of  Henry  Cottenham,  and  was  created  a  K.B.  25  July  1603.  {H.S.P.  v.  236-7  ; 
Shaw,  i.  156.) 

(155)  J°hn  Chamberlain,  3rd  son  of  Sir  Leonard  above  mentioned,  married 
Elizabeth,  sister  of  Richard  Owen  (n.  153  above),  and  widow  of  Thomas  Mathew,  of 
the  city  of  Hereford.    He  was  knighted  in  1603.     (Shaw,  ii.  1 13,  1 18  ;  H.S.P.  236-7.) 

(156)  William  Chamberlain,  4th  son  of  Sir  Leonard,  above  mentioned,  married 
Margaret,  d.  and  h.  of  John  Stretley,  of  Whitfield,  Northants.     {H.S.P.  v.  236-7.) 

(157)  Possibly  Roger  Baker,  2nd  son  of  John  Baker,  of  Henwood.  (H.S.P. 
xxviii.  21.) 

(158)  Roland  Bulkeley  married  Elizabeth,  d.  of  George  Barker,  of  Coulshurst, 
Salop,  and  is  mentioned  in  the  Concertatio  as  having  been  imprisoned.  (H.S.P. 
xxviii.  29.) 

(159)  Randolph  Brereton,  of  Malpas,  knighted  in  May  1577,  e.  s.  of  Sir  Randolph 
Brereton,  of  Malpas,  Chamberlain  of  the  county  palatine  of  Chester,  was  living  in 
1580.     (H.S.P.  xviii.  43  ;  Shaw,  ii.  78.) 

(160)  William  Brereton,  of  Brereton,  e.  s.  of  Sir  William  Brereton,  was  knighted  I 
May  or  30  June  1588,  and  married  Margaret,  d.  of  Sir  John  Savage.  He  was  a  re- 
cusant, and  was  alive  in  1 1596.  (H.S.P.  xviii.  42  ;  CaL  Cecil  MSS.  iv.  240  ;  Shaw, 
ii.  86.) 

(161)  Robert  Cotton,  of  Connington,  Huntingdonshire,  knighted  1603,  was  2nd 
son  of  Sir  John  Cotton,  of  Landwade,  Cambridgeshire  (above,  n.  33).  He  married 
Elizabeth,  d.  and  h.  of  John  Dormer.     (H.S.P.  xli.  22  ;  Shaw,  i.  125.) 


TWO    LISTS   OF   INFLUENTIAL   PERSONS  103 

Suff  103  Charles  comwallis  (162). 

Yorkshi  north  Ridinge. 

104  lames  stranguis  of  clinton  (163). 

105  Raulfe  crawthorne  of  crauthone  (164). 

106  Ihon  Seiar  of  worsells  (165). 

107  Ihon  Seiar  his  sonne  (166). 

108  Tho  coniers  of  Sokeborne  (167). 

109  Robt  coniers  his  brother  (168). 
no  Xpofer  Wyvell  of  thorp  (169). 

in  M'maduk  Wyvell  his  son  &  her  (170). 

112  Ihon  Rokebie  of  Rokebye  (171). 

113  nicolas  girlington  of  huton  (172). 

114  Ihon  coniers  of  huton  (173). 

115  Ihon  witham  of  cliff  (174). 

116  Wm  Thorneton  of  newton  (175). 
(4)                  117  Roger  menell  of  Kilvinton  (176). 

(162)  Charles  Comwallis.     (D.N.B.  xii.  234.) 

(163)  Probably  James  Strangwayes,  of  Ormesby  and  Smeaton  (living  1584),  who 
married  Margaret,  d.  of  Sir  Richard  Cholmeley.     (Foster,  G.  V.  Y.  203.) 

(164)  Ralph  Crathorne,  of  Crathorne  (living  1612),  married  (1)  Bridget,  d.  of 
Richard  Yaxley,  of  Yaxley,  and  (2)  Jane,  only  daughter  of  James  Strangwayes  above. 
(Foster,  G.  V.  Y.  204,  209.) 

(165)  and  (166)  John  Sayer,  of  Worsall,  J.  P.  for  the  North  Riding,  married  Dorothy, 
d.  and  h.  of  William  Aske,  of  Aske,  and  their  eldest  son  John,  alive  in  1612,  married 
a  daughter  of  Sir  George  Conyers,  of  Sockbume.  While  still  very  young  the  son 
took  part  in  the  rebellion  of  of  1569,  and  was  one  of  the  prisoners  first  at  Carlisle  and 
then  at  Durham  ;  but  was  pardoned  on  payment  of  ;£500.  (Foster,  G.V.Y.  572; 
Camden  Misc.  ix.  71  ;  Sharp,  pp.  123  n.,  129.) 

(167)  Thomas  Conyers,  5th  son  of  Sir  George  Conyers  of  Sockbume  (according 
to  H.S.P.  xvi.  72),  or  4th  son  (according  to  Foster,  G.V.  Y.  165). 

(168)  Roger  Conyers,  6th  son. 

(169)  and  (170)  Christopher  Wyvill,  of  Burton  Constable,  married  Margaret,  d.  of 
the  Hon.  John  Scrope,  of  Hameldon,  Bucks.  Their  eldest  son  Marmaduke,  b.  1540, 
was  Vice-Chamberlain  to  the  Queen,  M.P.  for  Richmond,  Yorks,  1584-5  and  1597-8, 
knighted  June  1608,  and  created  a  baronet  25  Nov.  161 1.  He  married  Magdalen, 
d.  of  Sir  Christopher  Danby,  of  Thorpe  Place,  and  died  9  June  1617/18.  (Cokayne, 
B.  i.  103.) 

(171)  John  Rokeby,  e.  s.  of  Christopher  Rokeby,  of  Mortham,  married  Anne 
Thweng,  of  Heslarton.  He  was  brought  to  London  in  Dec.  1581,  for  having,  it  was 
said,  harboured  B.  Edmund  Campion,  and  was  in  the  Fleet  7  April  1584  for  his 
religion.    (Foster,  G.V.Y.  128  ;  Dasent,  xiii.  267  ;  C.R.S.  ii.  234.) 

(172)  Probably  Nicholas  Girlington  (e.  s.  of  Nicholas  Girlington,  of  Hackforth, 
living  1585),  who  married  Dorothy,  d.  of  Robert  Meynell,  serjeant-at-law.  (Foster, 
G.  V.  Y.  284.) 

(173)  John  Conyers,  of  Hoton-on-Wiske,married  Margaret,  d.  of  Sir  William  Mal- 
lory,  and  had  a  son  named  Mallory,  who  is  probably  to  be  identified  with  the  Samuel 
Conyers  ordained  priest  at  Chalons-sur-Mame,  31  March  1581-2,  arrested  with  Ven. 
John  Nutter,  committed  to  the  Marshalsea  1  Feb.  1582/3,  indicted  with  Ven.  John 
Munden  and  Ven.  John  Nutter,  and  the  apostate  William  Tedder,  5  Feb.  1583/4, 
and  banished  21  Jan.  1584-5,  who  died  at  the  English  College,  Rheims,  2  Oct. 
1587.  Another  son,  Christopher,  married  Mary,  a  sister  of  Cardinal  Allen.  (Knox  ; 
C.R.S.  v.  38,  51-53,  103  ;  Foster,  G.V.Y.  157  ;  Hamilton,  Allen  Pedigree  at  end.) 

(174)  John  Witham,  of  Cliffe  (living  1585),  married  Elinor,  d.  of  James  Fox,  of 
Thorpe  under  Willows.     (Foster,  G.  V.  Y.  260.) 

(175)  William  Thornton,  of  East  Newton  (living  1585),  married  Elinor,  d.  of 
Thomas  Grimston  (see  n.  59  above).     (Foster,  G.  V.  Y.  296.) 

(176)  Roger  Meynell,  of  North  Kilvington  (living  1585),  married  Margery,  d.  of 
Anthony  Catherick,  of  Stanwick.     (Foster,  G.  V.  Y.  250.) 


104  Two   LISTS   0F   INFLUENTIAL   PERSONS 

118  Rich  menell  of  Kilvinton  (177). 

119  Roger  menell  of  hawneby  (178). 

120  Wm  pudsey  of  burforde  (179). 

121  francs  wicliff  of  wicliff  ( 1 80). 

122  Tho  thwynge  of  heworth  (181). 

123  Ihon  thorneton  of  burdforth  (182). 

124  Roger  chomley  of  bransby  (183). 

125  Rich  chomley  of  Scutesby  (184). 

126  edward  barton  of  newby  (185). 

127  francs  chomley  of  wilton  (186). 

128  Roger  Rasinge  of  malton  (187). 

129  Xpofer  wansforth  of  hipswell  (188). 

130  Roger  gore  of  Richmonde  (189). 

131  Thoms  wray  of  Richmonde  (190). 

132  Roger  tocots  of  (I9I)« 

133  lames  tocots  of  whaldrak  (192). 

(177)  Probably  Robert  Meynell,  of  Stanke  (half-brother  of  the  above,  living  1585), 
who  married  Margaret,  d.  and  h.  of  Christopher  Nodding,  of  Stanke.    (Foster,  loc.  cit.) 

(178)  Probably  the  Roger  Meynell,  cousin  of  the  above,  who  married  Jane,  d.  of 
Sir  Christopher  Danby,  of  Farmley.     (Foster,  loc.  cit.) 

(179)  Probably  William  Pudsey,  of  Bolton,  who  married  Elizabeth,  d.  of  John 
Roxby.     (Foster,  G.  V.  Y.  564.) 

(180)  Francis  Wycliffe,  of  Wycliffe,  married  Jane,  sister  of  John  Rokeby  (see  n. 
171  above).     (Foster,  G.V.Y.  377.) 

(181)  Thomas  Thweng,  of  Heworth,  married  Jane  Kellet,  of  York,  and  was  the 
father  of  Ven.  Edward  Thweng.     (Foster,  G.  V.  Y  210.) 

(182)  John  Thornton,  of  Birdforth  (living  1585),  married  Anne,  d.  of  Christopher 
Thomlinson.     (Foster,  G.V.Y.  210.) 

(183)  Roger  Cholmeley,  of  Bransby,  2nd  son  of  Sir  Richard  Cholmeley  (n.  47 
above),  married  Jane,  e.  d.  and  co-h.  of  Thomas  de  la  River,  of  Bransby,  and  died 
before  1584.     (Foster,  G.V.Y.  221.) 

(184)  Richard  Cholmeley,  of  Skewsby,  3rd  son,  brother  of  the  above,  married 
Thomasine,  2nd  d.  and  co-h.  of  Thomas  de  la  River,  and  widow  of  Ninian  Tankard. 
(Foster,  loc.  cit.) 

(X85)  Edward  Barton,  of  Whenby,  e.  s.  of  Thomas  Barton,  married  Elizabeth,  d. 
of  Francis  Norton,  of  Norton  Conyers,  and  died  1610.      Foster,  G.V.Y.  5.)  • 

(186)  Francis  Cholmeley,  of  Roxby,  elder  brother  of  Roger  and  Richard  (nn. 
183,  184  above),  married  Joan,  d.  and  co-h.  of  Ralph  Bulmer,  of  Wilton,  and  died 
about  Pentecost  1586.    (Foster,  G.V.  V.  221.) 

(187)  Probably  Ralph  Rasing,  of  Malton,  who  married  Elizabeth  Harwood,  and 
died  before  1 584.     ( Foster,  G.V.Y.  181.) 

(188)  Christopher  Wandesford,  of  Hipswell,  married  (1)  Cicely,  d.  and  co-h.  of 
John  Fulthorpe,  of  Hipswell  (probably  a  relative  of  Ven.  Edward  Fulthorpe),  and 
(2)  Anne,  d.  of  William  Thwaites,  of  Marston,  and  widow  of  Francis  Lascelles,  of 
Brackenbury.     (Foster,  G.  V.  Y.  269  and  61.) 

(189)  Probably  Roger  Gore,  of  Melsonby,  who  married  (1)  Anne,  d.  and  h.  of 
Christopher  Place,  of  Halnaby,  and  (2)  Mary,  d.  of  Francis  Norton,  e.  s.  of  Sir 
Richard  Norton,  attainted  for  the  rising  of  1569.     (Foster,  G.  V.  Y.  267.) 

(190)  Thomas  Wray,  of  Richmond,  son  of  Nicholas  Wray,  married  (1)  Agnes,  d. 
of  Robert  Foster,  of  Smawes,  and  (2)  Frances,  d.  of  Francis  Tunstall,  of  Scargill. 
(Foster,  G.V.Y.  316,  583.) 

(191)  Roger  Tocketts,  ofTocketts  in  Cleveland,  admitted  to  Lincoln's  Inn  13 
April  1542,  married  Margaret,  d.  of  Robert  Meynell,  serjeant-at-law.  He  died  for 
his  faith  in  a  Yorkshire  prison,  11  Oct.  1586.  (Foster,  G.V.Y.  195  ;  Rec.  Line.  Inn 
Adm.  i.  52  ;  C.R.S.  v.  192,  193.)  One  of  this  name  is  mentioned  in  a  list  of  1592  as 
in  prison  at  Hull.     {Cal.  Cecil  MSS.  iv.  273.) 

(192)  Wheldrake  is  in  the  East  Riding.     James  Tocketts  is  unidentified. 


TWO   LISTS   OF   INFLUENTIAL    PERSONS  I05 

134  Ihon  Rokeby  of  mask  (193). 

135  Thorns  fox  of  mask  (194). 

136  Xpofer  lockwood  of  Sowerby  (195). 

137  Thorns  lassels  of  brokenburgh  (196). 

138  wm  lacy  of  beverlaye  (197). 

139  george  palmer  of  esyngton  (198). 

140  Raulfe  Salvin  (199). 

141  Roger  Radcliffe  of  mowbray  (200). 

142  thorns  thwynge  of  heworth     +(201). 

143  Anthony  thwynge  of  hemilsay     +(202). 

144  Xpofer  thwynge  of  hugate     +(203). 

145  Robt  dalbye  of  he  (204). 

146  Seath  holmes  of  huntington  (205). 

147  Wm  thorseby  of  lad  (206).  * 

148  francs  scrope  of  Danby  yor  (207). 
lincoln          149  hector  wentworth  (208). 

York  150     Roger  crake  of  patington  (209). 

(193)  Probably  Robert  Rokeby,  of  Marske  (living  1584),  who  married  Muriel,  d. 
of  Gerard  Salvin,  of  Croxdale,  Durham.     (Foster,  G.  V.Y.  199.) 

(194)  Probably  Thomas  Fox,  of  Marderby  Grange,  who  married  Clare  Pinkeney. 
(Foster,  C.KK518.) 

(195)  Christopher  Lockwood,  of  Sowerby,  married  Clare,  d.  of  Christopher  Las- 
celles  of  Brackenborough.  Their  eldest  son  was  the  Ven.  John  Lockwood,  and  their 
second  son  Francis  was  also  a  priest.  He  himself  was  at  one  time  secretary  to  the 
Earl  of  Westmorland  and  was  indicted  ;  but  his  name  does  not  appear  in  the  list  of 
attainders.     (Foster,  G.V.Y.  549;  Gillow,  iv.  308  ;  Sharp,  81.) 

(196)  Thomas  Lascelles,  of  Brackenborough,  was  knighted  in  January  1 599/1600, 
married  Joan,  d.  of  Sir  William  Mallory,  of  Studley,  and  died  in  May  1619.  (Foster, 
G.V.Y.  61.) 

(197)  William  Lacy,  of  Sherburn,  2nd  s.  of  Thomas  Lacy,  of  Beverley,  married 
Elizabeth  Newby,  and  was  in  prison  at  Hull  in  1592  as  a  recusant.  (Foster.  G.  V.  Y. 
539  ;  Cal.  Cecil  MSS.  iv.  273.) 

(198)  George  Palmes,  of  Essington  in  Holderness,  married  Anne,  d.  of 

Lacy,  of  Folkton.     (Foster,  G.V.Y.  90.) 

(199)  Ralph  Salvin,  of  Newbiggin,  married  Dorothy,  d.  of  Roger  Tocketts  (n.  191 
above).     (Foster,  G.V.Y.  195.) 

(200)  Roger  Radcliffe,  of  Mulgrave  (living  1584),  married  Mary,  d.  of  John 
Ryther,  of  Ryther,  and  is  said  to  have  entertained  priests,  1 593.  (Foster,  G.  V.  Y.  206  ; 
C.R.S.  v.  221.)  (201)  See  n.  181  above. 

(202)  Probably  John  Thweng,  of  Over  Helmsley  (elder  brother  of  Thomas,  n. 
181  above),  who  married  Maude,  d.  of  Thomas  Grimston  (n.  117  above).  (Foster, 
G.V.Y.  230.) 

(203)  See  n.  137  above. 

(204)  Unidentified.  The  venerable  martyr  Robert  Dalby,  a  native  of  the  bishopric 
of  Durham,  was  a  minister  before  his  conversion,  and  may  have  lived  in  Yorkshire. 
(Pollen,  330  ;  Challoner,  Missionary  Priests.) 

(205)  Seth  Holme,  of  Huntington,  (living  1584),  married  Helen,  d.  of  John 
Seyer  (n.  165  above).     (Foster,  G.V.Y.  224.) 

(206)  William  Thoresby,  of  Thoresby,  married  Anne,  d.  of  Henry  Scrope,  of 
Spennithorne. 

(207)  Francis  Scrope,  of  Danby,  e.  s.  of  Henry  Scrope,  of  Spennithorne,  and 
Margaret,  d.  and  h.  of  Simon  Conyers,  of  Danby  upon  Yore,  married  Dorothy,  d.  of 
Anthony  Caterick,  of  Stanwick.     (Burke,  Landed  Gentry.) 

(20S)  Hector  Wentworth,  of  Clee,  died  26  Dec.  158-,  leaving  a  daughter. 
{H.S.P.  Hi.  1063.) 

(209)  Probably  Ralph  Creyke,  of  Cottingham,  and  Marton,  who  married  (1) 
Katharine,  d.  of  Thomas  Crathorne,  of  Crathorne,  and  (2)  Anne,  d.  of  George  Pate, 


lo6  TWO   LISTS    OF   INFLUENTIAL    PERSONS 

151  wmIngleby       j    ,  .,      (210). 

152  David  Ingleby  \  0t  npley  (211). 

153  Robt  plumbton  of  plumpton  (212). 

154  wm  Ardington  of  Ardington  (213). 
x55  Wm  hakesworth  of  hakesworth  (214). 

'156  Ihon  trollop     +(215). 

157  Wm  Smith     +(216). 

bysho         J 158  Raulfe  coniers     +(217). 
ofdurhm    1 159  claxton  of  wineyarde     +(218). 

160  claxton  of  thold  pk     +(219). 

161  Raulfe  coniers  of  cotam  (220). 

of  Flamborough.  On  24  October  1593,  the  spy  Anthony  Atkinson  reports  "There 
is  one  Mr.  Craik  in  Yorkshire,  a  great  harbourer  of  Preists."  In  1592  one  Ralph 
Crag  of  St.  Clements  in  Westminster  was  a  recusant.  (Foster,  G.  V.  Y.  163  ;  C.R.S. 
v.  222  ;  Cal.  Cecil  MSS.  iv.  267.) 

(210)  Sir  William  Ingilby,  at  Brasenose  Coll.,  Oxford,  1562,  sup.  B.A.  1564, 
knighted  17  April  1603,  e.  s.  of  Sir  William  Ingilby  (note  35  above),  married  (1) 
Anne,  d.  of  Thomas  Thwaites,  and  (2)  Katharine,  d.  and  h.  of  Anthony  Smyth  or 
Smethley,  of  Brantingham,  and  d.  5  Jan.  1617.  (Shaw,  ii.  100  ;  Foster,  G.V.Y.  283  ; 
Brasenose  Coll.  Reg.  32.) 

(211)  David  Ingilby,  the  2nd  son,  brother  of  the  above,  also  at  B.N.C.  in  1562, 
married  Lady  Anne  Neville,  2nd  d.  of  Charles,  6th  Earl  of  Westmorland.  Great  efforts 
were  made  for  his  apprehension  from  1594  to  1600,  but  apparently  in  vain.  {C.R.S.  v. 
221,222;  Cal.Dom.  1591,  544;  1595,  183;  1597,  188,  378,  576;  Cal.  Border  Papers, 
i.  237,  239,  248,  250,  519,  ii.  344;  Cal.  Cecil  MSS.  iv.  258,  478;  Brasenose  Coll.  Reg.  31.) 

(212)  William  Plumpton,  of  Plumpton,  e.  s.  of  Robert  Plumpton,  who  died  before 
1547,  and  Anne,  d.  of  John  Norton,  of  Norton  Conyers,  married  (1)  Mary,  d.  of  Sir 

William  Vavasour,  and  (2) ,  d.  of  Griffin,  of  Dingley,  Northants.    (Foster,  G.  V.  Y. 

386.) 

(213)  (Sir)  William  Ardington  married  Katharine,  sister  to  William  and  David 
Ingilby  (nn.  210,  211  above).     (Foster,  G.V.Y.  273.) 

(214)  William  Hawkesworth,  of  Hawkesworth,  (living  1585),  married  Rosamund, 
d.  of  Thomas  Lister,  of  Westby.  William  Hawkesworth,  of  Milton,  was  a  recusant  in 
1592.     (Foster,  G.  V.  Y.  299  ;  Cal.  Cecil  MSS.  iv.  273.) 

(215)  John  Trollope,  of  Thornley,  e.  s.  of  Thomas  Trollope  by  his  first 
wife  Margaret,  d.  of  Roger  Lumley,  of  Ludworth,  married  Maud,  sister  of  the 
confessor  Sir  Thomas  Metham  (see  n.  131  above.)  He  was  attainted  for  com- 
plicity in  the  rebellion  of  1569  and  fled  abroad.  His  expulsion  from  Spanish  terri- 
tory was  demanded  by  Queen  Elizabeth,  3  July  1575.  He  was  eventually  pardoned, 
and  returned.  He  died  14  Feb.  161 1.  (Foster,  G.V.Y.  253  ;  D.V.P.  307;  Cal. 
For.  1569,  269  ;  Surtees,  i.  92  ;  Proost,  284-5  '■>  C.R.S.  v.  193.) 

(216)  William  Smythe,  of  Eshe,  Walworth,  Nunstainton,  and  Woodham,  all  in 
co.  Durham,  e.  s.  of  George  Smythe,  was  a  Catholic  who  took  part  in  the  rebellion  of 
1569,  and  was  attainted,  but  pardoned.  He  married  Margaret,  2nd  d.  and  co-h.  of 
Anthony  Eshe,  of  Eshe  and  Barmton,  and  was  great-grandfather  of  Sir  Edward 
Smythe,  1st  Bart.     (Surtees,  ii.  336,  338  ;  Cal.  Dom.  Add.  1566,  100,  266,  267,  424.) 

(217)  Ralph  Conyers,  of  Layton,  e.  s.  of  Cuthbert  Conyers,  was  attainted  in  1569, 
but  pardoned,  and  died  12  Jan.  1605.     (Surtees,  iii.  ^7.) 

(218)  William  Claxton,  of  Wynyard,  e.  s.  of  Ralph  Claxton,  was  a  skilful  herald 
and  antiquary.  He  married  Margery,  d.  of  Robert  Lambert,  of  Owlton,  and  died  in 
1597.     (Surtess,  iii.  79-) 

(219)  Robert  Claxton,  of  Old  Park,  e.  son  of  Robert  Claxton,  was  attainted  in 
the  rebellion  of  1569  but  pardoned.  He  married  Alice,  sister  and  co-h.  of  Marma- 
duke  Lambton,  and  his  will  is  dated  10  Oct.  1587.  (Surtees,  iii.  299  ;  Cal.  Dan, 
Add.  1566,  262,  266,  271,  280.) 

(220)  Ralph  Conyers,  of  Gotham  Conyers,  e.  s.  of  Robert  Conyers,  was  appar- 
ently a  Protestant,  but  took  part  in  the  Northern  Rebellion,  and  was  attainted,  but 
pardoned.  He  married,  3  June  1572,  Janet  Thorpe,  a  widow,  and  died  Jan.  1 580/1. 
(Surtees,  iii.  219  ;  Cal.  Dom.  Add.  1566,  177,  263,  266,  271,  280,  308.) 


'162 

163 

bysho 

164 

of  durhm 

^5 

167 

,168 

Kent 

169 

170 

norff 

171 

norff 

172 

Kent 

173 

174 

norff 

175 

TWO   LISTS    OF   INFLUENTIAL    PERSONS  I07 

Anthony  preston     +(221). 
Gearrarde  Salvine     +(222). 
francs  bolmer  (223). 
wm  hudshon  (224). 

black  coniers  (225). 

Claxton  (226). 
Anthonye  woldon  of  great  pechrn  (227). 
Ihon  powell  (228). 

thwaytes  of  hardinghm  (229). 
francs  downes  tudnhm  (230). 
herosme  brett  of  leeds  (231). 
Ihon  smith  called  lusty  Smith  (232). 
water  winserbie  (233). 

(221)  Anthony  Preston,  of  East  Morton,  3rd  son  of  Reynold  Preston,  of  Biggins 
Hall,  married  Dorothy,  d.  of  William  Witham,  of  Brettonby,  and  was  a  recusant  in 
1592.     (Foster,  D.  V.P.  263  ;  Cal.  Cecil  MSS.  iv.  265.) 

(222)  Gerard  Salvin,  e.  s.  of  Gerard  Salvin,  of  Croxdale,  was  imprisoned  with  his 
father  at  Durham  on  the  failure  of  the  rebellion  of  1569.  His  father  died  in  Feb. 
1 570/1.  He  married  Joan,  d.  of  Richard  Norton,  of  Norton  Conyers,  and  died  9  Nov. 
1587.     (Surtees,  IV.  ii.  119  ;  Sharp,  op.  cit.  128.) 

(223)  Francis  Bulmer,  of  Elmden,  Yorks,  and  Tursdale,  co.  Durham,  son  of  Sir 
William  Bulmer,  was  admitted  to  Lincoln's  Inn  n  Feb.  1551/2.  He  married  Cathe- 
rine, d.  of  Richard  Norton,  of  Norton  Conyers.  (Foster,  D.V.P.  55  ;  Pec.  Line. 
Adm.  i.  60.) 

(224)  William  Hodgson,  of  the  Manor  House,  Lanchester,  4th  son  of  James 
Hodgson,  of  Newcastle,  married  Jane,  daughter  of  Sir  Christopher  Hildyard,  and  died 
in  1600.  In  1598  the  Bishop  of  Durham  mentions  him  as  "an  old  servant  and 
follower  of  the  earl  "  of  Westmorland,  and  "a  perilous  fellow,  conformable  to  all  her 
majesty's  proceedings,  and  farmour  to  her  highness  of  the  whole  deanery  of  Lan- 
chester dissolved,  worth,  it  is  said,  some  200  ma.  or  better,  above  the  yearly  rent." 
His  son  John  was  u  a  special  recusant,"  who  was,  but  it  seems  erroneously,  reported 
to  have  married  Katharine,  widow  of  Sir  Thomas  Gray,  and  daughter  of  the  Earl  of 
Westmorland  ;  and  in  1592  great  efforts  had  been  made  to  take  him.  (Surtees,  ii. 
319  ;  Cal.  Cecil  MSS.  iv.  258  ;  Strype,  A.  iv.  481.) 

(225)  Probably  Richard  Conyers,  e.  s.  of  Christopher  Conyers,  of  Horden,  who 
was  in  prison  at  Durham  in  1569,  and  married  Elizabeth,  d.  and  co-h.  of  Roger 
Lumley,  of  Lud worth,  and  was  living  31  Eliz.     (Surtees,  I.  ii.  28  ;  Sharp,  128.) 

(226)  Probably  Christopher  Claxton,  2nd  son  of  William  (n.  218  above).  He  was 
in  prison  at  Durham  in  1569,  and  died  in  the  lifetime  of  his  father.  (Surtees,  iii.  79  ; 
Sharp,  129.) 

(227)  Probably  Anthony  Weldon,  J. P.,  of  Swanscombe,  Kent,  Clerk  of  the  Green 
Cloth   to  Queen  Elizabeth,  who   died   16   Eliz.     (Hasted,  i.  261  ;    Camden  Misc. 

Ix.  58.) 

(228)  John  Powell  remains  unknown,  unless  he  was  one  of  the  family  of  Polhill 
alias  Polley,  for  whom  see  H.S.P.  xlii.  87-88. 

(229)  Thomas  Thwaytes,  of  Hardingham,  Norfolk,  married  Bridget,  d.  of  Robert 
Spring,  of  Lenham,  Suffolk,  and  died  31  Eliz.  His  e.  son  Anthony  was  a  recusant 
in  1592.    (H.S.P.  xxxii.  284  ;  Cal.  Cecil  MSS.  iv.  268 ;  Blomefield,  i.  226.) 

(230)  Probably  Francis  Downes,  of  Wramplingham,  Norfolk,  admitted  to  Lin- 
coln's Inn  19  Feb.  1552/3,  who  married  Elizabeth,  d.  of  William  Dyve,  of  Bromham, 
Beds.,  and  died  before  1591.  (U.S. P.  xxxii.  no;  Pec.  Line.  Inn  Adm.  i.  60; 
Blomefield,  ii.  486.) 

(231)  Jerome  Brett,  of  Leeds,  Kent,  afterwards  of  London,  died  before  34  Eliz. 
(Strype  A.  II.  ii.  617  ;  Hasted,  ii.  484.) 

(232)  John  Smith  is  possibly  the  person  of  this  name  who  about  1588  was  serving 
Dr.  Worthington  at  Brussels.  He  is  described  in  the  Concertatio  as  "  nobilis  exul." 
(Cal.Dom.  1581,  570.) 

(233)  Unidentifiable. 


lo8  TWO   LISTS   OF   INFLUENTIAL   PERSONS 


norff             176 

hubberde  by  bougey  (234). 

(5) 

Catholiks  in  walles  (c) 

north  walles. 

carnavanshire  1 

wm  Griffith  (235). 

2 

griffith  madrin.  1  mile  fro  sea  (236). 

3 

thorns  owen  J  (237). 

4 

Ihon  wyne  ap  hugh  |  (238). 

5 

Iohn  griffith  of  lhyne  J  (239). 

6 

moris  wyne 

(240). 

7 

doctor  wynne 

-hrnrh.f>r<>   \   ^   /" 
uromtrs  1       1 

8 

griffith  wynne 

9 

Robt  wynne 

(243)- 

10 

william  williams  (244). 

n 

Thorns  Williams  \  0  by  the  sea  (245). 

12 
13 

edward  Williams 
Ihon  Williams 

-brothers  <24^ 
(247)- 

14 

henry  williams 

(248). 

*$ 

Wm  Glynne  (249). 

(234)  Probably  James  Hubbard,  of  Hales,  who  was  committed  for  papistry  in 
1578,  but  on  conforming  was  dismissed  with  favour.  He  married  Frances,  d.  of  Sir 
William  Drury,  of  Halsted.     (Dasent,  x.  312  ;  H.S.P.  xxxii.  165.) 

[(c)  The  main  authority  for  all  the  following  Welsh  names  is  Nicholas.] 

(235)  William  Griffith,  LL.D.,  of  Carnarvon,  Sheriff  in  1563,  M.P.  for  the 
borough  of  Carnarvon  1 586. 

(236)  Griffith  Madryn,  of  Madryn. 

(237)  Thomas  Owen,  of  Plasden,  Sheriff  in  1569. 

(238)  John  Wynn  ap  Hugh,  of  Bodvel,  Sheriff  1551  and  1560,  M.P.  for  the 
county  of  Carnarvon  1553.  He  married  Elizabeth,  d.  of  Sir  John  Puleston.  He 
was  standard-bearer  to  John  Dudley,  Earl  of  Warwick,  in  Kelt's  rebellion. 

(239)  John  Griffith,  of  Llyn,  father  of  Griffith  Griffith,  who  was  Sheriff  in  1590. 

(240)  Maurice  Wynn,  of  Gwydir,  Sheriff  1555,  1570,  1578,  M.P.  for  Carnarvon- 
shire 1553,  1554,  1558,  1563  ;  was  e.  s.  of  John  Wynn  ap  Meredith,  Sheriff  1545  and 
1557-  He  married  Jane,  d.  of  Sir  Richard  Bulkeley,  of  Beaumorris,  Anglesey,  by 
whom  he  was  the  father  of  the  first  baronet,  the  famous  antiquary. 

(241)  Unidentified  further. 

(242)  Griffith  ap  John  Wynn,  of  Llanpedroke  in  Llyn,  was  a  recusant  in  1 592. 
(Cal.  Cecil  MSS.  iv.  273.) 

(243)  Robert  Wynn,  of  Conway,  3rd  son  of  John  Wynn  ap  Meredith,  married 
Dorothy,  widow  of  William  Williams,  next  below. 

(244)  William  Williams,  of  Cochwillan,  M.P.  for  Carnarvonshire  1571,  was  eldest 
son  of  William  Williams,  of  Cochwillan.  He  married  Dorothy,  4th  d.  of  Sir  William 
Griffith,  of  Penhryn,  Chamberlain  of  North  Wales.  He  is  to  be  distinguished  from 
William  Williams  of  the  Inner  Temple,  a  London  recusant  imprisoned,  who  was  of 
Newport,  Monmouthshire.     (M.I.T.  55.) 

(245)  Thomas  Williams  (3rd  son),  Sheriff  of  Anglesey  1556,  married  Jane,  d.  of 
William  Stanley,  of  Hooton,  Cheshire,  and  was  the  father  of  the  first  baronet  of 
Vaenol.     (Burke's  Peerage,  &c,  under  Bulkeley.) 

(246)  Edward  Williams  (4th  son),  of  Maes-y-Castell,  Sheriff  1571,  married 
Grace,  d.  of  John  Owen,  of  Garthymedd,  Abergele,  and  was  alive  in  1601. 

(247)  John  Williams  (5th  son),  of  "  Lansanfrine  in  Rose,"  i.e.  Llansaintffraid- 
Glan-Conway,  was  a  recusant  in  1592.     (Cat.  Cecil  MSS.  iv.  273.) 

(248)  Henry  Williams  (6th  son). 

(249)  William  Glyn,  of  Glynllifon,  Sheriff  1562,  2nd  son  of  Edmund  Lloyd, 
married  (1)  Angharad,  d.  of  Ellis  ap  Moms,  of  Clenenneu,  and  (2)  Katharine,  d.  of 
Thomas  Mostyn. 


TWO   LISTS    OF   INFLUENTIAL    PERSONS  109 

16  rich  griffith  (250). 

17  rich  vaghan  (251). 

18  Rollande  preston  (252). 

19  Ris  thorns  (253). 

20  Ihon  conwaye  (254). 

Anglesey  in  north  walls. 

2 1  Rich  bouckley  1(255). 

22  Thorns  boucle  H256)  all  the  boucles  are  catho. 

23  Ihon  bouckle   J  (257). 

24  Willm  lewes  (258). 

25  lewes  owen  (259). 

26  hugh  owen  of  bodon  (260). 

27  Rich  ap  rither  (261). 

28  Wm  griffith  (262). 

Denbighshire  north  wales. 

29  Ihon  Salisburie  of  Ryg  (263). 

30  david  lhoid  conway  (264). 

31  Ihon  wyne  ap  willm  (265). 

32  edwarde  almere  (266). 

33  Ivan  lhoid  of  yale  (267). 

34  Symon  thelwale  (268). 

35  Ihon  edwardes  of  the  waine  (269). 

(250)  Richard  Griffith  is  probably  the  person  of  this  name,  brother  to  Dr.  Griffith 
of  the  Arches,  who  in  January  1589-90  was  at  St.  Omer  in  the  service  of  Mr.  George 
Chamberlain.     {Cal.  Cecil MSS.  iv.  8.)     See  n.  405  below. 

(251)  Richard  Vaughan,  of  Llwyndyrus,  Sheriff  1579. 

(252)  Rowland  Puleston,  of  Carnarvon,  Sheriff  1575  and  1593. 

(253)  Rees  Thomas,  of  Carnarvon,  Sheriff  in  1574. 

(254)  Probably  John  Conway,  of  Bodryhddan,  Flintshire,  M.P.  for  Flintshire 
1557,  who  married  Janet,  d.  of  Thomas  Salusbury,  of  Llewenny,  Denbighshire. 

(255)  Richard  Bulkeley,  b.  1533  (e.  s.  of  Sir  Richard  Bulkeley,  of  Beaumaris  and 
Cheadle),  Constable  of  Beaumaris  Castle  1561,  first  Mayor  of  Beaumaris  1562, 
Sheriff  1570,  M.P.  1570,  1603-4;  knighted  17  February  1576/7;  married  (1) 
Katharine,  d.  of  Sir  William  Davenport,  of  Bramhall,  Cheshire  ;  (2)  18  February 
1576/7,  Mary,  e.  d.  of  Sir  William  Burgh,  Lord  Burgh  of  Gainsborough.  He  died 
28  June  1 62 1.     {D.N.B.  vii.  231  ;  Shaw,  ii.  78.) 

(256)  Thomas  Bulkeley,  of  Plasgronw  and  Beaumaris  (brother  of  the  above,  3rd 
son),  was  living  in  1607,  and  left  issue. 

(257)  Unidentified. 

(258)  Wiiliam  Lewis,  of  Presadfedd,  Sheriff  1549,  1558,  1572,  M.P.  for  Anglesey, 

1555- 

(259)  Lewis  Owen  ap  Meurick,  of  Frondeg,  Sheriff  1571,  M.P.  for  Anglesey  1555. 

(260)  Probably  Owen  ap  Hugh,  of  Bodeon,  now  Bedowen,  Sheriff  1563  and  1580. 

(261)  Possibly  Richard  ap  Rhydderch,  of  Myfyrion,  M.P.  for  Newborough  1542. 

(262)  Unidentified. 

(263)  John  Salusbury,  of  Rhug,  Merionethshire,  High  Sheriff  of  that  "county 
1559  an^  1578,  son  of  Robert  Salusbury,  married  a  daughter  of  Sir  John  Salusbury, 
Knt.,  of  Llewenny. 

(264)  David  Lloyd,  of  Conway,  Carnarvonshire,  M.P.  for  Carnarvonshire  1554. 

(265)  John  Wynn  ap  William,  of  Meley,  High  Sheriff  of  Denbighshire  1577. 

(266)  Edward  Aimer,  of  Pant  Yokin,  High  Sheriff  1558  and  1571. 

(267)  Evan  Lloyd,  of  Tale,  High  Sheriff  1568,  M.P.  for  the  county  1585. 

(268)  Simon  Thelwall,  of  Plas-y-Ward,  M.P.  for  the  borough  1547,  1553  (twice), 
for  the  county  1563,  for  the  borough  again  157 1,  Sheriff  1572. 

(269)  Probably  John  Edwards,  M.P.  for  the  county  1588,  then  in  temporary 
occupation  of  Chirk  Castle. 


110  TWO    LISTS   OF  INFLUENTIAL   PERSONS 

36  Ihon  trevor  (270). 

flintshire. 

37  Wm  Mostone  (271). 

38  piers  monstone  &  all  his  brethren  (272). 

39  Ithel  (273). 

Merionethshire. 

40  ellis  ap  wm  lhoid  (274). 

41  Ihon  owen  &  all  his  brethren  (275). 

42  griffith  (276). 

43  morgan  thorns  (277). 

44  Ihon  lewes  (278). 

45  Ihon  ap  Kadwallader  (279). 

Montgomery  shire. 

46  edwarde  harbert  (280). 

47  Ihon  price  (281). 

48  tho  (282). 

(270)  Possibly  John  Trevor,  of  Trevalyn,  Montgomeryshire,  High  Sheriff  of  that 
county  1573.  He  married  a  daughter  of  Sir  John  Bruges,  of  London,  and  dying 
1589,  was  buried  in  St.  Bride's,  Fleet  Street. 

(271)  William  Mostyn,  of  Mostyn,  M.P.  for  the  county  1554  and  1572,  married 
Margaret,  d.  of  Robert  Powell,  of  Park.     (Burke's  Peerage.) 

(272)  Pyers  Mostyn,  of  Talacre,  married  Lowry,  d.  of  John  Conwy,  of  Bod- 
rhyddan,  and  d.  s.p.  He  was  probably  M.P.  for  the  borough  of  Flint,  1577.  His 
brother  William,  who  succeeded  him,  married  about  1540,  Anne,  d.  and  h.  of  Henry 
ap  Harry,  of  Basingwarke,  or  Greenfield. 

(273)  Possibly  Ralph  Ithell,  brother  of- Thomas  Ithell,  LL.D.,  Master  of  Jesus 
College,  Cambridge,  who  was  committed  to  Dr.  Ithell's  custody  7  July  1577.  From 
4  August  to  3  December  1578  he  was  in  the  Marshalsea.  From  1584  to  1588  he  was 
a  priest  in  the  Tower,  charged  with  complicity  in  the  Babington  plot.  In  Oct.  1588 
he  was  removed  to  the  Counter  in  Wood  Street,  and  thence  to  Wisbech,  where  he 
still  was  in  1595.  He  afterwards  conformed,  and  was  R.  of  Aldham,  Essex,  1599- 
1600,  but  resigned.  (Cooper  (C.  H.  and  T.),  Athence  Cantabrigenses  (Cambridge, 
1858-61),  i.  406  ;  Strype,  A.  iv.  275  ;  C.R.S.  i.  ii.  iii.) 

(274)  Ellis  ap  William  Lloyd,  of  Rhiwaelog,  High  Sheriff  1575. 

(275)  John  Lewis  Owen,  of  Dolgelly,  afterwards  of  Llwyn,  Sheriff  1566,  1573, 
and  1590,  M.P.  1572  ;  son  of  Lewis  Owen,  Vice-Chamberlain  of  North  Wales, 
and  Baron  of  the  Exchequer  of  Carnarvon,  murdered  in  1555.  His  brother  Hugh, 
of  Caerverllan,  was  M.P.  for  Merionethshire  1 57 1 .  His  other  brothers  were  Edward, 
of  Hengwrt ;  Griffith,  of  Peniarth  ;  Robert,  of  Bronclydwr  ;  Simon  and  Ellis.  {D.N.B. 
xlii.  430.) 

(276)  Possibly  Griffith  Glynne,  of  Pwllheli,  Sheriff  of  Carnarvonshire  1564, 
Sheriff  of  Merionethshire  1563  and  1567. 

(277)  Unidentified. 

(278)  John  Lewis  is  probably  to  be  identified  with  n.  275  above. 

(279)  John  Wynn  ap  Cadwalader,  of  Rhiwlas,  High  Sheriff  1577  and  1586. 

(280)  Edward  Herbert,  of  Blackhall,  or  Lymore,  4th  son  of  Sir  Richard 
Herbert,  of  Montgomery  (but  his  eldest  son  by  his  wife  Anne),  and  grandfather  of 
Lord  Herbert,  of  Cherbury,  was  High  Sheriff  1557  and  1568  ;  M.P.  for  the  county 
1553  and  1556-7.  Keeper  of  Holt  Castle,  and  of  the  manors  of  Holt,  Bromefield, 
and  Yale,  15  May  1570  ;  esquire  of  the  body  to  Queen  Elizabeth,  knighted  23 
August  1574,  and  buried  in  Montgomery  church  20  May  1593.  {D.N.B.  xxvi.  173  ; 
Cal.Dom.  1547,  376.) 

(281)  Probably  John  Price,  of  Eglwysegle,  Llanfyllin,  Sheriff  1562,  or  else  John 
Price,  of  Newton,  M.P.  for  the  borough  of  Montgomery  1558,  1562-3,  and  for  the 
county  1572. 

(282)  Possibly  Thomas  Tanet  of  Aber-tanet,  Sheriff  1570. 


TWO   LISTS   OF   INFLUENTIAL   PERSONS  III 

Shropshire. 

49  Ihon  mitton  (283). 

50  gategarie  (284). 

51  hurde(285). 

52  edwarde  Kinaston  (286). 

53  tho  furmer  (287). 

(6.)  South  wales. 

54  Griffith  Rice  (288). 

55  wm  philips  of  puton  (289). 

56  wm  Morgan  (290). 

57  gadarne(29i). 

58  Came  (292). 

59  gamaige  (293). 

60  games  (294). 

61  Vaghan  (295). 

62  rich  Iones  (296). 

63  thorns  Tones  (297). 

64  Antho  Mansfeld  (298). 

(283)  Possibly  John  Mitton,  of  Pontascourth,  Montgomeryshire,  e.  son  of  Richard 
Mitton,  six  times  Bailiff  of  Shrewsbury.     (H.S.P.  xxix.  362.) 

(284)  Francis  Gatacre,  of  Gatacre,  married  Eliza,  d.  and  co-h.  of  Humphrey 
Swinnerton,  of  Swinnerton,  Staffs,  and  was  a  recusant  in  1592.  {H.S.P.  xxviii.  198  ; 
Cal.  Cecil  MSS.  iv.  272.) 

(285)  Probably  the  Catholic  William  Hoord,  of  Wolvesey,  Winchester,  mentioned 
Cal.  Dom.  1547,  688,  committed  to  the  Wood  St.  Counter  27  July  1586,  who  was 
probably  the  2nd  son  of  John  Hoorde,  of  Park  Bromage,  who  married  Elizabeth 
Harnage.     (H.S.P.  xxviii.  253  ;  Cal.  Cecil  MSS.  iv.  270  ;  C.R.S.  ii.  262,  269.) 

(286)  Probably  Edward  Kynaston,  of  Hordley,  who  was  twice  married,  and  died  in 
1594.     [H.S.P.  xxix.  295.) 

(287)  Thomas  Fermor,  or  Farmer,  of  Hay  Park,  Sheriff  1559,  married  Frances, 
d.  and  h.  of  Thomas  Horde.     (H.S.P.  xxviii.  183.) 

(288)  Possibly  Griffith  Rhys,  of  Newton,  Carmarthenshire,  Sheriff  of  Carmarthen- 
shire 1567,  son  of  Rhys  Griffith,  by  Katharine,  d.  of  Thomas,  Duke  of  Norfolk. 

(289)  William  Philips,  of  Picton  Castle,  Pembrokeshire,  Sheriff  of  Carmarthen- 
shire 1554,  Sheriff  of  Pembrokeshire  1562  ;  married  Jane,  d.  of  Thomas  Perrot,  of 
Haroldstone. 

(290)  One  William  Morgan  was  M.P.  for  Glamorganshire  1558-9.  One  William 
Morgan,  of  Kingston,  Herefordshire,  was  a  recusant  in  1592.  (Cal.  Cecil  MSS. 
iv.  265.) 

(291)  Thomas  Cadarn,  of  Prendergast  Place,  Pembrokeshire,  High  Sheriff  1565. 

(292)  Thomas  Came,  of  Ewenny,  Sheriff  of  Glamorganshire  1572  and  1581,  M.P. 
1586  and  1588 ;  married  a  daughter  of  Sir  John  Wyndham,  of  Orchard  Wyndham, 
Somerset. 

(293)  John  Gamage,  of  Coity,  Glamorganshire,  married  Gwenllian,  d.  and  h.  of 
Sir  Thomas  ap  Jenkin  Powell,  of  Glyn-Ogwr. 

(294)  John  Games,  of  Newton,  Breconshire,  Sheriff  1574,  1587,  1596,  and  1600, 
though  "evil  affected  in  religion,"  was  knighted  23  July  1603.  He  married  as  his 
2nd  wife  Elizabeth,  d.  of  Meredith  Games.  (Cal.  Cecil  MSS.  iv.  279  ;  Dasent, 
xxii.  184.) 

(295)  Reynold  Vaughan,  of  Whitechurch,  Herefordshire,  was  a  recusant  in  1592. 
{Cal.  Cecil  MSS.  iv.  265.) 

(296)  Richard  Johnes,  of  Cwmgwili,  Carmarthenshire,  (2nd  son)  brother  of  Sir 
Henry  Johnes  above  (n.  51). 

(297)  Thomas  Johnes,  of  Abermarlais,  e.  s.  of  the  above-mentioned  Sir  Henry,  was 
High  Sheriff  of  Carmarthenshire  in  1589  and  1603.  He  married  Jane,  d.  and  h.  of 
Rowland  Puleston,  of  Carnarvonshire. 

(298)  Unidentified. 


112  TWO   LISTS   OF   INFLUENTIAL    PERSONS 

65  henry  mansfeld  (299). 

66  Vghan  (300). 

67  Mathewe  (301). 

68  Willm  harbert  of  Swansea  (302). 

69  Hgo  harbart  of  Troy  (303). 

70  harbart  of  Colbroke  (304). 

71  Charles  (305). 

72  Edward  Lewis  (306). 

73  wiriot  (307). 

heref  74     Ihon  Skedmore  [crossed  out]. 

herford  sheere. 
Sr  lames  Crofte  [crossed  out]. 
Sr  lames  baskernile  [crossed  out]. 
Sr  Thomas  baskernile  [crossed  out]. 
Sr  Richard  walwyn  [crossed  out]. 

74  Iohn  Hibbotts  (308). 

75  Iohn  Scudamor  of  homlacy  (309). 

76  Iohn  Scudamore  of  Kenchurch  (310). 

77  William  Shelley  (3 1 1 ). 

78  Roger  bodenham  (312). 

(299)  Possibly  Henry  Mansfield,  a  recusant  of  Bucks  in  1587  (?  admitted  a 
member  of  Gray's  Inn  1537.     See  Foster  G.I.R.  13).     (Strype,  III.  i.  705.) 

(300)  Probably  James  Vaughan,  of  Llangattock,  who  married  Sibylla,  d.  and  h.  of 
John  Gwilym,  of  Killwch  Vach,  Lord  of  Bicknor  in  1575.     (Burke's  Landed  Gentry.) 

(301)  Probably  William  Mathews,  of  Radir,  Glamorganshire.  Sheriff  1568  and 
1580,  who  died  in  1587.     (Dasent,  xv.  88,  232  ;  Cal.  Dom.  1581  passim.) 

(302)  William  Herbert,  e.  s.  of  Matthew  Herbert,  of  Swansea,  was  knighted  in 
1576,  and  was  High  Sheriff  of  Glamorganshire  1578,  1582,  1592,  and  1606. 

(303)  Hugo  Herbert  was  probably  an  illegitimate  son  of  Sir  Charles  Herbert,  of 
Troy,  Steward  of  the  Duchy  of  Lancaster,  but  his  name  is  not  in  the  pedigree  on 
p.  38  of  Bradney. 

(304)  Matthew  Herbert,  of  Coldbrook,  M.P.  for  Monmouth  1557-8,  and  for 
Monmouthshire  1562-71,  Sheriff  1584  and  1595  ;  married  Anne,  d.  of  Matthew 
Herbert,  of  Swansea  (see  n.  244  above).     (Bradney,  189.) 

(305)  Possibly  John  Charles,  admitted  to  the  Inner  Temple  from  Tavistock,  Nov. 
1 561.     {M./.T.43.) 

(306)  Edward  Lewis,  of  Vann,  High  Sheriff  of  Glamorganshire  1549,  1556,  and 
1560  ;  married  Anne,  d.  of  Sir  William  Morgan,  knt.,  of  Peneved. 

(307)  George  Wyrriott,  of  Orielton,  Sheriff  of  Pembrokeshire  1577  ;  married  Jane, 
d.  of  John  Philip. 

(308)  John  Hibbotts,  of  Hampton,  was  in  1564  a  J.P.  opposed  to  Protestantism. 
{Camden  Misc.  ix.  13,  19.) 

(3°9)  John  Scudamore,  of  Holme  Lacy,  one  of  the  Council  of  the  Marches  of 
Wales,  Custos  Rotulorum,  High  Steward  of  Urchingfield,  and  Steward  of  the  City 
of  Hereford,  was  in  1564  a  J.P.  deemed  unfavourable  to  Protestantism.  He  how- 
ever signed  the  Act  of  Uniformity  1569,  and  died  25  Sept.  1591.  His  grandson 
John  married  Elinor,  d.  of  Sir  James  Crofts,  of  Crofts,  and  was  Sheriff  of  Hereford- 
shire 1581,  Deputy-Lieutenant  1590,  and  knighted  1596.  {Camden  Misc.  ix.  12  ; 
Weaver  Heref.  64. ) 

(310)  John  Scudamore,  of  Kentchurch,  J. P.,  refused  to  sign  the  Act  of  Uni- 
formity 19  Nov.  1569.  He  was  a  consistent  recusant,  excommunicated  and  paying 
a  fine  in  1581,  and  in  prison  in  1585  and  1592.  {Camden  Misc.  ix.  12  ;  Cal.  Cecil 
MSS.  iv.  265  ;  Cal.  Dom.  1547,  183,  353  ;  1581,  280,  287  ;  Dasent,  xiii.  192,  292.) 

(311)  William  Shelley,  of  Sutton  and  Stoke  Edith,  is  the  same  as  William  Shelley 
n.  98  above. 

(312)  Roger  Bodenham,  of  Rother,  was  b.  1545,  married  Bridgett,  d.  of  Hum- 
phrey Baskerville,  of  Eardisley.     He  was  Sheriff  of  Herefordshire  1586  ;  and  was 


TWO  LISTS   OF  INFLUENTIAL   PERSONS  113 

79  Richard  Monyngton  (313). 

80  Walter  Baskervile  of  pontrile  (314). 

8 1  Thomas  Clynton  (315). 

82  Iohn  Harley  (316). 

83  watkyn  Vaughan  (317). 

84  Thomas  havard  (318). 

85  gregory  price  (319). 

86  Georg  Parry  (320). 

87  Richard  Sebourne  (321). 

88  Symon  Parry  (322). 

89  Debden  (323). 

90  lames  Boile  (324). 

91  Iohn  Baskervile  (325). 

All  the  aforenamed  of  heref  sheere  be  or  haue  ben 
Iustice  of  ye  peace. 
(7)  92     Thomas  Crofte  brother  to  Sr  lames  (326). 

93  Crofte  sonne  to  Sr  lames  (327). 

created  K.B.  on  the  coronation  of  James  I.     (Weaver,  Herefordshire \  82;  Bnrke 
Landed  Gentry,  1847  edn.) 

(313)  Richard  Monington,  of  Sarnesfield,  married  Katharine,  d.  of  John  Scuda- 
more  (n.  309  above).  He  was  now  aged  63.  He  was  deemed  neuter  in  religion  in 
1564.     (Camden  Misc.  ix.  13  ;  Weaver,  Heref.  49.) 

(314)  Walter  Baskerville,  of  Pontrilas,  Kentchurch,  was  a  bastard  of  Thomas,  4th 
son  of  Sir  Walter  Baskerville.     (Weaver,  Heref  7.) 

(315)  Thomas  Clynton,  of  Castleditch  in  Eastnor,  married  Margery,  d.  of  Richard 
Tracy,  of  Toddington,  Gloucestershire.  He  was  a  Catholic  J. P.  in  1564,  and  died 
1575.    {Camden  Misc.  ix.  19  ;  Weaver,  Heref.  20.) 

(316)  John  Harley,  of  Brampton  Bryan,  was  a  neuter  J.P.  in  1564  and  "ruler  of 
Wigmores  land."     He  signed  the  Act  of  Uniformity  in  1 564.     (Camden  Misc.  ix.  1 3.) 

(317)  Watkyn  Vaughan  is  unidentified.  Walter  Vaughan,  of  Bredwardine,  was 
a  J.P.  favourable  to  Protestantism  in  1564.    (Camden  Misc.  ix.  13.) 

(318)  Thomas  Havard,  of  Hereford,  was  in  1564  a  J.P.  and  a  member  of  the 
city  council,  '*  which  by  common  fame  ys  a  daily  dronkard,  receiver  and  mayntainar 
of  thennemeys  of  religion,  a  mayntener  of  supersticion  and  namely  of  abrogated  holy- 
daies.  He  useth  to  praie  upon  a  laten  primer  full  of  supersticions.  His  wife  & 
maydens  use  bedes  and  to  be  short  he  is  a  mortall  ennemy  to  Christen  religion." 
He  refused  to  subscribe  to  the  Act  of  Uniformity,  19  Nov.  1569.  (Camden  Misc.  ix. 
13.  14,  I5»  19;  Cal.Dom.  1547,  183,  353.) 

(319)  Gregory  Price,  of  Hereford,  was  a  neuter  J.P.  in  1564.  He  married  Mary, 
d.  of  Humphrey  Coningsby,  of  Hampton.   (Camden  Misc.  ix.  13  ;  Weaver,  Heref.  58.) 

(320)  George  Parry,  of  Paston,  Sheriff  of  Herefordshire  1563,  was  a  neuter  J.P. 
in  1564;  and  signed  the  Act  of  Uniformity  in  1569.    (Camden  Misc.  ix.  13.) 

(321)  Richard  Seborne,  of  Sutton,  one  of  the  council  of  the  Marches  of  Wales, 
was  a  Catholic  J.P.  in  1564.  He  married  Elizabeth,  d.  of  William  Elton.  (Camden 
Misc.  ix.  12  ;  Weaver,  Heref.  64.) 

(322)  Simon  Parry  was  a  neuter  J.P.  in  1564,  and  signed  the  Act  of  Uniformity 
in  1569.    (Camden  Misc.  ix.  13.) 

(323)  Nicholas  Debden,  of  Ludford,  was  recommended  by  the  bishop  to  be 
appointed  a  justice  in  1564.    (Camden  Misc.  ix.  14.) 

(324)  James  Boyle,  of  Hereford,  was  a  Protestant  J.P.  in  1564.    (ibid.) 

(325)  John  Baskerville,  2nd  son  of  Sir  James  Baskerville  who  died  1546,  married 
Elizabeth,  d.  of  Richard  Hergist,  of  Chenstone  in  Vowchurch,  and  died  1577. 
(Weaver,  Heref.  8.) 

(326)  Thomas  Croft,  see  note  102  above. 

(327)  Edward  Croft,  married  Anne,  d.  and  h.  of  Thomas  Browne,  of  Attleborough, 
Norfolk,  and  died  1601.     (Weaver,  Heref  22  ;  Metcalfe,  Suffolk,  n.) 

XIII.  H 


!I4  TWO  LISTS   OF   INFLUENTIAL   PERSONS 

94  thomas  Bodenham  sone  to  Roger  B  (328). 

95  Iohn  harper  (329). 

96  Walter  Baskeruile  -f 

97  brother  to  Sr  James  B.  (330). 

98  Richard  walwyn  son  to  Sr  R.  (331). 

99  Richard  lyngen  4-  (332). 

100  Walter  Lyngen  (333). 

101  Tho  lyngen  (334). 

102  Lyggons  of  cowarn  (335). 

103  Richard  harford  (336). 

104  Richard  Willison  (337). 

105  Iohn  Breynton  (338). 

106  Iohn  Scudamor  of  heref  (339). 

107  Phelip  Scudamo1'  (340). 

108  lames  Scudamor  +  (341). 

109  Io  Parry  of  Morehampton  (342). 
no  lames  Parry  (343). 

(328)  Thomas  Bodenham,  living  in  1634,  married  Mary,  d.  of  Sir  Francis  Bacon, 
of  Kinlet  Hall,  Salop.     (Burke,  Landed  Gentry,  1847  edn.) 

(329)  John  Harper,  of  Amberley  in  Marden,  married  Sybell,  d.  of  Thomas 
Walwyn,  of  Longford  in  Lugwardine.    (Weaver,  Heref.  40.) 

(330)  Walter  Baskerville,  4th  son  of  the  Sir  James  Baskerville  who  died  1546, 
and  brother  of  the  Sir  James  Baskerville  who  died  1573,  married  Jane,  d.  of 
Richard  Grevill,  and  widow  of  Thomas  Tame,  of  Stowell,  Gloucestershire.  (Weaver, 
Heref.  8  ;  Fen  wick  and  Metcalfe,  Visitation  of  Gloucester,  79.) 

(331)  Richard  Walwyn,  son  of  the  Sir  Richard  Walwyn  knighted  at  Queen  Mary's 
coronation  (below,  n.  546),  was  High  Sheriff  of  Herefordshire  in  1582. 

(332)  Richard  Lingen,  of  Dormington,  a  recusant  in  1581  and  I592»  is  probably 
to  be  identified  with  Richard  Lingen  of  Stoke  Edith  (5th  son  of  John  Lingen)  who 
married  (1)  Ann,  d.  of  Thomas  Havard  (n.  318  above),  and  (2)  Elizabeth  Spenser, 
widow,  and  died  1631.  (Burke,  Landed  Gentry,  under  Burton  of  Longner  Hall ; 
Cal.  Cecil  MSS.  lv.  265  ;  Dasent,  xiii.  192,  292.) 

(333)  Walter  Lingen  (3rd  son),  brother  of  the  above,  entered  the  Inner  Temple 
1550,  married  Elizabeth,  d.  of  Philip  Baker,  and  died  1577.     (Burke,  loc.  cit.) 

(334)  Thomas  Lingen  (4th  son),  brother  of  the  above. 

(335)  **•*  Lygon,  of  Cowarne.     Unidentified. 

(336)  Richard  Harford,  of  Bosbury,  was  in  1564  "no  justice,  but  the  Quenes 
majesties  generall  surveior  ...  of  all  Hereford  shere,  and  receivor  to  her  majestie 
of  Soche  landes  as  belonged  lately  to  the  bishop  of  Hereford,"  and  was  considered 
unfavourable  to  Protestantism.  He  married  Katharine,  d.  of  William  Purfoy,  of 
Northants,  and  died  1578.     {Camden  Misc.  ix.  13,  19  ;  Weaver,  Heref  38.) 

(337)  Richard  Willison,  of  Sugwas  in  Eaton  Bishop,  married  Anne,  d.  of  William 
Elton,  of  Ledbury,  and  died  25  Feb.  1574.    (Weaver,  Heref  77.) 

(338)  Tohn  Breynton,  of  Stratton,  married  Elizabeth,  d.  of  Thomas  Smyth,  of 
Credenhill.    (Weaver,  Heref  13.) 

(339)  Probably  John  Scudamore,  3rd  son  of  the  John  Scudamore  first  mentioned 
n.  309  above,  who  married  Joan,  d.  and  h.  of  Edmund  Payne,  of  Fownhope. 

(340)  Probably  Philip  Scudamore,  4th  son,  who  married  Joan,  d.  of  Richard 
Warncombe,  and  widow  of  Walter  Kerle. 

(341 )  James  Scudamore  was  very  likely  the  e.  s.  of  John  Scudamore  (n.  310  above). 
He  was  a  recusant  in  1592.    (Cal.  Cecil  MSS.  iv.  265.) 

(342)  John  Parry,  of  Morehampton.  Possibly  the  John  Parry  sent  to  the  Gate- 
house 15  August  1585,  for  hearing  Mass,  and  still  there  7  Dec.  1586.  (C.R.S.  ii. 
245.  271.) 

(343)  James  Parry  a  prisoner  in  the  Fleet.  (Cal.  Cecil  MSS.  iv.  413  ;  N.  &*  Q., 
loth  S.,  iv.  492.) 


TWO  LISTS  OF  INFLUENTIAL  PERSONS  115 

111  tho  walwyn  of  longford  (344). 

112  Thomas  Scudamo'  sone  to  Io  S  of  B  (345). 

113  Richard  warnecombe  (346). 

114  Symon  Birington  (347). 

115  Francis  byrington  (348)  Antony. 

116  George  Byrington  (349)  Washbourne. 

117  Richard  wigmor  (350)  of  Bosebery  (351). 

118  Thomas  wigmor  (352). 

119  William  Caple  (353). 

120  Richard  Caple  (354). 

121  Thomas  Smyth  (355). 

122  George  Crompe  (356). 

123  George  Vaughan  (357). 

124  lames  Gomonde  (358). 

125  Wm  Gomonde  (359). 

126  Iohn  Seboume  (360). 

127  lames  Barow  (361). 

(344)  Thomas  Walwyn,  of  Longford  in  Lugwardine,  married  Elinor,  d.  of  Sir  John 
Price,  and  died  1580.    (Weaver,  Heref.  70.) 

(345)  Thomas  Scudamore,  s.  of  John  Scudamore  (n.  310  above),  a  recusant  in  1592, 
and  in  1604  with  his  wife  Anne.    (Cal.  Cecil  MSS.  iv.  265  ;  C.R.S.  ii.  295.) 

(346)  Richard  Warnecombe,  of  M  Wington,"  i.e.  Wintercott,  was  a  J. P.  favour- 
able to  Protestantism  in  1564,  who  signed  the  Act  of  Uniformity  in  1 569.  He  married 
Jane,  d.  of  John  Scudamore,  first  mentioned  n.  251  above.    (Weaver,  Heref.  61.) 

(347)  Simon  Berington,  e.  s.  of  William  Berington,  of  Winsley,  a  Catholic  in 
1564.     {Camden  Misc.  ix.  19  ;  Burke,  Landed  Gentry.) 

(348)  Francis  Berington,  probably  a  son  of  Thomas  Berington,  of  Cowarne,  a 
Catholic  in  1564.  (Camden  Misc.  ix.  19.)  In  1604  Joan,  the  wife  of  Francis  Ber- 
ington, of  Vankhill,  was  a  recusant.    (C.R.S.  ii.  296.) 

(349)  George  Berington,  see  preceding  note. 

(350)  Unidentified. 

(351)  Anthony  Washborne,  of  Bosbury,  married  Anne,  d.  of  Thomas  Leyland. 
(Weaver,  op.  cit.  73.) 

(352)  Thomas  Wigmore,  of  Shobdon,  married  Mary,  d.  of  Ellis  Evans,  alias 
Bithill,  of  Northop,  Flintshire.     (Weaver,  Heref.  71.) 

(353)  William  Capell,  illegitimate  son  of  Thomas  Capell,  of  Howe  Capell,  d.s.p. 
10  Nov.  1577.     (Weaver,  Heref.  17.) 

(354)  Richard  Capell,  e.  s.  of  Edward  Capell,  married,  1568,  Mylborough,  d.  of 
Anthony  Washborne  (n.  351  above),  and  was  buried  at  Ledbury,  4  May  1601. 

(355)  Thomas  Smyth,  of  Credenhill,  or  Thomas  Smyth,  of  Weston.  See 
Weaver,  Heref.  96. 

(356)  George  Crompe,  probably  father  of  Adam  Crompe,  of  Holgate,  a  recusant 
in  1604.     (C.R.S.  ii.  295.) 

(357)  Unidentified. 

(358)  James  Gomond,  e.  s.  of  John  Gomond,  of  Byford,  married  Margaret,  d.  of 
Nicholas  Walwyn,  of  Longward.  His  eldest  son  John  was  a  recusant  in  1 581, 
and  in  prison  1592.  (Weaver,  Heref.  34;  Dasent,  xiii.  192,  292  ;  Cal.  Cecil  MSS. 
iv.  265.) 

(359)  William  Gomond,  (3rd  son),  brother  of  the  above,  married  Anne,  d.  of 
Richard  Stevens.    (Weaver,  Heref.  34.) 

(360)  John  Seborne,  of  Sutton,  e.  s.  of  Richard  Seborne  (n.  321  above),  married 
Sibyl  Mornington,  of  Sarnesfield,  and  was  a  recusant  in  1592.  Both  he  and  his  wife 
were  recusants  in  1604.  (Weaver,  Heref.  64 ;  Cal.  Cecil  MSS.  iv.  265  ;  C.R.S. 
ii.  294.) 

(361)  James  Barrow,  of  Ballingham,  married  Margaret,  d.  of  Richard  Warnecombe, 
of  Hereford,  and  was  a  recusant  in  1592,  (Weaver,  Heref.  6  ;  Cal,  Cecil  MSS,  iv, 
265.) 


Il6  TWO   LISTS   OF   INFLUENTIAL   PERSONS 

128  Richard  Barow  his  sonne  (362). 

129  Gegory  havard  (363). 

torne  to  the  12  leife  ** 
(8)  Catholicks  banished. 

Erie  of  Westmorland  (364). 
Com t 'esse  Northombrelonde  (365). 
-f   Lorde  morley  (366). 
lorde  windsore  (367). 
lorde  dacre  (368). 

Sr  francs  Inglefild  (369). 
Sr  Ihon  nevill  +  (37o). 
Sr  Xforus  Stuckley-f  (371). 
Sr  Xpofer  nevill  +  (372). 
SyRicShelley  +  (373). 
Sir  lames  Shelley +  (374). 

(362)  Richard  Barrow,  his  son,  married  Elizabeth,  d.  of  James  Boyle  (n.  324 
above). 

(363)  Gregory  Havard,  of  Pipley  (a  son  of  Thomas  Havard,  n.  318  above),  and 
Sibyl  his  wife  were  recusants  in  1604.  (C.R.S.  ii.  296.  Cf.  the  two  letters  of  Edward 
Havard  at  Cal,  Dom.  Add.  1566,  p.  544.) 

(364)  Charles  (Neville),  6th  Earl  of  Westmorland.     {D.N.B.  xl.  245.) 

(361;)  Anne,  widow  of  Sir  Thomas  (Percy),  7th  Earl  of  Northumberland.  (Gillow, 
v.  266.) 

(366)  Henry  (Parker),  nth  Baron  Morley.     (D.N.B.  xliii.  240  ;  Cokayne.) 

(367)  Edward  (Windsor),  3rd  Baron  Windsor  (Cokayne).  He  died  at  Venice, 
24  Jan.  1574/5- 

(368)  Edward  Dacre.     See  note  12  above. 

(369)  Sir  Francis  Englefield.    (D.N.B.  xvii.  372.) 

(370)  Sir  John  Neville,' of  Leversege  and  Billingley  and  Leeds,  married  (1) 
Dorothy,  d.  of  Sir  Christopher  Danby,  of  Thorpe,  by  whom  he  had  a  son  and  heir, 
and  a  daughter,  and  (2)  Beatrice,  d.  of  Henry  Brome,  of  Wrenthorpe,  by  whom  he 
had  ten  children.  A  Protestant  under  King  Edward  VI.,  he  was  reconciled  to  the 
Church  by  Dr.  Thomas  Robertson,  Dean  of  Durham,  under  Queen  Mary.  Possibly 
the  person  of  this  name  admitted  to  Gray's  Inn  1534.  He  was  knighted  8  May 
1544.  He  took  part  in  the  Rebellion  of  1569,  and  was  attainted,  but  managed  to 
escape  to  Scotland,  and  thence  to  Paris.  From  Paris  he  went  to  Flanders.  He  left 
Flanders  for  Rome  157 1/2.  He  arrived  in  Madrid  from  Rome  in  Nov.  1572,  and 
received  200  ducats  with  a  promise  of  30  ducats  a  month.  He  left  Madrid  10  May 
I573»  an(l  in  '574  he  was  receiving  a  pension  of  60  ducats  a  month  from  the  King. 
In  1575  he  was  at  Brussels.  In  both  1574  and  1575  the  English  Government 
demanded  his  expulsion  from  Spanish  territory.  He  and  his  son  Robert  died  abroad 
before  1588  as  the  Concertatio  records.  (Sharp  ;  Knox,  299  ;  Gachet ;  Proost ;  Cal. 
Dom.  Add.  1566;  Foster;  G.I.R.  10;  Cal.  For.  1569;  H.S.P.  xvi.  229.) 

(371)  This  should  be  Sir  Thomas  Stukeley,  as  to  whom  see  D.N.B.  lv.  123.  It 
does  not  appear  when  he  was  knighted,  but  that  he  was  a  knight  is  clear  from  the 
Calendars  of  State  Papers.  He  was  made  Marquess  of  Ireland  by  the  Pope. 
(C.R.S.  ii.  161.) 

(372)  For  Christopher  Neville  (?  admitted  to  Gray's  Inn  1531),  who  does  not 
appear  to  have  been  a  knight,  see  D.N.B.  xl.  246. 

(373)  For  Sir  Richard  Shelley,  Knight  of  St.  John,  see  D.N.B.  Hi.  40,  as  corrected 
by  N.  6°  Q.,  9th  Series,  xii.  426,  and  nth  Series,  ii.  336. 

(374)  Sir  James  Shelley,  Knight  of  St.  John,  was  a  brother  of  the  above,  and 
went  abroad  soon  after  the  accession  of  Queen  Elizabeth.  On  29  May  1573  the 
Grand  Master  and  Venerable  Council  granted  him  50  scudi  a  year  besides  his  table 
money  and  pay.  (Berry,  Sussex;  Cal.  For.  1563,  625;  Strype,  A.  II.  ii.  597; 
N  &  Q.,  1st  S.,  viii.  192,  x.  201.) 


TWO   LISTS   OF   INFLUENTIAL   PERSONS  117 

Sir  Oliver  Starkie  (375). 
Sr  Xforus  Mackanfild  (376). 

1  Richarde  norton  (377). 

2  francs  norton  (378). 
dead                 3     Iohn  Swinborne  (379). 

4  Christop  Danby  (380). 

5  Antonie  bolmer  (381). 

6  Iohn  thwinge  (382). 

7  Michael  tempest  (383). 

(375)  Sir  Oliver  Starkey,  Knight  of  St.  John,  natural  son  of  Hugh  Starkey,  of 
Oulton  Lowe,  Cheshire,  was  in  Malta  in  1565,  and  was  reported  as  being  ready  to 
conform,  if  allowed  to  return  to  England.  Ormerod  states  that  he  became  Grand 
Prior  of  England.  He  is  not  in  the  Concertatio  list.  He  was  buried  in  St.  John's 
Church,  Malta.  (Ormerod,  Cheshire,  ii.  188;  Cal.  For.  1564,  330  ;  N.  &>  Q.,  1st  S., 
viii.  192.) 

(376)  Sir  Christopher  Markenfield  is  not  mentioned  either  in  the  Concertatio  or  in 
the  pedigree  in  H.S.  P. 

(377)  Richard  Norton.    {D.N.B.  xli.  27.) 

(378)  Francis  Norton,  e.  s.  of  the  above.     (Gillow,  v.  197.) 

(379)  John  Swinburne,  of  Chopwell,  co.  Durham,  took  part  in  the  rebellion  of 
1569  and  was  attainted.  He  fled  to  Scotland,  where  he  was  imprisoned,  but  he  was 
liberated  in  1572.  He  arrived  in  Madrid  Nov.  1573,  and  received  a  pension  from  the 
King  of  Spain.  He  was  living  at  Namur  in  1577.  On  3  July  1575  Queen  Elizabeth 
had  by  letter  demanded  his  expulsion  from  Spanish  territory.  He  married  Anne, 
sister  to  William  Smythe  (n.  216  above).  He  and  one  of  his  sons  were  living  in  Paris 
in  1580,  and  both  died  abroad  before  1588  according  to  the  Concertatio.  (Sharp,  33, 
264;  Proost,  286;  Cal.  Dom.  Add.  1566;  Cal.  For.  1569,  1572,  1579;  Surtees, 
ii.  277-8.) 

(380)  Christopher  Danby,  of  Beeston,  Leeds,  (2nd  son),  brother  of  Sir  Thomas  (n. 
49  above),  admitted  to  Gray's  Inn  1544,  was  attainted  for  his  share  in  the  rebellion  of 
1569.  He  arrived  in  Paris  Oct.  1570.  In  1574  he  was  in  Spain,  and  in  1575  at 
Brussels,  in  receipt  of  a  pension  of  30  ducats  a  month  from  the  King.  His  expulsion 
from  Spanish  territory  was  demanded  by  Queen  Elizabeth  in  1574  or  1575.  In  1580 
he  was  living  in  Paris.  He  married  Margaret,  d.  of  Sir  William  Calverley,  and 
widow  of  Sir  Robert  Beeston,  of  Beeston.  (Foster,  G.V.Y.  264;  G.I.R.  17;  Cal. 
For.  1569;  Strype,  A.  II.  i.  495;  Knox,  299;  Proost,  284-6.) 

(381)  Anthony  Bulmer,  e.  s.  of  Francis  (n.  223  above),  was  imprisoned  in  Durham 
gaol  1  Jan.  1569/70,  and  in  1574  was  in  Spain,  receiving  a  pension  of  30  ducats  a 
month.  In  1575  he  was  a  student  at  Louvain.  (Strype,  loc.  cit.  ;  Sharp,  129; 
Knox,  300.) 

(382)  John  Thweng  was  probably  the  person  of  this  name,  e.  s.  of  Edmund 
Thweng,  of  Rotsey,  Yorks,  and  the  Thweng  successively  in  the  service  of  the  Earl 
and  Countess  of  Northumberland,  who  in  1574  was  receiving  a  pension  of  30  ducats 
a  month  from  the  King  of  Spain,  and  in  1575  was  at  Brussels  with  a  pension  of  20 
crowns.  His  expulsion  from  Spanish  territory  was  demanded  by  the  English 
Ambassador,  Thomas  Wilson,  1  Dec.  1574.  He  died  before  1588,  according  to  the 
Concertatio.  (Proost,  284-5 ;  Strype,  loc.  cit.  ;  Knox,  299  ;  Cal.  Dom.  Add.  1566, 
345;  Cal.  For.  1572,  582.) 

(383)  Michael  Tempest,  e.  s.  of  Robert  Tempest,  J.  U.D.,  of  Holmside,  co.  Durham, 
entered  the  Inner  Temple  in  Nov.  1558.  He  married  Dorothy  Dymoke.  He  and 
his  father  were  both  attainted  in  1569,  but  having  escaped  to  Scotland  embarked 
from  Aberdeen,  23  Aug.  1570.  They  were  at  Louvain  in  1571.  Robert  died  at 
Brussels.  Michael  afterwards  went  to  Spain  with  one  of  his  sons.  They  were  in 
Madrid  May  to  July  1574,  and  received  300  ducats,  with  the  promise  of  35  ducats  a 
month  or  40  ducats  a  month  in  Flanders.  Michael's  banishment  from  the  Low 
Countries  was  demanded,  1  Dec.  1574,  and  3  July  1575.  Michael  died  abroad 
before  1 588  leaving  three  sons.  The  Robert  Tempest  who  was  in  Rome  in  1 586 
was  undoubtedly  the  nephew  of  the  first-mentioned  Robert,  and  was  afterwards  a 


Il8  TWO   LISTS   OF  INFLUENTIAL   PERSONS 

8  francs  more  (384). 

9  Redmaine  (385). 
Sir  Ric  McKinfilde  (386). 

10  Robt  giles  (387). 

1 1  Iohn  gage  (388). 
Thorn  gage  (389). 

13     Ihon  gage  (390). 

priest  and  doctor  of  divinity.  No  doubt  this  latter  was  the  licentiate  of  civil  law 
who  was  in  Paris  in  1580.  (M.f.T.  32;  CaL  Dom.  Add.  1566;  Sharp,  33,  264; 
Knox,  299;  Proost,  loc.  cit.;  Strype,  loc.  cit.  ;  Concertatio ;  CaL  For.  1579.) 

(384)  Francis  More,  of  Yorkshire,  was  probably  a  son  of  John  More,  of  More 
Place,  Herts,  a  son  of  B.  Thomas  More,  and  Anne,  d.  and  h.  of  Edward  Cresacre, 
of  Barnborough,  Yorks.  He  probably  took  part  in  the  rebellion  of  1569,  and  with 
George  More,  probably  his  brother,  had  gone  to  Spain  in  1574.  The  expulsion  of 
one  More  from  the  Low  Countries  was  demanded  by  the  English  Ambassador,  1  Dec. 
1574*    (CaL  Doni.  Add.  1566,  413  ;  Proost,  loc.  cit.  ;  Strype,  A.  I.  ii.  54  ;  II.  i.  495  ; 

n.  5960 

(385)  This  is  too  vague  to  identify  with  any  certainty.  One  Marmaduke  Redman, 
of  Thornton,  nephew  to  Sir  Richard  Cholmeley,  of  Roxby,  was  in  prison  at  Durham 
in  1569.  (Sharp,  129).  So  was  one  Thomas  Redman.  The  Concertatio,  which  does 
not  mention  Marmaduke,  mentions  both  Robert  and  Thomas  Redman  as  exiled 
gentlemen,  and  one  John  Redshaw  as  a  deprived  priest.  The  last  appears  to  have 
been  known  also  as  John  Redman.  Robert  Redman  married  Bridget,  d.  of  John 
Clement,  M.D.,  of  Louvain,  and  Margaret  (Giggs)  his  wife,  adopted  d.  of  B.  Thomas 
More. 

(386)  Sir  Richard  Markenfield  is  unknown  to  the  Markenfield  pedigree  and  to 
the  Concertatio.  The  latter  mentions  a  Thomas  Markenfield,  Knight  of  St.  John, 
but  this  should  be  Knight  of  the  Holy  Sepulchre.  Thomas  Markenfield,  e.  s.  of 
Thomas  Markenfield,  of  Markenfield,  Yorks,  married  Isobel,  d.  of  Sir  William 
Ingilby  (n.  35  above).  He  and  his  brother  John,  (3rd  son),  then  under  twenty,  and 
probably  his  brother  William,  (2nd  son),  alive  in  1584,  were  attainted  in  1570.  He 
probably  with  William  escaped  to  Scotland,  and  thence  to  Antwerp,  where  he 
received  a  pension  of  432  ducats  a  year  from  the  King  of  Spain,  but  was  so  poor 
that  he  had  but  scant  garment  to  wear.  His  banishment  from  Spanish  territory 
was  demanded  by  the  English  Ambassador,  1  Dec.  1574,  and  by  a  letter  from  the 
Queen,  dated  3  July  1575.  John,  who  was  attainted  only  to  bring  his  title  to  his 
eldest  brother's  lands,  if  he  had  any  such  title,  to  the  Queen,  was  not  meant  to  die,  as 
he  had  no  lands,  and  was  eventually  pardoned  on  the  score  of  his  youth.  (Strype, 
loc.  cit.;  CaL  Dom.  Add.  1566;  CaL  For.  1572;  H.S.P.  xvi.  197;  Proost,  281, 
284-6  ;  Gachet,  loc.  cit.) 

(387)  Robert  Giles,  gent.,  of  Kent,  married  a  daughter  of  Sir  Thomas  Stradling, 
of  St.  Donat's,  Glamorganshire,  and  died  at  Louvain  in  1578,  aged  44,  and  was  buried 
in  the  Church  of  St.  Michael  there.  He  is  described  as  "legum  Anglkc  professor 
egregius."     (N.  6°  Q.,  10th  S.,  i.  48.) 

(388)  John  Gage,  of  Firle,  Sussex  (identical  with  n.  99  above),  e.  s.  of  Sir  Edward 
Gage,  K.B.  He  married  (1)  Elizabeth  Littleton,  of  Frankley,  who  died  about  1560, 
and  (2)  Margaret,  d.  of  Sir  Roger  Copley,  of  Gatton.  He  and  his  second  wife  were 
living  at  Antwerp  at  the  date  of  this  list.  They  returned  to  England  in  1576,  and 
from  that  date  onward  to  his  death  without  issue,  10  October  1595,  John  Gage  was 
constantly  being  fined  and  imprisoned  for  his  religion.  See  N.  &*  Q. ,  10th  S.,  viii.  241, 
and  Gage,  237. 

(389)  Probably  Thomas  Gage,  3rd  son  of  Sir  Edward  Gage,  K.B.  Born  27  Jan. 
1542,  he  entered  Winchester  College  second  on  the  roll  for  1553,  probably  as 
founder's  kin.  He  was  a  magistrate  of  Sussex,  suspected  of  popery  in  1576,  and  died 
1590.  He  married  Elizabeth,  d.  of  Sir  Thomas  Guldeford  of  Hemstead,  Kent,  by 
whom  he  was  the  father  of  John  Gage,  who  became  first  baronet.  (JV.  &r  Q.  loc. 
cit.;  Gage,  238.) 

(390)  Probably  John  Gage,  of  Wormley,  Herts,  a  younger  son  of  James  Gage,  of 
Bentley,  Framfield,  Sussex.     {N.  &  Q.,  10th  S.,  vii.  102-3.) 


TWO  LISTS   OF  INFLUENTIAL   PERSONS  IlO, 

14  Thorns  Shelley  (391). 

15  Anthony  Shelley  (392). 

16  Ihon  Shelley  (393). 

17  Hgo  Copley  (394). 

18  Iohn  leedes  (395). 

19  Thorns  Vachell  +  (396). 

20  Shelton  (397). 

2 1  Gilbert  ticheborne  (398). 

22  Willm  Cotton  +  AM  (399). 

23  David  Stradlinge  (400). 

(391)  Thomas  Shelley,  of  Mapledurham,  Petersfield,  Hants,  a  brother  of  Sir 
Richard  and  Sir  James  (nn.  373  and  374  above),  married  Mary,  d.  of"  Sir  Roger  Copley, 
of  Gatton.  He  was  a  J.P.  for  Hampshire,  and  went  abroad  in  or  before  1570. 
Three  Shelleys  of  Hampshire  were  in  Paris  27  April  1580.  These  are  probably 
Thomas  Shelley  and  the  two  sons  next  mentioned.  {N.  &  Q.,  9th  S.,  xii.  426  ;  10th 
S.,ii.  155,457-) 

(392)  Anthony  Shelley,  one  of  the  younger  sons  of  the  above,  was  elected  a 
Winchester  Scholar  in  1563,  and  is  believed  to  have  become  a  Carthusian. 

(393)  Jonn  Shelley,  brother  of  the  above  Anthony,  was  elected  a  Winchester 
Scholar  in  1567.  lie  may  be  the  person  of  this  name  who  was  a  Knight  of  St.  John 
at  Malta  in  1582.  He  was  living  in  Hampshire  in  1596.  One  of  this  name  arrived 
at  the  English  College,  Rheims,  4  Dec.  1583,  and  left  13  May  1586,  returning  11 
Oct.  1588,  and  leaving  23  August  1589.  In  a  letter  from  Anthony  Copley,  attributed 
by  Strype  to  the  year  1596,  which  however  by  internal  evidence  cannot  be  later  than 
1588,  John  Shelley  is  said  to  be  serving  in  the  Spanish  Armada.  {AT.  &  Q.,  1st  S., 
viii.  192  ;   10th  S.,  ii.  155,  457;  Strype,  A.  iv.  388  ;  Knox,  199,  210,  221,  225.) 

(394)  Possibly  Henry  Copley,  e.  s.  of  Sir  Thomas  Copley  of  Gatton,  Baron  de 
Welles,  who  was  knighted  by  the  King  of  France  and  died  at  Rheims,  10  May  1580. 
(Knox,  164,  165.) 

(395)  John  Leeds,  of  Steyning,  Sussex,  married  Elizabeth,  d.  of  Sir  Thoma> 
Palmer,  of  Parham,  Sussex,  and  fled  abroad.  On  his  return  he  was  a  recusant,  and 
was  in  prison  at  Wisbech  in  1588,  but  was  at  liberty  in  1592.  {H.S.P.  liii.  25  ; 
Dasent,  x.  50  ;  Strype,  W.  i.  529;  Cal.  Cecil  MS S.  iv.  263.) 

(396)  Thomas  Vachell,  of  Berkshire,  e.  s.  of  Thomas  Vachell,  of  Ipsden,  Oxon, 
married  Katharine,  d.  of  Thomas  Reade,  of  Barton,  near  Abingdon,  Berks,  was 
living  at  Lire  (Lille?)  in  1575,  and  was  a  recusant  in  1585.  He  is  mentioned  as 
an  exile  in  the  Concertatio.     {H.S.P.  lvii.  205  ;  Knox,  300  ;  Cal.  Dom.  1581,  275.) 

(397)  Humphrey  Shelton,  of  London,  (?  and  of  Belhouse  Manor,  North  Tuden- 
ham,  Norfolk),  went  abroad  early  in  Queen  Elizabeth's  reign  and  lived  at  Rouen  as 
a  merchant,  receiving  also  a  pension  from  the  King  of  Spain.  He  was  alive  in  1602. 
(Strype,  ^4.  II.  ii.  596;  Cal.  For.  1579;  Cal.  Dom.  1 591  ;  Cal.  Dom.  Add.  1580; 
Blomefield,  x.  266.) 

(398)  Gilbert  Tichborne,  2nd  s.  of  Nicholas  Tichborne,  of  Tichborne,  Hants,  a 
Bencher  of  the  Inner  Temple,  brother  of  Benjamin  above  (n.  80),  entered  the  Inner 
Temple  Nov.  1572.  He  arrived  in  Spain  from  Flanders,  December  1573.  In  1574 
he  was  receiving  a  pension  of  30  ducats.  He  was  in  prison  in  the  Gatehouse  in  1581, 
described  as  a  "  soldier"  and  of  "Tichborne  besides  Portsmouth,"  in  1582  he  was  in 
Flanders.  In  1592  he  was  in  prison  for  recusancy,  and  in  1594  he  was  in  Winchester 
Castle,  and  died  at  Winchester  in  1636,  aged  96.  (Berry,  Hampshire;  Cal.  Cecil 
MSS.tr.  271  ;  Cal.  For.  1572  ;  Cal.  Dom.  1 591,  463  ;  Cal.  Dom.  Add.  1580;  C.F.S. 
ii.  220  ;  Strype,  A.  II.  i.  495  ;  M.I.  T.  71.) 

(399)  William  Cotton  arrived  in  Madrid  from  Flanders  and  obtained  a  pension 
from  the  King  of  Spain.  He  was  at  Dunkirk  and  at  Antwerp  in  1575,  and  is  some- 
times called  Sir  William.  {Cal.  Dom.  1547;  Cal.  Dom.  Add.  1566;  Cal.  For. 
1572.) 

(400)  David  Stradling,  of  Glamorganshire,  was  probably  a  brother  of  Sir  Edward 
Stradling  (n.  50  above).  He  was  at  one  time  of  the  Inner  Temple.  In  Nov.  1573  he 
arrived  at  Madrid  from  Flanders  and  obtained  a  pension  from  the  King.  {Cal.  For. 
1572  ;  Cal.  Dom.  Add.  1566  ;  Cal.  Inner  T.  Fee.  I.  Iv.) 


120  TWO   LISTS   OF  INFLUENTIAL   PERSONS 

24  George  tirrell  (401). 

25  Robt  tirrell  (402). 

26  Willm  Griffit  +  (403). 

(9)  27  thorns  daniell  [dead  +  f*  margin]  (404). 

28  George  chamberleine  (405). 

29  hugh  owen  AM  (406). 

30  Robt  owen  (407). 

31  Anthony  Standen     +(408). 

32  Anthony  nolloth  (409). 

(401)  George  Tyrrell,  4th  s.  of  Sir  Thomas  Tyrrell,  of  Heron,  Essex,  and 
Constance,  d.  of  John  Blount,  Lord  Mountjoy,  was  a  servant  of  Queen  Mary,  one 
of  the  ushers  of  the  presence-chamber,  who,  soon  after  the  accession  of  Queen 
Elizabeth,  went  abroad  with  his  wife  and  family.  He  arrived  at  Madrid  in  Nov.  1573, 
and  received  a  pension  of  30  ducats  a  month  from  the  King  of  Spain.  In  July  1578 
he  was  living  at  Louvain.  He  was  the  father  of  Anthony  Tyrrell.  (D.N.B.  lvii. 
437  ;  Knox,  300;  Cal.  Dom.  1547,  427  ;  Cal.  Dom.Add.  1569,  468  ;  Cal.  For.  1572, 
451  ;  Strype,  A.  II.  i.  495  ;  H.S.P.  xiii.  16,  302.) 

(402)  Robert  Tyrrell  was  probably  the  eldest  son  of  the  above. 

(403)  William  Griffith,  son  of  Hugh  Griffith,  of  London,  who  entered  the  Inner 
Temple  in  Nov.  1571,  is  probably  the  John  Griffin  of  Essex  noted  as  being  abroad  in 
1576,  and  is  doubtless  the  "Greffy  "  who  arrived  at  Madrid  in  Nov.  1573  to  get  a 
pension,  and  the  Mr.  Griffith  who  was  at  Padua  in  Sept.  1579  and  in  Venice  about 
1591.  {Cal.  Dom.  1547,  633;  1591,  161 ;  Cal.  Dom.  Add.  468;  Strype,  A.  II.  ii. 
596;  M./.T.69.) 

(404)  Thomas  Daniell  is  probably  the  Thomas  Daniell  slain  in  the  wars  in 
Flanders,  2nd  s.  of  Edward  Daniell  mentioned  C.R.S.  i.  118. 

(405)  George  Chamberlain,  2nd  s.  of  Sir  Leonard  Chamberlain,  brother  of  John 
(n.  155  above),  was  arrested  in  1562  and  lodged  in  the  Tower.  He  was  at  Louvain  in 
April  1 570,  and  had  6  crowns  a  month  pension.  He  arrived  at  Madrid  10  Dec.  1 57l> 
and  received  300  ducats  with  entertainment  for  Flanders,  and  left  29  Feb.  1572. 
He  returned  to  Madrid  in  Sept.  1573,  leaving  again  in  Dec,  having  received  another 
300  ducats.  In  Flanders  he  got  60  ducats  a  month.  He  married  Mary  Pring,  of 
Ghent,  and  was  the  father  of  George  Chamberlain,  Bishop  of  Ypres.  (Gillow,  i.  457  » 
C.R.S.  i.  56;  Cal.  Dom.  Add.  1566;  Cal.  Spain,  1558,  241;  Proost,  281;  Gachet, 
iil  9-13,  xvi.  19-21.) 

(406)  Hugh  Owen,  a  kinsman  of  Barbara,  wife  of  Sir  Robert  Sidney,  and  d.  and 
h.  of  John  Gamage  (n.  293  above),  entered  Lincoln's  Inn  21  April  1556.  He  arrived 
at  Madrid  26  Nov.  1572,  and  received  150  ducats,  with  the  promise  of  20  ducats 
a  month  in  Flanders.  In  1574  he  was  getting  40  ducats  a  month.  In  1575  he 
proposed  going  to  Rome  and  Naples.  In  the  same  year  his  servant  Parry  was 
arrested,  and  several  people  in  North  Wales  got  into  trouble  for  supposed  dealings 
with  him.  He  lived  mainly  in  Brussels.  In  a  letter  which  cannot  be  later  than  1588 
(though  dated  in  Strype  1596),  Anthony  Copley  reports  to  the  Privy  Council  that  no 
one  can  be  preferred  in  the  Court  of  Flanders  without  Hugh  Owen's  favour,  as  he 
was  "  in  credit  with  the  prince's  secretary,  none  more."  He  was  certainly  there  1 591 
to  1603,  a  zealous  servant  of  the  King  of  Spain.  It  appears  he  was  for  some  time  under 
arrest  there  (together  with  Fr.  William  Baldwin,  S.J.,  and  Sir  William  Stanley)  for 
supposed  complicity  in  the  Gunpowder  Plot.  {Rec.  of  Line.  Inn,  Adm.  i.  62;  the 
Calendars  of  State  Papers  passim  ;  Gachet;  Strype,  A.  iv.  390.) 

(407)  Robert  Owen  arrived  at  the  English  College,  Douay,  1570,  and  was  in 
Rome  in  1580.  {Cal.  Dom.  1547,  651.)  He  became  a  priest  in  France  (Knox,  5). 
He  was  probably  a  brother  of  the  above.  On  1  Dec.  1574  Thomas  Wilson,  the 
English  Ambassador,  demanded  that  "Owen  and  his  brother"  should  be  banished 
from  the  Low  Countries.     (Proost,  284-5.) 

(408)  For  Anthony  Standen,  see  N.  &>  Q.,  nth  Series,  i.  389,  469. 

(409)  Anthony  Nolloth,  of  Suffolk,  arrived  at  Madrid  13  Jan.  1 571/2,  and  left  31 
March  1572,  after  receiving  150  ducats  with  entertainment  for  Flanders.  He  got 
back  to  Flanders  before  7  May.  In  1574  and  1575  he  was  drawing  40  ducats  or  20 
crowns  a  month.  (Cal.  Dom.  Add.  1566,  394,  497;  Strype,  A.  II.  i.  495,  ii.  500 ; 
Knox,  299 ;  Gachet.) 


TWO   LISTS   OF  INFLUENTIAL  PERSONS  121 

33  francs  powell  (410). 

34  henry  carew  (411). 

35  willim  pollarde  (412). 

36  francis  paeto  (413). 

37  Ihon  parrett     +(414). 

38  Secheverell  (415). 

39  Iohn  Talbot  (416). 

(410)  Francis  Powell  is  doubtless  the  Mr.  Powell,  an  English  priest  conversant 
with  the  rebels  resident  at  Louvain  in  1 571/2,  who  in  1574  was  about  to  receive 
a  pension  of  16  ducats  a  month.     (Cal.  Dom.  Add.  1566,  385  ;  Strype,  loc.  cit.) 

(411)  Henry  Carew,  e.  s.  of  Henry  Carew,  of  Ham,  Dorsetshire,  in  1574  is  re- 
ported as  having  gone  to  Spain  to  get  a  pension.  In  Feb.  1574/5  he  had  returned  to 
Flanders  with  a  pension  of  20  crowns  a  month.  (Cal.  Dom.  1581,  586;  Cal.  Dom. 
Add.  1566,  478  ;  Strype,  loc.  cit.) 

(412)  William  Pollard  entered  the  Inner  Temple  in  November  1562  from  Hor- 
wood,  Devon,  and  again  in  November  1567,  and  is  described  as  the  eldest  son  of 
Roger  Pollard,  and  as  having  succeeded  to  the  estates.  It  appears,  however,  that  he 
was  the  2nd  son  of  Sir  Richard  Pollard,  of  Waye  and  Horwood,  and  being  sus- 
pected of  popery  had  gone  abroad  before  1577.  A  Richard  Pollard,  of  Devon,  not 
mentioned  in  the  pedigree,  occurs  in  the  Douay  Diaries,  pp.  220,  225,  232.  (M.I.T. 
50  and  62 ;  Cal.  Intter  T.  Rec.  liv. ;  Vivian,  Devony  597.) 

(413)  Francis  Peto  is  doubtless  the  Peto  who  had  come  out  of  Italy  and  was  with 
the  King  of  Spain  in  May  1574.  He  died  in  exile  before  1588,  according  to  the 
Concertatio.     (Cal.  Dom.  Add.  1566,  462.) 

(414)  John  Parratt,  who  was  serving  as  a  soldier  at  Antwerp,  5  July  1571, 
arrived  at  Madrid  1  March  157 1/2,  received  100  ducats  with  entertainment  for 
Milan,  and  left  31  May  1572.  In  1575  he  had  gone  to  Spain  again.  (Cal.  Dom. 
Add.  1566,  467;  Knox,  300.) 

(415)  John  Sacheverell  (of  Buxton,  Derbyshire)  was  imprisoned  in  the  Counter 
in  Wood  St.  in  1562  for  his  religion,  as  we  know  from  the  list  in  Cal.  Dom.  Add. 
1547,  which  must  be  later  than  June  1562,  as  one  of  the  prisoners  in  the  Fleet 
therein  mentioned  is  Thomas  Somerset,  who,  as  we  know  from  Dasent,  vii.  108,  was 
committed  27  June  1562.  Later  on  Sacheverell  fled  abroad.  (Strype,  A.  II.  ii. 
596.) 

(416)  Probably  John  Talbot,  of  Grafton,  Worcestershire,  only  s.  and  h.  of  Sir 
John  Talbot,  and  father,  by  Katharine,  d.  of  Sir  William  Petre,  of  George  Talbot, 
9th  Earl  of  Shrewsbury,  who  was  a  priest.  He  was  admitted  to  Lincoln's  Inn 
10  Feb.  1555/6.  It  was  when  passing  through  Smithfield  in  the  company  of  Mr. 
and  Mrs.  Talbot  that  B.  Robert  Johnson  was  recognised  by  Sledd  the  informer  in 
July  1580.  Indeed,  Fr.  Persons  calls  him  "  Mr.  Talbot's  priest,"  though  it  appears 
he  was  rather  Lady  Petre's.  Talbot  was  committed  to  the  custody  of  the  Dean  of 
Westminster,  24  August  1580,  and  afterwards  removed  to  the  house  of  his  brother- 
in-law,  Sir  John  Petre,  in  Aldersgate  St.  On  1  Oct.  1581,  the  plague  being  rife  in 
the  City,  he  was  moved  to  some  other  house  within  ten  or  twelve  miles  of  London. 
In  1583  the  priest  Hugh  Hall  confessed  that  he  had  in  past  years  been  entertained 
by  him.  Later  Talbot  was  restricted  to  one  Henry  Whitney's  house  at  Mitcham  in 
Surrey,  and  two  miles  round  it.  In  1588  he  was  in  prison  at  Wisbech  Castle  for 
having  heard  Mass,  contrary  to  the  provisions  of  23  Eliz.  c.  i.  From  9  Dec.  1588 
to  about  13  May  1589  he  was  liberated  on  bail,  owing  to  his  own  and  his  wife's 
health.  He  then  seems  to  have  been  restricted  to  his  house  in  Clerkenwell,  but  on 
19  May  1589  he  was  given  leave  to  go  anywhere  within  six  miles  of  it.  From  2  Aug. 
to  20  Oct.  1589  he  was  allowed,  on  giving  bail,  to  go  down  to  Worcestershire.  On 
12  March  1589/90  he  was  ordered  into  confinement  at  the  house  of  Richard  Fiennes, 
at  Broughton  in  Oxfordshire,  whence  he  was  released  on  bail,  24  May  1590,  for  a 
fortnight.  He  was  again  allowed  out  on  bail,  20  Dec.  1590,  and  22  July  1591.  In 
1592  he  was  at  Bickslie  (?  Bexley  or  Bickley),  Kent.  On  7  Aug.  1592  the  recusants 
formerly  imprisoned  at  Ely,  Banbury,  and  Broughton  were  ordered  back  to  their 
prisons,  but  an  exception  was  made,  17  Sept.  1592,  in  favour  of  John  Talbot.  How- 
ever, next  year  we  find  him  in  Ely  gaol.    Thence  he  was  liberated  for  a  considerable 


122  TWO  LISTS  OF  INFLUENTIAL   PERSONS 

40  Ihon  hart  (417). 

41  Raulfe  coniers  (418). 

42  Haddocke  (419). 

43  Tomson  (420). 

44  Crayford  (421). 

45  Ric  Hopkins  (422). 

period  on  bail  to  act  as  umpire  in  a  family  dispute.  Later  on  he  was  allowed  to  take 
"  the  Bathes,"  presumably  at  Bath,  on  account  of  his  health.  Between  Michaelmas 
1 593  and  the  nth  March  following  he  paid  .£120  in  fines  for  recusancy.  Afterwards 
he  was  imprisoned  in  Banbury  Castle,  whence  he  was  released  on  bail  for  two 
months,  27  Feb.  1596/7*  his  leave  being  subsequently  extended,  29  April  1597  and 
6  Nov.  i597-#  In  1601  he  was  living  in  Worcestershire,  and  pressure  was  brought 
to  bear  on  him  to  secure  his  influence  to  promote  the  candidature  of  Sir  Thomas 
Leighton  as  one  of  the  parliamentary  representatives  of  the  shire.  In  1604  he  was 
paying  £20  a  month  in  fines  for  his  recusancy,  the  benefit  whereof  was  on  26  Aug. 
granted  to  Sir  William  Anstruther,  who  on  13  Oct.  in  the  same  year  obtained  his 
pardon.  On  the  following  8  Dec.  a  warrant  was  issued  for  release  to  him  of  ,£160 
due  from  him  to  the  Crown  in  fines  for  recusancy.  In  1605  he  was  suspected  of 
complicity  with  the  conspirators  of  the  Gunpowder  Plot,  one  of  whom,  Richard 
Winter,  of  Huddington,  near  Droit wich,  had  married  his  daughter  Gertrude.  Robert 
Winter,  however,  declared  that  he  had  said  nothing  on  the  subject  to  his  father-in- 
law,  knowing  that  he  would  not  join  the  plot  under  any  circumstances.  Indeed,  he 
had  actually  driven  the  fugitive  conspirators  from  his  door.  Talbot  was,  neverthe- 
less, arrested,  and  on  the  4th  Dec.  1605  examined.  On  26  Sept.  1606  the  value  of 
his  recusancy  was  granted  to  Lord  Hay.  His  second  son  John,  the  father  of  the 
10th  Earl  of  Shrewsbury,  died  in  London  in  1607.  He  himself  probably  died  about 
the  same  year,  but  the  date  of  his  death  is  unknown.  (Dasent ;  Cal.  Dom.  1581  ; 
Strype,  W.  i.  529;  A.  iv.  276;  Hamilton,  182,  183;  Cal.  Cecil  MSS.  iv.  268; 
Cokayne  ;  Rec.  Line.  Inn>  Adm.  i.  62  ;  C.R.S.  ii.  27.) 

(417)  John  Hart.    See  D.N.B.  xxv.  61  ;  Gillow,  iii.  153. 

(418)  Ralph  Conyers,  probably  either  n.  217  or  n.  220  above. 

(419)  Vivian  (or  Evan)  Haydock.     See  Gillow,  iii.  202. 

(420)  Christopher  Thomson  was  ordained  acolyte  at  Chester  in  1557,  and  subse- 
quently received  Anglican  orders.  On  19  March  1568/9  he  was  instituted  to  the 
living  of  Winwick  in  Lancashire,  on  the  presentation  of  the  Queen.  In  1576  he  was 
at  the  English  College  at  Douay,  and  left  30  April  for  Louvain  and  England.  On 
27  March  1577  he  returned  to  Douay,  and  was  ordained  priest  at  Cambrai  on  Holy 
Saturday,  6  April,  by  the  Archbishop,  Mgr.  Louis  de  Berlaymont,  leaving  on  the 
following  24th  for  Louvain  and  England.  In  1578  he  was  arrested  by  the  Earl  of 
Derby  and  imprisoned.  By  command  of  the  Privy  Council,  dated  23  August,  he 
was  sent  to  London  by  the  end  of  September,  and  on  or  about  3  November  1578 
was  committed  to  the  Marshalsea.  About  the  end  of  December  1580  he  was  removed 
to  the  Tower,  where  he  was  racked  on  the  following  3  January.  He  remained  in 
prison  till  21  Jan.  1584/5,  when  with  nineteen  other  priests  and  one  layman  he  was 
put  on  board  the  Mary  Martin  of  Colchester,  at  Tower  Wharf.  On  2  Feb.  they 
were  landed  at  Boulogne.  Two  years  later  he  was  in  Paris.  (A7".  <5r>  Q.,  10th  S., 
x.  170.) 

(421)  Edward  Cratford,  a  native  of  Herefordshire,  was  a  Fellow  of  All  Souls' 
College,  Oxford,  and  B.A.  in  1540.  He  became  M.A.  in  1544,  and  migrated  to 
Christ  Church,  Oxford,  in  1547.  He  was  second-master  at  St.  Peter's  College, 
Westminster,  in  1 55 1,  received  the  tonsure  in  London  in  Dec.  1554,  became  a  Royal 
Chaplain  in  1555,  and  was  Vicar  of  North  Petherton,  Somerset,  1554-7.  He  sub- 
sequently was  given  the  prebend  of  Yatton  in  the  Cathedral  Church  of  Wells,  and 
the  rectory  of  Lydeard  St.  Lawrence,  of  which  two  preferments  he  was  deprived  in 
1 561.  He  was  living  abroad  in  1576,  and  died  before  1588,  probably  in  Spain. 
(Foster,  Alumni  Oxonienses ;  Gee  (H.),  Elizabethan  Clergy  (Oxford,  1898),  227, 
233,  255,  272  ;  Frere  (W.  II.),  Marian  Reaction  (London,  1896),  258  ;  Strype,  A. 
III.  i.  39;  C.R.S.  i.  19,42.) 

(422)  The  account  of  Richard  Hopkins  in  D.N.B.  xxvii.  3S7  W  not  quite  satis- 
factory.   It  may  therefore  be  noted  :  ( 1 )  that  he  was  son  and  heir  of  Richard 


TWO  LISTS  OF  INFLUENTIAL   PERSONS  123 

46  gabr  denis  (423). 

47  Houghton  (424). 

48  wm  Cleoburne    +(425). 

49  hugh  charnok  (426). 

50  leiton  (427). 

51  midelton  (428). 

52  Ingram  thwynge  (429). 

53  Agremont  RatclifT  [crossed  out]. 

Hopkins  ;  (2)  that  he  was  admitted  to  the  Middle  Temple  24  May  1561,  and  is 
possibly  the  Richard  Hopkins,  a  commoner  of  Magdalen  College  1564/5,  whom 
Wood  apparently  confuses  with  the  commoner  of  St.  Alban's  Hall,  1573/4  ;  (3)  that 
he  went  to  Flanders  by  licence  of  the  then  Lord  Treasurer,  i.e.  either  Richard  Sack- 
ville  or  Sir  William  Mildmay  ;  (4)  that  he  was  living  in  Antwerp  7  May  1575,  and 
in  Rome  1 1  August  1582,  at  which  latter  date  he  sent  a  copy  of  his  book,  Of  Prayer 
and  Meditation,  to  Sir  Francis  Walsyngham  ;  (5)  that  he  was  in  Brussels  1587,  and 
in  Paris  in  Oct.  1590  ;  (6)  and  that  in  1593  and  January  1593/4  he  was  living  at 
Sieur  Vandersteen's  house,  near  the  English  Exchange,  Antwerp.  (Hutchinson, 
Notable  Middle  Templars,  125  ;  Strype,  A.  II.  ii.  597,  iv.  203  ;  Cal.  Dom.  1581,  66  ; 
Dom.  1591,415;  Dom.  Add.  1566,  484;  Dom.  Add.  1580,  313,  314;  C.R.S.  v. 
149,  261,  262.) 

(423)  Gabriel  Dennis,  5th  son  of  Sir  Thomas  Dennis,  of  Holcombe  Burnell, 
Devon,  admitted  to  the  Inner  Temple  1544,  was  in  Brussels  1574*  and  his  expulsion 
from  the  Low  Countries  was  formally  demanded  by  the  English  Ambassador,  Thomas 
Wilson,  1  Dec.  1574.  He  is  mentioned  in  the  Concertatio  as  living  in  exile  with 
his  wife.  In  Sept.  1586  he  was  suspected  of  being  concerned  in  the  Babington 
plot.  In  1593  and  1594  Gabriel  Dennis  was  at  Brussels.  (Vivian,  Devon,  279-80  ; 
Proost ;  C.R.S.  ii.  268,  v.  248  ;  MI.T.  19  ;  Knox,  301,  403,  406.) 

(424)  Thomas  Hoghton.     See  C.R.S.  iv.  175,  193. 

(425)  William  Clyborne,  of  Clyborne,  Westmorland,  entered  the  Inner  Temple  in 
Nov.  1564.  He  is  probably  the  Cleburne,  a  Lancashire  man,  at  Vigo  about  1578, 
and  related  to  the  priest  Gerard  Cleburne,  of  Chester  dio.,  mentioned  in  the  Douay 
Diaries.     (MJ.T.  54  ;  Cal.  Dom.  Add.  1566,  543.) 

(426)  Hugh  Charnock,  of  Chester  dio.,  after  imprisonment  at  London  and  fifteen 
years'  exile  for  the  faith,  arrived  at  the  English  College  at  Rheims,  3  August  1 584, 
and  received  the  first  tonsure,  minor  orders,  and  the  subdiaconate  in  the  chapel  of  the 
Holy  Cross  in  Rheims  Cathedral  on  Holy  Saturday,  20  April  1585.  On  the  follow- 
ing 21  Sept.  he  was  ordained  deacon  in  the  same  place  by  Mgr.  Louis  de  Brezd, 
Bishop  of  Meaux,  and  died  10  April  1586,  aged  nearly  60.  (Knox,  13,  201,  206, 
207,  210.) 

(427)  Thomas  Layton  or  Leighton,  son  of  Anthony,  of  Lancashire,  was  supposed 
to  be  an  agent  of  Mary,  Queen  of  Scots,  and  to  have  piloted  various  political  emis- 
saries into  Scotland  in  the  spring  of  1584.  In  the  following  summer  he  was  taken 
at  sea  on  board  the  Hopewell  of  Poole,  by  William  Arnwood,  a  pirate.     On  27  May 

1585  we  find  him  in  the  Tower,  where  he  still  was  18  June  1586.     In  November 

1586  he  was  in  the  Clink,  having  been  sent  there  the  previous  28  August.  In  1587 
he  was  regarded  as  a  seminary  priest.  On  Sept.  30,  1588,  he  was  still  in  prison.  In 
1593  one  Layton  was  at  Seville.  {Cal.  Dom.  Add.  1580,  117  ;  Cal  Dom.  1581,  184, 
186;  C.R.S.  ii.  238,  251,  261,  264,  268,  283,  v.  247  ;  Strype,  A.  III.  ii.  600.) 

(428)  There  was  a  Middleton  in  Paris  in  1580,  and  the  Concertatio  mentions  one 
as  living  in  exile  in  1588,  and  one,  a  brother  to  Captain  Middleton,  R.N.,  was  at 
Antwerp  in  1594.  There  were  numerous  Middletons  in  Yorkshire,  Lancashire, 
and  Westmorland,  and  it  has  proved  impossible  to  identify  the  Middleton  here 
mentioned. 

(429)  Ingram  Thweng,  3rd  son  of  George  Thweng,  of  Over  Helmsley,  Yorks, 
was  in  the  service  of  the  Earl  of  Northumberland,  and  was  attainted  in  1571.  In 
April  of  that  year  he  was  at  Antwerp  in  attendance  on  the  Countess.  In  1574  he 
was  getting  a  pension  of  30  ducats  a  month  from  the  King  of  Spain.  At  the  end  of 
February  1 581/2  he  left  Rheims  for  Rome.  He  was  admitted  to  the  Hospice  of 
the  English  College  there  as  servant  to  Mr.  Charles  Basset,  14  April  1582,  and 


124  Two   LISTS   0F  INFLUENTIAL   PERSONS 

54     tymothe  mockett  (430). 
5  5     gerard  mary  ne     +  (43 1 ) . 

dutch     +  [crossed  out]. 

56  palmer     +(432). 

57  Ihon  gowre  (433). 

58  marmaduk  blakston  (434). 

59  george  smith  (435). 

60  george  stafforde  (436). 

61  paule  latham     +(437). 

62  Robt  heighinton  (438). 

remained  for  eight  days  as  a  poor  pilgrim.  On  20  Feb.  1597/8  he  was  again  admitted 
to  the  same  Hospice  at  Rome,  and  remained  for  fifty-eight  days.  (Foster,  G.  V.  Y. 
230;  Cal.  Dom.  Add.  1566,  345;  Cal.  Dom.  1581,  364;  1591,  207,  SI  I,  246; 
Strype,  A.  II.  i.  495  ;  Knox,  185 ;  Foley,  Records  English  Province,  S.J.  (London, 
1877),  vi.  552,  569.) 

(430)  Timothy  Mockett  arrived  at  Madrid,  16  Dec.  1571,  and  received  a  gift  of 
150  ducats  with  entertainment  for  Flanders,  and  left  31  March  1572.  In  1574  he 
was  receiving  20  or  30  ducats  a  month.  In  1575  he  was  at  Brussels  receiving  16 
crowns  a  month.  He  had  married  a  widow  with  ;£l20  a  year.  His  banishment 
from  the  Low  Countries  was  formally  demanded  1  Dec.  1574.  On  27  July  1580  he 
left  Paris  for  Spain.  He  was  subsequently  knighted  by  the  King  of  Spain,  and  his 
pension  was  increased  to  40  crowns  a  month.  He  was  at  Antwerp  in  July  1594 
desirous  to  return  to  England,  if  he  could  do  so  without  changing  his  religion.  He 
was  still  living  abroad  in  1596.  (Proost ;  Gachet ;  Cal.  Dom.  Add.  1566,  467; 
1580, 1 1  ;  Cal.  Dom.  1591,  478,  525  ;  Strype,  A.  II.  i.  495,  iv.  390 ;  Knox,  299,  468.) 

(431)  Gerard  Maryn,  of  Southampton,  entered  the  Inner  Temple  in  November 
1559,  and  was  expelled  for  recusancy  in  1 572.    {M.I.  T.  34 ;  Cal.  I.  T.  Rec.  I.  liv.  267.) 

(432)  Brian  Palmes,  of  Morton,  co.  Durham,  was  attainted  1571,  but  managed 
to  escape  to  Flanders.  Queen  Elizabeth  demanded  his  expulsion  from  Spanish 
dominions,  3  July  1575.  He  married  Margaret,  only  d.  of  Ralph  Ratcliffe,  of  Tun- 
stall.     (Sharp,  265  ;  Proost ;  Foster,  D.  V.P.  267  ;  Cal.  Dom.  Add.  1566,  358.) 

(433)  Jonn  Gower,  of  Richmond,  Yorks,  b.  1557,  attainted  1571,  son  of  Ralph 
Gower,  of  Picton,  escaped  to  Scotland,  and  thence  returned  to  Yorkshire,  but  after- 
wards went  abroad.  On  6  Feb.  1575/6  he  arrived  at  the  English  College,  Douay, 
from  Anchin  College,  a  student  of  theology,  and  on  6  Oct.  left  for  Rome.  On 
16  Oct.  1 580  he  arrived  at  Rheims  a  priest,  having  been  ordained  in  Rome.  The 
Queen  asked  for  his  expulsion  from  Spanish  territory,  3  July  1575.  On  4  August 
1 581  he  set  out  for  Paris,  where  he  was  imprisoned,  31  May  1582,  as  a  heretic.  He 
was  indeed  ready  to  become  a  Protestant  if  his  pardon  could  be  secured.  However, 
he  was  soon  after  reconciled  to  the  Church.  He  was  back  at  Rheims  21  April 
1586,  and  left  21  May.  In  1598  he  was  a  lunatic.  {C.R.S.  ii.  ;  Proost,  286  ;  Foster, 
G.  V.Y.  267  ;  Strype,  A.  III.  i.  192  ;  Cal.  Dom.  Add.  1566  ;  Knox.) 

(434)  Marmaduke  Blakiston,  of  Morden,  3rd  s.  of  Thomas  Blakiston,  of  Blakis- 
ton,  co.  Durham,  entered  the  Inner  Temple  Nov.  1555.  He  was  attainted  1571, 
but  pardoned  16  May  1574.  Nevertheless,  1  Dec.  1574  and  3  July  1575,  his  ex- 
pulsion from  Spanish  territory  was  demanded.  He  died  in  161 1.  (Sharp  ;  Foster, 
D.  V.P.  19  ;  M.I.T.  25  ;  Surtees,  iii.  162  ;  Proost,  284-6.) 

(435)  George  Smith,  of  the  bishopric  of  Durham,  was  in  the  Low  Countries 
about  1575.  Possibly  the  musician  who  arrived  at  the  English  College,  Rheims, 
4  April  1584,  and  left  for  the  English  College,  Rome,  2  Sept.  1587.  He  died  in 
exile  before  1588,  according  to  the  Concertatio.    (Knox,  201,  217  ;  Proost,  286  n.) 

(436)  George  Stafford's  banishment  from  the  Low  Countries  was  demanded  in  a 
letter  from  Queen  Elizabeth,  dated  3  July  1575.  (Proost,  286.)  He  died  in  exile 
before  1588,  according  to  the  Concertatio. 

(437)  Paul  Latham  died  in  prison  for  his  religion  in  York  Castle,  1  June  1583. 
(C.R.S.  v.  192,  193.) 

(438)  Robert  Heighington,  of  Richmond,  Yorks,  secretary  to  the  Earl  of  Northum- 
berland, was  attainted  in  1571,  but  escaped  abroad  with  two  of  his  sons,  and  re- 
mained in  attendance  on  the  Countess  in  Flanders.    Queen  Elizabeth  demanded  his 


TWO   LISTS   OF   INFLUENTIAL   PERSONS  1 25 

63  tho  nelson  (439). 

64  Willm  Seborne  (440). 

65  langdale  (441). 

66  stapleton  (442). 

67  wotton  (443). 

lames  hamleton  (444). 
Ihon  hamleton  (445). 
Adam  gordum  (446). 
liggons  (447). 
tho  prideaux  (448). 
(10)  priests 

1  Doctor  Sanders     +(449)- 

2  Docter  Allen     +  (450). 

3  Docter  hall     +(451). 

banishment  from  Spanish  territory,  3  July  1575.  He  had  lately  been  at  Namur, 
Feb.  1576/7,  but  had  then  left.  He  died  abroad  in  or  just  before  1590.  His  eldest 
son  William  was  a  priest.     (Sharp,  271  ;  Proost,  286  ;  Knox,  298.) 

(439)  Thomas  Nelson,  a  brother  of  B.  John  Nelson,  b.  at  Skelton,  Yorks, 
arrived  at  Douay  1575,  was  ordained  priest  and  sent  on  the  mission  in  1577,  and 
died  at  Antwerp  in  June  1625.     (Camm,  ii.  224.) 

(440)  William  Seaborne,  of  Sutton  St.  Nicholas,  Herefordshire,  became  a  Member 
of  the  Inner  Temple  Nov.  1554.  He  arrived  at  the  English  College  at  Rheims, 
11  June  1583.  He  was  ordained  deacon  by  Mgr.  Claude  d'Angenne,  Bishop  of 
Noyon,  25  Sept.,  in  the  chapel  of  St.  Remy's  monastery,  and  priest  on  29  Sept.  1583 
in  the  same  place  by  Louis,  Cardinal  de  Guise,  the  Archbishop  of  Rheims.  He  went 
away  from  Rheims,  but  returned  3  June  1588.  On  17  April  1590  he  left  for  Spa, 
and  in  1596  was  in  Spain.     (Knox  ;  Cal.  Inner  T.  Rec.  I.  lv. ;  M.I.T.  19.) 

(441)  Alban  Langdale.     (D.N.B.  xxxii.  94.) 

(442)  Thomas  Stapleton.     (D.N.B.  liv.  101.) 

(443)  Thomas  Wotton  died  in  exile  before  1588,  according  to  the  Concertatio. 
Probably  the  lawyer  named  Wotton,  who  arrived  at  Rheims  from  Douay,  31  July 
1580.    (Knox,  168.) 

(444)  James  Hamilton,  of  Bothwellhaugh.  (D.N.B.  xxiv.  170;  Strype,  A.  II. 
i.  495  ;  Knox,  300  ;  Gachet.) 

(445)  John  Hamilton,  Prior  of  Bothwell,  brother  of  the  above.  (D.N.B.  xxiv. 
170,  195  ;  and  Strype,  be.  cit.;  Knox;  Gachet.) 

(446)  Adam  Gordon,  of  Auchindoun,  occupies  some  space  in  The  Register  of 
the  Privy  Council  of Scotland  (Barton  and  Masson),  ii.  and  in.  passim. 

(447)  Ralph  Lygon,  3rd  s.  of  William  Lygon,  ancestor  of  the  Earls  Beauchamp, 
and  Eleanor,  his  wife,  d.  of  Sir  William  Dennis,  was  in  1574  receiving  40  crowns  a 
month  from  the  King  of  Spain.  His  banishment  from  Spanish  territory  was  de- 
manded, 1  Dec.  1574.  In  1575  he  was  in  Brussels  receiving  ,£100  a  year.  He  paid 
short  visits  to  England  in  1577  and  1579.  In  1584  he  was  still  living  in  Flanders. 
His  brother  Hugh,  the  4th  son,  was  a  Worcestershire  recusant  in  1585.  (H.S.P. 
xxvii.  91  ;  Proost ;  Knox  ;  Strype,  A.  II.  i.  279  ;  Cal.  Dom.  1549,  700;  1581,  279; 
Add.  1580,  155,  246.) 

(448)  Thomas  Prideaux,  s.  of  Humphrey  Prideaux,  of  Theuborough,  Devon,  by 
Edith,  his  2nd  wife,  d.  of  William  Hatch,  of  Aller,  was  at  Antwerp  in  1573.  By 
1  Sept.  1574  he  had  moved  to  Ghent,  and  had  sent  his  wife  and  daughter  on  a  visit 
to  his  half-brother  Richard  at  Theuborough.  Later  on  in  the  same  month  he  went 
to  Spain  to  obtain  a  pension.  In  1587  and  1591  he  is  spoken  of  as  a  follower  of  Sir 
Francis  Englefield.  (Vivian,  Devon,  618;  Strype,  A.  II.  i.  495  ;  Cal.  Dom  1547, 
486;  1591,  40;  Add.  1566,  446,  447,  450;  Add.  1580,  226.) 

(449)  Dr.  Nicholas  Sander,  educated  at  Winchester  College.     (D.N.B.  I.  259.) 

(450)  Dr.  William  Allen.    (D.N.B.  i.  314.) 

(451)  Dr.  Richard  Hall.     (D.N.B.  xxiv.  84) 


126  TWO  LISTS  OF  INFLUENTIAL  PERSONS 

4  mr  marshall     +(452). 

5  mrhide     +(453>- 

6  Mr  fenn  thelder     +  (454). 

7  mr  Stapleton  (455). 

8  father  darbishere  Iesuite    paris  (456). 

9  Doctor  nicolson  paris  (457) 
10  Cutbert  vaux  (458). 

(II)  1  Dutch     +(459)- 

2  willm  greene     +  (460). 

3  Ihon  price     +  cottons  man  (461). 

4  bremdon     +(462). 

5  hugh  linthwaite     +  cottons  man  (463). 

6  Richarde  ballarde    gildriche  man  (464). 

7  Xpofer  bank     bolmers  man  (465). 

8  edwarde  langton    doct  Sa  man  (466). 

9  thorns  Clempsall  (467). 

(452)  John  Marshall,  educated  at  Winchester  College.    (D.N.B.  xxxvi.  269.) 

(453)  Thomas  Hyde,  educated  at  Winchester  College.    (D.N.B.  xxvi.  401.) 

(454)  John  Fenn,  educated  at  Winchester  College.     (D.N.B.  xviii.  253.) 

(455)  Thomas  Stapleton,  educated  at  Winchester  College.  Identical  with  n. 
442  above. 

(456)  Thomas  Darbyshire.    (D.N.B.  xiv.  49.) 

(457)  Dr.  William  Nicholson,  miscalled  Richard  Nicholson  in  Dodd,  was  of 
Chester  diocese,  and  entering  the  English  College,  Douay,  in  1573,  was  ordained  priest 
on  Holy  Saturday,  6  April  1577,  at  Cambrai.  He  returned  to  Douay,  9  August  1 577, 
and  left  again  19th  August,  but  soon  returned.  On  13  Feb.  1577/8  he  left  Douay 
for  Cambrai,  and  on  the  following  14  March  arrived  back  at  Douay  from  Paris.  On 
5  April  1578  he  arrived  at  Rheims,  but  returned  almost  at  once,  and  again  arrived 
at  Rheims  6  June,  departing  about  15  June  for  Namur.  Thence  he  returned  to 
Rheims  and  went  to  Paris  1  Aug.,  returning  again  19  Aug.  Then  again  he  went  to 
Douay,  where  he  appears  to  have  received  the  degree  of  D.D.  He  returned  to 
Rheims,  7  Jan.  1578/9,  and  30  March  1579  left  for  Paris.  On  4  Sept.  1579  he 
left  Rheims  for  England,  returning  25  Jan.  1579/80  for  two  days.     He  again  left 

29  Jan.  1579/80  for  Paris  on  the  way  to  England,  but  apparently  got  no  farther,  as 
he  was  in  Paris  in  1580  and  1 581.  On  9  June  1583  he  arrived  at  Rheims  from 
Rome,  and  left  again  25  June.     (Knox  ;  Cal.  For.  1579,  251.) 

(458)  Cuthbert  Vaux,  according  to  the  Concertatio,  was  a  Licentiate  in  Theology, 
who  died  in  exile  before  1588.  He  was  M.A.  and  Fellow  of  Queen's  College, 
Oxford,  in  1559,  expelled  1560.     (Foster,  Alumni  Oxonienses.) 

(459)  Jonn  Duche,  one  of  the  "  gard  in  Q.  Marie.s  tyme,"  was  an  exile  at  "  Lire  " 
(probably  Lille)  in  Flanders  about  1585.  He  was  mace-bearer  to  Cardinal  Allen  in 
1588.     (Knox,  300 ;  Strype,  A.  III.  ii.  47,  48,  551,  552.) 

(460)  William  Grene,  described  as  a  lawyer  and  a  schoolmaster,  was  in  the 
Marshalsea  in  1579.     He  was  still  there  in  June  1582,  but  was  discharged  before 

30  Nov.  1586.  It  seems,  however,  that  he  was  merely  sent  from  the  Marshalsea  to 
the  Fleet,  whence  he  was  transferred  to  Newgate.  He  was  still  in  prison  30  Sept. 
1588.     (Strype,  A.  II.  ii.  661  ;  C.R.S.  ii.) 

(461)  John  Price,  one  of  the  sons  of  Robert  Price,  of  Newport  Pagnall,  Bucks, 
was  a  scholar  at  the  English  College,  Rome,  in  1581,  and  arrived  at  the  English 
College,  Rheims,  3  Nov.  1582.  On  the  following  14  April  Dr.  Barret  wrote  to- 
Fr.  Aggazario,  S.J.,  that  John  Price  would  never  be  a  theologian.  According  to  the 
Concertatio  he  died  in  exile  before  1588.     He  left  Rheims  12  Sept.  1583.     (Knox.) 

(462)  Unidentified. 

(463)  Hugh  Linthwaite.  The  fact  that  he  was  William  Cotton's  man  is  confirmed 
by  Dasent,  viii.  119. 

(464)^0  (467)  .Unidentified. 


TWO   LISTS   OF  INFLUENTIAL   PERSONS  127 

**(i2)  hereford  sheere 

130  Thomas  Bromwich  (468). 

131  Richard  bromwich  (469). 

132  Roger  hardwike  (470). 

133  william  vaughan  (471). 

134  Richard  whittington  (472). 

135  Vfm  Prior  (473) 

136  Iohn  Prior  (474). 

137  Iohn  Guyllym  of  fawby  (475). 

138  wm  Gwillym  (476). 

139  Richarde  Coxe  (477). 

140  Antony  Elton  (478). 

141  Iohn  heynes  (479). 

142  Richard  heynes  (480). 

143  Edmond  Iones     +(481). 

144  Antony  harper  (482). 

145  Browne  of  theschequer  (483). 

146  lames  Rogers  (484). 

the  Citee  of  hereford  a  very  smale  nombere  &  they 
of  smale  power  excepted  (485). 

(468)  Thomas  Bromwich,  of  Hereford,  married  Eleanor,  d.  of  Jenkyn  Pryce,  of 
Clyro,  co.  Radnor.     (Weaver,  Here/.  15.) 

(469)  Richard  Bromwich,  the  only  son  of  the  above,  was  one  of  the  councillors  of 
the  city  of  Hereford  deemed  to  be  unfavourable  to  Protestantism  in  1564.  He  was 
twice  married,  viz.  to  Eleanor,  d.  of  George  ap  Henry,  of  Poston,  and  to  Margaret, 
d.  of  William  Barkley,  of  Hereford.    (Weaver,  Heref.  ;  Camden  Misc.  ix.  1 5.) 

(470)  Possibly  Roger  Hardwick,  of  Hardwick,  Staffordshire,  who  married 
Eleanor,  d.  of  John  Gittins  and  widow  of  Edward  Corbett.    (H.S.P.  xxviii.  201.) 

(471)  William  Vaughan,  of  Clifford,  2nd  son  of  James  Vaughan,  of  Llangattock, 
married  Jane,  d.  and  h.  of  Richard  Clarke,  of  Wellington,  Herefordshire,  and  died 
1601.     (Burke,  Landed  Gentry,  ed.  1906,  p.  1717.) 

(472)  Probably  the  Richard  Whittington,  3rd  son  of  Alexander  Whittington,  of 
Notgrove,  Gloucestershire,  who  married  Mary,  d.  of  (?  Roger)  Hereford,  of  Sufton, 
Herefordshire.     {H.S.P.  xxi.  270.) 

(473)  Unidentified.  (474)  Unidentified. 

(475)  Tohn  Guillim,  of  Fawley,  e.  s.  of  John  Guillim,  of  Fawley,  married  Mary, 
d.  of  John  Burghill,  of  Thinghill.     (Weaver,  Heref.  35.) 

(476)  William  Guillim,  (4th  s.),  brother  of  the  above.    (Weaver,  loc.  cit.) 

(477)  Possibly  the  person  of  this  name  who  was  later  servant  to  Sir  Christopher 
Alien,  of  Kent.     {Cat.  Dom.  1581,  266,  268.) 

(478)  Anthony  Elton,  of  Ledbury,  married  Alice,  d.  of  John  Scudamore  (n.  252 
above),  and  died  1587  (Weaver,  Heref.  26) ;  but  one  of  this  name  was  a  recusant, 
1592.     ( Cal.  Cecil  MSS.  iv.  265. ) 

(479)  Unidentified.  (480)  Unidentified. 

(481)  Edmund  Jones,  of  Marden,  and  Edmund  Jones,  of  Streatford,  were 
recusants  in  the  county  of  Hereford  remaining  at  liberty  in  1592.  (Cal.  Cecil  MSS. 
iv.  265.) 

(482)  Anthony  Harper,  was  3rd  s.  of  William  Harper,  of  Wellington  and 
Amberley  in  Marden.    (Weaver,  Heref  39,  40.) 

(483)  Robert  Browne,  created  2nd  Baron  of  the  Exchequer  6  May  1550,  was 
replaced  by  George  Freville  in  the  3rd  month  of  Queen  Elizabeth's  reign,  but 
retained  the  title  of  Baron  Browne  in  1578  when  he  had  Mass  said  in  his  house. 
(Foss,  fudges  of  England,  470  ;  Cal.  Dom.  Add.  1566,  550,  551.) 

(484)  Unidentified. 

(485)  In  1564  Scory  reported  that  twenty-one  members  of  the  common  council 
of  the  city  of  Hereford  were  opposed  to  Protestantism,  and  ten  "neuters  in  religion," 
*'  So  that  of  the  holl  counsell  or  election  ther  is  not  on  that  ys  counted  favourable 
to  this  religion."     (Camden  Misc.  ix.  14,  15.) 


128  TWO  LISTS   OF   INFLUENTIAL   PERSONS 

shrops  147  Corbet  sonne  &  heir 

to  Sr  Andrue  Corbet  (486). 

148  Brian  fowler  (487). 

149  lee  (488). 
wines              150     Raffe  sheldon  (489). 

151  Rich  Dingley  (490). 

152  tho  wrenford  (491). 

153  Edmond  Coles  (492). 

154  Iohn  Richardson  (493). 

155  Copley  (494). 

156  william  Child  (495). 

157  Edward  Dornel  (496). 
Cloucs  Sr  Walter  Denyce  [crossed  out] 

158  Denice  sonne  to  Sr  Walt  (497). 

(486)  Robert  Corbet,  s.  and  h.  of  Sir  Andrew  Corbet,  of  Morton,  Vice-President 
of  the  Council  of  the  Marches  of  Wales,  married  Anne,  d.  of  Oliver,  Lord  St.  John 
of  Bletso,  and  died  1583.     (H.S.P.  xxviii.  136.) 

(487)  Brian  Fowler,  2nd  s.  of  Rowland  Fowler,  of  Bromhill,  Shropshire, 
married  Jane,  d.  and  h.  of  John  Hanmer,  of  Bettisfield  near  Whitchurch,  Shrop- 
shire. In  1575  he  was  a  J.P.  for  Staffordshire,  and  a  recusant.  On  7  Dec.  1575  he 
was  committed  to  the  Fleet,  but  liberated  in  the  following  Jan.  owing  to  his  health. 
He  was  again  liberated  from  the  Fleet  on  bail  8  May  1581,  and  in  1592  was  of  the 
manor  of  Sowe,  Staffordshire,  and  a  recusant  on  bail.  {H.S.P.  xxviii.  162,  212; 
Cal.  Cecil  MSS.  iv.  272  ;  Dasent,  ix.  xviii.) 

(488)  Probably  Richard  Lee,  of  Langley,  Shropshire,  who  married  Eleanor,  d.  of 
Walter  Wrothesley,  of  Wrothesley,  Staffordshire.  (H.S.P.  xxix.  319.)  One  of  this 
name  arrived  at  Madrid  31  May  1574,  and  received  150  ducats.  (Cal.  Dom.  Add. 
1566,  468.) 

(489)  See  n.  105  above.  (490)  Unidentified. 

(491)  Thomas  Wrenford,  or  Wranford,  of  Longdon,  Worcestershire,  was  a 
recusant  in  1585  and  1592.     (Cal.  Dom.  1581,  279;  Cal.  Cecil  MSS.  iv.  272.) 

(492)  Edmund  Colles,  of  Leigh,  married  (1)  Joan,  d.  of  Robert  Somerville,  of  War- 
wickshire, and  (2)  Anne,  d.  of  Robert  Townshend,  and  widow  of  Humphrey  Archer, 
of  Umberslade,  and  was  a  recusant  J.P.  in  1585,  but  was  continued  in  commission, 
1587,  the  bishop  remarking  that  he  was  "a  man  very  meet  for  his  experience  in 
service."  (Strype,  A.  III.  ii.  457.)  Member  Inner  Temple,  Nov.  1553,  Sheriff  of 
Worcestershire  1575,  M.P.  Worcestershire  1597.  Buried  in  Leigh  Church,  1606, 
aged  76.  In  15  July  1609  we  find  the  benefit  of  the  recusancy  of  "  Edmund  Coles 
of  Lye,"  his  grandson,  granted  to  John  Carse.  (Cal.  Dom.  1603,  529 ;  M.I.T.  18  ; 
Cal.  Dom.  1581,  279  ;  Metcalfe,  Worcester,  2  ;  H.S.P.  xxvii.  41.) 

(493)  John  Richardson,  of  Pershore,  Worcestershire,  entered  the  Inner  Temple 
Nov.  1555,  and  became  an  utter  barrister  though  suspected  of  recusancy.  He  was 
son  of  Conon  Richardson.    (Nash,  ii.  249  ;  Cal.  Inner  T.  Pec.  I.  liv.) 

(494)  Thomas  Copley,  of  Bredon,  Worcestershire,  married  (1)  Margaret,  d.  of 
George  Newport,  and  (2)  Eleanor,  d.  of  William  Middlemore,  of  Hacklow.  (H.S.P. 
xxvii.  45.) 

(495)  William  Child,  of  Norwick,  married  Katharine,  d.  of  Thomas  Coventry. 
He  was  High  Sheriff  in  1587,  and  the  Bishop  of  Worcester  remarks  that  "he  is 
both  wise  and  wealthy."    (H.S.P.  xxvii.  n ;  Strype,  A.  III.  ii.  458.) 

(496)  Edward  Harewell,  Harwell,  or  Horwell,  of  Besford,  J.P.  in  1587,  and 
thought  by  the  Bishop  to  be  "religious,"  i.e.  a  Protestant.  Married  (1)  Margaret,  d. 
of  Thomas  Neville,  by  whom  he  had  a  daughter,  and  (2)  Elizabeth,  d.  and  h.  of 
James  Bury,  of  Hampton,  Oxfordshire,  by  whom  he  had  among  other  issue  a  son 
and  h.,  Edmund,  afterwards  a  K.B.     (H.S.P.  xxvii.  72  ;  Strype,  A.  III.  ii.  457.) 

(497)  Probably  either  Richard  Dennis,  e.  s.  of  Sir  Walter,  who  married  Anne,  d. 
of  Sir  John  St.  John,  of  Bletso  (H.S.P.  xxi.  51,  52),  or  Thomas,  his  second  son,  who 
married  (1)  Joan,  d.  of  Thomas  Bell,  of  Gloucester  :  (2)  Elizabeth  Pauncefoote,  of 
Hesfield. 


TWO   LISTS   OF  INFLUENTIAL    PERSONS  1 29 

159  Francis  denice  (498). 

160  liggons  that  mar  the 

161  lady  boucler  (499). 

162  henry  Cassy  (500). 

163  Dutton  (501). 

164  nicolas  Sanky  (502). 

165  George  Cachmay  (503). 

166  Thomas  Wilton  (504). 
13  Gloucsh    167  Giles  Dobbins  (505). 
devon             168  Iustice  Whiddon  (506). 

169  wm  whiddon  (507). 

170  hughe  wiot  that  mar  the  Erie  of  bathes  sister  (508). 

171  Norley  (509). 
Glouc             172     Christopher  George  (510). 

173  Strang  of  Ciseter  (511). 

174  yong  Mr  higford     +(512). 

(498)  Francis  Dennis,  (3rd  s.),  brdther  of  the  above,  entered  the  Inner  Temple 
in  Nov.  1560.    {MJ.T.  38.) 

(499)  Probably  Hugh  Lygon,  a  Worcestershire  recusant  in  1585.  {Cal.  Dom. 
1581,  279.) 

(500)  Henry  Cassey  was  a  Gloucestershire  recusant  living  in  London  in  1585. 
He  was  son  of  Robert  Cassey,  of  Stratton,  Cassey  Compton,  and  Wightfield  in 
Derhurst,  and  died  38  Eliz.    (Ca/.  Dom.  1581,  278,  285  ;  Rudder,  404,  709,  726,  839.) 

(501)  Thomas  Dutton,  of  Sherbourn,  Gloucestershire,  who  married  (1)  Mary 
Maney ;  (2)  Anne,  d.  of  Stephen  Kyston,  of  London,  Alderman,  and  widow  of  Sir 
Thomas  Withers,  Knt. ;  and  (3)  [?  Elizabeth],  d.  of  [?  Robert]  Taylor,  of  Gloucester- 
shire, and  died  24  Oct.  1581,  aged  74.  {H.S.P.  xxxi.  54 ;  Rudder,  650;  Strype,  A. 
II.  i.  159)  . 

(502)  Nicholas  Sankey,  utter  barrister  of  the  Inner  Temple,  had  been  induced 
before  1577  to  come  to  church  occasionally.     {Cal.  Inner  T.  Rec.  I.  liv.) 

(503)  George  Catchmaid,  or  Catchmay,  e.  s.  of  William  Catchmaid,  of  Bickswear 
in  St.  Briavel's.     (H.S.P.  xxi.  242.) 

(504)  Thomas  Wilton,  s.  and  h.  of  John  Wilton,  of  Dymock,  by  Eleanor,  his 
1st  wife,  d.  of  Guy  Cassey.     {H.S.P.  xxi.  270.) 

(505)  Unidentified. 

(506)  Sir  John  Whiddon.     {D.N.B.  lxi.  5.) 

(507)  William  Whiddon,  of  Chagford,  Devon,  e.  s.  of  the  above,  admitted  to 
the  Inner  Temple  1553,  was  twice  married,  but  died  s.p.  before  the  death  of  his 
father,  which  occurred  27  Jan.  1575/6.     (Vivian,  Devon,  781  ;  MJ.T.  15.) 

(508)  Hugh  Wyatt,  of  Shillingford,  Barrister-at-law  of  the  Inner  Temple,  2nd 
son  of  Philip  Wyatt,  Steward  and  Town  Clerk  of  Barnstaple,  entered  the  Inner 
Temple  Nov.  1560.  Married,  28  Nov.  1566  at  Braunton,  Lady  Mary  Bourchier,  d.  of 
John,  2nd  Earl  of  Bath,  who  died  without  issue  ;  and  secondly,  in  161 4,  Mary,  d.  of 
John  Hill,  of  Ide.  He  was  expelled  from  the  Inner  Temple  for  recusancy  in  1572, 
but  conformed,  and  was  readmitted  in  1577.  (Vivian,  Devon,  823;  MJ.T.  39; 
Cal.  Inner  T.  Rec.  i.  267,  291.) 

(509)  One  of  the  Northleighs,  of  Northleigh.  (Vivian,  Devon,  584.)  William 
Northleigh,  (of  Ingarley),  e.  s.  of  Raymond,  entered  the  Inner  Temple  Feb.  1546/7. 
Richard  Northleigh,  (of  Ingarley),  2nd  son,  entered  the  Inner  Temple  in  Nov.  1558  ; 
and  Leonard,  (of  Ockington),  the  4th  son,  in  Nov.  1564.     {M.I.T.  2,  30,  55.) 

(510)  Christopher  George,  e.  s.  of  John  George,  of  Baunton  near  Cirencester, 
married  Anne,  d.  of  Robert  Strange,  of  Cirencester,  and  was  buried  15  March  1598. 
{H.S.P.  xxi.  247-9.) 

(511)  Probably  either  the  last  above-mentioned  Robert  Strange,  or  his  eldest  son 
Roger.     {Ibid.  222.) 

(512)  Possibly  Robert  Higford,  secretary  to  the  late  Thomas,  Duke  of  Norfolk, 
whom  he  betrayed. 

XIII.  I 


130  TWO   LISTS   OF   INFLUENTIAL   PERSONS 

175  Thomas  parker  (513). 

176  Wm  Morwent  (514). 
Bark             177     lames  Braibroke  (515). 

178  Francis  yate  (516). 

179  Yate  (517). 

180  bourdet  (518). 

181  Plowden  (519). 
Oxef            182  Robert  Atkinson  (520). 

(513)  Thomas  Parker,  of  Northlatch,  married  Jane,  d.  and  co-h.  of  John  Moore, 
of  "Donklin"  [?  Dunclent],  Worcestershire,  and  widow  of  James  Dingley  and 
William  Ashfield.    {H.S.P.  xxi.  257.) 

(514)  William  Morwent,  of  Hartpury,  Gloucester,  a  member  of  the  Inner 
Temple  1552,  married  Elizabeth,  d.  of  William  Wyrrall,  of  English  Bicknor.  {H.S.P. 
xxi.  189  ;  M.I.T.  12.) 

(515)  James  Bray  broke,  of  Sutton  Courtney,  and  Brightwalton,  Berks,  was  born 
at  Abingdon,  and  was  e.  s.  of  Thomas  Braybrooke,  of  Abingdon.  He  married 
Martha,  d.  of  John  Yate,  of  Lyford,  and  widow  of  Humphrey  Cheyney.  Admitted  to 
the  Inner  Temple  Nov.  1553  he  became  an  utter  barrister,  and  was  expulsed  for 
recusancy  in  1572.  He  was  in  prison  in  the  Gatehouse  in  1581,  and  was  released  on 
bail  26  June  in  that  year,  but  was  soon  sent  back  again,  and  remained  there  till  he 
was  again  released  on  bail  on  the  score  of  illness,  13  Nov.  1586.  Described  as  of 
"Kinston,"  we  find  him  out  on  bail  in  1592.  {H.S.P.  lvii.  82,  83  ;  Cal.  Inner  T. 
Rec.  I.  liv.  276;  M.I.T.  17  ;  C.R.S.  ii.  221,  225,  230,  234;  Dasent,  xiii.  106,  xiv. 
249  ;  Cal.  Cecil  A/SS.  iv.  270.) 

(516)  Francis  Yate,  of  Lyford,  e.  s.  of  Thomas  Yate,  of  Lyford,  and  grandson  of 
John  Yate  (mentioned  n.  515  above),  a  member  of  the  Inner  Temple  1554,  married 
Jane,  sister  of  Sir  Benjamin  Tichborne,  1st  baronet.  When  the  Bridgittine  nuns  of 
Syon  left  England,  13  July  1559,  nine  of  their  sisters  remained  behind.  Of  these, 
two,  Prioress  Margaret  Daly  and  Sister  Clementia  Tresham,  died  in  or  about  1561. 
The  others,  including  Sister  Elizabeth  Yate,  a  daughter  of  the  above-mentioned 
Thomas  Yate's  half-brother  James,  found  a  refuge  in  Mr.  Francis  Yate's  house,  and 
were  in  a  sense  the  cause  of  B.  Edmund  Campion's  capture.  Francis  Yate  was  in 
prison  in  London  when  B.  Edmund  was  taken  at  his  house,  17  July  1581.  Mrs. 
Yate  was  at  once  sent  to  the  common  gaol  at  Reading  with  the  nuns.  What  eventu- 
ally happened  to  them  all  does  not  appear.  Francis  Yate  was  probably  liberated 
before  1587,  when  his  house  was  raided  and  many  "popish  "  relics  and  books  found 
therein.  Described  as  of  "  Kencot,"  he  was  a  recusant  "  at  liberty  upon  bonds  "  in 
1592.  {H.S.P.  lvi.  148-150  ;  Downside  Review,  xxvii.  141-2  ;  Cal.Dom.  1 581,  61, 
384,  385  J  Dasent,  xiii.  136,  145  ;  Cal.  Cecil MSS.  iv.  270 ;  M.I.T.  20.) 

(517)  Either  Edward  Yate,  3rd  son,  brother  of  the  above,  who  was  arrested 
with  B.  Edmund  Campion  and  sent  to  the  Gatehouse,  where  he  was  8  April  1584, 
and  died  without  issue.  {H.S.P.  lvi.  150  ;  C.R.S.  ii.  225,  230,  235.)  Or  else  John 
Yate,  of  Buckland,  brother  of  Sister  Elizabeth  the  nun,  who  married  Mary,  d.  and  h. 
of  William  Justice,  merchant  of  Reading,  and  died  before  1584,  a  Catholic,  either  in 
prison  or  released  on  bail.  One  of  the  sons  of  John  and  Mary  Yate,  John,  took  the 
name  of  Vincent,  and  was  a  missionary  in  Brazil  in  1593.  The  eldest  son  Edward 
(called  Edward  Hare  by  Berry)  married  Jane,  one  of  the  sisters  of  William  Gifford, 
Archbishop  of  Rheims,  and  had  a  son  Edward,  created  a  baronet  30  July  1622.  The 
youngest  son  Thomas  lived  for  a  long  time  abroad,  but  had  returned  to  England 
before  1584.  {H.S.P.  lvi.  149  ;  Cal.  Dom.  1591,  355  ;  Berry,  Hants,  285  ;  Cokayne, 
i.  205.) 

(518)  Possibly  the  Clement  Burdett,  late  of  Bath,  an  unlearned  priest,  who  in  the 
latter  part  of  1562  (see  n.  415  above)  was  restricted  to  Crondall,  Hants,  or  Sonning, 
Berks.     {Cal.Dom.  Add.  1547,  523.) 

(519)  For  Edmund  Plowden,  see  D.N.B.  xlv.  428,  and  Gillow,  v.  325. 

(520)  Robert  Atkinson,  of  Oxfordshire,  admitted  to  the  Inner  Temple  Nov.  1554, 
became  an  utter  barrister,  and  in  1569  was  brought  before  the  Star  Chamber  on  the 
ground  of  recusancy,  and  confessed  that  he  had  not  been  to  church  much  in  term- 
time  since  he  began  to  practice,  and  had  only  twice  received  the  communion,  once  at 


TWO   LISTS   OF  INFLUENTIAL   PERSONS  131 


183 

Thomas  Grenwod     +(521). 

184 

Napper  (522). 

waresh 

185 

foliot  (523). 

186 

francis  foliot     +(524). 

187 

Robert  with  (525). 

Glouc 

188 

Alexander  whithed     +  (526). 

Sussex 

189 

wm  Shelley  (527). 

190 

Richard  Shelley  (528). 

the  beginning  of  the  reign,  and  once  in  1568  at  "  Ethrop,"  i.e.  doubtless  Tythrop,  in 
Oxfordshire.  He  was  accordingly  disbarred,  and  expelled  from  the  Temple  in  1570. 
It  appears  likely  he  was  the  Atkinson  living  as  a  student  in  Paris  in  1580.  In  1586 
it  was  reported  that  Robert  Atkinson  was  determined  to  come  into  England  between 
Whitsuntide  and  Midsummer.  Possibly  he  is  the  Robert  Atkinson,  of  Borstal), 
Bucks,  a  musician,  in  trouble  in  August  1586.  (Cal.  Inner  T.  Rec.  i.  l.-liv.  266; 
Cal.  For.  1579,  251  ;  Cal.  Dom.  1581,  324  ;  Dasent,  xiv.  210,  214.) 

(521)  Thomas  Greenwood,  of  Oxford,  Counsellor-at-law  of  the  Inner  Temple, 
was  in  trouble  at  the  same  time  as  the  above,  gave  very  similar  answers,  and  met 
with  the  same  fate.  He  married  Joan,  d.  of  Edward  Napper,  of  Holywell,  Oxford. 
He  is  probably  the  Thomas  "  Grimwell,"  of  Oxford,  a  recusant  at  liberty  in  1592. 
(H.S.P.  v.  256  ;  Cal.  Inner  T.  Rec.  I.  l.-liii.  266  ;  Cal.  Cecil  MSS.  iv.  270.) 

(522)  William  Napper,  of  Holywell,  Oxford,  brother  of  Joan  mentioned  in  the 
note  above,  married  Isabel,  d.  of  Edmund  Powell,  of  Sandford,  and  was  a  recusant 
at  liberty  in  1 592.     (H.S.P.  v.  254  ;  Cal.  Cecil  MSS.  iv.  270.) 

(523)  Probably  Thomas  Folliott,  e.  brother  of  the  next,  who  married  Katharine, 
d.  of  William  Lygon,  of  Madresfield. 

(524)  Francis  Folliott,  of  Pirton,  Worcestershire,  was  2nd  son  of  John  Folliott, 
by  Elizabeth  Ellenor,  d.  of  John  More,  of  "  Donklen  "  [?  Dunclent].  He  entered  the 
Inner  Temple  in  Nov.  1557  and  became  an  utter  barrister,  sometime  suspected  of 
recusancy,  but  reduced  to  occasional  conformity  before  1577.  In  1580  a  Folliott  of 
Worcestershire  was  in  Paris.  (H.S.P.  xxvii.  55  ;  Cal.  Inner  T.  Rec.  I.  liv. ;  Cal. 
For.  1579,250.) 

(525)  Robert  W'ithe,  2nd  s.  of  John  Withe,  of  Droitwich,  b.  1523  ;  M.P.  Droit  - 
wich  1554-71  ;  admitted  to  the  Inner  Temple  1549,  called  to  the  Bench,  Reader 
1572,  Treasurer  1576.    Died  at  Droitwich,  1586.     (H.S.P.  xxvii.  150  ;  M.I.T.  7.) 

(526)  Alexander  Whitehead  entered  the  Inner  Temple  in  Feb.  1546/7  from 
Tewkesbury,  was  a  counsellor-at-law  of  the  Inner  Temple,  reported  as  a  recusant  in 
1585.     (Cal.  Dom.  1 581,  284  ;  Cal.  Inner  T.  Rec.  I.) 

(527)  See  n.  98  above. 

(528)  Probably  Richard  Shelley,  M  late  of  Warminghurst,"  Sussex,  who  was  one 
of  those  suspected  of  popery  in  1576.  He  was  2nd  son  of  Edward  Shelley,  of 
Warminghurst,  and  brother  of  Ven.  Edward  Shelley.  He  was  of  Alcanning,  Wilts, 
and  married  Katharine,  d.  of  Thomas  Devenish,  of  Kelinglye,  Sussex.  (Berry, 
Sussex,  67  ;  Strype,  A.  II.  ii.  22.)  He  is  still  called  Richard  Shelley,  of  Warming- 
hurst, and  Findon,  when  he  was  committed  to  the  Marshalsea,  13  August  1580 
(Dasent,  xii.  253),  and  indeed  it  was  through  him  that  the  plaintiff  in  "  Shelley's 
case  "  claimed.  On  24  August  1582  Mass  was  being  said  in  his  chamber  by  the 
venerable  martyr  William  Hartley.  He  was  still  there  8  April  1584,  but  appears  to 
have  been  liberated  soon  afterwards.  (C.R.S.  ii.  221,  231,  233,  235.)  He  was,  it 
appears,  again  in  prison  in  1592.  (Cal.  Cecil  MSS.  ix.  264.)  It  is  important  to  dis- 
tinguish him  from  the  Richard  Shelley  who  in  the  list  of  the  Prcetermissi  is  called 
Robert  (Calk.  Encyl.  v.  478),  and  who  was  committed  to  the  Marshalsea,  15  March 
1584/5.  This  was  the  3rd  son  of  John  Shelley,  of  Michaelgrove,  Clapham,  Sussex 
(Berry,  Sussex,  62),  and  brother  of  William  Shelley  (n.  98  above).  He  was  for  some 
time  abroad  with  his  uncle,  Sir  Richard  Shelley,  but  was  given  permission  to  return 
in  May  1583.  (Strype,  A.  III.  i.  188.)  The  story  of  the  petition  presented  to 
Parliament  is  told  in  Strype  (A.  III.  i.  432  to  434,  and  cf.  Cal.  Dom.  1581,  231),  and 
differs  from  that  told  by  Challoner,  inasmuch  as,  according  to  Strype,  it  was  presented 
to  Parliament,  and  not  to  the  Queen.  He  seems  to  have  seen  the  petition,  and  his 
account  is  therefore  to  be  preferred  to  that  of  Peter  Penkevill.     (Pollen,  283-4.) 


132  TWO   LISTS    OF   INFLUENTIAL   PERSONS 


191 

Iohn  Shelley  (529). 

192 

Edward  Cavell  (530). 

193 

Iohn  gage  (531). 

Glouc 

194 

hungerford  (532). 

hamsh 

195 

althe  whittes  (533). 

george  Cotton  before  set  on  (534), 

196 

norton  (535). 

197 

Welles  (536). 

Oxef 

198 

michael  nashe  (537). 

Essex 

199 

wiston  browne  (538). 

hamsh 

Sr  Robert  Oxenbrig  and  (539) 

200     his  sonne  (540). 

This  Richard   Shelley  was  still  in  the  Marshalsea  21  Oct.  1585  {Cal.  Dom.  1581, 
276),  where  he  died  soon  after  the  beginning  of  February  1585/6. 

(529)  John  Shelley,  2nd  s.  of  John  Shelley,  of  Michaelgrove,  and  brother  of  the 
Richard  Shelley  last  above  mentioned,  was  of  Hawford  Darcy,  Huntingdonshire,  and 
married  Eleanor,  d.  of  Sir  Thomas  Lovell,  of  Harling,  Norfolk,  by  whom  he  was  the 
father  of  Sir  John  Shelley,  one  of  the  first  eighteen  baronets.     (Berry,  Sussex,  62.) 

(530)  Edward  Caryll,  of  Harting,  Sussex,  who  was  knighted  11  May  1603,  and 
died  12  Jan.  1609,  aged  72.  His  2nd  wife  was  Philippe,  d.  of  James  Gage,  of 
Bentley  in  Framfield,  Sussex.     (Berry,  Sussex,  359.) 

(531)  See  n.  99  above.  Another  George  Cotton,  cousin  of  the  one  noted  above, 
was  a  Hampshire  recusant  in  1592.     {Cal.  Cecil  MSS.  iv.  271.) 

(532)  Anthony  Hungerford,  of  Down  Ampney,  Sheriff  of  Gloucester  in  1585, 
married  Bridget,  sister  of  John  Shelley  (n.  366  above).  (H.S.P.  xxi.  89  ;  Cal.  Dom. 
1581.) 

(533)  For  the  Whites  of  Southwarnborough,  see  Berry,  Hants,  295,  and  for  the 
Whites  of  Southwick,  see  ibid.  194,  and  Notes  and  Queries,  10th  S.,  vi. 

(534)  See  n.  77  above. 

(535)  Probably  John  Norton,  of  Norwood,  Kent,  who  married  Eleanor,  sister  to 
William,  Richard,  and  John  Shelley,  of  Michaelgrove  (nn.  98,  528,  529). 

(536)  Gilbert  Wells,  of  Twyford  and  Brambridge,  eldest  of  the  five  sons  of 
Thomas  Wells  by  Mary,  daughter  of  John  Mompesson,  of  whom  the  Ven.  Swithun 
Wells  was  the  youngest,  was  sent  to  Newgate  as  a  recusant  in  1582,  and  transferred 
to  the  Marshalsea  21  Dec.  1583.  In  1588  we  find  him  imprisoned  at  Wisbech.  In 
1592  he  was  a  recusant  at  liberty.  In  March  1593/4  he  was  ordered  to  be  confined  at 
Ely,  but  it  is  not  clear  that  he  actually  went.  On  19  Dec.  1596  order  was  made  that 
as  he  could  not  come  to  London  with  the  other  recusants  to  be  committed  to  Banbury 
and  Ely  without  danger  of  life,  owing  to  his  age  and  weakness,  he  was  to  be  confined 
to  his  house.  He  was  still  living  in  July  1598.  He  married  (1)  Alice,  d.  of  Sir 
Thomas  Delalind  ;  (2)  Isabel,  d.  of  Nicholas  Demaryne  ;  and  (3)  Elizabeth,  d.  of 
Robert  Coker,  of  Mapowder,  Dorset.  (Berry,  Hants,  no;  C.R.S.  ii.  221,  233, 
235;  Cal.  Cecil  MSS.  iv.  270;  Strype,  W.  i.  529  ;  Dasent,  xxvi.  372,  xxviii.  589  ; 
Cal.  Dom.  Add.  1591,  463.) 

(537)  Michael  Nash,  of  Old  Woodstock,  s.  and  h.  of  John  Nash,  married  a 
daughter  of Huband,  of  Ipsley,  Warwickshire.     (H.S.P.  v.  218.) 

(538)  Weston  Browne,  of  Rookwood  Hall,  or  Colvile  Hall,  Essex,  entered  the 
Inner  Temple  Nov.  1553,  was  Sheriff  of  Essex  in  1577,  and  suspected  of  recusancy 
in  1578,  though  he  denied  it.  He  married  (1)  Mary,  d.  of  Sir  Edward  Capel. 
of  Hadham,  Hants,  and  (2)  1578,  Elizabeth,  d.  of  Lord  Giles  Paulet  (n.  9  above). 
He  seems  to  have  died  in  1591.  (H.S.P.  xiii.  167  ;  Dasent,  x.  passim  ;  M.I.T.  16  ; 
Cal.  Dom.  1591,  186.) 

(539)  Sir  Robert  Oxenbridge,  of  I  Iurstbourne,  Hants,  knighted  1549,  a  son  of 
Sir  Godard  Oxenbridge,  K.B.,  by  his  2nd  wife,  married  Alice,  d.  of  Sir  Thomas 
Fog,  of  Ash,  Kent,  and  widow  of  Edward  Scott.  He  was  Constable  of  the  Tower, 
and  died  17  Nov.  1574.     (Berry,  Hants,  214-5). 

(540)  His  son  Robert  entered  the  Inner  Temple  Nov.  1 561,  and  married  Barbara 
d.  of  Sir  Thomas  White,  Master  of  the  Requests.    (M.I.T.  44.) 


TWO   LISTS   OF   INFLUENTIAL   PERSONS  I33 


Somerset 

201 

Walter  Siddenham  (541). 

202 

John  Siddenham  (542). 

Yorke 

203 

Richard  frankleyn  (543). 

turne  to  the  18  leife  *** 

(14) 

Knights  in  Inglande 

Hereford 

Sr  Tho  Baskervile  (544). 

Hereford 

Sr  lames  Baskervile  (545). 

Herefordsh 

Sr  Richard  Walwin  (546). 

4i 

Sr  henry  Sidney  (547). 

42 

Sr  lames  Crofts  (548). 

43 

Sr  Xpofer  Allein  (549). 

44 

Sr  william  dormar  (550). 

45 

Sr  waiter  Denier  (551). 

46 

Sr  Robt  Oxenbridge  (552). 

47 

Sr  lames  dier  1  chief  Iustice  (553)- 

Cheshire 

48 

Sr  peter  legh  (554). 

(541)  Walter  Sydenham,  3rd  s.  of  Sir  John  Sydenham,  of  Brimpton,  entered  the 
Inner  Temple  November  1559.  In  1587  Lady  Sydenham  and  her  eldest  son's  wife 
were  recusants.     (Weaver,  Somerset,  77  ;  Strype,  A.  III.  ii.  462  ;  M.I.T.  32). 

(542)  John  Sydenham,  of  Langford  Budville,  married  Katharine,  d.  of  Thomas 
Newton,  of  Swell.     (Weaver,  Somerset,  78.) 

(543)  Possibly  the  "  Mr.  Franklin,  of  Yorkshire,  a  gentleman  of  ,£500  a  year," 
mentioned  Cal.  Dom.  1591,  485  ;  cf.  also  451,  536,  542. 

(544)  Sir  Thomas  Baskerville,  3rd  son  of  Sir  James  Baskerville,  was  knighted 
19  Oct.  1553.  He  married  Eleanor,  d.  of  Richard  Abington,  of  Brockhampton,  and 
widow  of  John  Dantsey,  and  probably  died  soon  after  the  list  was  drawn  up.  (Shaw, 
ii.  68 ;  Weaver,  Heref.  2,  7,  8.) 

(545)  Sir  James  Baskerville,  eldest  brother  of  the  above,  was  knighted  24  Nov. 
1547.  He  married  Elizabeth,  d.  of  Walter,  Viscount  Hereford.  In  1564  he  was  a 
justice  of  peace,  deemed  neuter  in  religion,  and  he  died  s.p.  in  1573.  (Shaw  ii.  63  ; 
Weaver,  Heref.  7,  8  ;  Camden  Misc.  ix.  13.) 

(546)  Sir  Rickard  Walwyn,  of  Llantrithyd,  Glamorganshire,  was  knighted  20  Oct. 
1 5  53>  and  was  High  Sheriff  of  Glamorganshire  1559.  (See  n.  331  above.)  (Shaw, 
269  ;  Nicholas;  ii.  598.) 

(547)  Sir  Henry  Sidney.  {D.N.B.  lii.  210.)  There  seems  to  be  no  ground  for 
supposing  he  had  Catholic  sympathies. 

(548)  Sir  James  Croft.     (D.N.B.  xiii.  no.) 

(549)  Sir  Christopher  Alleyn,  eldest  son  of  Sir  John  Alleyn  (Alderman  of  London 
for  the  Vintry  and  Lime  Street  Wards,  Lord  Mayor  in  1525  and  1535,  Privy 
Councillor,  and  Founder  of  the  Mercers'  Chapel  in  Cheapside,  destroyed  in  the 
Great  Fire),  was  knighted  2  October  1553.  He  was  M.P.  for  New  Romney  in  1562. 
He  married  Etheldreda,  one  of  the  daughters  of  the  first  Lord  Paget  of  Beaudesert, 
and  died  towards  the  end  of  1585,  in  which  year  his  house,  Ightham  Mote,  in  Kent, 
was  searched  for  relics  and  priests.  By  his  father's  will,  dated  3  Aug.  1 545  and  proved 
15  Jan.  1S45/6,  he  had  succeeded  to  various  lands  and  manors  in  Nottinghamshire  and 
Yorkshire.  His  widow  was  a  recusant  in  1587,  and  may  possibly  be  the  "uxor 
cujusdam  Allani  ordinis  equestris  atque  civis  Eboracensis  "  of  C.P.S.  v.  193.  (Shaw, 
ii.  66 ;  Strype,  A.  III.  ii.  597  ;  Archceologia  Cantiana,  xxiv.  197  ;  Surtees  Soc,  Publ. 
cvi.  289  ;  Banks,  Extinct  Peerage,  ii.  410.) 

(550)  For  Sir  William  Dormer,  see  Burke's  Peerage. 

(551)  Unidentified. 

(552)  See  n.  539  above. 

(553)  Sir  James  Dyer.     (D.N.B.  xvi.  286.) 

(554)  Sir  Peter  Legh,  of  Lyme,  knighted  II  May  1544.  married  Margaret,  d.  of 
Sir  Thomas  Gerard,  of  Bryn,  and  died  6  Dec.  1589.  (Shaw,  ii.  54  ;  Lancashire  and 
Cheshire  Pec.  Soc.  lviii.  142.) 


*34 


TWO   LISTS   OF   INFLUENTIAL   PERSONS 


Heretikes. 

Erles  of  huntington. 

Warwick. 

leicester. 

bedforde. 

$    penbroke. 

$    darby. 

Sussex. 

Rutlande. 

Shrosberye. 

Lincolne. 

hartforde. 

Essex. 

I 

lorde  houseden. 

2 

lorde  montioye. 

3 

lord  darcy  essex. 

4 

lorde  north. 

5 

lorde  rich. 

6 

lorde  evers. 

7 

lorde  delaware. 

8 

lorde  of  bukhurst. 

9 

lorde  burleigh. 

•  ) 

IO 

baron  hilton. 

1 

ii 

baron  of  redgrave.     bakon. 

12 

lorde  graye. 

heretiks. 

Yorks 

Sr  thorn's  gargrave. 

Norff 

Sr  Wm  butts. 

North 

Sr  Iohn  foster. 

Suff 

Sr  Owen  hopton. 

Kent 

Sr  Thorns  litton  — ( 

Yorksh 

Sr  oswald  wilstrop. 
Sr  Raulfe  Sudley. 
Sr  francs  Knowles. 

Kent 

Sr  ed                Nailer. 

essex 

Sr  Walter  Miliner. 
Sr  Thorns  Gresham. 
Sr  thon  parrett. 

(15) 

Protestants  of  hereford  sheere. 

Sr  lames  Whitney, 
hughe  Parry, 
lames  warmecombe. 
Wm  Tomkyns. 
Iohn  Garnance. 
Wm  Garnunce. 

♦♦* 


x6) 

a 


Sr  lames  dier  1  Chieffe  lust  ad  pi.  (553) 
+   204     Iustice  welshe  (555). 


(555)  F(>*  John  Walsh,  Justice  of  Common  Pleas,  who  died  1572,  sec  Foss,  fudges 
of  England^  v.  542. 


TWO   LISTS    OF   INFLUENTIAL    PERSONS  135 

-f   205  Iustice  weston  (556). 

206  Iustice  harper  (557). 

+   207  Iustice  Corbet  (558). 

208  seriant  wraie  (559). 

Kent  209  seriant  lowels  (560). 

210  william  latesham  (561). 

211  Andrue  Grey  (562). 

212  Peter  Grey  (563). 

213  hanchet  (564). 

214  Underhil  (565). 

215  henry  Darcy  mar  to  M1  Dymocks  sister  (566). 

(556)  For  Richard  Weston,  Justice  of  Common  Pleas,  who  died  6  July  157-2,  see 
D.N.B.  lx.  364,  and  Foss,  op.  cit.  543. 

(557)  For  Richard  Harpur,  Justice  of  Common  Pleas,  who  died  29  Jan.  1576/7. 
see  Foss,  op.  cit.  496. 

(558)  For  Reginald  Corbet,  Justice  of  Queen's  Bench,  who  died  in  1566,  see 
D.N.B.  xii.  203,  and  Foss,  op.  cit.  475. 

(559)  Fo*  Sir  Christopher  Wray,  see  D.N.B.  Ixiii.  75,  and  Foss,  op.  cit.  546. 

(560)  No  Kent  Lovells  appear  as  recusants  ;  but  in  1587  Thomas  Lovel  was  a 
magistrate  of  Norfolk  suspected  and  "  reckoned  to  be  backward  in  religion  "  (Strype, 
A.  III.  ii.  460),  and  in  1592  Robert  Lovell,  of  Beech  Amwell,  Norfolk,  Esquire,  was 
a  recusant  at  liberty  {Cat.  Cecil MSS.  iv.  268).  They  were  the  first  and  third  sons 
respectively  of  Sir  Thomas  Lovell,  of  East  Harling,  who  died  in  1567.  (Blomefield, 
i.  323.)  Robert  was  admitted  to  Lincoln's  Inn,  19  Dec.  1564  (Rec.  of  Line.  Inn, 
Adm.  i.  72).     Cf.  note  67  above. 

(561)  William  Lottisham,  of  London,  was  admitted  to  the  Inner  Temple  in 
November  1554,  and  is  frequently  mentioned  in  the  Records.  (M.I.T.  20;  Cat. 
Rec.  I.T.  i.  244,  260,  261,  263,  269.) 

(562)  Andrew  Gray,  of  Albury,  Herts,  entered  the  Inner  Temple  in  Feb.  1552/3, 
and  was  a  recusant  in  1569,  but  eventually  conformed.  He  was  called  to  the  Bench 
1574,  was  Autumn  Reader  the  same  year,  Double  Reader  in  Lent  1583,  and  Treasurer 
1585.  He  died  13  January  1614/5,  aged  85,  and  was  buried  at  Hinxworth.  {M.I.7\ 
16;  Cal.  Rec.  I.  T.  I.  passim  ;  Cussans,  Hertfordshire,  Hundred  of  Odsey,  12.) 

(563)  Perhaps  John  Gray,  of  Bisley,  Herefordshire,  who  entered  the  Inner  Temple 
in  Nov.  1564,  became  a  barrister,  and  was  disbarred  for  recusancy  in  1572.  (M.I.T. 
53;  Cal.  Rec.  I.T.  I. passim.)  One  John  Gray,  of  Preston,  in  Suffolk,  was  sent  to 
the  Marshalsea,  2  January  1577/8,  where  he  was  in  1577,  1579,  1584,  1585,  and 
1588,  and  in  1593  nad  been  in  prison  for  nearly  twenty  years.  (C.R.S.  ii.  232,  235, 
240,283;  Strype,  A.  II.  ii.  661,  III.  ii.  600,  IV.  261.)  Another  of  this  name, 
described  of  St.  Saviour's  in  Southwark,  was  a  recusant  at  liberty  in  1592.  (Cal. 
Cecil  MSS.  iv.  271.) 

(564)  Probably  [?  Thomas]  Hanchet,  of  Braughing,  Herts,  father  of  the  Thomas 
Hanchet  who  entered  the  Inner  Temple  in-  Nov.  1578,  and  was  Sheriff  of  Herts  1591 
and  1602.     {M.I.T.  86  ;  H.S.P.  xxii.  63.) 

(565)  William  Underhill,  e.  s.  of  William  Underhill,  of  the  Inner  Temple,  Bar- 
rister-at-law,  and  of  Idlicote  and  New  Place,  in  Stratford-on-Avon,  who  died  in  1570, 
sold  New  Place  to  Shakespeare,  4  May  1597,  and  died  poisoned,  6  July  1597.  He 
had  married  his  1  st  cousin,  Mary,  d.  of  Thomas  Underhill,  of  Eatington.  (See  Herald 
and  Genealogist,  ii.  1 30-1 32. ) 

(566)  This  Henry  D'Arcy  is  unidentified.  Another  Henry  D'Arcy  (e.  s.  of  Hon. 
Sir  Arthur  D'Arcy,  Lieutenant  of  the  Tower  of  London,  3rd  s.  of  George,  1st  Baron 
D'Arcy)  entered  the  Inner  Temple  in  November  1555,  and  was  knighted  21  Aug. 
1565  at  Kenilworth  by  the  Earl  of  Leicester.  He  was  of  Bremham,  Yorks,  and 
Leighton,  Huntingdonshire,  for  which  latter  county  he  was  a  justice  of  the  peace. 
He  married  (1)  Catherine,  d.  of  Sir  Robert  Tyrwhitt,  and  (2)  Catherine,  d.  of  Sir 
John  Fermor.  In  1581  he  with  others  was  ordered  to  search  Mr.  Price's  house  at 
Washingley  in  Huntingdonshire  for  Ralph  Emerson,  and  for  books  "and  other 
superstitious  stuffe"  belonging  to  B.  Edmund  Campion.  (Shaw,  ii.  71  ;  Burke, 
Peerage  (ed.  1907),  460;  M.I.T.  24;  Dasent,  xiii.  153  ;  Cal,  Dom.  1581.) 


136  TWO    LISTS    OF   INFLUENTIAL   PERSONS 

216     Edward  herbert  brother  to  the  Erie  of  Pembroke 

(567). 
Thomas  Bery     1  (568) 

Iones    [■  (569)  clerks  of  the  Prevey  Seale. 

oseley   J  (570) 
Cliffe  clerke  of  signet  (571). 
Sr  Peter  lighe  (554). 

manering  of  Pever  (572). 


217 

218 

219 

220 

Chess  f 

I 

221 

Lane 

222 

[  Iohn  Culchete  (573). 
I  P* 


223-   Peter  Langton  (574). 

224  I  Io  Urmeston  (575). 
Staff  225  J        Aston  (576). 

226a        manoring  of  whitmore  (577). 

227  I  Brian  fowler  (578). 
Brecknock  228  j  Richard  Price  (579). 

229]  Philip  havard  (580). 

230  [  Iohn  hide  (581). 
Radnor        231     Thomas  Lewis  (582). 

(567)  Sir  Edward  Herbert,  who  was  knighted  9  Sept.  1574,  was  of  Powis  Castle, 
and  married  Mary,  d.  and  h.  of  Thomas  Stanley,  of  Standon,  Herts,  Master  of  the 
Mint,  by  whom  he  became  the  father  of  William,  1st  Baron  Powis.  He  died  23  March 
1  ^94.    (Burke's  Peerage,  under  Pembroke  and  Powis.) 

(568)  Unidentified. 

(569)  Robert  Jones,  Clerk  of  the  Privy  Seal  in  1566  and  1569,  and  Keeper  of 
the  Council  Chamber  in  1572.     {Ca/.  Dom.  Add.  1566  ;  Dasent,  viii.  75.) 

(570)  Richard  Oseley  is  frequently  mentioned  as  a  Clerk  of  the  Privy  Seal  in  Ca/. 
Dom.  Add.  1566  and  1580.  In  1592  he  was  living  at  Hertford.  {Cat.  Dom.  1591, 
285.)     For  a  priest  of  this  name,  see  C.R.S.  ii.  253,  256.) 

(571)  John  Cliff  was  Clerk  of  the  Signet  in  1557.     {Ca/.  Dom.  1547,  90.) 

(572)  Philip  Mainwaring,  of  Peover,  married  Anne,  d.  of  Sir  Ralph  Leicester,  of 
Toft,  Cheshire.  (H.S.P.  xviii.  166.)  In  1592  his  e.  s.  Randall  was  a  recusant. 
(Ca/.  Ceci/MSS.  iv.  240.) 

(573)  J°hn  Culcheth,  of  Culcheth,  married  Cecilia,  d.  of  Sir  Thomas  Southworth 
(n.  36  above),  and  died  1574.  (C.R.S.  iv.  205;  MisceUanea  Gen.  et  Her.  N.S. 
ii.  212.) 

(574)  Peter  Langton,  of  the  Lowe  in  Hindley,  was  the  father  of  Robert  and 
Edward  Langton,  who  were  recusants  in  1592.  Robert  married  a  sister  of  Mrs. 
Philip  Mainwaring  (see  n.  572  above).  (Chetham  Soc.  Pub/,  lxxxv.  174  ;  C.R.S.  iv. 
209  ;  Ca/.  CecU  MSS.  iv.  241,  2.) 

(575)  John  Urmston,  e.  s.  of  Richard  Urmston,  of  West  Leigh,  married  Mary, 
d.  of  John  Culcheth  (n.  573  above),  and  died  1632.  He  was  Gentleman  of  the  Horse 
to  Edward,  Earl  of  Derby,  who  died  1574.  (Chetham  Soc.  Pub/,  xxxi.  155,  Ixxxviii. 
319.) 

(576)  For  the  Aston  family,  see  Clifford,  Parish  of  Tixa//  (Paris.  1817),  pp.  145 
sqq.  It  is  uncertain  to  whom  reference  is  here  made.  Possibly  John  Aston,  who 
entered  the  Inner  Temple  Nov.  1554.     (M.LT.  21.) 

(577)  Edward  Mainwaring,  of  Whitmore,  married  Jane,  d.  of  Matthew  Cradock, 
of  Stafford,  and  was  buried  8  Nov.  1604.     (Burke,  Landed  Gentry  (edit.  1906),  1109.) 

(578)  Brian  Fowler  (see  n.  487  above). 

(579)  Richard  Price,  of  the  Priory,  Brecon,  was  High  Sheriff  of  Breconshire  in 
1564  and  1570.     (Nicholas,  i.  104.) 

(580)  Probably  a  son  of  Thomas  Havard,  of  Pontwilym,  High  Sheriff  of  Brecon- 
shire 1549  and  1555.     (Ibid.) 

(581)  Possibly  John  Hvde,  the  e.  s.  of  William  Hyde,  of  Urmston  Hall,  Lanca- 
shire.    (C.R.S.  iv/217.) 

(582)  Probably  Thomas  Lewis,  of  Harpton,  High  Sheriff  of  Radnorshire  in  155 1, 
M.P.  for  Radnorshire  1563  and  1585.     (Nicholas,  ii.  916,  919.) 


TWO   LISTS   OF   INFLUENTIAL   PERSONS  1 37 


Radnor        232  (  Iohn  Lewis  (583). 

233 1  W1"  Lewis     +(584). 


Monmth 


234  (  Thomas  morgan  (585). 
235]  IoCoxe     +(586).    ' 


36^  morgan     +(587). 

Glamorg      237  J  Mansel  second  br  (588). 

238  t  Edward  Kemys  (589). 
London       239  f  Thomas  Anderson  (590). 

240  Nicolas  hare  (591). 

241  <  Raffe  hare  (592). 

242  Symon  Egerton  (593). 

243  \  Thomas  Gardener  (594). 
Somers         244  Poole  (595). 

245  f  Thomas  Marret  (596). 

246  (  Edmond  Sander  (597). 

(583)  John  Lewis,  of  Presteigne,  Radnor,  entered  the  Inner  Temple  Nov.  1567. 
One  John  Lewis,  of  Norton,  Herefordshire,  was  a  recusant  at  liberty  in  1592.  {Cal. 
Cecil  MSS.  iv.  265  ;  M.I.  T.  64.) 

(584)  Unidentified. 

(585)  Thomas  Morgan.     {D.N.B.  xxxix.  31  ;  N.  &>  Q.,  10th  S.,  ix.  183.) 

(586)  Possibly  Tohn  Cook,  M.P.  for  the  borough  of  Monmouth  1563.  (Nicholas, 
ii.  765.) 

(587)  Probably  Polydore  Morgan,  as  to  whom  see  N.  6°  £?.,  10th  S.,  ix.  183. 

(588)  Hugh  Mansel,  2nd  son  of  Sir  Jenkin  Mansel,  married  Jane,  d.  of  and 
co-h.  of  Richard  Owgan,  of  Kent.     (Burke,  Peerage  (edn.  1907),  1114.) 

(589)  Edward  Keymes,  of  Keven-mably,  was  High  Sheriff  of  Glamorganshire 
in  1575,  1585,  1595,  and  1605.  (Nicholas,  ii.  598,  599.)  One  Edward  Keymes  was 
in  the  Tower  for  religion  in  1582.    {C.R.S.  ii.  228.) 

(590)  Thomas  Anderson,  b.  about  1529,  eldest  son  of  Edward  Anderson,  of 
Flixborough  and  Roxby,  Lincolnshire,  entered  the  Inner  Temple  in  P'ebruary 
1 549/5°  with  his  brothers  Richard  and  Edmund,  the  latter  of  whom  became  Chief 
Justice  of  the  Common  Pleas.  He  was  of  Castlethorpe  in  the  parish  of  Broughton, 
and  married  Helena,  d.  of  George  Dallison,  of  Laughton.  {H.S.P.  i.  19,  25  ; 
M.I.T.  9.) 

(591)  Nicholas  Hare,  e.  s.  of  John  Hare,  of  London,  mercer,  entered  the  Inner 
Temple  in  February  1547/8,  and  was  called  to  the  Bench  in  1574,  and  was  Treasurer 
in  1584.  He  was  also  M.P.  for  Horsham,  resigning  1589.  He  purchased  the  Stow 
Bardolph  estates  and  spent  ,£40,000  in  1589  on  a  mansion.  He  also  erected  a 
mausoleum  adjoining  the  church  at  Stow.  In  1587  he  was  a  magistrate  of  Norfolk, 
"reckoned  to  be  backward  in  religion."  He  died  unmarried,  1591.  (Strype,  A. 
III.  ii.  460;  M.I.T.  4.) 

(592)  Ralph  Hare,  (2nd  son),  brother  of  the  above,  entered  the  Inner  Temple 
February  1550/1,  and  was  called  to  the  Bench  1568.  He  succeeded  to  his  brother's 
estates,  and  died  unmarried  1601. 

(593)  Unidentified. 

(594)  Thomas  Gardiner,  of  Cripplegate  Without,  was  a  recusant  in  1592.  He 
married  Katharine  Bembo,  of  Devonshire.  {Cal.  Cecil  MSS.  iv.  267;  H.S.P. 
xv.  299.) 

(595)  No  Somerset  recusant  Poole  or  Pole  is  known  ;  but  for  Geoffrey  Pole,  of 
Lordington  Racton,  Sussex,  see  Ar.  6°  Q.,  nth  Series,  Hi.  45,  112,  154. 

(596)  Probably  Thomas  Marriott,  of  Bretforton,  Worcester,  who  entered  the 
Inner  Temple  in  Feb.  1550/1,  was  called  to  the  Benchj  1567,  and  was  Reader  in 
1567  and  1577,  and  Treasurer  1578.     (  M.I.T.  II.) 

(597)  Edmund  Sander  (e.  s.  of  Sir  Thomas  Sander,  knighted  4  Edward  VI., 
Remembrancer  of  the  Court  of  Exchequer,  of  Charlwood,  Surrey,  by  Alice,  d.  of 
Sir  Edmund  Walsingham,  Lieutenant  of  the  Tower  of  London)  married  Philippa, 
sister  of  John  Gage  (nn.  99,  388  above),  and  died  15  November  161 5,  aged  74. 
(Berry,  Surrey,  46  ;  H.S.P.  xlv.  18.) 


I38  TWO   LISTS   OF   INFLUENTIAL   PERSONS 


247 

Walsingam  Sander  (598). 

248 

Thomas  Balvairte  (599). 

249 

and  his  brother  (600). 

250 

William  Skynner  (601). 

251 

George  Skynner  (602). 

252 

Sheckesborowe  (603). 

253 

Charles  fewilliams  &  (604). 

254 

his  brother  (605). 

255 

Brocas  (606). 

Some  totalis  429  gent 
Knights    48 
lords    15 

Notingh 

256 

Edwarde  Whaley  caled  balde  wh  (607). 

yle  man 

Turbuck  of  lancashire 

captaine  of  too  castles  in  man  (608). 

(598)  Walsingham  Sander  (2nd  s.),  brother  of  the  above,  died  unmarried.  He 
entered  the  Inner  Temple  in  November  1561.    {M.I.T.  42.) 

(599)  Possibly  Thomas  Baldwin  who  was  in  the  Tower  27  May  1586  and  30 
November  1586,  for  dealing  with  the  Queen  of  Scots  and  receiving  and  conveying  of 
her  letters.     {C.K.S.  239,  261,  263.) 

(600)  Unidentified. 

(601)  William  Skinner,  of  Shelfield,  Warwickshire,  e.  s.  of  Anthony  Skinner, 
was  a  Catholic,  a  favourer  of  Mary,  Queen  of  Scots,  and  a  harbourer  of  priests,  whose 
house  was  searched  in  January  1583/4.  He  married  Alice  Oldenhall.  {H.S.P. 
xii.  295  ;  Cal.  Dom.  1581,  152.) 

(602)  George  Skinner  was  a  Suffolk  recusant  in  1577.     {Cat.  Dom.  1566,  527.) 

(603)  Probably  one  of  the  Warwickshire  Shuckburghs,  of  whom  a  pedigree  is 
given  H.S.P.  xii.  345.  Possibly  John,  3rd  s.  of  Thomas,  who  entered  the  Inner 
Temple  in  1555,  and  married  Elizabeth  Combes.     {M.I.T.  23.) 

(604)  Charles  Fitzwilliams  entered  the  Inner  Temple  Feb.  1548/9  from  Clay- 
worth,  Notts.    {M.I.T.  7.) 

(605)  Edward  Fitzwilliams  entered  the  Inner  Temple  from  Clay  worth,  Notts,  in 
Nov.  1556.     {M.I.T.  27.) 

(606)  Bernard  Brocas,  of  Horton,  Bucks,  s.  and  h.  of  Robert  Brocas,  of  Little 
Brickhill,  entered  the  Inner  Temple  in  Nov.  15  55,  and  was  M.P.  for  Buckingham 
1557.  He  married  Anne,  d.  and  h.  of  Sir  Robert  Pexhall,  and  died  1589. 
{M.I.T.  24.) 

(607)  Probably  one  of  the  25  children  of  Richard  Whalley,  of  Kirkton,  Notts,  as 
to  whom  see  D.N.B.  lx.  399. 

(608)  In  1 570  Edward  Tarbock  was  Captain  or  Governor  of  the  Isle  of  Man. 
See  A.  W.  Moore's  History  of  the  Isle  of  Man  (London,  1900),  ii.  976. 


TWO   LISTS   OF   INFLUENTIAL   PERSONS  1 39 


SECOND   LIST. 

Catholi. 
Northumbrland  (i). 
Shrewsburry  (2). 

Darby  &  his  sonne  the  Lo:  Straunge  (3)  (4). 
Arundell  &  his  ij  brethren  the  Lo  Audly  &  the  Lo 

Wm  haward  (5)  (6)  (7). 
Worcester  &  his  Sonne  the  Lo  harbord  (8)  (9). 
Westmorland  (10). 
Lo  Vaux  &  his  sonns  (n)-(i5). 
Lo  montaioy  &  his  sonne  (16)  (17). 
Lo  pageat  (18). 

Wyndsor  &  his  brethren  (19)  (20). 
Lo  mordyant  (21). 
Lo  harry  haward  (22). 
Lo  dacers  of  the  nothe  (23).  / 

Lo  Sturton  &  his  brethren  (24)-(26). 

(1)  Henry  (Percy),  8th  Earl  of  Northumberland.    (D.N.B.  xliv.  409.) 

(2)  George  (Talbot),  6th  Earl  of  Shrewsbury.    (D.N.B.  lv.  314.) 

(3)  Henry  (Stanley),  4th  Earl  of  Derby,  one  of  the  Commissioners  for  the  trial 
of  Mary,  Queen  of  Scots.     (D.N.B.  liv.  71.) 

(4)  Ferdinando  (Stanley),  5th  Earl  of  Derby.     (D.N.B.  liv.  67.) 

(5)  Philip  (Howard),  1st  Earl  of  Arundel  of  the  Howard  family.    (D.N.B.  li.  52.) 

(6)  Thomas  (Howard),  Lord  Audley  of  Waldem,  afterwards  1st  Earl  of  Suffolk. 
(D.N.B.  1.  71.) 

(7)  Lord  William  Howard.     (D.N.B.  1.  79.) 

(8)  William  (Somerset),  3rd  Earl  of  Worcester,  one  of  the  Commissioners  for  the 
trial  of  Mary,  Queen  of  Scots.     (D.N.B.  liii.  247.) 

(9)  (Edward  (Somerset),  4th  Earl  of  Worcester.    (D.N.B.  liii.  231.) 

(10)  Charles  (Neville),  6th  Earl  of  Westmorland.     (D.N.B.  xl.  245.) 

(11)  William  (Vaux),  3rd  Baron  Vaux.     (D.N.B.  lviii.  196.) 

(12)  Henry  Vaux,  e.  s.  by  his  first  wife  of  the  preceding,  was  a  prominent 
Catholic,  who  died  without  issue  in  1587  or  1588.   (Cal.  Dom.  1581,  61,  239,  242,  368.) 

(13)  George  Vaux,  2nd  son,  e.  s.  by  the  second  wife,  was  of  Pabenham,  Beds, 
and  married  Elizabeth,  d.  of  Sir  John  Roper,  1st  Baron  Teynham,  by  whom  he 
became  the  father  of  the  4th  Baron.     He  died  13  July  1595.    (Cokayne.) 

(14)  Edward  Vaux,  3rd  son,  died  without  issue. 

(15)  Ambrose  Vaux,  4th  son,  died  without  issue. 

(16)  James  (Blount),  6th  Baron  Mountjoy.     (Cokayne.) 

(17)  William  (Blount),  7th  Baron  Mountjoy.    (Cokayne.) 

(18)  William  (Paget),  4th  Baron  Paget.     (D.N.B.  xliii.  63.) 

(19)  Frederick  (Windsor),  4th  Baron  Windsor.    (Cokayne.) 

(20)  Henry  (Windsor),  5th  Baron  Windsor.    (Cokayne.) 

(21)  Lewis  (Mordaunt),  3rd  Baron  Mordaunt,  one  of  the  Commissioners  for  the 
trial  of  Mary,  Queen  of  Scots.    (Cokayne.) 

(22)  Lord  Henry  Howard,  afterwards  Baron  of  Marnhull,  and  Earl  of  Northamp- 
ton.    (D.N.B.  xxviii.  28.) 

(23)  Edward  Dacre,  see  n.  12  to  first  list. 

(24)  John  (Stourton),  6th  Baron  Stourton,  one  of  the  Commissioners  for  the  trial 
of  Mary,  Queen  of  Scots.    (Cokayne.) 

(25)  Edward  (Stourton),  10th  Baron  Stourton.    (Cokayne.) 

(26)  Charles  Stourton  (3rd  s.),  brother  of  the  two  preceding,  entered  Exeter 
College,  Oxford,  3  Dec.  1575,  aged  14,  and  supplicated  for  the  degree  of  B.A.,  15 
Dec.  1576. 


140 


TWO    LISTS    OF   INFLUENTIAL   PERSONS 


indifferent 


Lo  Lumley  (27). 
Lo  Wharton  (28). 
Lo  Bartley  (29). 
Lo  Shefyld  (30). 
Lo  morley  (31). 

Kyldare  &  his  Sonne  the  Lo  garrot  (32)  (33). 
Lo  Compton  (34). 
Rutland  earle  (35). 
Oxford         „     (36). 
Bathe  „     (37). 

Lyncolne     ,,     (38). 
Cumbrland„     (39). 
Cobam  lo  (40). 
Shandoys  Lo  (41) 
mounioy  lo  (42) 
delaware  lo  (43). 
Charles  haward  lo  (44). 
bramley  lo  chancelor  (45). 
Cheny  lo  (46). 
Dakars  of  the  Southe  (47). 
.Marquys  of  Southampton  (48). 

(27)  John  (Lumley),  6th  or  7th  Baron  Lumley,  one  of  the  Commissioners  for  the 
trial  of  Mary,  Queen  of  Scots.     {D.N.B.  xxxiv.  272.) 

(28)  Philip  (Wharton),  3rd  Baron  Wharton.     (Cokayne.) 

(29)  Henry  (Berkeley),  3rd,  7th,  or  17th  Baron  de  Berkeley.     (Cokayne.) 

(30)  Edmund  (Sheffield),  3rd  Baron  Sheffield,  afterwards  1st  Earl  of  Mulgrave. 
{D.N.B.  Hi.  11.) 

(31)  Edward  (Parker),  12th  Baron  Morley,  one  of  the  Commissioners  for  the  trial 
of  Mary,  Queen  of  Scots.     (Cokayne.) 

(32)  Gerald  (Fitzgerald),  nth  Earl  of  Kildare.     {D.N.B.  xix.  123.) 

(33)  Gerald  Fitzgerald,  one  of  the  Commissioners  for  the  trial  of  Mary,  Queen  of 
Scots,  styled  Lord  Gerald,  who  died  in  1580.     (Cokayne.) 

(34)  Henry  (Compton),  1st  Baron  Compton,  one  of  the  Commissioners  for  the 
trial  of  Mary,  Queen  of  Scots.     (Cokayne.) 

(35)  Edward  (Manners),  3rd  Earl  of  Rutland,  one  of  the  Commissioners  for  the 
trial  of  Mary,  Queen  of  Scots.     {D.N.B.  xxxvi.  48.) 

(36)  Edward  (de  Vere),  17th  Earl  of  Oxford,  one  of  the  Commissioners  for  the 
trial  of  Mary,  Queen  of  Scots.     {D.N.B.  lviii.  225.) 

(37)  William  (Bourchier),  4th  Earl  of  Bath.     (Cokayne.) 

(38)  Edward  (Clinton),  1st  Earl  of  Lincoln  of  the  Clinton  family.    {D.N.B.  xi.  91.) 

(39)  George  (Clifford),  3rd  Earl  of  Cumberland,  one  of  the  Commissioners  for  the 
trial  of  Mary,  Queen  of  Scots.     {D.N.B.  xi.  59.) 

(40)  William  (Brooke),  10th  Baron  Cobham.     (Cokayne.) 

(41)  Giles  (Bridges),  3rd  Baron  Chandos.     (Cokayne.)         (42)  See  n.  16  above. 

(43)  William  (West),  1st  Baron  De  la  Warre.     (Cokayne.) 

(44)  Charles  (Howard),.  2nd  Baron  Howard,  of  Effingham,  and  1st  Earl  of 
Nottingham,  one  of  the  Commissioners  for  the  trial  of  Mary,  Queen  of  Scots. 
{D.N.B.  xxviii.  1.) 

(45)  Sir  Thomas  Bromley,  one  of  the  Commissioners  for  the  trial  of  Mary,  Queen 
of  Scots,  Lord  Chancellor.    {D.N.B.  vi.  400.) 

(46)  Sir  Henry  Cheney,  one  of  the  Commissioners  for  the  trial  of  Mary,  Queen  of 
Scots,  Baron  Cheney  de  Toddington.     (Cokayne.) 

(47)  Gregory  (Fiennes),  10th  Lord  Dacre  of  the  South.     {D.N.B.  xviii.  428.) 

(48)  It  is  not  clear  whether  this  refers  to  Henry  (Wriothesley),  2nd  Earl  of  South- 
ampton, who  was  a  Catholic  {D.N.B.  lxiii.  152),  or  to  John  (Paulet),  2nd  Marquess 
of  Winchester.    (Cokayne.) 


TWO   LISTS   OF   INFLUENTIAL   PERSONS  141 

Sr  Wm  Baptorp  &  his  Lady  (49). 

Sr  Wm  Maldey  &  the  L  Ingleby  his  Aunt  (50)  (51). 

Sr  Rychard  Stapleton  (52). 

Sr  Thorn's  Garrat  &  his  Lady  (53). 

Sr  Wm  Catsby  &  his  Lady  (54). 

Sr  Thorn8  Tressam  &  his  Lady  (55). 

Sr  Thorn's  fytz  harbard  (56). 

Sr  George  peccam  &  his  Lady  (57). 

Sr  Iohn  Godwyne  (58). 

Sr  Edward  harbard  S:  his  Lady  (59). 

Sr  Wm  Bruerton  &  his  Lady  (60). 

Sr  George  hastings  &  his  Lady  (61). 

Sr  Xpofer  browne  &  his  Lady  (62). 

Sr  Nycolas  Poynes  &  his  Lady  (63). 

(49)  See  n.  39  to  first  list. 

(50)  and  (51)  Sir  William  Mallory,  knighted  18  July  1560,  2nd  s.  of  Sir  William 
Mallory,  of  Studley,  Yorks,  was  the  brother-in-law  of  Anne,  widow  of  Sir  William 
Ingleby,  of  Ripley,  Yorks  ;  but  by  his  wife  Ursula,  d.  of  George  Gale,  of  York,  Master 
of  the  Mint  there,  he  had  a  second  son  William,  who  may  be  the  person  here  intended. 
(Foster,  G.V.  Y.  157  ;  Shaw,  ii.  71.) 

(52)  Sir  Richard  Stapleton,  knighted  2  Oct.  1553,  was  son  of  Sir  Brian  Stapleton, 
of  Carleton,  Yorks,  by  Elizabeth,  d.  of  Henry  Lord  Scrope.  He  married  (1)  Thoma- 
sin,  d.  and  h.  of  Robert  Amadas,  Master  of  the  Jewel  House  to  King  Henry  VIII., 
and  (2)  Elizabeth,  d.  and  co-h.  to  John  Mering,  of  Mering,  and  died  27  Eliz.  (Foster, 
G.V.Y.  332;  Shaw,  ii.67.) 

(53)  See  n.  30  to  the  first  list. 

(54)  Sir  William  Catesby,  of  Lapworth,  Warwickshire,  knighted  in  1575,  married 
Anne,  d.  of  Sir  Robert  Throckmorton,  of  Congleton,  and  was  the  father  of  Robert 
Catesby,  the  conspirator,  and  died  1598.     {D.N.B.  ix.  281-2.) 

(55)  Sir  Thomas  Tresham.     {D.N.B.  lvii.  204.) 

(56)  Sir  Thomas  Fitzherbert.     (See  n.  52  to  the  first  list.) 

(57)  Sir  George  Peckham.     (D.N.B.  xliv.  189.) 

(58)  Sir  John  Godwin  or  Goodwin,  knighted  in  1570  at  Eythorpein  Waddesdon, 
Bucks,  at  William  Dormer's  house,  by  the  Earl  of  Leicester,  at  the  Queen's  command, 
was  a  J.  P.  for  Bucks,  and  one  of  the  two  Commissioners  appointed  to  inquire  after 
recusants,  &c,  in  that  county  in  1592.  He  was  High  Sheriff  in  4th,  15th,  and  29th 
Eliz.  He  married  Anne,  d.  of  Sir  William  Spencer,  and  was  buried  at  Woburn,  16 
May  1597.     (Bferry,  Bucks,  71  ;  Shaw,  ii.  74;  Cal.  Dom.  1591.) 

(59)  Sir  Edward  Herbert.    (See  n.  567  to  first  list.) 

(60)  Sir  William  Brereton,  of  Brereton,  Cheshire,  knighted  at  Leith,  Sunday,  11 
May  1544,  by  the  Earl  of  Hertford,  married  Margaret,  d.  of  Sir  John  Savage. 
(Shaw,  ii.  54;  H.S.P.  xviii.  42.) 

(61)  Sir  George  Hastings,  of  Loughborough,  knighted  21  Aug.  1565,  or  in  1575, 
was  a  J. P.  for  Leicestershire,  was  supposed  to  be  hostile  to  Queen  Elizabeth  in  1 583, 
and  (Shaw,  ii.  72,  77  ;  Cal.  Dom.  1581,  220,  275,  354)  seems  to  be  identical  with 
George  Hastings,  21st  Earl  of  Huntingdon,  as  to  whom  see  Cokayne. 

(62)  Sir  Christopher  Browne,  knighted  in  1566,  was  a  J.P.  for  Oxfordshire.  His 
wife  was  a  recusant,  liberated  from  the  Tower  9  April  1578.  (Dasent,  viii.  168,  x. 
204,  xiv.  56,  309  ;  Shaw,  ii.  72.) 

(63)  Sir  Nicholas  Poyntz,  K.B.,  15  January  1558/9,  was  son  of  a  Sir  Nicholas 
Poyntz  mentioned  in  the  1st  vol.  of  Dasent,  and  in  Letters  and  Papers  Hen.  VIII., 
in  and  after  1535,  by  Joan,  d.  of  Thomas,  Lord  Berkeley.  His  sister  Frances,  who 
died  1576,  married  Sir  John  Berkeley,  K.B.,  of  Beverston  Castle,  Gloucestershire, 
who  died  18  Oct.  1582,  and  was  the  mother  of  Dame  Joanna  Berkeley,  first  Abbess 
of  the  English  Abbey  of  the  Glorious  Assumption  at  Brussels  (as  to  whom  see  Gillow, 
i.  201).  He  married  (1)  Anne,  d.  of  Sir  Ralph  Verney,  and  (2)  Margaret,  d.  of 
Henry,  Earl  of  Derby.     (Shaw,  i.  153;  Rudder,  214.) 


143 


TWO   LISTS   OF  INFLUENTIAL   PERSONS 


Sr  Rychard  Barteley  (64). 

Sr  Iohn  Arundell  (65). 

Sr  Iohn  Conwey  (66). 

Sr  Iohn  Peter  &  his  Lady  (67). 

Sr  Iohn  Baker  &  his  Lady  (68). 

Sr  ffrauncis  Inglefyld  (69). 

Sr  Wm  wynter  (70). 

Prot: 
Lecester 
huntington 
Warwyke 
Bedford 
Kent 
hunsdone 
Tresorer 


Buckhurst 
crnwell 

walsingame     Knight 
Knoles     Knight 
Gray  of  Wilton 
Russell  lord 


(64)  Sir  Richard  Berkeley,  created  K.B.  15  Jan.  is 58/9,  s.  of  Sir  John  Berkeley, 
of  Stoke  Gifford,  Gloucestershire,  by  Isabel,  d.  of  Sir  W.  Dennis,  of  Dysham, 
Gloucestershire,  married  Elizabeth,  d.  of  William  Rede.  (Shaw,  i.  153;  Weaver, 
Somerset,  6.) 

(65)  Sir  John  Arundell.    (See  n.  22  to  first  list.) 

(66)  Sir  John  Conway,  of  Arrow,  Warwickshire,  knighted  1 8  July  1 560.  {D.N.B. 
xii.  57.) 

(67)  Sir  John  Petre,  afterwards  1st  Baron  Petre.    (Cokayne.) 

(68)  Sir  John  Baker  is  unidentified  (but  see  n.  108  to  first  list). 

(69)  Sir  Francis  Englefield.    (D.N.B.  xvii.  372.) 

(70)  Sir  William  Wynter,  knighted  Sept.  1 573  at  Gillingham.  (D.N.B.  xii.  220 ; 
Shaw,  ii.  75.) 


NO.    Ill 

A   NARRATIVE   OF  THE   MARTYRDOM   OF  THE 
VEN.   THOMAS   HOLLAND,   S.J.,    1642 

CONTRIBUTED    BY   THE   REV.    EDWARD   ROBERT  JAMES 

The  following  account  of  the  martyrdom  of  Father  Thomas  Holland,  priest 
of  the  Society  of  Jesus,  is  a  translation  from  a  very  rare  Portuguese 
pamphlet,  written  by  an  English  Catholic  who  was  present  at  the  execution, 
and  published  at  Lisbon  on  June  10,  1643,  that  is  within  six  months  of  the 
martyr's  death.  It  is  most  probably  the  first  printed  account  of  the 
martyrdom  of  Father  Holland. 

The  copy,  perhaps  the  only  copy  extant,  from  which  this  translation  is 
made,  is  in  the  possession  of  His  Majesty,  Don  Manuel  II.,  King  of  Por- 
tugal. {Real  Bibliotheca  d'Ajudil,  55,  ii.  26,  Papeis  Vart'os,  No.  13.  As 
this  library  is  strictly  private,  I  have  to  thank  Sr.  Ramalho  Ortigao,  His 
Portuguese  Majesty's  Librarian,  for  permission  to  translate  it,  and  also  Sr. 
Cardoso  de  Bethencourt,  member  of  the  Royal  Academy  of  Sciences, 
Lisbon,  for  assistance  in  translation.)  Owing  to  the  clumsy  way  in  which 
this  pamphlet  was  bound  with  other  printed  matter,  part  of  the  last  line  of 
the  first  three  pages,  and  the  whole  of  the  last  line  of  page  4,  have  been  cut 
off.  My  searches  for  an  integral  copy  in  several  libraries,  public  and  pri- 
vate, of  Lisbon,  have  been  unsuccessful.  As  this  narrative  will  be  seen  on 
perusal  to  differ  in  some  details  from  Dr.  Challoner's  notice,*  which  was 
based  on  the  Latin  life  of  Fr.  Holland,!  published  at  Antwerp  in  1645,  a 
few  notes  have  been  added,  calling  attention  to  the  chief  differences. 

E.  R.  J. 

Relacab  da  Ditosa  morte  do  Padre  Thomas  Hollanda,  sacerdote 
de  Companhia  de  Jesus,  Ingres  de  nacab,  e  natural  da  Provincia  de 
Lencestre  no  Reyno  de  Inglaterra.  Escrivoa  hu  Inglez  Catholico, 
que  se  achou  presente. 

Foy  prezo  o  Padre  Thomas  Hollanda  na  cidade  de  Londres,  corte 
dos  Reys  de  Inglaterra,  e  metropoli  daquelle  Reyno  (menor  theatro 
nab  bastava  pera  as  facanhas  de  tab  illustre  cavalleiro  de  Christo). 
Esteve  preso  seis  somanas :  chegou  o  tempo  de  huma  das  quatro 
audiencias  geraes  do  anno :  foi  levado  a  juizo,  entre  ladroes  e  malfei- 
tores,  pera  que  nem  esta  gloria  de  padecer  por  Christo  lhe  faltasse ; 
com  valor  gazoso  aparaceo  diante  dos  Juizos :  fizerab  lhe  varias  per- 
guntas,  entre  outras,  se  era  sacerdote?  respondeo,  que  quern  por  tal 
o  acusava,  que  lho  provasse,  que  elle  estaria  pellos  autos,  e  leys  do 
Reyno,  porem  os  acusadores,  que  erab  quatro,  jurarab  somente,  que  o 
haviab  visto  estudar  em  Castella  pera  sacerdote,  mas  que  nab  sabiab  si 
o  era.  Pore  q  sabiab  que  prometiab  os  que  estudavab  en  taes  casasj 
collegios  de  o  serem  pella  doutrina  e  estudo,  que  nelles  recebiab.  Com 
tudo  os  juizes  por  estas  sospeitas  somente  fulminarab  sentenca  de 
morte  contra  o  valeroso  soldado  de  Christo,  nem  esperarab  replica,  ne 

*  Memoirs  of  Missionary  Priests  (Manchester,  1803),  vol.  »•  PP-  125-8. 
f  Certamen  triplex. 


144  A  NARRATIVE  OF  THE  MARTYRDOM  OF  THE 

treplica,  ne  embargos,  ne  admittarab  defesa  alguma  contras  as  leys  do 
Reyno.     A  forma  da  sentenca  foy  a  sequinte. 

Por  quanto  a  este  tribunal  lhe  consta  serdas  sacerdote^  mandamos  que 
morrais  por  traidor,  conforme  as  leys  do  Reyno.  Tornareis  ao  lugar 
donde  viestes,  que  he  a  cadea  de  JVeugate,  e  de  la  saireis  a  arrastar  por 
traidor  ao  rabo  de  cav  alios,  pellas  ruas  publicas,  ate  o  lugar  de  Tiborne,  e 
ahi  sereis  enforcado  e  meyo  vivo  vos  lancardo  abaixo  .  .  .  arancarao  o 
corafao  e  o  mostrar  ao  povo  e  entranhas  com  elle  serao  lanfadas  no/ogo,  e 
vosso  corpo  esquartejado  e  os  quartos  pendurados  pellas  portas  de  Londres. 

Pronunciada  a  sentenga,  levantou  o  servo  de  Deos  os  olhos  e  as 
mabs  ao  Ceo,  e  deo  gragas  a  divina  Magestade  pella  merce  que  lhe 
fazia  de  dar  a  vida  pela  confissab  de  sua  Fe  Romana  e  Apostolica  :  e 
logo  com  sembrante  de  vencedor  disse  pera  os  juizes,  "  liberalmente 
vos  perdoo  tab  injusta  sentenga,  dada  somente  por  sospeitas  e  leves 
indicios,  contra  as  leys  do  Reyno,  e  tambem  perdoo  as  testemunhas, 
que  jurarab  contra  mim,  porem  nab  permitta  Deos  que  no  tremendo 
tribunal  de  dia  do  Juizo  nab  clame  meu  sangue  contra  vos."  daqui  o 
levarab  outra.  ves  a  cadea,  em  hum  sabado  dez  de  Setembro  de  1642. 
Passou  o  restante  deste  dia,  e  o  Domingo  seguinte  com  visitas  de 
Religiosos  e  outras  pessoas  de  grande  calidade,  q  por  sua  devogab  o 
hiab  visitar.  A  segunda  feira  dose  do  dito  mes  dissa  missa  na  prisab 
a  comungou  a  muytas  pessoas  devotas  q  concorrerab  pera  o  ver,  e  ouvir 
sua  practica  e  doutrina.  Pellas  oito  horas  da  mesma  manhaa  chegou 
a  Justica,  com  grande  estrondo  e  estrepito  criminal,  e  o  tirarab  de 
cadea,  e  deitarab  em  hum  carrinho  baixo  de  altura  de  hum  palmo  de 
chab,  sobre  huma  pouca  de  palha  e  depois  de  o  amarrarem  bem,  o 
forab  arrastando  por  dous  cavallos  pellas  ruas  publicas,  ate  o  lugar 
onde  padecem  os  malfeitores  ;  chegou  a  Tiborne,  lugar  de  seus  trium- 
phos,  e  posto  que  muyto  enlameado,  a  lama  lhe  parecia  gala  :  o  algoz 
o  desamarrou  do  carro,  que  verdadeiramente  pera  o  servo  de  Deos  foy 
carro  triumphal,  deste  subio  a  outro  mais  alto,  prevenido  ja  pella 
justiga,  donde  com  cortes  alegria  fez  suas  continencias  aos  senhores  e 
senhoras  Catolicas,  e  aos  mais  que  erab  muytas,  e  povo  sem  conto. 
Logo  pedia  licenga  aos  ministros  da  justiga  pera  mostrar  em  publico  a 
sem  rasab  comque  o  matavab,  contra  as  leys  do  Reyno,  e  pera  se  des- 
pedir  daquelle  povo.  Tanto  que  hum  dos  ministros  lhe  acenou  com 
a  licenga,  elle  em  alto  voz  pedio  attengab  e  comegou  huma  practica 
admiravel.  "  Comecemus  (disse  elle)  pello  sinal  da  Cms,  que  os  Cal- 
venistas  entranhavelmente  aborrecem  e  .  .  .  esta  nossa  gloriosa  acgab 
pera  que  tenha  o  fim  que  desejamos.  Em  nome  do  Padre  e  do  Filho, 
e  do  Spirito  Santo,  tres  pessoas  e  hum  so  Deos  verdadeiro.  Ha  neste 
auditorio  quern  se  escandalise  deste  sinal  ?  "  aqui  parou  hum  pouco,  e 
tanto  que  vio  que  ninguem  lhe  respondia,  proseguio  seu  arresoado,  e 
provou  com  textos  e  pontos  do  direito  concludentemente,  como  fora 
condendado  sem  algum  genero  do  prova.  E  logo  tornou  de  novo  a 
pedir  attengab  e  a  perguntar :  "  Ha  neste  auditorio  alguem  que  me 
visse  obrar  cousa  mal  feita,  ou  contra  Deos,  ou  contra  el-Rey  ? " 
Depois  de  parar  e  ver  que  ninguem  respondia,  disse  :  "  aqui  tern  logar 
o  nosso  vulgar  proverbio  quern  calle  consente  ;  todos  logo  confessais  que 
morro  innocente  e  contra  direyto,  sem  prova  juridica?     Pois  agora, 


VEN.    THOMAS    HOLLAND,    S.J.,    1 642  145 

quero  eu  declarar  quern  sou,  meu  estado,  minha  profissab,  e  minha 
ventura. 

"  Eu  sou  sacerdote,  posto  que  indigno  de  Companhia  de  Jesus, 
Religiab  que  he  coluna  de  Fe  Romana  e  Apostolica,  em  que  somente 
ha  salvagab.  Eu  sou  o  Padre  Thomas  Hollanda,  deste  illustre  nagab  : 
sou  natural  da  Provincia  de  Lencester,  bem  conhecido  nella  pellos 
Catolicos  Romanos,  porque  de  meu  nascimento  fuy  sempre  Catolico 
Romano ;  nesta  vivi  sempre,  nella  espero  morrer,  porque  assi  como  nab 
ha  mais  que  hum  so  Deos,  assi  nab  ha  mais  que  huma  so  Fe,  em  que 
ha  salvagab,  esta  he  somente  a  Romana,  que  nossos  antepassados  por 
tantos  annos  professarab,  com  huma  prodigiosa  e  continua  successab 
de  espantosas  e  milagrosos  successos,  como  testemunhab  tantos  annaes 
anglicanos.  Neste  me  cor;  robor — ei  [«V=corroborei]  mais  em  Es- 
panha,  Allemanha,  Franca,  Flandres  e  outras  provincias  onde  estudei 
muyto  de  vesas  todos  os  fundamentos  da  verdadeira  religiab,  e  sempre 
achei  que  os  das  contrarias  erab  falsos,  e  so  os  da  Romana  verdadeiros, 
e  que  so  nella  podia  haver  salvagab." 

Aqui  desfez  algums  dos  fundamentos  da  falsa  ceita  de  Calvino,  mas 
hum  ministro  della  lhe  interrompeo  o  discurso,  e  bradou :  "  Senhor 
Hollanda,  pare  vossa  merce,  pera  que  sab  tantas  rasoes?  Cuidarab 
os  rudes,  que  ouvem  esse  sua  doutrina,  que  verdadeira;"  e  logo 
entendeo  com  os  ladroes  que  morriab  en  companhia  do  servo  de 
Deos  e  os  perverteo  ainda  mais  .  .  .  -stas  ao  impio  pregador,  e 
sua  doutrina,  e  levantando  as  mabs  e  rosto  pera  o  Oriente,  esteve 
immobil  por  um  quarto  em  profunda  contemplagab :  depois  se 
tournou  a  virar,  e  em  alta  e  sonora  voz  disse :  M  Senhor  meu  e 
Deos  meu,  vos  me  criastes  e  remistes  com  vosso  precioso  sangue,  eu 
vos  dou  infinitas  gramas  por  todos  os  merces  que  me  fizestes,  e  agora 
particularmente  por  esta  de  dar  a  vida  pella  profissab  e  confissab  da 
vossa  Fe  Romana  e  Apostolica ;  eu  vos  torno  a  vida  e  alma  que  me 
destes.  Oh !  quern  tivera  muytas  mais  pera  vos  sacrificar  !  quern  por 
vosso  amor  padecera  todos  quantos  tormentos  padecarab  vossos  invictos 
martyres ! " 

E  porque  o  algoz  hia  facendo  seu  officio,  meteo  a  mab  na  algibeira, 
e  tirou  humas  moedas  embrulhadas  en  hum  papel,  e  lhas  meteo  na 
mab,  dizendo  que  perdoasse,  que  nab  tinha  mais,  que  sempre  vivera 
como  pobre  de  Christo.  O  algos  lhas  aceitou  com  o  chapeo  na  mab. 
Logo  o  defendor  da  Fe  Romana  se  pos  de  joelhos  no  carro,  emque 
ultimamente  havia  de  triumphar,  com  os  olhos  no  norte,  e  em  alta  voz 
fez  a  Deos  a  ultima  recommendagab  da  sua  alma,  e  lhe  pedio  perdab 
pera  seus  inimigos,  e  lhe  encomendou  com  notavel  affeito,  e  forga  de 
espirito  a  redugab  da  Inglaterra.  Depois  de  rogar  a  Deos  por  todos, 
se  tornou  alevantar  em  pe,  sitto  e  postura  de  capitab  triumphante  na 
morte  gloriosa.  Logo  os  algoses  darab  hum  agouta  nos  cavallos,  que 
partindo,  ficou  o  servo  de  Deos  pendurado  no  ar,  com  as  maos  postas 
no  Ceo,  sem  fazer  no  rosto  esgar  algum,  antes  vestio  hum  sembrante 
ainda  mais  sereno  e  alegre. 

Meyo  vivo  o  cortarab  abaixo  e  o  despirab  nu,  e  o  abrirab  pellas 
peitos,  e  lhe  arrancarab  o  coragab,  que  vinha  palpitando,  e  como 
triumphando.      O  algoz  o  mostrou  ao  povo  com  a  custumada  cere- 

XIII.  K 


146  A  NARRATIVE  OF  THE  MARTYRDOM  OF  THE 

monia  e  solemes  palavras,  dizendo  "vedes  aqui  o  coraQab  de  hum 
traidor,  e  Deos  guarde  o  el-Rey,"  e  o  deitarab  no  meyo  de  huma 
fogueira,  que  preparado  tinhab,  com  os  entranhas  juntamente,  e  depois 
fizerab  o  corpo  em  quatro  quartos  que  dependurarab  pellas  portas  mais 
principaes  da  cidade,  pera  que  aquelles  tropheos  da  Fe  Romana,  fossem 
de  todos  mais  vistos  e  tab  alto  os  levantarab.  ... 

Foy  este  cruel  execu^ab  sentida  dos  Hereges  :  e  com  ella  gragerab 
os  Juizos  pera  si  odio  e  malevolencia  e  pera  o  cavalleiro  de  Christo 
gloria,  e  eterna  fama.  Forab  comigo  presentes  tres  sacerdotes,  fdra 
outras  muytas  pessoas  Catolicas  en  Londres  a  12  de  Dezembro  de 
1642. 

Esta  relagab  confirmarab  de  pois  en  este  Reyno  algiias  pessoas,  que 
assistarab  nesta  fermosa  accab  do  servo  de  Deos,  Thomas  Hollanda, 
que  na  verdade  foy  hum  aspectaculo  de  honra  pera  Deos,  de  esforca 
pera  os  Catolicos,  e  de  pasmo  pera  os  hereges.  Na  divina  bondade 
esperamos  que  seu  sangue  vertido  pellas  prac^as  de  Londres,  por  teste- 
munha  da  Fe  Romana,  tome  a  consegrar  aquelle  grande  cidade,  e  todo 
aquelle  Reyno  na  verdadeira  crenga  e  Religiab,  que  seus  mayores  outro 
tempo  patentemente  professarab. 

Em  Lisboa. 
Na  onicina  de  Lourenca  de  Anveres, 

10  de  Junho  de  1643. 

Translation 

Account  of  the  happy  death  of  Father  Thomas  Holland,  priest 
of  the  Society  of  Jesus,  Englishman  by  birth,  and  a  native  of  the 
Province  of  Lancashire,  in  the  kingdom  of  England.  Written  by  an 
English  Catholic  who  was  present. 

Father  Thomas  Holland  was  arrested  in  the  city  of  London,  court 
of  the  Kings  of  England,  and  metropolis  of  that  kingdom.  (A  lesser 
theatre  [than  London]  was  not  sufficient  for  the  prowess  of  so  famous 
a  knight  of  Christ.)  He  was  in  prison  six  weeks.*  When  the  time 
of  one  of  the  general  quarter  sessions  came  round,  he  was  taken  to  the 
judge  between  thieves  and  malefactors,  in  order  that  not  even  this 
glory  of  suffering  for  Christ  should  be  wanting  to  him.  He  appeared 
with  courage  and  pleasure  before  the  judges,  who  put  to  him  various 
questions,  among  others,  if  he  was  a  priest  ?  He  answered  that  he 
who  accused  him  of  such  must  prove  it  against  him ;  that  he  would 
submit  to  the  acts  and  laws  of  the  kingdom ;  but  his  accusers  (who 
were  four)  swore  only  that  they  had  seen  him  studying  for  a  priest  in 
Castile, t  but  did  not  know  if  he  was  one;  moreover,  they  knew  that 
they  who  studied  in  these  houses  and  colleges,  engaged  to  be  priests 
in  return  for  the  science  and  study  which  they  received  there.  On 
these  suspicions  only  the  judges  passed  sentence  of  death  on  the  brave 
soldier  of  Christ,  without  waiting  for  a  reply,  or  sur-rebut,  or  legal 


*  Challoner  says  he  was  apprehended  on  October  4,  i.e.  nearly  ten  weeks  before 
s  the  date 
probably 


his  death.     Perhaps  the  date  assigned  by  Challoner  is  a  misprint  for  November  4 
t  Valladolid  is  probably  referred  to. 


VEN.    THOMAS    HOLLAND,   S.J.,   1642  147 

exception,  or  admitting  any  defence,  against  the  laws  of  the  kingdom. 
The  form  of  the  sentence  was  as  follows : — 

Whereas  at  this  court  it  has  been  proved  against  you  that  you  are  a 
priest,  we  command  that  you  shall  die  as  a  traitor  conformably  to  the 
laws  of  the  kingdom.  You  shall  return  to  the  place  whence  you  came 
{which  is  the  prison  of  Newgate),  and  you  shall  be  taken  out  to  be  dragged 
as  a  traitor  at  the  tails  of  horses  through  the  public  streets  to  the  place  of 
Tiborne,  and  here  you  shall  be  hanged,  and  they  shall  cut  you  dotvn  while 
half  alive,*  .  .  .  they  shall  tear  out  your  heart  and  show  it  to  the 
people ;  your  entrails  shall  be  cast  with  it  into  the  fire,  and  your  body 
quartered,  and  the  quarters  hung  on  the  gates  of  London. 

The  sentence  being  pronounced,  the  servant  of  God  raised  his  eyes 
and  hands  to  heaven,  and  gave  thanks  to  the  Divine  Majesty  for  the 
grace  bestowed  on  him,  of  laying  down  his  life  in  confession  of  the 
Roman  and  Apostolic  Faith  j  and  presently  with  the  countenance  of 
a  conqueror,  he  said  frankly  to  the  judges  :  "  I  pardon  you  so  unjust 
a  sentence,  given  only  on  suspicions  and  slight  evidences,  against  the 
laws  of  the  kingdom  ;  and  I  also  pardon  the  witnesses  who  have  sworn 
against  me;  and  may  God  permit  not  my  blood  to  cry  out  against 
you  in  the  tremendous  tribunal  of  the  day  of  judgment."  From  here 
they  took  him  again  to  the  prison,  on  a  Saturday,  the  tenth  of  Sep- 
tember t  of  1642.  He  passed  the  rest  of  this  day  and  the  Sunday 
following  in  visits  from  Religious  and  other  persons  of  high  quality, 
who  out  of  devotion  \  came  to  visit  him.  On  Monday,  the  twelfth  of 
the  said  month,  he  said  Mass  in  prison,  and  communicated  many 
devout  persons  who  had  come  to  see  him  and  to  listen  to  his  discourse 
and  instruction.  At  eight  o'clock  of  the  same  morning  the  officers  of 
justice  arrived  with  great  noise  and  criminal  uproar,  and  took  him  from 
prison  and  put  him  in  a  low  hurdle  of  the  height  of  a  palm  from  the 
ground,  on  a  little  straw ;  and  after  fastening  him  well,  they  began  to 
drag  him  by  two  horses  through  the  public  streets  to  the  place  where 
malefactors  suffer ;  he  arrived  at  Tiborne,  the  scene  of  his  triumphs, 
and  although  he  was  covered  with  mud,  the  mud  seemed  to  him  an 
ornament.  The  executioner  took  him  from  the  car,  which  certainly 
for  the  servant  of  God  was  a  triumphal  car ;  from  this  he  mounted  a 
higher  triumphal  car,  the  judges  being  already  there  assembled ;  and 
from  there  he  bowed  politely  and  cheerfully  to  the  Catholic  men  and 
women,  and  to  the  rest,  who  were  many,  and  an  innumerable  people. 
Then  he  asked  the  ministers  of  justice  for  permission  to  set  forth  to 
the  people  the  unreason  of  their  putting  him  to  death  against  the  laws 
of  the  realm,  and  to  take  his  leave  of  the  people.  As  soon  as  one  of 
the  ministers  nodded  permission,  he  called  in  a  loud  voice  for  atten- 
tion, and  commenced  an  admirable  discourse.  "  Let  us  begin  (he 
said)  with  the  sign  of  the  cross,  which  the  Calvinists  heartily  detest, 

*  Four  or  five  words  are  here  cut  off. 

f  This  is  evidently  a  misprint  for  December.  The  trial  was  held  at  the  Old 
Bailey  on  December  7,  and  it  was  not  until  the  10th  that  the  recorder  pronounced 
sentence  of  death  against  him. — Challoncr. 

X  q  por  sua  devoffib  o  hiab  visilar,  may  mean  M  who  out  of  their  devotion  to  him 
came  to  visit  him,"  or  "  who  in  consideration  of  his  devotion,"  &c.  The  Portuguese 
use  of  '  •  sua  "  is  often  ambiguous. 


148  A  NARRATIVE  OF  THE  MARTYRDOM  OF  THE 

and  ...  *  this  our  glorious  action,  that  it  may  attain  the  end  which  we 
all  desire.  In  the  name  of  the  Father,  and  of  the  Son,  and  of  the  Holy 
Ghost,  three  persons  and  one  only  true  God.  Is  there  any  one  in  this 
audience  who  is  scandalised  at  this  sign  ?  "  Here  he  paused,  and 
seeing  that  no  one  answered  him,  he  continued  his  speech  in  his 
defence,  and  proved  conclusively  with  texts  and  points  of  law  that  he 
had  been  condemned  without  any  kind  of  proof.  Then  he  called 
again  for  attention  and  asked :  "  Is  there  any  one  in  this  assembly 
who  has  seen  me  do  any  evil  deed,  either  against  God  or  against  the 
king  ? "  After  waiting,  and  seeing  that  no  one  answered,  he  said : 
"Here  our  common  proverb  is  exemplified,  'Silence  gives  consent'; 
then  all  of  you  confess  that  I  die  innocent  and  against  the  law,  without 
juridical  proof.  Now,  then,  I  wish  to  declare  who  I  am,  my  state,  my 
profession,  and  the  course  of  my  life. 

"I  am  a  priest,  though  unworthy,  of  the  Company  of  Jesus,  a 
religious  order  which  is  a  column  of  the  Roman  and  Apostolic  Faith, 
in  which  alone  is  salvation.  I  am  Father  Thomas  Holland,  of  this 
illustrious  nation ;  I  am  a  native  of  the  province  of  Lancashire,  well 
known  there  by  the  Roman  Catholics,  since  from  my  birth  I  have 
always  been  a  Roman  Catholic.  In  this  (faith)  I  have  always  lived, 
in  it  I  hope  to  die ;  because  as  there  is  one  only  God,  so  there  is  one 
only  faith,  in  which  is  salvation ;  this  is  the  Roman  Faith  which  our 
forefathers  for  so  many  years  professed,  with  a  wonderful  and  con- 
tinuous succession  of  marvellous  and  miraculous  events,  as  so  many 
English  annals  testify.  I  have  been  confirmed  in  this  (my  faith)  in 
Spain,  Germany,  France,  Flanders,  and  other  lands,  where  I  have 
studied  very  seriously  all  the  fundamental  principles  of  true  religion ; 
and  I  have  always  found  that  the  fundamental  principles  of  contrary 
[religions]  were  false,  that  those  of  the  Roman  Faith  were  the  only 
true  ones,  and  that  in  it  alone  could  salvation  be  had." 

Here  he  confuted  some  of  the  principles  of  the  false  sect  of  Calvin, 
but  a  Calvinist  minister  interrupted  his  discourse  and  bawled  out : 
"  Mr.  Holland,  hold  your  peace !  to  what  purpose  is  all  this  reason  ? 
Ignorant  people  who  hear  your  doctrine  will  believe  that  it  is  the 
truth  ;  "  and  then  he  spoke  with  the  thieves  who  were  to  die  in  com- 
pany with  the  servant  of  God,  and  perverted  them  still  more  with  t  •  .  . 
[and  Father  Holland  .  .  .]  to  the  impious  preacher  and  his  doctrine  ; 
and  raising  his  hands  and  (turning)  his  face  towards  the  East,  he  stood 
immovable  for  a  quarter  (of  an  hour)  in  deep  contemplation  ;  then 
he  turned  round  and  in  a  high  and  sonorous  voice  said :  "  My  Lord 
and  my  God,  you  created  me  and  redeemed  me  with  your  precious 
blood.  I  give  you  infinite  thanks  for  all  the  graces  you  have  bestowed 
on  me,  and  now  especially  for  this  grace  of  laying  down  my  life  in 
profession  and  confession  of  your  Roman  and  Apostolic  Faith.  I 
return  to  you  the  life  and  soul  which  you  gave  me.  O  would  that  I  had 
many  more  lives  to  sacrifice  to  you  !     Would  that,  for  love  of  you,  I 

*  Here  several  words  are  cut  off ;  perhaps  they  were  u  beg  God's  blessinr 
on,"  &c. 

t  Probably  "  with  psalms";  the  prison  chaplain,  says  Challoner,  sang  psalms 
with  the  two  malefactors  who  were  to  die  that  day.     About  nine  words  are  cut  off, 


VEN.    THOMAS    HOLLAND,   S.J.,    1642  149 

could  suffer  all  the  torments  which  your  invincible  martyrs  have 
suffered !  " 

As  the  executioner  was  about  to  do  his  duty,  [the  servant  of  God] 
put  his  hand  into  his  pocket  and  drew  out  some  coins  wrapped  up  in 
paper,  and  put  them  into  the  (executioner's)  hand,  saying  that  he 
pardoned  him,  that  he  had  no  more,  that  he  had  always  lived  as  a  poor 
man  of  Christ.  The  executioner  received  them  with  hat  in  hand. 
Then  the  defender  of  the  Roman  Faith  knelt  down  in  the  cart,  in  which 
he  was  at  last  to  triumph,  with  his  eyes  turned  to  the  North,  and  in  a 
loud  voice  made  the  last  commendation  of  his  soul  to  God,  and  asked 
pardon  for  his  enemies ;  and  with  remarkable  affection  and  with  all  his 
soul  he  prayed  for  the  return  of  England  [to  the  faith].  After  praying 
to  God  for  all  he  rose  on  his  feet,  like  a  captain  triumphing  in  a  glorious 
death.  Then  the  executioners  whipped  the  horses,  which,  in  going 
away,  left  the  servant  of  God  suspended  in  the  air,  with  his  hands  lifted 
up  to  heaven,*  and  his  face  showing  no  sign  of  contortion,  but  on  the 
contrary  his  countenance  was  more  serene  and  joyful. 

They  cut  him  down  while  half  alive,  t  and  stripped  him  and  cut 
open  his  breast  and  tore  out  his  heart,  which  came  forth  palpitating 
and,  as  it  were,  triumphing.  The  executioner  showed  it  to  the  people 
with  the  usual  ceremonial  and  solemn  words,  saying,  "See  here  the 
heart  of  a  traitor,  and  God  save  the  king,"  and  then  flung  it,  together 
with  the  entrails,  into  the  middle  of  a  fire  which  had  been  prepared, 
and  then  they  cut  the  body  into  four  quarters,  which  they  hung  on 
the  principal  gates  of  the  city,  in  order  that  these  trophies  of  the 
Roman  Faith  might  be  seen  by  everybody ;  and  they  placed  them  so 
high... J 

This  cruel  execution  grieved  even  the  heretics,  and  brought  hatred 
and  malevolence  on  the  judges,  and  glory  and  eternal  fame  to  the 
knight  of  Christ.  There  were  present  with  me  three  priests,  besides 
many  other  Catholics,  in  London  on  the  twelfth  §  of  December  1642. 

This  account  has  since  been  confirmed  here  in  this  country  by 
several  persons  who  assisted  at  this  beautiful  action  of  the  servant  of 
God,  Thomas  Holland,  which  in  very  truth  was  a  spectacle  of  honour 
to  God,  of  encouragement  to  the  Catholics,  and  admiration  to  the 
heretics.  We  hope  through  the  Divine  goodness  that  his  blood,  spilt 
in  the  public  squares  of  London,  in  testimony  of  the  Roman  Faith, 
may  consecrate  that  great  city,  and  the  whole  of  that  kingdom  in  the 
true  creed  and  religion  which  its  ancestors  in  other  times  openly 
professed. 

Printed  at  Lisbon  by  Louren^o  de  Anveres;  10  June  1643. 

*  as  mobs postas  no  Ceo;  Challoner  says,  "his  hands  all  the  while  joined  before 
his  breast." 

t  Challoner  says  :  "  The  minister  would  have  had  the  hangman  cut  the  rope 
before  he  was  dead ;  but  Jack  Catch  was  more  humane  than  the  parson,  and  lie 
delayed  till  the  pious  soul  was  let  loose  from  the  body ;  and  then  he  performed  the 
the  usual  butchery." 

X   The  whole  of  the  last  line  is  cut  off. 

§  Here,  as  above,  the  date  is  given  according  to  the  Julian  Calendar,  which  was 
in  use  in  England  until  September  3,  1752.  According  to  the  present,  i.e.  Gregorian 
Calendar,  the  proper  date  is  ten  days  later,  that  is,  the  twenty-second  of  December. 


NO.    IV 
PAPERS   FROM   THE   COURTFIELD   MUNIMENTS 

CONTRIBUTED   BY   JOHN    HOBSON    MATTHEWS 

I  HAVE  lately  concluded  the  laborious  but  interesting  task  of  examining  and 
calendaring"  the  large  and  important  collection  of  ancient  muniments  pre- 
served at  Courtfield,  near  Ross,  in  the  county  of  Hereford.  Courtfield  has 
been,  since  the  reign  of  Elizabeth,  the  seat  of  the  Vaughan  family,  one  of  the 
elder  branches  of  the  great  Herbert  sept.  The  present  head  of  this  branch 
is  Colonel  Francis  Baynham  Vaughan,  J. P.,  K.C.P.,  to  whom  I  am  indebted 
for  permission  to  print  the  following  papers. 

In  1 72 1  John  Vaughan  of  Courtfield,  lord  of  Welsh  Bicknor,  inherited 
the  adjoining  manor  of  Ruardean,  co.  Glouc,  together  with  the  manor  of 
Abenhall,  one-third  of  Mitcheldean,  and  other  lands  in  Gloucestershire  ;  as 
also  the  manor  of  Cleiro  and  lands  in  Radnorshire.  This  inheritance  was 
from  the  family  of  Vaughan  of  Ruardean,  who,  though  staunch  Catholics 
and  near  neighbours,  were  of  Breconshire  origin,  and  an  entirely  distinct 
race  from  their  namesakes  of  Courtfield.*  Most  of  the  documents  here  pre- 
sented for  the  first  time  to  the  public  relate  to  the  Ruardean  Vaughans. 
They  are  arranged  as  follows  : — 

A.  A  series  of  papers  concerning  the  indictment  in  1641  of  Dame  Joan 
Vaughan  of  Ruardean  (widow  of  John  Vaughan  of  Kinnersley,  co.  Heref., 
who  was  jure  uxoris  of  Ruardean),  for  the  treason-felony  of  harbouring  a 
priest.  The  priest  was  John  t  Broughton,  who  was  chaplain  to  Dame  Joan, 
and  also  acted  as  her  Steward.  We  have  a  few  particulars  about  him  from 
the  Ruardean  Court  Rolls,  followed  by  a  Petition  of  John  Vaughan  on  behalf 
of  his  mother,  the  accused  lady.  Then,  after  sundry  minor  items,  comes 
Case  for  Counsel's  Opinion,  with  learned  counsel's  opinion  duly  set  out. 
The  Instructions  for  Pleadings  to  the  Indictment  follow,  and  afterwards  the 
Chief  Justice's  reversal  of  his  warrant  to  arrest  the  defendant.  The  set  of 
documents  concludes  with  the  King's  mandate  {Nolle  exequi)  under  the 
Royal  sign  manual,  to  stay  execution  of  sentence  in  case  the  accused  lady 
was  found  guilty. 

B.  Letter  from  John  Jones  of  Dingastow,  co.  Monm.,  esq.,  to  Richard 
Vaughan  of  Courtfield,  esq.  (whose  sister,  Mary  Vaughan,  was  married  to 
Mr.  Jones),  dated  in  1642.  It  gives  warning  that  a  new  Commission  is  to  be 
held  in  Monmouthshire  for  laying  fresh  burdens  upon  the  Catholics. 

C.  Two  receipts,  dated  in  1684-5,  f°r  legacies  bequeathed  by  John 
Vaughan  of  Courtfield  to  the  Benedictines  of  Douai  and  to  the  Franciscans. 

D.  A  letter,  dated  in  18 13,  from  John  Brydges  to  Mr.  William  Vaughan 
of  Courtfield,  claiming  kinship  in  a  female  line  and  making  reference  to  well- 
known  Catholic  families.  The  writer  was  evidently  not  a  Catholic.  His 
anxiety  to  show  himself  worthy  of  recognition  as  a  kinsman  is  almost 
pathetic. 

*  See  The  Vaughans  of  Courtfield,  by  the  present  writer.  Sands  &  Co., 
London,  19 12. 

t  Not  Thomas  as  stated  by  Sir  John  Maclean  (History  of  the  Manors  of  Dene 
Magna  and  Abenhall). 


PAPERS    FROM    THE   COURTFIELD    MUNIMENTS  151 

I.  PAPERS  IN  THE  CASE  OF  DAME  JOAN  VAUGHAN  AND 
FATHER  JOHN  BROUGHTON 

Dame  Joan  Vaughan  was  imprisoned  in  Gloucester  Castle  on  the  above 
charge.  It  is,  however,  clear  that  her  friends  were  able  to  bring  sufficient 
influence  to  bear  upon  the  King  to  secure  her  liberation.  Indeed,  Charles 
the  First  and  Charles  the  Second  were  always  glad  to  save  the  life  of  a 
Catholic — even  of  a  priest — if  the  political  situation  allowed  them  to  ignore 
Puritan  pressure. 

The  reader  will  observe  the  King's  autograph  signature  at  the  head  of 
the  Royal  mandate,  reproduced  here  in  facsimile. 

"Dame  Joan,"  as  she  is  traditionally  styled,  was  a  daughter  of  Thomas 
Baynham  of  Clowerwal  (now  Clearwell)  in  the  parish  of  Newland,  co. 
Glouc,  esq.,  lord  of  the  manors  of  Ruardean,  Mitcheldean  and  Abenhall 
in  that  county,  by  his  wife  Mary,  daughter  of  Sir  William  Winter,  knt.  The 
said  Thomas  was  a  younger  son  of  Sir  George  Baynham  of  Clowerwal, 
knt.,  by  his  wife  Cecily,  daughter  of  Sir  John  Gage,  knt.  {Visit.  Glouc, 
1623,  ed«  Harl.  Soc.  xxi.  14,  15.)  Cecily  was  Sir  George's  2nd  wife.  Her 
father,  Sir  John  Gage,  was  of  Firle,  co.  Sussex,  and  was  a  K.G. ;  her  mother 
was  Philippa,  daughter  of  Sir  Richard  Guldeford  or  Guildford,  another 
Knight  of  the  Garter.  The  Gage  family  was  Catholic,  but  lapsed  soon  after 
attaining  to  peerage  rank.  They  represent  the  old  Catholic  family  of  Hall 
of  Highmeadow  in  Newland.  The  surname  Baynham  is  a  corruption  of 
the  Welsh  Ab  Einion. 

John  Broughton  {verc  Crowther)  was  born  in  co.  Salop,  1589,  eldest  son 
of  Arthur  Crowther  by  his  wife  Mary  Broughton.  {Visit.  S/irops.y  1623; 
ed.  Harl.  Soc.  xxviii.)  He  was  professed  a  Benedictine  at  St.  Gregory's, 
Douay,  in  1609,  was  sent  to  St.  Lawrence's,  Dieulouwart,  and  thence  to  the 
mission  in  the  South  Province.  He  suffered  imprisonment  in  London,  and 
on  his  release  laboured  in  Gloucestershire.  He  was  Provincial  of  Canter- 
bury, 1625-9.  In  his  old  age  he  retired  to  the  Abbey  of  Lambspring,  and 
died  there  14  Mar.  1658.  In  religion  he  bore  the  additional  name  Mark. 
(Snow,  Necrology  O.S.B.)  John  Crowther  had  two  brothers,  Thomas 
and  Arthur,  and  four  sisters.  Arthur  was  born  in  Montgomeryshire,  and 
became  a  Benedictine  priest  {ibid.).  Their  paternal  grandfather  was 
Thomas  Crowther,  whose  wife's  maiden  surname  was  Baldwin.  {Visit. 
Shrops.,  p.  22.) 

Mary  Broughton  was  dau.  of  Geoffrey  Broughton  by  his  wife  Alice, 
dau.  of  John  Stevenson.  Geoffrey  was  7th  son  of  Thomas  Broughton  by 
his  wife  Katherine,  dau.  and  heir  of  Edmund  Hodnett.  The  last-named 
Thomas  was  son  of  Walter  Broughton  of  Broughton.  {Visit.  Shrops.,  pp. 
83-84.     See  also  Gillow,  Diet.  Engl.  Cath.,  i.  603.) 

The  Middlesex  Records,  vol.  iii.,  contain  a  list  of  1430  persons  against 
whom  proceedings  were  to  be  taken  for  recusancy  in  1640.  Among  them 
are  many  residents  of  St.  Clement  Danes,  and  four  of  these  are  stated  to 
have  proffered  a  writ  of  Certiorari  in  the  King's  Bench,  returnable  at  Christ- 
mas in  the  year  above  mentioned.  Of  these  four,  the  first  two  are  Edward, 
Lord  Harberte,  and  John  Vaughan,  gentleman.  There  can  be  little  doubt 
that  the  lastnamed  was  Dame  Joan  Vaughan's  son,  whom  in  the  following 
papers  we  find  forwarding  the  cause  of  his  mother's  defence  with  so  much 
energy  and  success. 

John  Broughton  witnesses  several  deeds  (now  among  the  Courtfield 
muniments)  executed  by  and  for  Dame  Joan  Vaughan  at  Ruardean.  That 
he  was  a  resiant  in  the  manor  of  Ruardean  appears  from  an  entry  on  the 
Court  Roll  of  1633,  when  the  Homage  present  that  John  Broughton,  gent., 
ought  to  have  a  wain  way  for  the  fetching  of  his  hay,  to  a  place  called  the 
Cinderhill. 


152  PAPERS   FROM    THE   COURTFIELD   MUNIMENTS 

On  a  blank  space  in  the  Court  Roll  of  1636  is  an  obscure  memorandum  : 
"query  Mr.  Broughton  about  the  bootes." 

In  1638  the  Homage  say  as  follows  : — 

"We  doe  prsent  Mr  John  Braughton  for  tackinge  in  to  his  howse  one 
Mr  ganseford,  *  and  did  not  first  geue  securitie  to  saue  the  prish  harmles 
according  To  a  standinge  paine  of  this  Corte  of  fortie  shilinges. 

"  We  doe  order  and  apoynt  that  the  s<l  Mr  John  Braughton  shall  pvt 
away  the  sd  Mr  Ganseford  or  to  geue  securiti  to  saue  The  parish  harmles  be 
fore  the  first  Day  of  May  next  vpon  payn  of  xls." 

Probably  Mr.  Gainsford  was  a  youth  residing  with  the  priest  for  purposes 
of  education.  His  family  were  then  of  Grosmont  in  Monmouthshire,  but 
had  come  from  Sussex  in  Elizabeth's  reign.  The  removal  was  doubtless  on 
religious  accounts,  this  branch  having  remained  Catholic.  Its  present 
representative  is  W.  D.  Gainsford,  esq.,  of  Skendleby,  co.  Line,  a  member 
of  this  Society.  J.  H.  M. 


I.    PETITION    TO    RESPITE   THE    FINDING    OF   THE    BILL 

To  the  Right  ho'ble  sr  Robert  Heath  knight  his  Mats  Justice  of  assise 
for  the  Countye  of  Glouc1*. 

The  humble  Petition  of  John  vaughan  gent.  Shewing  that  hee 
hath  some  cause  to  beeleeve  that  a  bill  of  Indictm*  is  lykely  to  bee 
prferred  against  his  mother  by  one  [blank]  Graye  att  this  assisses  for  the 
releiving  receaveing  or  harboring  of  one  John  Broughton  al's  Crowder 
whoe  the  prsecutor  doth  suggest  is  a  semenary  priest  and  thereby 
draweth  in  question  yor  petitioners  mothers  life  &  estate.  Now  foras- 
much as  there  is  not  any  prffe  more  then  the  prsecutors  owne  that  the 
said  Broughton  is  a  priest  or  that  his  mother  hath  any  waye  releved  or 
harbored  hym  contrary  to  the  lawe  neyther  is  hee  on  his  mothers  behalf 
prvided  to  make  any  Defence  being  altogether  Ignorant  of  the  law  in 
this  point  wch  tendeth  to  her  vtter  overthrow 

In  tender  considerac'on  whereof  maye  yt  please  yor  good  lo:  to 
afford  to  yor  petitioner  on  the  behalf  of  his  mother  whoe  is  a  very 
weake  &  sickley  gentlewoman  tyme  vntill  the  next  assisse  to  make  her 
lawfull  Defence  &  in  the  meane  tyme  that  the  finding  of  the  bill  against 
her  maye  bee  respited  other  wise  her  life  &  fortune  &  the  Ruine  of  her 
many  children  whoe  hath  no  subsistance  but  from  her  will  fall  vppon 
them,  wch  by  yor  lo.  goodnes  hee  hopeth  may  lawfully  bee  prvented 

And  yor  petr  &c. 

On  the  other  side  is  "An  abstracte  of  Rentall  giuen  my  Mother  by  m1' 
Broughton  in  Martch  25.  1641."  The  account  refers  to  Ruardeane,  Litle 
Deane,  Westbury,  and  Blakeny  in  the  county  of  Gloucester,  Aston  in  Caple 
in  the  county  of  Hereford,  and  Clyrowe  with  Cleeve  in  the  county  of  Radnor. 
There  are  also  the  words:  " borrowed  of  my  brotr  to  Aid  my  Mother  81#" 
On  the  third  side  of  the  paper  are  accounts  relating  to  a  forge  or  iron- 
foundry,  to  March  1640,  crossed  out.  On  the  fourth  side  is  an  endorse- 
ment :  "  The  abstracte  of  my  Mothers  Rents,  164 1 — with  the  actfc  of  Receypts 
and  Payements  at  Mychellmas  :  1641  :  and  the  wholl  busines  of  her  Gloster 
Troubles,"  with  a  few  further  figures. 

*  Recti  Gainsford. 


PAPERS   FROM    THE   COURTFIELD    MUNIMENTS  153 

2.    SUMMONS   TO    BRING    THE    PRISONER    UP    FOR   TRIAL 

[On  an  &vo  sheet  of 'paper .] 
london.     Exa  Joh'em  Broughton  nup1'  de  London  Cl'ic'm  al's  Dom' 
Joh'em  Crowder  nup'  de  London  Cl'ic'm  r'  R'i  p°  altis  prdic'onibz  ind' 
Octav'  Pas'  [blank]  T.  vj  die  Novembr'  Anno  xvj  Car'  R's  vtP  die  lune 
prx'  ante  festum  s'ce  Scolastice  Virginis  Anno  xvj  Car'  R8 

p*  br'u'a  Hillar'  xvj  Car'  R's. 

ex*  pr  Offley. 
Translation. 
London.  Bring  up  John  Broughton,  late  of  London,  clerk,  otherwise  Sir 
John  Crowder,  late  of  London,  clerk,  to  answer  unto  the  King  for  high 
treasons,  in  the  Octave  of  Easter  Term ;  wherefor  he  was  on  the  6th  day  of 
November  in  the  16th  year  of  the  reign  of  King  Charles  outlawed.  Monday 
next  before  the  feast  of  Saint  Scholastica,  virgin  (Feb.  10)  in  the  16th  year 
of  King  Charles  (1641).     By  writs.     Hilary,  16  Car.  I.     Exd  by  Offley. 

3.    CASE   WITH    COUNSEL'S    OPINION 

[  Written  in  a  jine  hand  on  one  side  of  a  doubled  foolscap  sheet  of  paper. 
The  Opinion  is  written  on  the  left  margin^  in  a  rapid  legal  hand 
identical  ivith  that  of  the  first  document^ 

A  being  about  9  yeares  since  indicted  for  a  Preist  and  in  Hillary 
terme  last  was  outlaw'd  B  after  indictm*  but  before  outlawry  lodgeth  A 
not  knowing  him  to  be  a  preist. 

B  is  indicted  for  lodging  A  and  that  indictm*  is  found  by  ye  grand 
Jury  to  wch  indictm*  B  appeares. 

Quest,  whether  they  that  indict  B  for  lodging  of  A  must  not  prove 
B  lodged  A  after  A  was  outlaw'd  and  that  B  had  notice  thereof  by 
shewing  B  ye  record  or  whether  a  verball  notice  to  B  is  sufficient  notice 
to  bring  B  within  the  statute  or  not  or  if  C  being  the  prosequutor  desir- 
ing D  to  give  B  notice  thereof  wch  C  sweares  D  accordingly  did  and 
told  C  he  had  so  done  be  sufficient  notice  to  bring  B  within  ye  statute 
or  whither  D  must  not  personally  appeare  and  depose  he  gaue  B  notice 
of  the  outlawry  and  if  D  shall  whither  this  shalbe  sufficient  notice  for 
B  or  not. 

I  understand  that  the  outlawr'  was  in  another  Countie  then  where 

the  lodging  was  of  A 
To  prve  B  guiltie,  it  must  be  prved  that  hee  lodged  A  afr  the  out- 
lawrie  &  knowledg  of  the  outlawrie  it  being  in  anothr  Countie, 
vnlesse  it  be  prved  that  B  knew  him  to  be  a  priest  when  hee 
lodged  A 
But  I  thinke  notice  of  the  outlawr'  may  be  given  by  word  w^out 
shewinge  the  Record,  &  that  wilbe  a  sufficient  notice  to  bring  B 
w'hin  the  copas  of  the  stat'  if  hee  entvtaine  A  after 
And  if  D  at  the  request  of  C  did  give  notice  of  it  to  B  it  wilbe 
sufficient  to  bring  B  w%in  the  stat'  if  hee  entertained  A  aftr  that 
But  the  saying  of  D  to  C  that  hee  had  given  notice  of  it  to  B  is  not 
sufficient,  vnles  it  be  prved  vpon  oathe  that  hee  did  it 
26  Julij  1641.  Hen:  Rolle. 

[Endorsed  "  The  Case."] 


154  PAPERS    FROM   THE   COURTFIELD    MUNIMENTS 

4.    COUNSEL'S   INSTRUCTIONS    FOR    PLEADING   TO    INDICTMENT 

The  following  document  is  written  in  a  bold  roundhand  on  one  side  of 
four  folios  of  foolscap  paper.  Curiously,  it  appears  that  a  reprieve  had 
already  been  obtained,  before  the  trial,  but  was  not  to  be  produced  unless 
sentence  was  pronounced. 

The  text  of  the  document  contains  no  mention  of  the  accused's  name, 
nor  of  his  or  her  place  of  abode.  A  pencil  note  on  the  back,  written 
probably  at  the  end  of  the  18th  century,  is  as  follows  : — 

u  For  Dame  Catherine  Pembroke  *  Vaughan  of  Rhuardeane." 

(1.) — They  must  Proue  Broughton  to  be  a  Priest.  If  they  shall 
sweare  they  knowe  him  to  be  a  Priest,  quest:  Howe  :  If  they  answeare, 
he  is  outlawd,  and  soe  Conuicted,  and  shewe  not  the  Record,  it  is 
noethinge.  If  they  shewe  the  Recorde,  Answ:  I  hope  under  ffauor 
my  Lord,  they  must  nowe  viua  voce,  prooue  him  to  be  a  Priest ;  for 
his  nowe  Conuiction  is  only  for  wante  of  appearance,  and  not  by 
Euydence  at  tryall,  and  thus  anie  man  may  be  Conuicted,  and  yett  be 
noe  Priest ;  and  therefore  excepte  they  fully  prooue  him  nowe  to  be  a 
Prieste,  I  hope  it  shall  not  Preiudice  me. 

If  they  shall  sweare  they  fownde  his  orders  aboute  him,  Quest: 
wheather  those  they  call  his  orders  weare  not  in  Lattine,  if  yea,  if  they 
Can  Reade,  and  understand  Latine,  if  no,  howe  can  they  tell  those 
weare  his  orders.  If  they  Answeare  they  tooke  them  a  way,  and  an 
other  Read  them,  to  them,  and  by  that  they  knew  they  wear  his 
orders,  Answ:  that  he  that  Read  them,  must  vyua  voce,  testifie 
this,  or  ells  it  is  noethinge.  If  they  shall  answeare,  that  uppon 
his  Cuminge  to  seartch  for  him  in  my  house,  he  fownd  an  Alter, 
and  manie  Such  Lyke  Ceremonies,  which  they  beinge  acquaynted 
with  businesses  of  that  nature,  knewe  a  Priest  had  bin  excersiseinge 
his  ffunction  in  the  house,  Quest:  when  this  was,  Answeare  must 
be  made  a  boute,  tenn,  or  twelue,  years  since.  Answ:  they  ought 
to  haue  enformed  within,  3.  yeares  after  the  knoweledge  of 
the  offence,  or  ells  the  Information  is  voyde ;  And  that  this  is  noe- 
thinge; if  the  time  be  admitted  [fo.  2.]  excepte  they  Sweare,  Mass  was 
Sayed  in  the  house,  I  beinge  Presente,  and  that  by  Broughton  beinge 
a  Priest,  I  knoweinge  him  to  be  soe. 

(2.)— They  must  prooue  him  to  be  borne  in  the  Kings  dominions 
(Scottland  excepted)  for  this  act  was  made  27.  Elyzabeth,  and  then 
Scottland  was  not  in  her  dominions ;  and  soe  he  must  be  a  Priest 
borne  in  the  Kings  dominions.  It  is  not  suffitiente  to  sweare  this  at 
Large,  but  quest:  howe  they  knowe  this,  and  where  he  was,  and  when 
he  was  borne,  and  what  his  friends  weare. 

(3.) — They  must  Proue  him  to  be  at  Lybertie,  and  out  of  howld. 
And  soe  he  must  be  a  Priest  borne  in  the  Kings  dominions,  and  at 
Lybertie,  and  oute  of  howlde. 

If  they  Answ:  he  was  at  Large, 

Answ:  Soe  are  manie  Prysoners  that  enter  securetie,  for  theyr 
Cuminge  in  agayne,  and  soe  myghte  he. 

Admitt  these  3.  to  be  ffully  Proued,  as  that  they  must  all  be,  or  ells 

*  This  word  "  Pembroke"  is  interlineated  in  the  same  hand. 


PAPERS   FROM   THE   COURTFIELD    MUNIMENTS  1 55 

we  are  not  faultie  though  we  harboured  him ;  for  if  they  fayle  to  proue 
anie  of  them  fully,  they  Proue  noethinge. 

(4.) — They  must  Proue  that  I  wittingly,  and  willingly  Receaued  him, 
knoweinge  him  to  be  such  a  Priest ;  and  that  I  knewe  him  to  be  at 
Lybertie,  borne  in  the  Kings  dominions,  and  out  of  howlde  when  I  soe 
Receaued  him. 

Md  if  they  shall  Proue  I  knewe  him  to  be  a  Priest,  and  harboured 
him,  yett  if  they  doe  not  Proue  I  harburd  him,  knoweinge  him  to  be 
Such  a  Priest  as  aboaue,  they  Proue  noethinge  j  this  the  uery  words  of 
the  Statute  makes  good. 

[fo.  3.]  If  he  shall  Sweare  that  he  gaue  me  notice  that  he  was 
indicted  for  a  Priest ;  or  that  he  Sente  me  Such  word,  and  the  same 
parties  did  giue  me  notice,  and  tould  him  afterwards  they  had  soe 
done,  these  parties  must  Cum  in,  (viua  voce)  and  testefy  this  agaynst 
me,  otherwise  his  euidence  is  not  suffitiente. 

If  both  these  Shall  be  deposed. 

Question,  when  he,  or  they  gaue  me  this  notice,  for  if  it  weare 
anie  time  before  the  Sixth  of  ffebruary  Last,  we  are  Safe,  for  untill  he 
be  outlawd  he  is  not  Conuicted,  and  we  in  noe  daynger,  unless  notice 
be  after  outlawry. 

Quest:  farther  (this  beinge  a  mayne  poynte)  if  they  would  not  haue 
indicted  me  for  this  at  Last  Michellmas  Sessions,  and  wheather  they 
haue  nowe  anie  other  euidence  agaynst  me  then  they  had  then ;  if  they 
Confess  this  we  are  Cleere  (if  they  fall  uppon  matter  of  notice)  by  theyr 
owne  testimonie  for  it  Cleerly  appeares  Broughton  was  not  outlawd  untill 
the  sixth  of  ffebruary  Last,  beinge  a  Longe  time  after  they  would  haue 
Indicted  me. 

If  all  these  shall  be  deposed,  and  the  Jury  bringe  in  a  Billa  Vera, 

Then  bespeake  an  arrest  of  Judgemente  and  desire  that  the  Indict- 
ment and  the  Statute  may  be  Compared  togeather,  for  if  it  be  not  Layed 
thus  in  the  indictmente,  that  he  beinge  a  Priest,  borne  in  the  Kings 
dominions  and  at  Lybertie  and  out  of  houlde,  that  I  wittingly  and 
willingly  harboured  him,  knoweinge  him  to  be  such  a  Priest  as  afore- 
sayde  ;  these  or  anie  one  of  these  Lefte  out  are  suffitiente  to  quash  the 
Indictmente,  and  then  they  must  Indict  a  gayne,  and  all  things  [fo.  4.] 
must  be  agayne  agitated. 

If  none  of  these  hold,  after  Sentence  produce  the  Repriue,  and 
that  will  Saue  your  Lyfe,  and  doubtless  we  shall  afterwards 
procure  a  Pardon  to  haue  your  estat. 

1641. 

5.    THE   CHIEF   JUSTICE'S    REVERSAL   OF   HIS   WARRANT    FOR    ARREST 

[  Written  on  one  side  of  a  foolscap  sheet  of  paper, .] 
Angl'  ss.  Whereas  I  was  Informed  by  Henry  Garrett  gent'  That 
Jane  Vaughan  Widdowe  standinge  indicted  at  the  Assize  latly  houlden 
for  the  County  of  Glocester  for  felonye  did  absent  herselfe  and  could 
not  be  taken  Wherevppon  I  did  graunt  foorth  my  Warrant  to  apprhend 
the  said  Jane  Vaughan  and  bringe  her  before  me,  or  some  of  his 
matie8  justices  of  the  peace  to  be  prceeded  against  as  to  lawe  and 
Justice  should  apprteine ;  And  fforasmuch  as  Three  able  and  sufficient 


156  PAPERS   FROM   THE   COURTFIELD    MUNIMENTS 

Suretyes  were  added  before  me  and  entered  into  Recognizances  to  his 
matie8  vse  for  the  pvsonai  appearance  of  the  said  Jane  Vaughan  at  the 
next  Assizes  to  be  houlden  for  the  said  County  of  Glocester  then  and 
there  to  answer  to  the  prmisses  and  further  to  be  prceeded  against  as 
to  lawe  and  Justice  shall  apprteine.  These  are  therefore  to  will  & 
require  in  his  Maties  name  foorthwth  vppon  receipt  hereof  to  forbeare 
to  arrest  attack,  or  any  way  molest  the  said  Jane  Vaughan  by  vertue  of 
my  said  warrant  and  if  you  shall  apprhend  her  by  vertue  of  the  same 
that  then  yo11  foorthwth  sett  her  at  liberty  and  this  shall  be  yor  warrant 
Dated  at  my  Chamber  in  Seriants  Inne  ffleetestreete  London  viij°  die 
Iulij  Anno  D'ni  1642. 

John  Bramston. 
To   all    maio18    Shereiffs     Baileiffs\ 
Constables  Headborroughs  &  to  all  I 
other  his  Matie6  Officers  to  whom? 
these  shall  or  may  apprteine.  J 

[Seal  of  arms:    On  a  /ess   three   roses.     Endorsed:    The  Chiefe 
Justice  VVarrante  to  Recall  a  former  agaynst  my  Mother.] 

6.    MANDATE  TO  STAY  EXECUTION,   UNDER   THE  ROYAL  SIGN   MANUAL 

[Beautifully  written  in  Stuart  script  on  one  side  of  a  doubled  quarto 
sheet  of  paper.     The  Royal  sign  manual  at  the  head.] 
Charles  R 
Whereas  Joane  Vaughan,  of  Ruerdeane,  in  our  Countie  of  Glouc, 
widdow,  stands  Indicted  in  our  foresaid  Countie,  for  harboring  of  one 
John  Broughton  as  a  Preist,  These  are  therefore  to  will  and  Command 
you,  vpon  sight  hereof,  to  stay  Execution  vpon  the  said  Joane  Vaughan, 
(in  case  she  shalbe  found  guiltie  vpon  the  said  Indictment)  vntill  o1 
further  pleasure  be  declared;  Given  at  our  Pallace  of  Westm1*,  this 
31  day  of  July  in  the  Seaventeenth  yeare  of  our  Raigne. 

To  or  High  SherrirTe  for  our  Countie 
of  Glouc,  and  to  the  VndersherrirTe 
for  the  same  And  to  all  other  ol 
Officers  and  Ministers  whom  these 
prsents  may  Concerne. 

A  statement  of  account  of  rents  received,  dated  14  November  1641,  has 
the  following  memorandum  endorsed: — "The  actts  of  my  Receipts,  and 

Disbursements  of  my  Mothers  Rents  at  Mychelmas  1641 

The  Charge  of  her  Gloster  troubles,  was  payed  oute  of  her  Jewells  and  Plate. 
Pawned  by  her  selfe  for  it ;  excepte  what  of  it,  is  in  this  actt8." 

B 

LETTER    FROM    JOHN   JONES   OF   DINGASTOW    TO    HIS    BROTHER-IN-LAW, 
RICHARD    VAUGHAN    OF   COURTFIELD 

Good  Brother 

I  understand  that  there  is  a  Coffiission  coine  downe  from  the  Lord 

Keepr  &  Mv  Pyffie  to  the  SherirTe  &  Justic8  to  enquire  of  the  Lands  & 

goods  of  Recusants  wch  is  to  be  executed  vpon  tuesday  next  at  Carlion, 

the  warrants  are  already  come  out,  all  wch  I  thought  good  to  give  you 


PAPERS   FROM   THE   COURTFIELD    MUNIMENTS  1 57 

notice  of  that  you  may  indevour  to  prvent  the  yssue  thereof.  My  Lord 
Herbert  is  Come  home  &  two  of  his  servants  went  vp  yesterday 
againe,  my  brother  John  is  yet  in  London.  Yo1'  sister  hath  not  as  yet 
putt  of  her  sorry  prtner  but  I  hope  I  haue  prted  wfch  myne,  she  doth 
intend  to  bee  w*h  you  to  Chaindge  the  ayre  as  soone  as  she  shalbe  well 
able  &  desires  all  yo1  prayers  &  remembers  her  best  affecc'on  vnto 
you  all.  Soe  not  forgettinge  myne  to  you  &  to  my  good  sister  I  end  in 
haste. 

Yor  most  affecc'onat  brother  to  serve  you 
John  Jones. 
Ding'  70  Apr'  1642. 
post. 

Walter  Powell  brought  home  my  sweard  w^iout  the  schape  &  belt. 
I  desire  to  knowe  where  to  find  them  he  had  the  sweard  at  the  Cutlers. 
I  pray  send  mee  the  Coppyes  as  soone  as  yo"  Canne,  but  I  feare  yf 
yo11  should  send  them  by  the  boy  least  he  should  loose  them.  Yf  you 
send  them  by  the  boy  I  pray  seale  them  in  yr  letter  &  will  him  to  haue 
greate  Care  to  bringe  them  safe.  My  mother  desires  to  be  kindly 
remembred  to  you  both. 

[Endorsed]  To  my  good  Brother  Mr  Richard  Vaughan  at  Court- 
field  bee  these  d'd  w^  speede. 

[Seal  of  arms  in  red  wax :  Three  talbofs  heads  erased.  Esquire's 
helm  and  mantlings.     Crest :  A  stag  tri/>/>ant.] 

C 

Receipts 
April  21.  1684 
Receiued  by  the  order  and  for  the  use  of  Doct1  Smith  President  of 
the  English  Clergy  Colledge  of  Doway  the  Sume  of  forty  pounds  of 
good  English  money  of  Richard  Vaughan  of  Courtfield  in  the  County 
of  Monmouth  Esq1'  in  full  discharge  of  a  Legacy  giuen  by  his  Brother 
Mr  John  Vaughan  late  of  Courtfield  deceased  to  the  said  English  Coll. 
of  Dy  I  say  receiued  in  full  by  me  iol.  Philipp  Lewys.* 

July  14th  [i6]'84. 
I  ye  under  named  do  testifie  y*  m1  Richard  Vaughan  of  Court-field 
hath  paid  ye  some  of  03  li.  lertt  as  a  legacie  by  m1  John  Vaughan 
deceased  to  mr  Francis  Williams  t  and  his  friends,  ye  wch  sum  mv 
williams  haue  (to  my  knowledg)  receaued  as  wittness  my  hand  ye  day 
and  yeare  aboue  written.  Tho:  Hancock. 

D 

LETTER    FROM   JOHN    BRYDGES    IN    LONDON    TO    WILLIAM    VAUGHAN 
OF   COURTFIELD 

Queen  Ann  §*  Cavh  Sq1 

Nov1'  22nd  1813. 
Sir, 
Being  quite  unknown  to  you,  it  is  not  without  considerable  hesi- 
tation that  I  intrude  myself  upon  your  notice ;  but  I  am  impelled  to  it 

*  Vide  vol.  ii.  p.  303.  f  Vide  vol.  ii.  p.  301. 


158  PAPERS   FROM   THE   COURTFIELD    MUNIMENTS 

by  the  desire  of  a  venerable  Mother  now  living  with  me  &  which  will  I 
trust  plead  my  excuse  &  intitle  me  to  the  favor  of  your  Answer  upon 
the  information  I  have  to  require ;  &  especially  when  you  will  perceive 
by  the  following  sketch  of  pedigree  that  I  am  not  without  some  portion 
of  the  Blood  of  the  Vaughans  in  my  veins. 

William  Brydges  or  Bridge  =  Margfc  dau.  of  John  Vaughan 
Upleadon,  Bosbury  of  Courtfield,  co.  Monm., 

Hereford55  died  at  Mordiford  1655 

M.I. 

William  John  James  =  Ann  Acton      Thomas      Richard  &c.  &c. 

of  Tibberton    of  Prior's  Court  of  Colwall 


Edward  =  [Sarah]* 
of  Ross  I  (Catholic) 


Rev.  James  Brydges =  daiis  (Catholics) 

Joseph  Munn=  Mary  =  Richard  Eckley  esq.  (1st  husb.) 


John 


=  Mary  Elizabeth  dau.  h.  to  late  Capt.  Parker 

2nd  &  youngest  s.  mar.  1804.  of  the  Engineers  &  niece  of  Dr  Parker 

Assumed  surname  Brydges  late  rector  of  S1  James's 

1 812  by  Patent  (the  writer 
of  this  letter.) 

My  mother  imagines  that  her  grandmother,  the  wife  of  Edward 
Brydges,  must  have  been  also  one  of  your  family,  from  the  Circum- 
stances of  her  having  been  a  Catholic  and  having  brought  up  her 
daughters  (my  Mother's  Aunts)  in  the  same  Religion,  &  their  being  in 
habits  of  Intimacy  with  former  possessors  of  Courtfield,  whom  my 
Mother  in  early  life  visited  as  a  Relation.  My  Mother  is  now  in  her 
8 Ist  year.  Her  Father  died  when  she  was  quite  young,  &  she  has 
remained  in  ignorance  as  to  the  name  of  the  family  of  her  Grand- 
mother ;  but  she  thinks  it  not  unlikely  that  the  pedigrees,  Registers  or 
records,  belonging  to  Courtfield  &  its  family,  might  afford  some  light 
upon  the  Subject.  She  joins  with  me  therefore  in  requesting  the  favor 
of  you,  Sir,  to  inform  us,  if  you  have  observed  or  can  find  out  any 
thing  in  them  connected  with  the  object  of  her  enquiry.  Three  of  her 
Aunts,  whose  names  were  Gaynford,  Trotter,  &  E.  Brydges  (the  two 
former  widows)  resided,  she  says,  for  many  Years  near  Courtfield ;  but 
it  is  about  60  Years  since  the  last  of  them  died. 

I  had  the  honor  of  being  particularly  well  known  to  your  late 
Mother,  by  my  former  name  of  Munn,  about  fifteen  years  ago,  when 
I  was  with  Mr  Thomas  Phillips  of  Monmouth,  whose  family  are  my 
particular  friends — as  are  also  your  neighbours  the  Haselriggs,  Evans's, 
Underwoods,  Symonds,  Jones's,  Cliffords  &c.  &c.  In  short,  I  am 
well  known  to  all  the  respectable  families  in  Herefordshire,  most  of 

*  As  in  my  transcripts  from  the  Courtfield  muniments,  fo.  215. — J.H.M. 


PAPERS    FROM   THE   COURTFIELD    MUNIMENTS  159 

whom  M1S  Brydges  and  I  visited  in  a  tour  from  Cheltenham  to  Mon- 
mouth, thence  to  the  Black  Mountains,  the  Summer  before  last,  when 
we  brought  my  Mother  to  Town  with  us  ;  and  although  my  rank  in 
Society  is  not  higher  than  that  of  a  Solicitor,  my  Situation  and 
Acquaintance  in  Town  and  County  are  of  the  best  sort — which  I 
mention  merely  to  convince  you  of  your  being  addressed  by  a  respect- 
able person. 

Entreating  your  pardon  for  the  nature  and  length  of  this  Letter  & 
the  favor  of  a  reply 

I  rem11  Sir 

Your  Most  Obdfc  humble  Serv* 
John  Brydges. 


NO.  V 

ADDRESSES   OF  THE    STATIONS   IN    ENGLAND   SERVED 
BY   THE   JESUIT   FATHERS,    1727-1734 

CONTRIBUTED    BY    RICHARD   TRAPPRS-LOMAX 

During  the  times  of  persecution  no  secrets  were  kept  more  religiously 
than  the  addresses  of  the  missionary  priests.  Even  when  the  persecution 
of  blood  had  ceased,  something  of  the  old  reticence  remained,  and  it  is  very 
hard  to  tell  with  certainty  where  priests  used  to  live.  The  following  list  of 
the  addresses  of  the  Jesuit  missionaries  is  the  earliest  of  the  sort  with  which 
we  are  acquainted.  Most  of  these  fathers  were  chaplains  at  gentlemen's 
houses.  An  inspection  of  the  addresses  will  show  this  in  some  cases,  and 
also  that  many,  perhaps  more  than  might  have  been  expected,  were  living 
independently.  The  number  of  different  residences  is  also  remarkable. 
At  the  present  time,  owing  to  the  possibility  of  communities  living  together, 
the  Jesuits  have  thirty-seven  residences  for  priests  on  the  mission  in  Eng- 
land, less  than  a  quarter  of  what  they  had  during  the  period  covered  by 
the  lists. 

The  volume  from  which  the  list  is  taken  is  preserved  in  the  library  of  the 
Provincial  of  the  English  Jesuits.  Its  size  is  octavo ;  it  is  bound  in  white 
pigskin,  and  numbers  376  pages.  The  first  page  is  dated  "  i°  Jan:  An:  1727," 
evidently  the  date  at  which  the  book  was  commenced.  Brother  Henry 
Foley  has  used  it  freely  in  his  Records^  and  he  has  written  on  the  outside 
(not  quite  accurately),  "Province  Note  and  Address  Book,  Provincial's 
Book,  about  1724  to  1773."  In  reality  it  was  begun  in  1727,  and  the  last 
entry  is  July  27,  1772. 

Pages  13  to  20  are  for  the  addresses  of  the  Vicars  Apostolic  and  the 
extent  of  the  Vicariates.    The  addresses  are  worth  copying. 

"  To  Mr  Gifford,1  at  Stafford  house,2  on  ye  backside  of  S.  James's 
Park  London.  ■ 

[Midland  District.]  "To  John  Talbot  Stoner3  Esqr— (At  Hey- 
thrope4  by  Enstone  bagg  Oxfordshire  can.)  at  Stonor,  Nettlebed, 
Oxfordshire." 

"Mr  Hornyold5  (Joann :  Philumen  :  Coadjtr,  at  Longbirch,  Wol- 
verhampton, Staffordshire." 

1  Bishop  Bonaventure  Giffard,  son  of  Andrew  Giffard  of  the  Chillington  family, 
co.  Stafford ;  born  1642  ;  educated  at  Douai ;  consecrated  Bishop  of  Madura  1687  ; 
appointed  President  of  Magdalen  College,  Oxford,  1688 ;  died  12  March  1733. 

2  Not  the  present  Stafford  House,  but  the  residence  of  the  Stafford-Howards, 
Earls  of  Stafford,  situated  near  what  is  now  Stafford  Street,  between  Bond  Street  and 
Dover  Street. 

3  Son  of  John  Stonor,  of  Stonor,  by  Lady  Mary  Talbot ;  educated  at  Douai ; 
consecrated  Bishop  of  Thespise  17 16,  and  appointed  V.A.  of  the  Midland  District 
in  succession  to  Bishop  George  Witham.     He  died  1756,  aged  77. 

4  A  seat  of  the  Talbots,  Earls  of  Shrewsbury. 

6  Second  son  of  John  Hornyold  of  Blackmore,  co.  Worcester,  by  Mary  Mostyn  ; 
became  chaplain  to  Mrs.  Giffard  {nee  Thimelby)  at  Longbirch  in  1739;  consecrated 
Bishop  of  Philomelia  1752,  as  coadjutor  to  Bishop  Stonor;  died  1778,  aged  72. 
Longbirch  continued  to  be  the  residence  of  the  Vicars  Apostolic  of  the  Midland 
District  till  1804. 


STATIONS   SERVED    BY   THE   JESUIT   FATHERS,    1727-1734  l6l 

[Western  District.]  "To  Mrs  [sic]  Powell  at  Perthier1  near  Mon- 
mouth (to  MrB  [sic]  Harris  at  ye  Pitt  near  Lhenarth  can.)" 

[Northern  District.]  "  To  Mr  (Williams  2  at  Ralph  Brandling's  3  Esqr 
at  Middleton  near  Leeds,  Yorkshire  can.)  Eaton4  at  Wycliff5  near 
Greeta  bridge,  Yorkshire." 

"  To  Fr:  Petre  6  Esqre  (at  Wycliff  near  Richmond  p.  Greatabridge, 
Yorkshire,  can.)  at  Shoalley  near  [Blackburn]  Lancashire." 

Then  come  (p.  25)  a  List  of  "Provincials"  (1719-1770);  pp.  27-50, 
"  Colleges"  at  home  and  abroad,  with  Rectors,  Superiors,  &c. ;  pp.  53-104, 
"  Names  of  ours  with  their  directions  by  the  following  numbers"  ;  pp.  109- 
138,  "Directions" — this  is  now  copied  in  full.  Pp.  139  to  end  contain  lists 
of  admissions,  deaths,  dismissals,  dates  of  vows,  &c. — many  of  the  pages 
being  blank.  The  obits  seem  to  have  been  strictly  kept  up  to  date  ;  the 
other  lists  are  less  regular.  The  addresses  do  not  seem  to  have  been 
entered  at  all  after  1734. 

(1)  When  the  original  address  has  been  cancelled,  it  has  been  printed  here 
in  brackets,  and  the  note  can.  has  been  added  after  it.  (2)  When  a  new 
name  or  address  is  inserted  it  is  printed  in  brackets,  and  the  note  ins.  has 
been  added  after  it.  (3)  By  referring  to  pp.  53-104  it  has  been  possible  to 
ascertain  a  little  more  about  the  persons  who  lived  at  the  various  addresses, 
especially  their  Christian  names:  these  are  inserted  in  square  brackets. 
(4)  The  names  in  italics  are  derived  from  the  lists  in  other  parts  of  the  book. 

It  may  be  as  well  to  give  a  table  of  the  "  Districts"  or  "Colleges." 

(1)  The  London  District,  or  "  College  of  St.  Ignatius,"  comprised  London, 
Middlesex,  Surrey,  Kent,  Berkshire,  and  Hertfordshire. 

(2)  The  Suffolk  District,  or  "  College  of  the  Holy  Apostles,"  comprised 
Suffolk,  Cambridgeshire,  Norfolk,  and  Essex. 

(3)  The  Lancashire  District,  or  "College  of  St.  Aloysius,"  comprised 
Lancashire,  Cheshire,  Westmoreland. 

(4)  The  Staffordshire  District,  or  "  College  of  St.  Chad,"  comprised  that 
county. 

(5)  The  Derbyshire  District,  or  "  College  of  the  Immaculate  Conception 
of  the  Blessed  Virgin  Mary,"  comprised  Derbyshire,  Leicestershire,  Not- 
tinghamshire, and  Rutland. 

(6)  The  Wales  and  Hereford  District,  or  "  College  of  St.  Francis  Xavier," 
comprised  Wales,  Monmouthshire,  Herefordshire,  Gloucestershire,  and 
Somersetshire.  In  1666/7  North  Wales  became  a  district  by  itself,  "The 
Residence  of  St.  Winefrid." 

1  Perthir,  the  seat  of  the  Powells,  and  later  of  the  Lorymers,  to  whom  it  passed 
by  marriage,  is  in  the  Parish  of  Rockfield,  about  three  miles  from  Monmouth.  It 
was  given  up  as  a  mission  in  1818,  and  merged  in  that  of  Monmouth.  See  C.R.S. 
vol.  i.  p.  271. 

*  A  native  of  Monmouthshire  ;  joined  the  Dominicans  at  Bornheim  in  1664 ; 
consecrated  Bishop  of  Tiberiopolis  1725,  and  appointed  to  succeed  Bishop  Withant 
as  V.A.  of  the  Northern  District.     He  died  1740,  aged  73. 

3  A  native  of  Morpeth,  who  acquired  Middleton  by  his  marriage  with  Helen, 
dau.  and  heiress  of  John  Legh.     (Waugh,  The  Leeds  Mission,  1904.) 

4  The  alias  of  Bishop  Edward  Dicconson,  son  of  Hugh  Dicconson,  of  Wright  - 
ington,  by  Agnes  Kirby.  He  was  appointed  V.A.  of  the  Northern  District  1740,  and 
was  consecrated  Bishop  of  Malla  1741.     He  died  1752,  aged  82. 

6  The  seat  of  the  Tunstalls,  and  inherited  by  them  from  the  family  of  the  same 
name. 

6  Third  son  of  Joseph  Petre,  of  Fithlers,  co.  Essex,  by  Cath.  Andrews ;  conse- 
crated Bishop  of  Amoria  1750;  and  succeeded  Bishop  Dicconson  as  V.A.  of  the 
Northern  District  1752;  died  at  Showley,  near  Blackburn,  1775,  aged  84,  and  was 
buried  at  Stydd,  near  Richester. 

XIII.  L 


l62  ADDRESSES   OF   THE    STATIONS   IN    ENGLAND 

(7)  The  Yorkshire  District,  "Residence  of  St.  Michael,"  comprised  the 
three  Ridings  of  that  county. 

(8)  The  Durham  District,  or  "  College  of  St.  John  the  Evangelist,"  com- 
prised Durham,  Cumberland,  and  Northumberland. 

(9)  The  Lincolnshire  District,  or  "  College  of  St.  Hugh,"  consisted  of 
that  county. 

(10)  The  Worcestershire  District,  or  "  Residence  of  St.  George,"  con- 
sisted of  Warwickshire  and  Worcestershire. 

(11)  The  Oxfordshire  District,  or  "  Residence  of  St.  Mary,"  comprised 
Oxfordshire,  Bucks,  Bedfordshire,  and  Northamptonshire. 

(12)  The  Hampshire  District,  or  "Residence  of  St.  Thomas  of  Canter- 
bury," comprised  Hants,  Wilts,  Sussex,  and  Dorset. 

(13)  The  Devon  District,  or  "Residence  of  St.  Stanislaus,"  consisted  of 
Devon  and  Cornwall. 

Since  the  completion  of  the  Annotation  of  the  Addresses  of  1 727-1 734, 
later  addresses  for  1767,  1768,  1769,  and  1772  have  been  found  in  different 
lists,  bound  together  in  the  volume  at  Farm  Street,  entitled  Catahgi  varii 
Provindce  Anglicr,  pp.621,  &c.  References  to  them  have  therefore  been 
added. 

From  these  it  will  be  seen  that  a  large  proportion  of  the  missions  served 
by  Jesuits  in  1727,  &c,  as  given  in  the  earlier  lists,  were  also  served  by  them 
in  1767  and  onwards,  while  others  had  dropped  out.  On  the  other  hand, 
there  are  numerous  new  missions  served  by  Jesuits  in  1767  and  onwards 
which  were  not  so  served  before,  or  which  at  any  rate  do  not  appear  in  the 
earlier  lists.  Unless  otherwise  stated,  the  dates  at  which  they  occur  are 
1767  to  1772.  Among  these  were  Alnwick ;  Aldenham,  co.  Salop  ;  Brook 
Green,  Hammersmith  ;  Bury  St.  Edmunds  ;  Bodney,  co.  Suffolk,  the  seat 
of  the  Tasburgs  ;  Barlborough,  co.  Derby;  Brandsby,  co.  York  (1767); 
Berrington,  near  Berwick  ;  Besley,  near  Henley-in-Arden  ;  Britwell,  co. 
Oxon,  the  seat  of  the  Simeons  and  Welds ;  Beckford,  co.  Gloucester 
(1769,  1772) ;  Chiswick  (1767) ;  Crondon  Park,  co.  Essex  (1767-9) ;  Cowley 
hill,  near  Prescot,  Lanes  ;  Croxteth,  Lancashire  (1772) ;  Carleton,  co.  York, 
the  seat  of  the  Stapletons ;  Dam  House,  Pontefract  (1767-9) ;  Dorchester, 
co.  Dorset  (1 769-1 772) ;  Everingham,  co.  York,  the  seat  of  the  Constables 
(1767-9) ;  Exeter ;  Formby,  co.  Lane.  ;  Fazackerley,  near  Liverpool 
(1767-8) ;  Furness,  co.  Lane. ;  Husbands  Bosworth,  co.  Leicester  (1767-9)  ; 
Hanley  Castle,  co.  Worcester ;  Hammersmith ;  Holderness,  co.  York 
(1769-72)  ;  Hardwick,  co.  Durham  (1769-72) ;  Houghton  (the  Langdale's), 
co.  York  (1769-72);  Irnham  and  Kingerby,  co.  Lincoln;  Kilvington,  co. 
York  ;  Linstead  Lodge  (Lord  Teynham's),  co.  Kent ;  Long  Horsley,  co. 
Northumberland  ;  Leigh,  co.  Somerset ;  Lanherne,  co.  Cornwall ;  London, 
at  Lord  Molyneux'(i772),and  at  Lord  Widdrington's(i 767-1 772),  and  others; 
Lydiate,  co.  Lanes  (1769-72);  Moor  hall,  near  Ormskirk  ;  Mosley  (the 
Whitgreave's),  co.  Stafford ;  Odstock  (the  Webbe's),  near  Salisbury  (1767-9) ; 
Pontop,  co.  Durham ;  Pursall  hall,  near  Bromsgrove  ;  Puddington,  co. 
Chester;  Rockley  or  Rookley,  co.  Hants  (1767-9);  Red  Hill,  co.  Surrey  ; 
Rixton,  co.  Lanes  (1769-72)  ;  Swinburne  Castle,  near  Hexham  ;  Stella,  co. 
Northumberland ;  Canterbury,  St.  Stephens ;  and  St.  Stephen's  Green 
(1768-9) ;  Sawston,  co.  Cambs  ;  Sarnesfield,  co.  Hereford  ;  Shepton-Mallet, 
Somerset ;  Slate  Delph,  near  Chorley ;  Southworth,  near  Warrington ; 
Salisbury  (Hon.  Thos.  Arundell's);  Stubbs  Walden,  co.  York;  Sizergh,  co. 
Westmoreland  (1768-72);  Stockeld  Park  (1768-9);  Twickenham;  Thorn- 
don,  co.  Essex ;  Thelton  or  Thelveton,  co.  Norfolk  (1769-72) ;  Tasburgh,  co. 
Norfolk  (1768) ;  Wooburn  Farm,  co.  Surrey  ;  Wealside,  co.  Essex  (1769-72) ; 
Winchester;  Wappenbury,  near  Coventry  (1769-72);  Warkworth,  co. 
Oxon  ;  Mr.  Wright's,  Essex  (1768)  ;  Walthamstow  (1769-72) ;  Winsley,  co. 
Hereford  (1769-1772) ;  Yarm,  co.  York  (1768-1772).  R.  T.-L. 


SERVED   BY   THE   JESUIT   FATHERS,    1727-1734  1 63 

i.  A  Monsr,  Mons1'  de  Fosse,  chez  Monsr  Clinquemaille,  Marchand 
a  An  vers. 

2.  A  Mons1*,  Monsr  [Rob]  Beeston1  chez  Monsr  Pigault,  riie 
des  Capuchines  a  Calais. 

3.  A  Monsr,  Mons1'  Richards,2  chez  Mons1'  Pigault,  riie  des 
Capucines  a  Calais  (Ric.  Plowden).3 

4.  A  Monsr,  Mons1'  Beaugrand,4  sur  Steendam,  a  Gand  (Tho: 
Pierson,5  Ric.  Vaughan  6). 

5.  A.  Monsr,  Monsr  Haye,7  vis  a  vis  la  fontaine,  riie  S.  Antoine, 
a  Paris  (Ch.  Kennet*  Jh.  JVol/hal9). 

6.  A  Mons1',  Monsr  Clinquemaille,  Marchand  a  Anvers  (Percy 
Plowden™  Ralph  Sheldon?*  Tho.  Smith 12). 

7.  Hilton.13     Levin:   Brown™  Jac:    Cooh,15  Jh:    Owens,16  Jac: 

1  He  entered  the  Society  1680;  was  Missioner  at  Worcester  1702-3;  was  Pro- 
vincial 1721-24,  and  died  at  St.  Omer's  1732,  aged  72.     Foley,  vii.  47. 

2  This  is  probably  the  alias  of  Richard  Plowden. 

3  He  entered  the  Society  1679 ;  was  Rector  of  Liege  1704,  of  St.  Omer's  1708, 
and  in  the  same  year  of  the  Eng.  Coll.,  Rome.  He  became  Provincial  1715 ;  again 
Rector  of  Liege,  1719;  Rector  of  St.  Omer's,  1725.  He  died  at  Watten  (the 
Novitiate),  1729,  aged  66.     Foley,  vii.  104. 

4  The  only  Beaugrand  mentioned  by  Foley  (vii.  43)  is  stated  to  have  died  in 
1716. 

6  He  entered  the  Soc.  1667  ;  was  sent  to  the  Durham  District  1675.  He  served 
that  mission  until  the  Revolution,  when  the  mission  and  college  were  destroyed. 
He  died  1732,  aged  86,  probably  at  Durham.     Foley,  vii.  578. 

8  He  entered  the  Soc.  1690.  In  1725  he  was  declared  Rector  of  Ghent,  and 
died  1727,  aged  53.     Foley,  vii.  795. 

7  Probably  Fr.  Henry  Hays,  who  entered  the  Soc.  1698.  He  served  the  missions 
of  Lincolnshire  for  some  years,  and  became  Rector  of  St.  Hugh's  College,  residing  at 
Driby,  near  Horncastle.  He  became  Rector  of  Ghent  in  1731— later  he  returned  to 
England,  and  was  at  Scotney  Castle,  co.  Kent,  and  died  1739,  aged  63.  Foley, 
vii.  348. 

8  He  entered  the  Soc.  168 1.  He  was  a  Professor  at  Liege  for  some  years.  In 
1704  and  1 7 14  he  was  Procurator  of  the  Province  in  London.  He  died  at  Paris 
1728,  aged  68.     Foley,  vii.  413. 

9  He  entered  the  Soc.  1702,  and  died  at  Ghent  1742,  aged  60.     Foley,  vii. 

8,  55- 

10  He  entered  the  Soc.  1693.  In  1731  he  was  appointed  Rector  of  the  Eng. 
Coll.,  Rome,  and  in  1739  of  St.  Omer's.  He  died  at  Watten  1745,  aged  73-  Foley, 
vii.  604. 

11  He  entered  the  Soc.  1700.  In  1728  he  was  Minister  at  Liege  Coll.,  and  in 
1730  Procurator  for  the  Province  at  Antwerp.  He  died  1 741,  aged  60.  Foley, 
vii.  706. 

12  He  entered  the  .Soc.  1691  ;  in  1708  he  was  a  Missioner  in  Hampshire.  In  1709 
he  was  in  Durham,  and  in  1711  in  London.  He  died  in  England  1721,  aged  47. 
Foley,  vii.  721. 

13  i.e.  the  English  College,  Rome,  for  which  Hilton  was  a  common  alias  or 
code  name.  It  had  been  founded  by  Pope  Gregory  XIII.  in  1578  for  the  educa- 
tion of  the  English  Secular  Clergy.  The  management  of  the  College  was  soon 
afterwards  entrusted  to  the  Jesuits,  under  whom  it  continued  till  their  suppression 
in  1773. 

14  He  entered  the  Soc.  1698.  From  1723  to  1731  he  was  Rector  of  the  Eng. 
Coll.,  Rome,  and  then  became  Rector  of  Watten  and  Master  of  Novices.  In  1733 
he  was  declared  Provincial,  and  in  1737  Rector  of  Liege.  He  died  at  St.  Omer's 
(after  the  expulsion  of  the  S.J.)  in  1764,  aged  94.  At  one  time  he  was  Missioner  at 
Ladyholt,  co.  Sussex,  a  seat  of  the  Carylls.     Foley,  vii.  94. 

15  Foley,  vii.  162. 

16  Foley,  vii.  560. 


164  ADDRESSES    OF    THE    STATIONS   IN   ENGLAND 

Atkinson,1  Ch:  Baker,2  Anth:  Donere?  Jac:  Gaderne?  Percy 
Plowden?  Phil:  Rogers?  Lew:  Sabran?  Franc:  Sechli?  Fran: 
Southern?  Jos:  Stevens,10  Jh:  Tempest,11  Jh:  Williams1'2' 

8.  Fosses.13  Felix  Bartlet1*  Wm:  Beaumont,™  Joan: 16  and  Jos: 
Beaumont11  Geo:  Bell,18  Jh:  Bevan,19  Jac.  Blaire20  Ch:  Booth,21  Ric: 

1  He  entered  the  Soc.  1708,  and  having  spent  thirty  years  as  English  Peni- 
tentiary at  Loreto  and  Rome,  died  in  1763,  aged  76.     Foley,  vii.  22. 

2  Alias  David  Lewis.  Entered  the  Soc.  1691.  From  1728  onwards  he  was 
English  Penitentiary  at  Rome,  and  died  before  1741.     Foley,  vii.  458. 

3  Foley,  vii.  205. 

4  Spelt  Gadene  in  Foley,  vii.  282. 

6  Foley,  vii.  604  and  iv.  554. 

•  He  entered  the  Soc.  17 17.  In  1730  he  was  Minister  of  the  English  College, 
Rome.  He  died  a  Missioner  in  the  Yorkshire  District,  1761,  aged  70.  Foley, 
vii.  666. 

7  He  was  educated  at  St.  Omer's,  and  entered  the  Soc.  1670.  In  1685  he  was 
appointed  Chaplain  to  K.  James  II.  In  1708  he  was  declared  Provincial  of  the  Eng. 
Province,  and  in  17 12  he  was  appointed  Rector  of  St.  Omer's.  He  died  there  in 
1732,  aged  80.     Foley,  vii.  676. 

8  Foley,  vii.  694. 

•  He  entered  the  Soc.  1720,  and  died  at  St.  Omer's  1754,  aged  68.  Foley, 
vii.  724.  10  Foley,  vii.  738. 

11  Of  the  two  Frs.  John  Tempest  mentioned  by  Foley  this  is  probably  the 
younger,  though  distinguished  by  Foley  as  No.  I.  He  entered  the  Soc.  17 12. 
Some  time  after  1730  he  was  Chaplain  to  the  8th  Lord  Petre  at  Ingatestone  and 
Thorndon,  where  he  died  1737,  aged  43.  The  other  Fr.  John  Tempest  (alias 
Hardesty)  entered  the  Soc.  1699.  He  served  the  mission  at  Liverpool  for  many 
years,  and  was  there  in  1718.  He  began  to  serve  Lydiate  from  Liverpool  in  1722, 
and  built  the  first  chapel  in  Liverpool  in  1736.  After  this  he  served  in  Hampshire, 
and  in  1741  was  at  Lord  Aston's  at  Tixall,  co.  Stafford.  He  died  1752,  aged  71. 
Foley,  vii.  765  and  766. 

12  He  entered  the  Soc.  17 12.  In  1728  he  was  Minister  of  the  Eng.  Coll.,  Rome. 
In  1730  he  was  in  the  "Residence"  of  St.  Winefred  (N.  Wales),  and  died  at  Holy- 
well 1 76 1,  aged  70.     Foley,  vii.  846. 

13  According  to  a  pencil  note  in  Foley's  hand  in  the  MS.  this  is  an  alias  for  Liege, 
where  the  Society  had  a  College  for  Philosophy  and  Theology.  It  had  been  founded 
in  1614  by  Fr.  John  Gerard.  In  1773  the  school  for  boys  at  Bruges  (previously  at 
St.  Omer's)  was  transferred  to  Liege,  and  through  the  good  offices  of  the  Prince  Bishop 
was  placed  under  the  charge  of  the  ex-Jesuits,  who  continued  it  under  the  name  of 
"  The  Academy "  as  a  Seminary  for  English  laymen  and  ecclesiastics.  In  1794  it 
was  transferred  to  Stonyhurst. 

14  He  entered  the  Soc.  in  1726;  served  the  missions  at  Hanley  Castle  and 
Worcester,  where  he  died  in  1777,  aged  69.     Foley,  vii.  37. 

15  He  entered  the  Soc.  in  17 18,  and  for  many  years  was  Missioner  in  Devon  and 
Cornwall,  and  at  Bonham  and  Lulworth  in  Dorsetshire ;  also  at  Cowley  Hill,  near 
St.  Helens,  Lancashire,  where  he  died  in  1764,  aged  85.     Foley,  vii.  44. 

16  He  entered  the  Soc.  1732,  and  was  also  knewn  as  Poyntz  and  Price.  For 
many  years  he  was  Procurator  of  the  Province  in  London.  He  died  at  Liege  in 
I789t  aged  80.     Foley,  vii.  629. 

17  He  entered  the  Soc.  in  1723,  and  was  for  many  years  Superior  of  the  Lanca- 
shire District.  He  was  Missioner  at  Cowley  Hill,  St.  Helens,  and  died  there  in 
1773i  aged  71.     Foley,  vii.  44. 

18  Foley,  vii.  48.  19  Foley,  vii.  56. 

20  He  entered  the  Soc.  in  1713  ;  was  sent  to  the  English  Mission  1744,  and  served 
at  Crondon  Park,  Essex.     He  died  at  Liege  1759,  aged  66.     Foley,  vii.  63. 

21  He  entered  the  Soc.  1724,  and  after  serving  as  Missioner  in  England,  became 
English  Penitentiary  at  Loreto.  He  became  Rector  of  the  Eng.  Coll.,  Rome,  1762/3. 
From  1769  to  1779  he  was  Chaplain  at  Burton,  near  Petworth,  the  seat  of  the 
Gorings.  In  1779  he  went  to  Wardour,  the  seat  of  the  Arundells,  where  he  died 
J797»  aged  90.    Foley,  vii.  72. 


SERVED    BY   THE   JESUIT    FATHERS,    1727-1734  165 

Boucher?  W"1  Brewster?1  Herm:  Carpentier?  Phil:  Carteret^ 
Jh:  Cerfb  Fran:  Clifton*  Jac:  Clifton?  Tho:  Clifton*  Nic: 
Clough?  Hen:  Corby™  Jh:  Barell,11  Jac:  Darel^  Jac:  Denet.™ 
Dinsdale  Jos:u  (erased)  T/io:  Darel?5  Jh:  Edisford?*  Jac:  Farrar?1 
Nic:  Fitzgerald?9,  Jh:  Fleetwood?*  W'n  Frankland20  (erased),  Edw: 
Galaway,21  Jac:-  and  Rob.    Gex™  Jh:  Harding™   Tho:  Hunter ,25 

1  He  entered  the  Soc.  in  1713 ;  for  many  years  was  Chaplain  to  the  Chichesters 
at  Arlington,  where  he  died  1 760,  aged  64.  He  was  Superior  of  the  Devon  District 
in  1741-     Foley,  vii.  74. 

2  He  entered  the  Soc.  1724;  served  in  the  Worcestershire  District  for  some 
time.  In  1746  he  was  Missioner  in  London,  and  afterwards  at  Norwich,  where  he 
died  1758,  aged  58.     Foley,  vii.  82. 

■  He  entered  the  Soc.  1721  ;  served  the  missions  of  Bryn,  Liverpool  (1746),  and 
Stapehill,  and  died  at  Bury  St.  Edmunds  1770,  aged  67.     Foley,  vii.  116. 

4  He  entered  the  Soc.  1709;  served  the  mission  at  Oxburgh  ;  in  1746  became 
Rector  of  Ghent,  and  in  1751  was  appointed  Provincial.  He  died  in  London  1756, 
aged  63.     Foley,  vii.  1 20. 

5  Foley,  vii.  124. 

6  He  entered  the  Soc.  1719.  He  served  on  the  mission  in  Hampshire  (1743), 
and  afterwards  at  Stone,  and  Swinnerton,  co.  Stafford  (1750 — Kirk),  and  later  at 
Lincoln.     He  died  at  Dunkirk  in  1757,  aged  55.     Foley,  vii.  139. 

7  He  entered  the  Soc.  1719 ;  served  the  mission  at  Crosby  for  some  years,  and 
died  there  1750,  aged  52.     Foley,  vii.  140. 

8  He  entered  the  Soc.  17 18.  He  served  as  Missioner  in  the  Durham  District, 
but  the  date  given  by  Foley  (1706-7)  is  impossible.  In  1754  he  was  at  the  English 
Coll.,  Rome.     He  died  in  Shropshire  1777,  aged  77.     Foley,  vii.  141. 

9  He  is  probably  the  Nicholas  Fourniers,  alias  or  vere  Clough,  mentioned  in 
Foley,  vii.  278,  who  entered  the  Soc.  1725;  served  the  mission  of  Scarisbrick, 
Lancashire,  until  about  1778,  and  died  at  Lydiate  1779,  aged  71. 

10  He  entered  the  Soc.  1722;  was  professed  at  York  1740  ;  declared  Provincial 
1756  ;  became  Rector  of  the  London  District  1762,  and  he  died  1765,  aged  65.  Foley, 
vii.  168. 

11  He  entered  the  Soc.  1722;  was  professed  in  London  1740;  was  Rector  of 
St.  Omer's  1752  to  1759.  He  came  over  to  England  after  the  removal  of  St.  Omer's 
College  to  Bruges  (1762),  and  served  the  mission  of  Wealside,  in  the  Suffolk  District. 
He  died  in  London  1768,  aged  63.     Foley,  vii.  194. 

12  He  entered  the  Society  1723.  He  served  the  mission  of  Calehill,  co.  Kent,  the 
seat  of  the  Darells,  for  many  years,  and  died  at  Liege  1785,  aged  78.     Foley,  vii.  194. 

,3  He  entered  the  Soc.  1720;  was  declared  Provincial  1762,  and  died  at  Bury 
St.  Edmunds  1789,  aged  87.     Foley,  vii.  200. 

14  Foley,  vii.  204.  15  Foley,  vii.  195. 

16  This  is  probably  the  second  of  the  three  Fathers  John  Edisford.    Foley,  vii.  221 . 

17  He  entered  the  Soc.  1725.  He  was  sent  to  the  Maryland  Mission  1733,  but 
returning  to  England  1746,  served  the  missions  of  Biddleston  (co.  Northumberland), 
the  seat  of  the  Selbys  ;  Durham  ;  Giffard's  Hall,  co.  Suffolk,  the  seat  of  the  Mannocks  ; 
and  Hooton,  co.  Chester,  the  seat  of  the  Stanleys,  where  he  died  1763,  aged  56. 
Foley,  vii.  245. 

18  This  is  the  second  of  the  two  Fathers  Nicholas  Fitzgerald.     Foley,  vii.  257. 

19  He  entered  the  Soc.  1723  ;  was  Missioner  at  Broughton  Hall,  co.  York,  the  seat 
of  the  Tempests,  for  some  time,  and  was  sent  to  the  Maryland  Mission  in  1733, 
where  he  died  the  following  year,  aged  31.     Foley,  vii.  262. 

20  Not  mentioned  in  Foley. 

21  He  entered  the  Soc.  1724 ;  was  Missioner  in  the  London  District  and  at  Norwich, 
where  he  died  1799,  aged  93.     Foley,  vii.  288. 

22  Foley,  vii.  298.  23  Foley,  vii.  298. 

24  Also  called  John  Harding.  He  entered  the  Soc.  1722  ;  was  sent  to  the  Mary- 
land Mission  1732,  and  died  at  Philadelphia  1772,  aged  71.     Foley,  vii.  ^S3- 

26  Alias  Weston.  He  entered  the  Soc.  1723.  In  1741  he  was  in  the  Yorkshire 
District,  and  in  1754  in  the  Worcester  District ;  in  1763-4  he  was  in  Lancashire,  and 
died  at  Scholes,  near  Prescot,  1786,  aged  81.     Foley,  vii.  385. 


1 66  ADDRESSES   OF   THE   STATIONS   IN    ENGLAND 

Jos:  Le  Jeune?  Jh:  Johnson?  Mich  Josaar?  W"1  Kings  ley? 
Tho:  Kingsley?  Lew:  Laurs?  Ric:  Leckonby?  Tho:  Leckonby? 
Am:  Livers?  W"1  Lower?0  Christ:11  and  Jac:  Maire?2  Rob: 
Mannock?3  Pet:  Matthews?*  Erard  Mo/ien?5  Jh:  Bap:  Molien,™ 
Ric:  Moleyneux,  Junr?1  Fran:  More?9,  Melch:  Morphy?9  Fran: 
Morris?0  Hen:  Neat?1  Fran:  Oakley?2  Jh:  Paine?9  Tho:2*  and  Ric: 
Parker?*    Wm  Pendril?6  Jim\    Rob:   Petre?'1    Tho:   Phillip?*  Jh: 

1  Foley,  vii.  403. 

2  Alias  Jackson.  He  entered  the  Soc.  1719.  In  1746  he  was  Superior  of  the 
Oxford  District.  He  also  served  in  Lancashire,  and  was  at  Croston  (seat  of  the 
Traffords)  in  1752.     He  died  the  same  year,  aged  54.     Foley,  vii.  396. 

3  Foley,  vii.  410. 

*  He  entered  the  Soc.  1718;  was  professed  at  Ellingham  1731,  where  he  was 
Missioner  for  several  years.     He  died  there  1734,  aged  38.     Foley,  vii.  420. 

5  He  entered  the  Soc.  1723;  he  was  serving  the  mission  at  Bromley  Hall,  in 
the  Suffolk  District,  in  1752;  in  1761  he  was  at  Slindon,  in  Sussex ;  in  1764  he  was 
in  London,  where  he  died  1781,  aged  76.     Foley,  vii.  420. 

6  Foley,  vii.  438. 

7  He  entered  the  Soc.  1720.  He  served  various  missions  in  Lancashire,  and 
died  at  Croston  1771,  aged  72.     Foley,  vii.  445. 

8  Probably  the  elder  of  the  two  Fathers  Thos.  Leckonby  mentioned  in  Foley, 
vii.  445.  He  entered  the  Soc.  1721  ;  was  sent  to  the  Maryland  Mission  in  1733,  and 
died  there  1734,  aged  32. 

*  He  entered  the  Soc.  1724;  returned  to  Maryland  (of  which  he  was  a  native) 
on  completion  of  his  studies,  and  died  there  1767,  aged  62.     Foley,  vii.  463. 

10  Foley,  vii.  467. 

11  He  entered  the  Soc.  1715  ;  was  declared  Rector  of  the  Eng.  Coll.,  Rome,  1744, 
and  held  that  office  till  1750.     He  died  at  Ghent  1767,  aged  70.     Foley,  vii.  479. 

12  He  entered  the  Soc.  in  1726;  served  missions  in  the  Suffolk  District,  at 
Oxburgh,  &c,  and  died  1746,  aged  41.     Foley,  vii.  480. 

13  Alias,  or  rather  vere,  Robert  Petre.  He  entered  the  Soc.  1686-87.  In  1708 
he  was  Missioner  at  Callaly,  co.  Northumberland  (a  seat  of  the  Claverings),  and  in 
1 715  in  the  London  District ;  in  1733/4  he  was  in  Lancashire ;  in  1737/8  in  Lincolnshire. 
Later  he  was  Missioner  at  Eccleston,  in  Lancashire,  and  died  at  Dunkenhalgh  (a  seat 
of  the  Petres)  1766,  aged  61.     Foley,  vii.  594. 

14  He  entered  the  Soc.  171 1  ;  in  1748  he  became  Missioner  at  Brynn  (a  seat  of  the 
Gerards),  and  died  at  Garswood  1752,  aged  60.     Foley,  vii.  493. 

15  Foley,  vii.  513.  16  Foley,  vii.  513. 

17  He  entered  the  Soc.  1722.  He  served  missions  in  the  Hampshire  District,  and 
died  at  Marnhull  (the  seat  of  the  Husseys),  co.  Dorset,  in  1769,  aged  69.  Foley, 
vii.  514. 

18  Foley,  vii.  518.  19  Foley,  vii.  534.  20  Not  in  Foley. 

21  He  entered  the  Soc.  1724  ;  he  was  in  Maryland  1741,  and  died  in  Pennsylvania 
1748,  aged  46.     Foley,  vii.  537. 

22  He  entered  the  Soc.  1715.  In  and  after  1744  he  was  Superior  of  the  Yorkshire 
District,  and  died  1755,  aged  61.     Foley,  vii.  556. 

23  Foley,  vii.  564. 

24  Alias  Culcheth.  He  entered  the  Soc.  1674.  He  was  three  times  Rector  of 
Liege  College  ;  was  Provincial  from  1712  to  1715  ;  and  was  Superior  of  the  London 
District  about  1724.     He  died  1730,  aged  76.     Foley,  vii.  188. 

25  Foley,  vii.  569. 

28  Alias  William  Howe.  He  entered  the  Soc.  1722  ;  died  at  Rome  1746,  aged  45. 
Foley,  vii.  581  and  376. 

27  Alias  Mannock.  He  entered  the  Soc.  1686/7.  *n  1706  he  was  Minister  of  the 
Eng.  Coll.,  Rome;  in  1708  he  was  Missionary  in  the  Lancashire  District,  and  in 
1 71 5  in  the  London  District.     He  died  at  Liege  1727,  aged  61.     Foley,  vii.  594. 

28  He  entered  the  Soc.  1726,  but  left  in  1733.  He  was  Chaplain  to  Mr.  Berkeley 
at  Spetchley.  He  was  re-admitted  to  the  Soc.  1768,  and  died  1774,  aged  66. 
Foley,  vii.  596. 


SERVED    BY   THE   JESUIT    FATHERS,    1727-1734  167 

Porter,1  Sebas.  Redford?  Ch:  Rods?  Phil:  Rogers?  Jh:  Robinson? 
Alex:  Russell?  Edw:  Saltmarsh?  Fran:  Scarisbrick?  Jh:  Scuda- 
more?  Ign:  Sheffield?0  Nat:  Sheldon?1  Ralph  Sheldon?1  Walt: 
Shelley?*  Pet:  Shepherd?*  Ediv:  Slaughter?*  Pet:  Sluyper?*  Hen: 
Smith?1  Edw:  Southcot?*  Tho:  Stevens™  Fran:  Stone?0  Ch:  Tempest?1 

1  Alias  Corbusier.  He  entered  the  Soc.  1726.  He  died  at  Scotney  Castle, 
Sussex,  a  seat  of  the  Darells,  1765,  aged  58.     Foley,  vii.  616  and  167. 

2  Alias  or  vere  Exton.  He  entered  the  Soc.  1719.  About  1730  he  was  Chaplain 
to  Mr.  Wright,  at  Kelvedon,  Essex;  in  1733  he  was  Missioner  at  Powis  Castle;  in 
1754  he  was  serving  in  Lancashire,  and  later  at  Wealside,  Essex,  where  he  died 
17°3,  aged  62.     Foley,  vii.  640. 

3  Alias  Rousse.  He  entered  the  Soc.  17 10.  In  1743  he  was  appointed  Rector 
of  Liege,  and  died  there  1764,  aged  74.     Foley,  vii.  664  and  673. 

4  He  entered  the  Soc.  171 7.  In  1730  he  was  Minister  of  the  Eng.  Coll.,  Rome. 
He  was  Missionary  in  the  Yorkshire  District,  where  he  died  1761,  aged  70.  Foley, 
vii.  666. 

5  He  was  also  known  as  Gasine  or  Gazain.  He  entered  the  Soc.  1718.  In  1732 
he  was  a  Missionary  in  the  Lancashire  District,  and  died  at  Preston  1742,  aged  43. 
Foley,  vii.  658. 

8  He  belonged  to  the  Scotch  Province.  He  entered  the  Soc.  1691  (Scotch 
Province).  He  was  in  England  in  1729  with  the  "Marchioness  de  Seafort";  he 
died  at  Liege  1742,  aged  73.     Foley,  vii.  675. 

7  Alias  Lewis.  He  entered  the  Soc.  1678  ;  he  served  the  missions  in  Yorkshire, 
London,  North  Wales,  and  Suffolk,  and  died  at  Watten  1737,  aged  79.  Foley, 
vii.  682. 

8  Alias  Neville.  He  entered  the  Soc.  1722.  In  1740  he  was  Missioner  in 
Hereford  and  South  Wales.  In  1759  he  was  declared  Rector  of  St.  Omer,  and  in 
1764  of  Liege,  where  he  died  1789,  aged  87.     Foley,  vii.  689. 

•  He  entered  the  Soc.  17 18.  In  1746  he  became  Rector  of  the  Hereford  and 
South  Wales  District.  He  served  at  Bristol  from  1744  or  1745  until  his  death  there, 
1778,  aged  82.     Foley,  vii.  694. 

10  Alias  William  Anderson.  He  entered  the  Soc.  172 1.  In  1741  he  was  a 
Missioner  in  the  Suffolk  District,  and  later  in  Lincolnshire.  He  died  at  Kingerby, 
the  seat  of  the  Youngs,  1764,  aged  75.     Foley,  vii.  704  and  9. 

11  Alias  Nath.  Elliot.  He  entered  the  Soc.  1723.  In  1748  he  was  declared 
Rector  of  St.  Omer's  ;  in  1756  of  the  Eng.  Coll.,  Rome  ;  in  1766  of  the  Greater  Coll., 
Bruges  (removed  from  St.  Omer,  1762),  and  soon  after  was  appointed  Provincial. 
He  died  at  Holt,  Leicestershire,  1780,  aged  75.     Foley,  vii.  706  and  223. 

12  Alias  Elliot.  He  entered  the  Soc.  1700.  In  1728  he  was  Minister  at  Liege, 
and  in  1730  Procurator  for  the  Province  at  Antwerp.  He  died  at  Liege  1741,  aged 
60.     Foley,  vii.  706. 

13  He  entered  the  Soc.  1717  ;  was  Professor  of  Philosophy  at  Liege  in  1735  5  about 
1743  he  was  Procurator  for  the  Province  at  Antwerp,  where  he  died  1750,  aged  49. 
Foley,  vii.  707. 

14  Foley,  vii.  708. 

15  He  entered  the  Soc.  1673.  ^n  I7°I  ne  was  declared  Rector  of  Liege,  being 
subsequently  Rector  of  St.  Omer  and  Ghent.  He  served  the  mission  of  Swaffham, 
Norfolk,  in  1682,  and  died  at  Liege  1729,  aged  74.     Foley,  vii.  715. 

16  Foley,  vii.  716. 

17  He  entered  the  Soc.  1724;  served  the  mission  at  Dutton  Hall,  near  Preston 
on  the  Hill,  Cheshire,  and  died  near  there  1756,  aged  57.     Foley,  vii.  717. 

18  He  entered  the  Soc.  1719.  In  1741,  and  later,  he  was  Missioner  in  the 
London  District ;  in  1762  he  became  Chaplain  at  Woburn  Farm,  Chertsey,  where  he 
died  1780,  aged  83.     Foley,  vii.  724. 

19  Foley,  vii.  738. 

20  Foley,  vii.  741. 

21  He  entered  the  Soc.  1724.  In  1741  he  was  Missioner  in  the  Hereford  and 
South  Wales  District ;  for  some  time  he  was  Chaplain  to  the  Jones'  of  Clytha.  In 
1763  he  was  in  the  London  District,  and  died  at  Chiswick  1768,  aged  69.  Foley, 
vii.  765. 


l68  ADDRESSES    OF   THE    STATIONS   IN   ENGLAND 

Nic:  Thiry?  Rob:  Turner?  Tho:  Wakeman?  Chris:  Walmesley? 
Jh:  Walsh,5  Tho:  Waterton?  Tho:  Wesby?  Tho:  Whitgrave? 
Jh:  Williams?  Geo:  Williamson™ Jos:  Wright?1  W"1  Ward.12 

9.  Blandyke 13  (near  Sl  Omer,  ins.),  Bern:  Baker,14  Etc:  Boucher?5 
Am:  Bouillon?*  Wm  Brinkhurst?1  Christ:  Burton?*  Mich:  Dane?9 
Edw:    Carteret?*  Edm:    Clarkson?1  Fran:   Clifton?2   Tho:    Clifton?* 

1  Or  Thierry.     Foley,  vii.  768. 

2  He  entered  the  Soc.  1701.  He  served  the  missions  at  Hooton,  co.  Chester 
(seat  of  the  Stanleys),  and  Callaly,  co.  Northumberland  (seat  of  the  Claverings). 
He  died  in  Sussex  1734,  aged  57.     Foley,  vii.  789. 

3  Alias  Jeffreys.     P^oley,  vii.  801  and  398. 

4  He  entered  the  Soc.  1708;  was  Professor  at  Liege  for  some  years,  and  died 
there  1734,  aged  50.     Foley,  vii.  805. 

6  He  entered  the  Soc.  1720.  He  served  the  mission  of  Gateshead  from  about 
1734,  and  Newcastle  from  about  1746.  He  was  for  some  years  Superior  of  the 
Durham  District.     He  died  1773,  aged  73.     Foley,  vii.  811. 

6  He  entered  the  Soc.  1721  ;  was  Missioner  in  the  Durham  District  in  1741,  and 
died  there  1766,  aged  65.     Foley,  vii.  820. 

7  Or  Westby,  alias  Green.  He  entered  the  Soc.  1724 ;  served  in  the  Hampshire 
District  for  some  years,  and  died  there  1735/6,  aged  32.     Foley,  vii.  829. 

8  Entered  the  Soc.  1718.  In  1724  he  was  serving  the  mission  at  Salden,  co. 
Bucks,  and  later  at  Oxford;  in  1754  he  was  in  the  Staffordshire  District,  where  he 
died  1757,  aged  61.     Foley,  vii.  839. 

9  He  is  the  elder  of  the  two  Frs.  John  Williams.  He  entered  the  Soc.  17 12. 
In  1730  he  was  Missioner  in  North  Wales.  He  died  at  Holywell  1761,  aged  70. 
Foley,  vii.  846. 

10  He  entered  the  Soc.  17 18,  and  died  in  London  1 741,  aged  46.      Foley,  vii.  848. 

11  He  entered  the  Soc.  1720;  served  the  mission  at  Wardour  1720-30.  In  1753 
he  was  at  Norwich.     He  died  at  Ghent  1760,  aged  62.     Foley,  vii.  869. 

12  Not  in  Foley. 

13  Blandyke  is  a  village  a  few  miles  from  St.  Omer,  where  the  College  of  St.  Omer 
had  a  country  villa  for  recreation  and  change  of  air.  Here  it  probably  stands  for 
St.  Omer  itself.  The  College  of  St.  Omer's  was  founded  by  Fr.  Robert  Parsons  in 
1593  ;  in  1762  it  was  seized  by  the  French  Government.  The  inmates  were  trans- 
ferred to  Bruges,  and  the  College  was  handed  over  to  the  English  secular  clergy. 

14  He  entered  the  Soc.  1721  ;  after  teaching  in  the  colleges  in  the  Low  Countries 
he  became  Rector  of  the  London  District  some  years  before  1766,  and  died  in  1772 
or  1773.     Foley,  vii.  28. 

15  He  entered  the  Soc.  171 3  ;  was  for  some  time  Prefect  of  Studies  at  St.  Omer's, 
and  for  many  years  chaplain  to  the  Chichesters  of  Arlington,  co.  Devon,  where  he 
died  1760,  aged  64.     Foley,  vii.  74.  16  Foley,  vii.  74. 

17  Alias  or  vere  Meara.  He  entered  the  Soc.  1697/8.  In  1707-10  he  was  Mis- 
sioner at  Worcester ;  in  1724  and  after  at  York ;  he  died  at  St.  Omer's  1728,  aged 
51.     Foley,  vii.  500. 

18  He  entered  the  Soc.  1693  ;  was  sent  to  the  English  mission  17 10  ;  served  the 
missions  of  Formby  and  Lytham  for  many  years.  He  died  at  Watten  1744,  aged  73. 
Foley,  vii.  104. 

19  Or  Dean.  He  entered  the  Soc.  17 14.  He  was  for  many  years  a  Missioner  in 
the  Suffolk  and  Hampshire  Districts;  he  died  at  Watten  1760,  aged  64.  Foley, 
vii.  198. 

20  Alias  Fairfax.  He  entered  the  Soc.  1709;  was  Missioner  at  Stonyhurst  1724, 
and  died  probably  at  Coughton,  co.  Warwick,  the  seat  of  the  Throckmortons,  1753. 
He  served  in  Lincolnshire  in  1747  and  later.     Foley,  vii.  119. 

21  Foley,  vii.  135. 

22  He  entered  the  Soc.  1719.  He  was  serving  in  the  Hampshire  District  in  1743, 
and  later  at  Stone  and  Swinnerton,  co.  Stafford  ;  after  that  at  Lincoln ;  he  died  1757, 
aged  55.     Foley,  vii.  1 39- 

23  He  entered  the  Soc.  17 18.  In  1706-7  he  was  Missioner  in  the  Durham 
District;  in  1754  he  was  at  the  Eng.  Coll.,  Rome.  Afterwards  he  was  Rector  and 
Minister  at  Ghent.     He  died  in  Shropshire  1777,  aged  "jj.     Foley,  vii.  141. 


-J 


SERVED   BY   THE   JESUIT   FATHERS,    1727-1734  169 

Wm  Conway?  Jh:  Corby*  Arm  Corneille?  Nic:  Le  Fevre*  Jac: 
Gex,5  Jac:  Gooden*  Hen:  Hayes,1  Ric:  Hyde*  Ign:  /ones,9  Ign: 
Kingsley™  Phil:  Leridan,11  Pet:  Louis,1*  Vine:  Phillips,1*  Mich: 
Pool,1*"  Tho:  Pulton1*  Tho:  Ryther16  Fran:  Scarisbrick11  Fran: 
Southern,1*  Rob:  Stanfield1*  Fran:  Stone;-0  Nicol:  Sanderson,*1  Jh: 
Tichburne,  Junr,22  Mich:  Tichburn™  Tho:  Turberville2i  Chris: 
Walmesley25  Ch:  Wills™  Geo:  Williamson21  Cm  Winter2* 

1  Alias  or  vere  Wright.  Entered  the  Soc.  1702  ;  died  at  St.  Omer's  1741,  aged 
59.  Foley,  vii.  162. 

2  Foley,  vii.  168.  3  Foley,  vii.  170. 

4  Foley,  vii.  247.  5  Foley,  vii.  298. 

6  Entered  the  Soc.  1689  ;  in  1722  he  was  declared  Rector  of  St.  Omer's ;  1728 
Rector  of  Ghent ;  he  died  1730,  aged  60.     Foley,  vii.  307. 

7  He  entered  the  Soc.  1698.  Having  served  missions  in  Lincolnshire  for  some 
years,  he  became  Rector  of  that  district,  living  at  Driby,  near  Horncastle ;  became 
Rector  of  Ghent,  1731.  Returning  to  England,  he  was  stationed  at  Scotney  Castle, 
co.  Kent,  and  died  (probably  there)  I739>  aged  63.     Foley,  vii.  348. 

8  He  entered  the  Soc.  1706.  In  1728  he  was  Rector  of  St.  Omers,  and  again 
in  1742.     He  died  at  Canterbury  1744,  aged  57.     Foley,  vii.  390. 

•  Not  in  Foley,  though  possibly  he  is  the  Fr.  John  Jones  who  entered  the  Society 
1709;  served  the  mission  at  Frickley,  near  Doncaster,  and  died  in  Yorkshire  1748, 
aged  65.     Foley,  vii.  407. 

10  Alias  George  Clayton.  He  entered  the  Soc.  1720.  In  1751  he  was  a  Mis- 
sioner  in  the  Suffolk  District;  in  1754  in  the  Hampshire  District;  in  1773  in  the 
London  District,  where  he  died  1787,  aged  86.     Foley,  vii.  420. 

11  Not  in  Foley.  12  Foley,  vii.  459. 

13  He  entered  the  Soc.  17 17.  Served  missions  in  the  Districts  of  London  and 
Suffolk  (Gifford's  Hall)  ;  in  1741  was  in  Maryland  ;  in  1754  he  was  in  the  Oxford 
District,  and  died  at  Ghent  1760,  aged  62.     Foley,  vii.  597. 

14  He  entered  the  Soc.  1718;  was  Prefect  and  Minister  at  St.  Omer's  in  1728. 
In  1 741  he  was  Missioner  in  the  Hampshire  District,  being  for  some  time  stationed 
at  Wardour  Castle.     He  died  1748,  aged  61.     Foley,  vii.  013. 

15  He  entered  the  Soc.  1716.  In  1730  he  was  Prefect  at  St.  Omer's;  in  1738 
he  was  sent  to  Maryland,  where  he  died  1749,  aged  51.     Foley,  vii.  625. 

16  He  entered  the  Soc.  1683.  He  was  Missioner  in  the  Hampshire  District  for 
many  years,  and  died  at  St.  Omer's  1733,  aged  70.     Foley,  vii.  676. 

17  Alias  Neville.  He  entered  the  Soc.  1722.  In  1740  he  was  Missioner  in  the 
Hereford  and  South  Wales  District,  and  in  1744  he  was  Spiritual  Director  at  the 
Eng.  Coll.,  Rome.  In  1752  he  was  at  Ghent,  and  in  1755  at  Antwerp.  In  1759 
he  was  declared  Rector  of  St.  Omer's.  In  1 764  he  became  Rector  of  Liege.  In 
1773  he  was  at  Bruges,  and  died  at  Liege  1789,  aged  87.     Foley,  vii.  689. 

18  Foley,  vii.  724. 

19  He  entered  the  Soc.  1687.  He  was  Missioner  in  the  London  District  for 
several  years.  He  served  in  the  Yorkshire  District  1706  and  following  years,  171 1 
and  following  years,  1732/3  and  following  years.  In  1708  he  was  in  the  Derby- 
shire District.     He  died  at  Watten  175 1,  aged  83.     Foley,  vii.  730. 

20  Foley,  vii.  741 .  21  Foley,  vii.  684. 

22  He  entered  the  Soc.  17 12  ;  was  sent  to  the  English  Mission  1745,  and  served 
about  two  years  in  the  Yorkshire  District ;  then  in  the  Hampshire  District  at 
Southend,  Soberton.     He  died  in  London  1772,  aged  78.     Foley,  vii.  779. 

23  Entered  the  Soc.  17 12  ;  was  Missioner  at  Hooton,  Cheshire  (Sir  R.  Stanley's), 
for  several  years  ;  he  was  then  stationed  at  Liverpool ;  then  at  Brynn  and  Ashton 
in  Lancashire  ;  where  he  died  1751,  aged  59.     Foley,  vii.  780. 

24  Foley,  vii.  785. 

25  He  entered  the  Soc.  1708.  He  was  a  Professor  at  Liege  for  several  years,  and 
died  there  1734,  aged  50.     Foley,  vii.  805. 

26  Not  in  Foley. 

27  He  entered  the  Soc.  1718.  He  was  mostly  employed  abroad;  he  died  in 
London  (where  he  was  Procurator  of  St.  Omer's  Coll.)  1741,  aged  46.  Foley, 
vii.  848.  28  Foley,  vii.  852. 


I70  ADDRESSES    OF   THE   STATIONS   IN   ENGLAND 

10.  The  Hill.1  Felix  Bartlet,  Wm  Boucher;1  Mic:  Clough?  W'n 
Dagbertf  Jos.  Di?isdale  (erased),  Jh:  Dupont,b  Edw:  Edisford?  Geo: 
Eyston1  Jac:  Farrer,  Herm:  Fountaine,8  Jos:  S.  George?  Tho: 
Havers^  Mart:  Incoming1  Wm  Jacobsen,12  Jac:  Jansens,13  Franc: 
J  emmet,14  Lew:  Laurs,  Jac:  Marin, lb  Alb:  Maxwell,™  Jac:  Merrier,11 
IV"1  Newton™  Tho.  Phillips,  Fie:  Plowden,  Th:  Porter,19  Edw: 
Paynes,20  Tho:  Ryther,21  Abrah:  Schilver,22  Pet:  Shepherd23 Jh:  Smith- 
son24  Tho:  Stevens,  Jac:  Thornton,2*  Rob:  Turner 2Q  Tho:  Whit- 
grave,21  Ch:  Wilson,2*  Jh:  Wilson,29  Jh:  Wolfal. 

1  i.e.  Watten,  the  Novitiate.  The  Novitiate  of  the  English  Province  was  founded 
at  Louvain  in  1606  by  Fr.  Parsons.  In  16 14  it  was  removed  to  Liege,  and  in 
1624-5  to  Watten.     In  1767/8  this  was  transferred  to  Ghent. 

2  He  entered  the  Soc.  1700;  was  for  some  time  Professor  at  Liege;  afterwards 
Missioner  at  Mr.  Bartlett's,  Hillend,  co.  Worcester ;  at  Aston,  co.  Stafford,  and  at 
Lulworth.     He  died  1757,  aged  75.     Foley,  vii.  74. 

3  There  is  no  Mich.  Clough  in  Foley,  and  probably  Nicholas  is  intended ;  for 
whom  see  note  above  under  No.  8,  "  Fosses  "  (Liege). 

4  Not  in  Foley. 

5  Not  in  Foley. 

6  Foley,  vii.  221. 

7  He  entered  the  Soc.  1688/9  '■>  does  not  appear  to  have  ever  served  as  missioner 
in  England,  and  died  at  Ghent  in  1745,  age(l  74-     Foley,  vii.  238. 

8  Foley,  vii.  269. 

9  A  lias  Joseph  Roge  and  Parry.  He  entered  the  Soc.  1700  or  1704.  In  1728 
he  was  at  Ghent ;  in  1730  at  Liege,  where  he  died  1763,  aged  83  or  85.  Foley, 
vii.  664. 

10  He  entered  the  Soc.  1688.  In  1701  he  was  Prefect  at  St.  Omer's ;  in  1705 
he  was  in  Maryland  ;  he  died  at  Watten  1737,  aged  69.     Foley,  vii.  345. 

u  Not  in  Foley. 

12  He  entered  the  Soc.  1714.  He  was  at  Burton,  near  Lincoln,  in  1732,  and 
died  at  Watten  1764,  aged  52.     Foley,  vii.  397. 

13  Foley,  vii.  398. 

14  Foley,  vii.  398. 

15  Foley,  vii.  488. 

16  Or  Herbert.  He  entered  the  Soc.  1675  ;  in  1705  was  chaplain  to  King  James 
at  St.  Germains.  In  1723  he  was  at  Watten,  where  he  died  1729,  aged  74.  Foley, 
vii.  494.  17  Not  in  Foley. 

18  He  is  probably  the  senior  of  the  two  William  Newtons  mentioned  in  Foley, 
vii.  546. 

19  Alias  Corbusier.  He  entered  the  Soc.  1726,  and  died  at  Scotney,  co.  Sussex, 
the  seat  of  the  Darells,  1765,  aged  58.     Foley,  vii.  167. 

20  Alias  Nixon.  He  entered  the  Soc.  1694.  In  1704/5  he  was  sent  to  the 
Hampshire  District,  and  taught  at  Twyford  or  Stapehill.  In  1706  he  was  sent  to 
the  Yorkshire  District  ;  in  1707/8  he  was  in  Lancashire  (Crosby).  He  died  at 
Watten  1728,  aged  53.     Foley,  vii.  547. 

21  Foley,  vii.  676. 

22  The  name  is  spelt  Schilders.     Foley,  vii.  690. 
83  Foley,  vii.  708. 

24  Foley,  vii.  722. 

25  He  entered  the  Soc.  1700,  and  died  at  Ghent  1752,  aged  72.     Foley,  vii. 

773- 

26  He  entered  the  Soc.  1701  ;  served  the  missions  of  Hooton,  co.  Chester, 
Callaly,  co.  Northumberland,  and  died  in  Sussex  I734>  aged  57.     Foley,  vii.  789. 

27  He  entered  the  Soc.  1718.  In  1724  he  was  serving  the  mission  at  Salden,  co. 
Bucks,  and  afterwards  at  Oxford  ;  in  1754  he  was  in  the  Staffordshire  District,  where 
he  died  1757,  aged  61.     Foley,  vii.  839. 

28  He  entered  the  Soc.  1680.  In  1693  ne  was  at  Spetchley,  co.  Worcester,  and 
in  1694  in  the  Suffolk  District.     He  died  at  Watten  1730,  aged  68.     Foley,  vii.  850. 

H  Not  in  Foley. 


SERVED   BY   THE   JESUIT   FATHERS,    1727-1734  171 

11.  Stendam.1      David  La  Battel  Jh:  Bennett  Hiron:   Bertie* 
Wm  Conway  1  Jos:  S.  George,  Rob:  Gex,  Hen:  Guillim,5  Ch:  Hage- 

manf  Jac:  Merrier,  Ch:  Middleton,1  Delph:  Plotho,8  Geo:  Pulton? 
Ralph  Sheldon,  Walt:  Shelley,  Jos:  Simons,10  Edw:  Southcot,  Adrian11 
6-  Jh:  Stevens111  Jh:  Tichburn1*  Sen1',  Leon  Verdcheval,1*  Phil- 
Wright.1* 

12.  Vallad[olid].16     W"  Blakeston.17 

13.  Maryl[an]d.18    Jh:  Bennet,  Burley,19  Pet:  Alwood,20  Jac:  Case,21 
Pet:    Davis,22   Jos:    Delvaux,23    Fran:    Floyd,24   Wm    Gerard,26   Jos: 

1  Probably  an  alias  for  Ghent,  where  was  the  "  House  of  the  third  Probation  " 
(a  sort  of  second  noviceship,  after  a  period  of  teaching  and  study).  It  was  founded 
in  1621,  largely  by  the  generosity  of  Anne  (Dacre),  Countess  of  Arundel.  In  1767/8 
the  novitiate  at  Watten  was  transferred  to  Ghent. 

2  Foley,  vii.  427. 

3  Alias  or  vere  Gosling.  He  entered  the  Society  1710.  He  was  Missioner  in 
Maryland  about  1 724-28.  He  was  at  Lytham,  co.  Lancaster  (the  seat  of  the 
Cliftons),  in  1750,  and  died  at  Highfield,  near  Wigan,  the  following  year,  aged  59. 
Foley,  vii.  50. 

4  He  entered  the  Soc.  1693,  antl  died  at  Ghent  in  1739,  aged  66.  Foley, 
vii.  55- 

5  Alias  Territ  or  Terwhit.  He  entered  the  Soc.  1692,  and  died  at  Ghent  1742, 
aged  70.     Foley,  vii.  767. 

6  Foley,  vii.  326.       , 

7  He  entered  the  Soc.  1687,  and  died  at  Ghent  1743,  aged  83.     Foley,  vii.  507. 

8  Entered  the  Soc.  1687,  and  died  at  Ghent  1747,  aged  78.     Foley,  vii.  600. 

9  He  entered  the  Soc.  1707,  and  died  at  Watten  1739,  aged  50.  Foley,  vii. 
621. 

10  Or  Simeon.     Foley,  vii.  712. 

11  Foley,  vii.  717. 

12  Foley,  vii.  738. 

13  He  entered  the  Soc.  1700/1.  In  1714  he  was  at  Liege;  in  1716  a  Mis- 
sioner in  the  Hampshire  District.  He  died  at  Ghent  1748,  aged  69.  He  became 
5th  Baronet  in  1743.     Foley,  vii.  779. 

14  Foley,  vii.  797. 

16  He  entered  the  Soc.  1684  ;  in  1695  he  was  chaplain  to  James  Stansford,  of 
Clayton-le-dale,  co.  Lancaster;  in  1701  he  was  Missioner  in  the  Worcester  District  ; 
in  1704  in  North  Wales  ;  in  1734  he  became  Rector  of  Ghent.  He  died  at  Watten 
1737,  aged  72.     Foley,  vii.  871. 

16  The  College  of  St.  Alban  at  Valladolid  was  founded  by  Fr.  Robt.  Parsons  in 
1588-9.  When  the  S.J.  was  expelled  from  Spain  in  1767,  the  College  was  trans- 
ferred to  the  English  secular  clergy. 

17  He  entered  the  Soc.  (already  a  priest)  in  1723.  In  1730  he  was  Minister  at 
Valladolid.     In  1768  he  died  at  Bruges,  aged  70.     Foley,  vii.  6^. 

18  The  mission  in  Maryland  began  in  1633  with  3  priests ;  in  1696  there  were  4 
priests,  I  teacher,  and  4  lay  brothers;  in  1740  there  were  13  "Socii."  Foley,  vii. 
clviii.,  &c. 

19  Foley,  vii.  103. 

20  He  entered  the  Soc.  1703/4  ;  was  sent  to  the  Maryland  Mission  171 1,  and  died 
Superior  of  it  1734,  aged  52.     Foley,  vii.  23. 

21  He  entered  the  Soc.  1 71 3  ;  in  1723  he  was  Procurator  at  Ghent ;  was  Mis- 
sioner in  Maryland,  where  he  died  1731,  aged  40.     Foley,  vii.  122. 

22  He  entered  the  Soc.  171 1  ;  sent  to  Maryland  1724,  after  serving  in  the  York- 
shire District;  returning  to  Europe  in  1733/4*  he  was  sent  to  the  Hampshire  District. 
In  1740  he  was  in  Yorkshire,  and  died  at  Watten  1759,  aged  67.     Foley,  vii.  197. 

23  Foley,  vii.  200. 

24  He  entered  the  Soc.  1710;  was  sent  to  Maryland  in  1724,  and  died  there  1729, 
aged  37-     Foley,  vii.  267. 

25  He  entered  the  Soc.  1707.  He  was  in  Maryland  in  1730,  and  died  there  1731, 
aged  44.     Foley,  vii.  297. 


172  ADDRESSES    OF   THE   STATIONS    IN    ENGLAND 

Greaton?  Tho:  Holland?  Owen  Kingsley?  Vine:  Phillips^  Jac:  Quin? 
Rich:  Reynolds?  Ric:  Thomas?  Geo:  Thorold?  Jh:  Wesley?  Hen. 
Whetenhall?  Jac:  IVhitgrave.10 

14.  Paris.     Rob:  Constable?1  Ant:  Donerei  Tho:  Stevens. 

15.  Antwerp.     Tho:  Smith. 

16.  London.      Hen:    Clark?2   Tho:    Caxton?3   Edm:    Gage?*  Jh: 
Lallart?h    Tho:   Law  son  ?%  Jos:   Marshal?1    Sebas:   JVeedham?8   Tho: 

1  He  entered  the  Soc.  1708  ;  was  sent  to  Maryland,  became  Superior  in  Pennsyl- 
vania in  I747>  and  died  in  Maryland  1753,  aged  74.     Foley,  vii.  313. 

2  The  only  Thomas  Holland  in  Foley  who  fits  in  with  these  dates  is  Fr.  Thos. 
Holland  vere  Fccleston.  Foley,  however,  says  nothing  as  to  his  having  served  in 
Maryland.  Fr.  Eccleston  {alias  Holland)  entered  the  Soc.  1677,  was  professed  of 
the  four  vows  in  England,  171 2.  He  was  employed  in  the  Yorkshire  District,  and 
at  Lord  Petre's  at  Ingatestone.  He  was  Rector  of  St.  Omer's  1731-37.  He  died 
1743,  aged  84.     Foley,  vii.  220. 

3  He  entered  the  Soc.  1716;  after  serving  in  Maryland  for  some  years  he  re- 
turned to  England,  and  was  stationed  at  Belgrave,  near  Leicester  (Mr.  Byerley's),  in 
1727  and  following  years.     He  died  at  Watten  1739,  aged  42.     Foley,  vii.  420. 

4  He  entered  the  Soc.  1717 ;  was  sent  to  Maryland  before  1727,  where  he  died 
J745»  aged  47.     Foley,  vii.  636. 

6  Foley,  vii.  645. 

6  He  entered  the  Soc.  1704;  was  sent  to  Maryland  171 1,  and  returning  to 
England  was  Missioner  in  Lancashire,  where  he  died  1735,  aged  50.  Foley, 
vii.  769. 

7  He  entered  the  Soc.  1691 ;  was  sent  to  Maryland  1700/1  ;  became  Superior  of 
that  Mission  1725;  he  died  there  1742,  aged  69.  He  had  previously  to  going  to 
Maryland  been  Chaplain  at  the  Micklegate  Convent,  York.     Foley,  vii.  774. 

8  Or  Westley.  He  entered  the  Soc.  1706 ;  was  sent  to  Maryland,  and  died  there 
between  1741  and  1746.     Foley,  vii.  829. 

9  He  entered  the  Soc.  171 3  ;  was  sent  to  Maryland  1724  ;  returned  to  England 
about  1736/7,  and  was  Missioner  at  Lulworth,  co.  Dorset.  He  died  in  London  1745, 
aged  51.     Foley,  vii.  831. 

10  He  entered  the  Soc.  17 15  ;  was  in  Maryland  about  1724  ;  returned  to  Eng- 
land about  1738,  and  became  Missioner  in  the  Staffordshire  District.  He  died 
there  1750,  aged  52.     Foley,  vii.  839. 

11  Probably  the  second  of  the  three  Frs.  Robert  Constable.  He  entered  the  Soc. 
171 1.  In  1728  he  was  living  in  France.  He  died  at  Watten  1739,  aged  66.  Foley, 
vii.  160. 

12  He  entered  the  Soc.  1690 ;  in  1701  and  1704  he  was  Missioner  in  the  Worcester 
and  London  Districts.     He  died  in  London  1729,  aged  60.     Foley,  vii.  133. 

13  Not  in  Foley. 

14  Alias  Plowden,  Simeon,  and  Perot.  He  entered  the  Soc.  1682 ;  in  1704  was 
Missioner  in  the  Staffordshire  District ;  in  1727  he  was  declared  Rector  of  the  London 
District,  and  in  1730  of  Liege.     He  died  at  Ghent  1740,  aged  77.     Foley,  vii.  603. 

15  Alias  Peters.  He  entered  the  Soc.  1714/5.  He  served  missions  in  the  London 
District  for  many  years;  in  1727  he  was  at  Mr.  Whetenhall's  at  East  Mulling,  near 
Tunbridge  Wells.     He  died  1743,  aged  50.     Foley,  vii.  430. 

16  He  entered  the  Soc.  1684;  in  1700  he  was  Missioner  in  the  Yorkshire  District, 
and  became  Chaplain  at  Brough.  From  17 14/ '5  to  1 720/1  he  was  at  St.  Germains, 
and  confessor  to  King  James.  In  1721  he  became  Rector  of  Watten,  and  in  1724 
Provincial ;  in  1725  he  became  Chaplain  to  Mary  (Sherburne),  Duchess  of  Norfolk  ; 
in  1733  he  was  again  Rector  of  Watten.  He  died  at  St.  Omer's  1750,  aged  84. 
Foley,  vii.  440. 

17  He  entered  the  Soc.  1708.  He  was  living  with  Mr.  Fermor  at  Bristol  about 
1724,  and  in  London  in  1727.  In  1734  he  became  Rector  of  the  Eng.  Coll.,  Rome. 
He  died  there  1739,  aged  56.     Foley,  vii.  489. 

18  He  entered  the  Soc.  1691.  He  served  the  mission  of  Leigh,  and  others  in  the 
Lancashire  District,  and  afterwards  in  the  London  District,  of  which  he  became 
Rector  in  1736.     He  died  in  London  1743,  aged  72.     Foley,  vii.  538. 


SERVED   BY   THE   JESUIT   FATHERS,    1727-1734  173 

Parker^  Ric:  Parkinson?  Tho:  Ryther,  Edw:  Saltmarsh,  Jh:  Smith? 
Rob:  Stanfield,  Tho:  Tasburg*  Jh.  Turberville?  Ch:  Turville*  Pet: 
Williams.1 

17.  To  M1  [Hen.]  Hayes  at   Driby,  near  Horn  Castle  Lincoln- 
shire. 

18.  (To  Mrs  Ratcliff  at  ye  Ld  Cliffords  at  U  brook  8  near  Chudleigh, 
Devonshire  can.)     Tho:  Risdon.9 

19.  To  Mr  Ward  Woollen  draper  in  Durham.     Tho:  Pierson. 

20.  To  Mr  John  Noris10  at  Burton  near  Petworth,  Sussex. 

21.  To  Mr  Young11  at  Mr  Cliftons  in  Old  Street  Durham.  Alexius 
Pockets. 

22.  To  Mr  [Mic.]  Tichburn12  at  Sir  Rowld  Stanleys  at  Hooten  near 
Chester.     Rob:  Turner. 

23.  To  Mr  [Ch:]  Brown 13  at  Mr  Wrights  at  Kelvedon  Hall  near 
Onger,  Essex. 

1  Alias  Culcheth.  He  entered  the  Soc.  1674  ;  was  three  times  Rector  of  Liege  ; 
he  was  Provincial  1712  to  1715,  and  about  1724  was  Superior  of  the  London  District. 
He  died  at  Liege  1730,  aged  76.     Foley,  vii.  188. 

2  He  entered  the  Soc.  1704;  served  in  the  London  District  for  many  years,  and 
afterwards  in  the  Suffolk  District.  He  died  at  Ghent  1748,  aged  67.  Foley,  vii. 
570. 

3  He  entered  the  Soc.  1688;  in  1700/1  he  was  Missioner  in  the  Durham  Dis- 
trict, and  in  1701/2  he  was  at  Scarisbrick,  Lancashire,  the  seat  of  the  family  of  that 
name.  In  17 10  he  was  sent  to  the  London  District ;  in  1743  he  became  Rector  of 
that  District.     He  died  in  London  1754,  aged  85.     Foley,  vii.  718. 

4  He  entered  the  Soc.  1691.  In  1701  he  was  Missioner  in  the  Suffolk  District, 
and  from  1704  until  near  his  death  in  the  London  District.  He  died  in  Dublin  1727, 
aged  54.     Foley,  vii.  762. 

5  Alias  Farmer  or  Fermor.  He  entered  the  Soc.  1683.  He  was  Missioner  in 
Lancashire  for  some  years,  and  was  Chaplain  to  the  Andertons  at  Lostock.  In 
1 7 10  he  was  in  the  Yorkshire  District.  From  1725  to  1731  he  was  Provincial  j  when 
he  became  Rector  of  the  London  District.  He  died  there  1735,  aged  72-  Foley, 
vii.  785. 

6  He  entered  the  Soc.  1700;  from  171 1/2  to  1724  he  was  Missioner  at  Ince 
Blundell,  Lancashire  (the  seat  of  the  Blundells),  and  in  1725  was  sent  to  the  London 
District.  From  1733  to  1735  he  was  at  Antwerp;  in  1739  he  became  Rector  of 
Ghent;  in  1752  he  was  in  London  ;  in  1753  he  was  at  Watten,  where  he  died  1757, 
aged  76.     Foley,  vii.  789. 

7  lie  entered  the  Soc.  17 10.  He  was  in  London  in  1728.  In  1754  he  was  in 
the  Suffolk  District,  and  died  at  Ingatestone,  co.  Essex,  1755,  aged  66.  Foley, 
vii.  847. 

8  More  correctly  Ugbrooke.  It  is  mentioned  in  the  Addresses  for  1767,  1768, 
1769,  and  1772. 

*  Alias  Bluet.  He  entered  the  Soc.  1685  ;  was  sent  to  England  1695,  and  became 
Superior  of  the  Devon  District.     He  died  at  Watten  1744,  aged  82.     Foley,  vii.  652. 

10  He  entered  the  Soc.  1692/3.  From  1715  to  1719  he  was  Rector  of  Ghent; 
1724-28  Rector  of  the  Hampshire  District  at  Burton,  near  Petworth  ;  from  1738 
onwards  he  was  Missioner  in  the  Suffolk  and  Hampshire  Districts  ;  he  died  1754, 
aged  82.  Burton  was  the  seat  of  the  Goring  and  Biddulph  families.  It  occurs  in  the 
Addresses  for  1767,  1768,  1769,  and  1772.     Foley,  vii.  550. 

11  This  is  an  alias  for  Alexius  Tocketts.  He  entered  the  Soc.  1689  ;  served 
missions  in  the  Durham  District,  and  died  (probably  there)  1731,  aged  66.  Hooton 
is  mentioned  in  the  Addresses  for  1767  and  1772.     Foley,  vii.  781,  947,  950. 

12  He  entered  the  Soc.  1712  ;  was  Missioner  for  several  years  at  Sir  R.  Stanley's 
at  Hooton,  co.  Chester ;  see  note  above,  under  No.  9,  "  Blandyke  "  (St.  Omer's). 
Foley,  vii.  780. 

13  Vere  Le  Maitre.  He  entered  the  Soc.  1693  ;  served  the  mission  at  Kelvedon 
from  1726  till  his  death  there  1737.     Foley,  vii.  450. 


174  ADDRESSES   OF   THE   STATIONS   IN   ENGLAND 

24.  (To  Mr  Hen:  More 2  at  Hawkwell  near  Tunbridge,  Kent  can.) 

25.  To  Mr  ([Rob.]  Aldred2  can.)  (Clifton3  ins.)  at  Little  Crosby 
near  Leverpoole  Lancashire. 

26.  To  Mr  [Will.]  (Berch  4  can.)  Pendrell  at  (Haggerston  5  can.)  at 
Berrington  (near  Berwick  can.)  to  be  left  at  ye  Post  house  in  Belford, 
Northumberland. 

27.  (To  Mr  Powell6  at  Idsworth,7  by  Harting  bagg.  Sussex  can.) 

28.  (To  Mr  Wm  Boucher  at  Mr  Bartlets  of  Hillen8  near  Wor- 
cester, by  Worcester  bagg  can.) 

29.  To  Mrs  Mary  Marchant  at  Madme  Paston's9  at  Michael  Gate, 
York.  Ralph  Candish,10  Jh:  Chapman^  Edw:  Saltmarsh^  Geo: 
Thorold. 

30.  (To  Mr  Edw:  Scarisbrick 12  at  Sir  Gery13  Cliftons  of  Clifton  near 
Nottingham  can.) 

31.  (To  Mr  (Tho:  Roberts14  can.)  ([Jh.]  Hill16  ins.)  at  ye  Starr  in 
Holywell  by  Northrop  bagg  Flintshire  can.) 

1  Otherwise  Francis,  and  alias  or  vere  Ford.  He  entered  the  Soc.  1684 ;  in 
1705  and  1706  he  was  in  the  Lancashire  District;  in  1708  in  the  Hampshire 
District ;  in  17 10  and  till  his  death,  1730,  he  was  in  Kent.     Foley,  vii.  519. 

2  He  entered  the  Soc.  1697  ;  served  Little  Crosby  (the  seat  of  the  Blundells)  for 
many  years,  and  died  there  1728,  aged  54.     Foley,  vii.  6. 

3  i.e.  Fr.  James  Clifton.  He  entered  the  Soc.  1719.  He  was  Missioner  at 
Crosby  for  some  years,  and  died  there  1750,  aged  52.  Little  Crosby  occurs  1767, 
1768,  1769,  1772.     Foley,  vii.  140. 

4  Alias  Pendrell.     P'oley,  vii.  581. 

6  Then  the  seat  of  the  Haggerstons,  Baronets.  It  occurs  in  the  Lists  for  1677, 
1768,  1769,  and  1772. 

6  Alias  Ashton.  He  entered  the  Soc.  1677 ;  in  1707  he  became  Rector  of  the 
Roman  College;  in  1712  of  Liege;  and  in  1715  of  St.  Omer's.  In  1724  he  was 
Missioner  in  Sussex.     Foley,  vii.  616. 

7  A  seat  of  the  Lords  Dormer  in  Hampshire.  See  Foley,  vii.  205.  Idsworth 
occurs  in  the  Lists  for  1767,  1768,  1769,  and  1772. 

8  More  correctly  Hillend,  the  seat  of  the  Bartlets. 

9  The  well-known  Convent  of  the  Institute  of  the  B.V.M.,  of  which  "Madame 
Paston"  was  the  Superioress.  She  was  Dorothy,  daughter  of  Francis  Bedingfeld, 
of  Redlingfield,  co.  Suffolk,  by  his  wife  Mary  Paston ;  she  became  second 
Superioress  in  1699,  on  the  death  of  her  great-aunt,  Frances  Bedingfeld ;  she  died 
1734.     See  Cath.  Rec.  Soc.  iv.  357. 

10  He  was  otherwise  known  as  Hugh  Taylor.  He  entered  the  Soc.  1706;  after 
teaching,  &c,  in  the  Colleges  abroad  he  was  sent  to  the  English  Mission  in  17 14, 
and  was  stationed  in  the  Yorkshire  District,  being  for  many  years  Chaplain  to  the 
Micklegate  Convent.  He  died  there  1727,  aged  49.  This  address  occurs  in  the 
Lists  for  1767,  1768,  1769,  and  1772.     Foley,  vii.  113  and  764. 

11  Alias  or  vere  St.  Leger.  He  entered  the  Soc.  1692 ;  served  the  missions  of 
Salden,  co.  Bucks,  and  Spital,  near  Windsor.  He  died  at  the  Micklegate  Convent 
1729,  aged  60.     Foley,  vii.  128. 

12  He  entered  the  Soc.  1682;  in  1700/1  he  was  Missioner  in  the  Derbyshire 
District,  and  Chaplain  to  the  Cliftons  at  Clifton,  co.  Notts  ;  in  1703/4  he  was  in  the 
Lancashire  District;  in  1707/8  he  was  again  in  the  Derbyshire  District,  of  which  he 
was  Rector  in  17 14-15.  In  1735  he  was  in  the  London  District,  where  he  died 
that  year  aged  72.     Foley,  vii.  687.  13  Sir  Gervase  Clifton. 

14  He  entered  the  Soc.  1696.  He  served  the  Holywell  Mission  for  many  years, 
and  died  there  1727,  aged  54.     Foley,  vii.  656. 

15  He  entered  the  Soc.  1704  ;  served  the  mission  at  Stapehill,  Dorset,  for  a  short 
time,  and  also  in  Glamorganshire  ;  later  for  some  years  at  Holywell.  He  died  in 
London  1751,  aged  68.  Holywell  occurs  in  the  Lists  for  1767,  1768,  1769,  and 
1772.     Foley,  vii.  360. 


SERVED   BY   THE   JESUIT   FATHERS,    I727-I734  1 75 

32.  To  Mr  John  Thornton1  at  Haggerston  (near  Berwick)  to  be 
left  at  ye  Posthouse  in  Belford,  Northumberland. 

33.  To  Mr  [Ch.]  Shirburn2  at  Beries  Hall  by  Swaffam  bagg, 
Norfolk. 

34.  (To  Mr  Howes 3  at  Boscobell,4  to  be  left  at  Mr  Massons  at  the 
Starr  in  Wolverhampton  Staffordshire,  can.)     Rob.  Collingwood.b 

35.  (To  Mr  Hen.  Rookwood6  at  Coldham  7  near  S*  Edmd8  Bury 
Suffolk  can.) 

36.  To  Mr  Char:  Poole8  at  Sutton9  near  Gilford,  Surrey. 

37.  To  Mr  Wm  Case10  to  be  left  at  Mr  Rosses,  Townditch 
Worcester.      Wm  Baxter. 

38.  To  Mr  Ambr:  Isles11  at  Sutton,  near  Ferrybridge  Yorkshire. 

39.  To  Mr  Turner12  at  (Claxby13  can.)  Kerman14  near  Market 
Reason,  by  Lincoln  bagg.     Edm.  Thorold. 

40.  (To  Mr  [Ralph  Gower15  erased]  (Fairfax16  ins.)  at  Stonyhurst17 
to  be  left  at  ye  (White  Bull  can.  Post  house  in  Preston,  Lancashire  can.) 
Edw.  Carteret. 

1  Alias  Le  Hunt.  He  entered  the  Soc.  1693.  He  became  Chaplain  and 
Missioner  at  Haggerston,  co.  Northumberland  (the  seat  of  the  family  of  that  name), 
in  1701.  He  became  Superior  of  the  Durham  District  in  1736.  In  1753  he  removed 
to  Ellingham  (a  seat  of  the  same  family),  and  died  at  Durham  1759,  aged  84. 
Haggerston  occurs  in  the  Lists  for  1767,  1768,  1769,  and  1772.  Foley,  vii.  773 
and  382. 

2  He  entered  the  Soc.  1702.  He  was  appointed  Rector  of  the  Suffolk  District 
1728;  became  Provincial  1740  ;  and  died  in  London  1745,  aged  61.  Berie's,  Bure's 
or  Bury's  Hall  was  a  seat  of  the  Bedingfeld  family.     Foley,  vii.  710. 

3  Probably  the  Fr.  William  Howe,  alias  Pendrel,  who  entered  the  Soc.  1722,  and 
died  in  Rome  1746.     Foley,  vii.  376. 

4  The  scene  of  Charles  II.'s  escape  near  Tong,  Shropshire ;  at  this  time  it  was 
the  property  of  the  Fitzherberts,  of  Swynnerton,  co.  Stafford. 

•  He  entered  the  Soc.  1677 ;  was  sent  to  England  1694,  and  stationed  in  the 
Staffordshire  District ;  he  died  at  Boscobel  1740,  aged  83.     Foley,  vii.  147. 

6  He  entered  the  Soc.  1681 ;  he  served  the  Mission  of  Coldham  Hall  for  many 
years,  and  died  in  Norfolk  1730,  aged  71.     Foley,  vii.  670. 

7  The  seat  of  the  Rookwood  family.  This  occurs  in  the  Lists  for  1767,  1768, 
1769,  and  1772  ;  that  for  1768  gives  the  patron's  name  as  Gage. 

8  Otherwise  Pole,  or  de  la  Poole.  In  1704  he  was  Minister  at  Liege.  In  1724 
he  was  Missioner  at  Sutton,  near  Guildford,  and  died  probably  there  in  1740,  aged  71. 
Foley,  vii.  609. 

9  The  seat  of  the  Westons,  now  the  property  of  their  representative,  Philip 
Witham,  Esq. 

10  Alias  Baxter.  He  entered  the  Soc.  171 1  ;  served  the  mission  at  Worcester 
from  about  1720  till  his  death  there  1747,  aged  57.     Foley,  vii.  122. 

11  Vere  Jackson.  He  entered  the  Soc.  1704.  He  served  in  the  Yorkshire  District 
for  many  years,  and  died  1746,  aged  61.  The  Isles  family  owned  property  at  Sutton. 
Foley,  vii.  915. 

"  Alias  Edmund  or  Epiphanius  Thorold.     He  entered  the  Soc.  1686/7  '■>  served 
the  mission  of  Market  Rasen  for  many  years,  and  died  1732,  aged  63.     Foley,  vii.  774. 
13  The  seat  of  the  Markhams. 
M  More  correctly  Kirmond,  a  few  miles  N.E.  of  Market  Rasen. 

15  Otherwise  Hornyold.  He  entered  the  Soc.  1693  ;  was  Missioner  in  the  Lanca- 
shire District  for  many  years,  being  stationed  at  Lytham  (the  Cliftons),  at  Stonyhurst 
(1724),  at  Bryn  (the  Gerards),  and  Ashton  (in  Makerfield).  He  died  1740,  aged  66. 
Foley,  vii.  372. 

16  Alias  Carteret.     Foley,  vii.  119. 

17  Then  the  seat  of  Mary  (Shireburn),  Duchess  of  Norfolk.  It  occurs  in  the  Lists 
for  1767,  1768  (where  Weld  is  stated  to  be  the  patron),  and  1772. 


176  ADDRESSES   OF   THE   STATIONS   IN    ENGLAND 

41.  To  M1  John  Constable1  at  M1  Fitzherberts  at  Swinerton  near 
Stone  to  be  left  at  Sandeford,2  Staffordshire. 

42.  To  M1  (Rich.  Tasburgh  3  Junr  can.)  (Ant.  Bedingfield4  ins.)  at 
Flixton  by  Beccles  bagg,  Suffolk. 

43.  To   Mr   Lewis  at  Mls  Daniel's 5   in   Shaddow   Street,   Great 
Warningfield  near  Sudbury,  Suffolk.    Jh:  Gage. 

44.  To  Mr  (John  Busby  6  can.  [Ralph]  (Gower 7  ins.)  at  Brin  near 
Ashton  by  Warrington  bagg,  Lancashire. 

45.  To  Mr  [Will.]  Pordage8  at  Oxborough  hall,  to  be  left  at  Stoke 
ferry,  Norfolk. 

46.  (To  Mr[Tho.J  Lochard9  at  Cheame  by  Croydon  bagg,  Surrey  can.) 

47.  To  Mr  Ch:  Dormer10  at  ye  Lady  [Guilfords  in  Chichester  can.] 
North,11  to  be  left  with  Mra  Andrews  at  Petersfield  Hampshire  (ins.). 

48.  To  Mr  [Jh.]  (Tho.  Burnet 12  can.)  [Fleetwood  ins.]  at  Broughton 
near  Skipton  in  Craven  (by  Ferry  bridge  bagg  can.)  Yorkshire. 

49.  To  Mr  (Wm  Copley13  can.)  Ch:  Williams14  at  Edw.  Ferrars 
Esqre  (Sutton  Coldfield  Warwickshire  ins.). 

1  Alias  Lacey.  He  entered  the  Soc.  1695  ;  was  Chaplain  at  Swynnerton  for 
many  years,  and  died  there  1740,  aged  62.     Foley,  vii.  159. 

2  A  large  farm  in  Swynnerton,  on  the  road  from  Stone  to  Nantwich.  Swynnerton 
occurs  in  the  Lists  for  1767,  1768,  1769,  and  1772. 

3  He  entered  the  Soc.  1710;  in  1728,  or  earlier,  he  was  Missioner  at  Flixton  (the 
seat  of  his  family) ;  he  died  (probably  there)  1735,  aged  42.     Foley,  vii.  762. 

*  He  entered  the  Soc.  17 14  ;  he  served  in  the  Suffolk  District  between  1724  and 
1730,  and  in  1735  became  the  last  Missioner  at  Flixton.  From  1741  to  1746  he  was 
at  Liverpool.     He  died  at  Liege  1752,  aged  54.     Foley,  vii.  45. 

6  Alias  John  Gage.  He  entered  the  Soc.  1670.  In  1685  he  was  Missioner  in 
the  Suffolk  District,  and  died  (probably  there)  1728,  aged  77.     Foley,  vii.  282. 

6  Mrs.  Daniel  was  the  heiress  of  Sir  Robt.  Kempe,  of  Pentloe,  co.  Essex,  and  was 
a  benefactress  to  the  Society. 

7  Alias  Brown.  He  entered  the  Soc.  1699;  served  the  mission  of  Bryn,  co. 
Lancaster  (a  seat  of  the  Gerards),  for  some  time.  He  was  the  first  fixed  resident  priest 
at  Bristol.     Brin  occurs  in  the  Lists  for  1767,  1768,  1769,  and  1772.     Foley,  vii.  105. 

8  Alias  Collins.  He  entered  the  Soc.  1670  or  167 1.  In  1685  he  was  Missioner 
in  the  Suffolk  District,  and  was  Rector  of  that  "College"  1701.  He  died  at  Ox- 
burgh  (the  seat  of  the  Bedingfelds)  in  1736,  aged  85.  Oxburgh  occurs  in  the  Lists  for 
1767,  1768,  1769,  and  1772.     Foley,  vii.  615. 

9  Or  Lockhart.  He  entered  the  Soc.  1693.  After  being  at  Cheame  he  was  also 
stationed  at  Culcheth  Hall,  in  Lancashire,  the  seat  of  the  family  of  the  same  name, 
and  died  at  Bryn  1744,  aged  72.     Foley,  vii.  464. 

10  He  entered  the  Soc.  1709 ;  became  6th  Lord  Dormer  in  1728.  He  was  at 
Petersfield  in  1724,  and  subsequently  served  at  Puddington,  co.  Chester  (Mr.  Massey's), 
and  at  Liverpool.    He  died  at  Gt.  Missenden,  co.  Bucks,  1761,  aged  71.    Foley,  vii.  205. 

11  This  appears  to  be  Maria  Margaretta,  daughter  of"  Cornelius  de  Long,  Lord  of 
Ellemeet,  in  the  United  Provinces,  who  married,  firstly,  William,  6th  Lord  North, 
who  served  under  Marlborough  in  Flanders  ;  and  secondly,  in  1735,  Patrick,  7th  Lord 
Elibank.  She  died  1762.  Lord  North  became  a  Catholic  in  1728,  and  died  at 
Madrid  in  1734.     {Diet,  of  Nat.  Biog.) 

12  He  entered  the  Soc.  1681  ;  served  the  mission  of  Broughton  Hall,  the  seat  of 
the  Tempests,  for  many  years,  and  died  (probably  there)  1727,  aged  66.  Broughton 
occurs  in  the  Lists  for  1767,  1768,  1769,  and  1772.     Foley,  vii.  104. 

13  He  entered  the  Soc.  1686  ;  in  170 1  he  was  a  Missioner  in  the  Hampshire  Dis- 
trict, and  in  171 1  in  the  London  District;  later  he  was  Chaplain  to  the  Mannocks 
at  Giffard's  Hall,  Suffolk,  and  later  to  the  Ferrers,  of  Baddesley,  where  he  died  1727, 
aged  59-     Foley,  vii.  165. 

14  Alias  Hubert  Hacon.  He  entered  the  Soc.  1698  ;  in  1728  he  was  Chaplain  to 
Lord  Petre,  and  then  to  the  Ferrers,  and  in  1740  to  Lord  Arundell  at  Wardour,  where 
he  died  175 1,  aged  74.     Foley,  vii.  845  and  326. 


SERVED   BY   THE   JESUIT   FATHERS,    1727-1734  1 77 

50.  (To  Mr  Hen.  Stanley1  at  Waterperry2  to  be  left  at  ye  Starr  in 
Oxford  can.) 

5 1.  To  Mr  Jos.  Blundel 3  at  Spinckhill 4  near  Chesterfield,  Derbyshire. 

52.  To   Mr  (Jos.  Scarisbrick5  can.)  (Hen.  Smith  ins.)  at  Dutton 
Hall 6  near  Preston  in  ye  Hill  by  Warrington  bagg  Cheshire. 

53.  To  Mr  Leon.  Coniers 7  to  be  left  at  Mr  Geo.  Binsteds  mercer 
in  Hambleton  by  Fareham  bagg,  Hampshire. 

54.  To  Mr  Adam  Pigot8  at  Cale  Hill  near  Charing,  by  Ashford 
bagg,  Kent. 

55.  To   Mr  (Rich.  Smith9  can.)  at  Culcheth10  near  Warrington, 
Lancashire. 

56.  (To  Mr[Hen.]  Hayes  (Bonav:  Lane11  can.)  (with  Mr  Darrell 
erased)  at  Scotney  near  Lamberhurst,  Kent,  can.) 

57.  To  Mr  [Hen.]  Bolt12  at  Mr  Berkeleys  of  Spetchley  near  Worcester. 

58.  To  Mrs  (Mary  Clavering  can.)  [Rob.]  Turner  at  Calalay13  near 
Alnwick,  Northumberland.     Hen.  Widdrington^ 

1  Alias  Culcheth.  He  entered  the  Soc.  1706;  in  1716-8  he  was  Professor  of 
Philosophy  at  Liege ;  he  served  the  missions  in  the  Oxford  District  for  many  years  ; 
was  sent  to  the  Lancashire  District  about  1748,  and  died  at  Culcheth  Hall  1753, 
aged  65.     Foley,  vii.  733. 

2  The  seat  of  the  Curzons.     It  occurs  in  the  Lists  for  1767,  1768,  and  1769. 

3  He  entered  the  Soc.  1703  ;  served  for  some  years  in  the  Yorkshire  District,  and 
was  some  time  at  Spink  Hill,  co.  Derby.  He  died  at  Watten  1759,  aged  73.  Foley, 
vii.  66. 

*  Now  the  College  of  Mount  St.  Mary's.  This  is  one  of  the  earliest  centres  of 
the  labours  of  the  Society.  Fr.  John  Pole  was  sent  from  Spink  Hill  to  Valladolid  in 
1600.     Spinkhill  occurs  in  the  Lists  for  1767,  1768,  1769,  and  1772. 

6  He  was  also  known  as  Neville.  He  entered  the  Soc.  1692/3 ;  in  1705  he  was 
Missioner  in  the  London  District ;  in  1706  in  the  Worcester  District,  and  in  17 14  in 
the  Devonshire  District;  in  1721  he  was  in  the  Lancashire  District,  where  he  died 
1728/9,  aged  56.     Foley,  vii.  690. 

6  The  seat  of  the  Fleetwoods,  and  inherited  by  them  from  the  Gerards  of  Gerard's 
Bromley,  co.  Stafford. 

7  He  entered  the  Soc.  1690;  he  served  most,  if  not  all,  his  missionary  life  in  the 
Hampshire  District;  and  died  at  Southend,  Soberton,  1745,  aged  74.  Calehill  is 
mentioned  in  the  Lists  for  1767,  1768,  1769,  and  1772.     Foley,  vii.  155. 

8  He  entered  the  Soc.  1694  ;  in  1724  he  was  at  Cale  Hill  (a  seat  of  the  Darells), 
co.  Kent;  during  1741  in  London;  and  died  at  Crondon  Park,  co.  Essex,  175 1, 
aged  78.     Foley,  vii.  599. 

9  He  is  also  known  as  Saville.  He  entered  the  Soc.  1680;  served  the  Lulworth 
Mission  from  about  1685  till  1707,  and  the  Lancashire  District  for  many  years ;  he 
died  in  Lanes.  1735,  aged  75.     Foley,  vii.  720. 

10  The  seat  of  the  family  of  the  same  name.  It  occurs  in  the  Lists  for  1767, 
1768,  1769,  and  1772. 

11  He  entered  the  Soc.  1706.  He  was  Chaplain  to  the  Darells  of  Scotney  for 
some  years,  and  subsequently  at  Dunkenhalgh,  co.  Lancaster,  a  seat  of  the  Petres, 
and  formerly  of  the  Walmesleys,  where  he  died  1750,  aged  66.  Scotney  occurs  in 
the  Lists  for  1767,  1768,  and  1769.     Foley,  vii.  432. 

12  Alias  Bolt  and  M'Intosh.  He  entered  the  Soc.  1691  ;  soon  after  1704  was 
sent  to  England,  and  became  Chaplain  at  Spetchley,  and  for  some  years  was  Rector 
of  the  Worcestershire  District;  in  1734  he  was  declared  Rector  of  Liege,  and  in 
1737  Provincial.  He  died  at  Liege  1743,  aged  73.  Spetchley  occurs  in  the  Lists 
for  1768,  1769,  and  1772.     Foley,  vii.  74. 

13  Then  the  seat  of  the  Claverings.  It  occurs  in  the  Lists  for  1767,  1768,  1769, 
and  1772. 

14  He  entered  the  Soc.  1687  ;  served  in  the  Durham  District  for  many  years. 
He  died  (probably  at  Callalv)  1729,  aged  61.     Foley,  vii.  841. 

XIII.  M 


178  ADDRESSES   OF  THE   STATIONS  IN   ENGLAND 

59.  (To  Mr  [Rob.]  Garbot1  at  Mr  Jones'  by  Drybridge  in 
Monmouthshire  can.) 

60.  To  Mr  (Cottam  2  can.)  [Ign.]  Brooks3  at  Benj.  Blackeburns 
Esqr  in  Sheffield,  Yorkshire  (Boulsterstone  ins.). 

61.  To  Mr  Tho.  Roberts4  (alias  Busby  ins.)  at  the  Globe  in 
Leicester. 

62.  (To  Mr  Ch:  Williams  to  be  left  wth  Mr  Collins  at  Dadnam 
near  Sittenburn  Kent  can.) 

63.  To  Mr  (Ch:  Powell 5  can.)  Lane  at  Dunkenhall 6  near  Blakeburn, 
Lancashire. 

64.  To  Mr  Gilb.  Gray 7  at  Ingatestone  Hall,  Essex. 

65.  To  Mr8  [Mary  ?  Sheers  can.]  Brook  8  (ins.)  at  Great  Canford  9 
near  Wimborn,  Dorsetshire.  [Above  Brook,  the  name  Jennison 10  has 
been  added  later.] 

66.  To  Mr  Franc.  Gibson11  at  Sir  Charles  Brown's  at  Kiddington 
by  Eustone  bagg,  Oxfordshire. 

67.  To  Mr  Thomas  Kimber12  at  Powis  Castle  by  Welsh  Poole, 
Montgomerie. 

1  Alias  Richardson.  He  entered  the  Soc.  1688 ;  he  served  the  missions  in  the 
South  Wales  District  for  many  years,  and  was  long  its  Rector.  In  1733  he  went  to 
the  Hampshire  District,  and  was  for  some  time  at  Lulworth  Castle.  He  died  1737, 
aged  66.     Foley,  vii.  286  and  647. 

2  There  is  no  priest  in  Foley  of  this  name  that  fits  in  with  this  date. 

3  He  entered  the  Soc.  1699  ;  about  1724  was  Missioner  and  Chaplain  at  Mr.  B. 
Blackburn's  (?  Blakehurst's)  at  Boulsterstone,  near  Sheffield  ;  in  1728  he  was  declared 
Rector  of  the  Derbyshire  District;  and  died  at  St.  Omer  1751,  aged  81.  Foley, 
vii.  90. 

*  He  entered  the  Soc.  1675 ;  in  1701  and  later  he  was  Rector  of  the  Derbyshire 
District.     He  died  at  Liege  1750,  aged  94.     Foley,  vii.  106. 

6  He  entered  the  Soc.  1679  5  m  *724  he  was  Missioner  at  Dunkenhalgh,  the  seat 
of  Catherine  {nSe  Walmesley),  Dowager  Lady  Petre.     Foley,  vii.  626. 

6  A  seat  of  the  Lords  Petre,  and  by  them  inherited  from  the  Walmesleys.  It 
occurs  in  the  Lists  for  1767,  1768,  1769,  and  1772. 

7  Vere  Talbot.  He  entered  the  Soc.  1694;  was  sent  to  England  in  1701  or 
1702,  where  he  served  missions  in  the  Lancashire  District,  including  Preston,  Billing- 
ton,  &c. ;  in  171 1  he  was  Rector  of  that  "College,"  but  afterwards  removed  to  the 
Suffolk  District,  and  was  Chaplain  to  Lord  Petre  at  Ingatestone.  About  1726  he  re- 
turned to  Lancashire,  and  was  Chaplain  at  Dunkenhalgh.  In  1738  he  removed  to 
the  London  District,  but  was  back  in  Lancashire  in  1739.  He  died  in  London 
1743,  agecl  71*  He  became  13th  Earl  of  Shrewsbury  in  17 18.  Foley,  vii.  318  and 
754- 

8  It  is  not  easy  to  decide  which  of  the  various  Brooks  or  Brookes  this  Father  was. 
It  might  be  Fr.  Ignatius  Brook  (Foley,  vii.  90) ;  or  Fr.  Thomas  Brooke  (Foley, 
vii.  91) ;  or  possibly  one  of  the  two  Frs.  Thomas  Poulton  mentioned  in  Foley,  vii.  90 
and  vii.  625. 

•  A  seat  of  the  Webbe  family.  Canford  occurs  in  the  Lists  for  1767, 1768,  1769, 
and  1772. 

10  Michael  Jennison  entered  the  Soc.  1675.  From  1701  and  onwards  for  many 
years  he  was  Missioner  in  the  Hampshire  District,  and  about  1724  was  Chaplain  to 
the  Webbes  at  Canford.     He  died  at  Watten  1735,  aged  80.     Foley,  vii.  400. 

11  He  entered  the  Soc.  1687.  In  1701  and  1704  he  was  serving  the  missions  in 
the  Worcester  District ;  in  17 18  in  the  Suffolk  District,  and  in  1724  and  after  he 
was  at  Kiddington.     He  died  there  1738,  aged  69.     Foley,  vii.  300. 

12  He  entered  the  Soc.  1706.  He  served  in  the  North  Wales  District  for  many 
years.  In  1724  and  after  he  was  at  Powis  Castle,  the  seat  of  the  Herberts,  Earls 
(and  titular  Dukes)  of  Powis;  he  died  there  1742,  aged  54.     Foley,  vii.  419. 


SERVED   BY   THE   JESUIT   FATHERS,   1727-1734  179 

68.  (To  Mr  Geo.  Brown1  at  Gateshead  house  near  Newcastle 
uppon  Tyne,  Northumberland  can.) 

69.  To  Mr  Pet.  Curson2  at  Mr  Wells  at  Brambridge  near  Winchester. 

70.  To  Mr  (Christ.  Coniers  3  can.)  (C.  Powell  can.)  Ric.  Moore  4  at 
Esqre  Nevil's  uppon  ye  Green  in  Richmond,  Surrey. 

71.  To  Mr  John  Mannock5  at  Mr  Sheldons  of  Weston  near 
Shipston  uppon  Stower  Worcestershire. 

72.  (To  Mr  John  Inglefield  6  at  Mr  Messengers  of  Fountains  Abbey 
near  Ripon,  Yorkshire  can.) 

73.  To  Mr  Tho  [Holland  can.]  Soutcout7  (?)  at  Ingatestone  Hall  Essex. 

74.  To  [Mr  John  Peares  8  alias  Hayman  (inserted)  ]  at  MM  Row  of 
Trevithic9  near  S.  Columbe  in  Cornwall.  [See  also  161  (If.  Foley's 
hand).] 

75.  To  Mr  Wm  Clark10  at  Un  Vaughans  in  (Hereford  can.). 

76.  To  Mr  (John  Gardiner  "  can.)  Poulton 12  at  MrB  Smiths  of  Quini- 
borough  near  Leicester. 

1  Alias  Pippard.  He  entered  the  Soc.  1688;  served  missions  in  the  Durham 
District  for  many  years;  he  was  at  Gateshead  in  1701 ;  he  retired  to  the  Continent 
after  the  Rebellion  of  1715,  but  eventually  returned  to  the  Durham  District,  where 
he  remained  till  shortly  before  his  death  in  1735,  aged  65.  Newcastle  occurs  in  the 
Lists  for  1767,  1768,  1769,  and  1772.     Foley,  vii.  92. 

2  He  entered  the  Soc.  1706.  In  1724  he  was  Chaplain  to  Mr.  Wells,  of  Bram- 
bridge, and  died  at  Winchester  1766,  aged  79.  Dr.  Challoner  mentions  him  at 
Brambridge  in  1741.    Foley,  vii.  191. 

3  He  entered  the  Soc.  1688 ;  was  sent  to  England  1698.  In  1701  and  1704  he 
was  in  the  Hampshire  District,  and  in  1 704  he  was  at  Mr.  Neville's  He  died  1 730, 
aged  61.     Foley,  vii.  154. 

*  He  entered  the  Soc.  1693.  From  1704  until  about  1725  he  was  a  Missioner 
in  the  Lancashire  District.  He  was  then  stationed  at  Holywell.  He  left  Holywell 
for  the  London  District  1731.  About  1740  he  returned  to  North  Wales,  where  he 
died  1753,  aged  81.     Foley,  vii.  517. 

6  Alias  or  vere  Petre.  He  entered  the  Soc.  1680.  In  17 10  he  was  in  the  Wor- 
cester District,  as  Chaplain  to  the  Sheldons  at  Weston.  He  died  1738,  aged  77. 
Weston  occurs  in  the  Lists  for  1767,  1768,  1769,  and  1772.    Foley,  vii.  593. 

6  Or  rather  Englefield.  He  entered  the  Soc.  1696 ;  in  1724  and  following  years 
he  served  the  mission  in  England  ;  at  Mr.  Messenger's  at  Fountains,  at  Mr.  Hussey's 
at  Marnhull,  co.  Dorset,  and  at  Clytha,  co.  Monmouth.  He  died  1733,  aged  57. 
Foley,  vii.  227. 

7  i.e.  Southcote.     Fr.  Edward  Southcote  entered  the  Soc.  17 19. 

8  He  entered  the  Soc.  1687.  In  1701  and  1704  he  was  serving  in  the  Hamp- 
shire District.  Most  of  his  time  was  spent  in  Cornwall,  at  Trevethick,  or  at  Tolfrey. 
In  1724  he  was  at  Trevethick.  He  died  at  Tolfrey  1756,  aged  87.  Tolfrey  is  near 
Fowey,  and  was  the  residence  of  the  Couche  family.  (Oliver,  Collections,  p.  33.) 
Fowey  occurs  in  the  Lists  for  1768,  1769,  and  I772*     Foley,  vii.  348. 

9  Trevethick  was  originally  the  seat  of  a  branch  of  the  Arundells  of  Lanherne, 
and  was  inherited  from  them  about  the  middle  of  the  seventeenth  century  by  the 
marriage  of  Richard  Rawe  or  Rowe  with  Bridget,  dau.  of  William  Arundell.  (Gil- 
bert's History  of  Cornwall, ) 

10  He  entered  the  Soc.  1687.  In  1 701-4  he  was  Missioner  in  the  Hereford  and 
South  Wales  District,  where  his  whole  career  was  spent ;  he  died  at  Hereford  1734, 
aged  65.  Hereford  occurs  in  the  Lists  for  1767,  1768,  1769,  and  1772,  but  the 
priest  was  living  "at  his  (own)  house."  During  the  same  period  there  was  another 
priest  at  Hereford  at  Mrs.  Bodenhams.     Foley,  vii.  135. 

11  He  entered  the  Soc.  1680;  in  1701  he  was  serving  the  missions  in  the  Derby- 
shire District,  and  is  found  at  Queniborough  in  1724.  He  died  at  Liege  in  1727, 
aged  70.     Foley,  vii.  287. 

12  Probably  Fr.  Giles  Poulton,  alias  Palmer,  who  entered  the  Soc.  1721.  He  was 
Missioner  at  Belgrave,  near  Leicester,  prior  to  1731.  From  1 737  to  1746  he  was  at 
Plowden,  co,  Salop.    He  died  in  London  1752,  aged  58,     Foley,  vii,  622, 


l8o  ADDRESSES   OF   THE    STATIONS    IN    ENGLAND 

77.  To  M1  John  Bodenham1  at  Courtfield,2  to  be  left  with  M1 
Lewis  mercer  in  Monmouth. 

78.  (To  Mr  [Jh.]  Hawker3  to  be  left  at  Mrs  Cranes  in  Lincoln 
can.) 

79.  (To  Mr  James  Blake4  at  M1'8  Mannocks  at  Bromley  Hall  near 
Colchester  (Essex  ins.)  can.) 

80.  To  M1*  Rob.  Widdrington  5  at  Biddleston  to  be  left  at  ye  Post 
house  in  Alnwick,  Northumbd. 

81.  (To  M™  Ann  Walgrave  next  door  to  ye  White  Lyon  in  S*  Giles8 
Norwich.6  with  succh  a  stroke,  can.) 

82.  To  Mr  (Richard  Mollyneux7  can.)  Tho  Maire8  at  Gateshead 
house  near  Newcastle  uppon  Tyne,  Northumberland. 

83.  To  Mr  Edw.  Sadler9  (at  ye  Swan  in  can.)  at  Mr  Resbrooks 
marget-End 10  near  Ingatestone,  Essex. 

84.  To  Mr  [Ric]  Billinge11  at  Garswood 12  near  Ashton  by  Warring- 
ton bagg,  Lancashire. 

85.  To  Mr  Walt:  Vavasor13  to  be  left  at  ye  White  Bull  in  Preston 
Lancashire. 

1  He  entered  the  Soc.  1 709.  From  1 724  to  1 740  he  was  Missioner  and  Chaplain 
at  Courtfield;  in  1740  he  was  Rector  of  Watten.  In  1 741  he  returned  to  England 
and  died  at  Croxteth  (Vise.  Molyneux')  1750.    Foley,  vii.  68. 

2  The  seat  of  the  Vaughans.  It  occurs  in  the  Lists  for  1767,  1768,  1769,  and 
1772. 

3  He  entered  the  Soc.  1704.  He  served  in  the  Lincolnshire  District  for  many 
years.  He  died  at  St.  Omer's  (being  too  infirm  to  bear  removal  at  the  expulsion  of 
the  Fathers)  1764,  aged  77.  Lincoln  (St.  Peter  at  Arches)  occurs  in  the  Lists  for 
1767,  1768,  1769,  and  1772.     Foley,  vii.  345. 

*  Alias  Cross.  He  entered  the  Soc.  1675.  He  was  Chaplain  at  Bromley  Hall 
from  1720  to  1728,  when  he  died,  aged  79.     Foley,  vii.  64. 

5  He  entered  the  Soc.  1679.  He  served  the  mission  of  Biddlestone  (the  seat  of 
the  Selby's)  for  many  years,  and  died  at  Durham  1 741/2,  aged  82.     Foley,  vii.  842. 

6  With  such  a  stroke,  i.e.  with  a  line  under  Norwich.  Norwich  (St.  Swithin's 
Lane)  occurs  in  the  Lists  for  1767,  1768,  1769,  and  1772. 

7  Where  he  is  the  senior  of  the  two  Fathers  Richard  Molyneux.  He  entered  the 
Soc.  171 5.  In  1724  and  following  years  he  was  Missioner  at  Gateshead.  From 
1733  to  1749  he  was  in  Maryland ;  he  became  Chaplain  to  the  Husseys  at  Marn- 
hull,  co.  Dorset,  in  1749.  and  removed  thence  to  Bonham,  co.  Wilts  (Lord  Stourton's), 
where  he  died  1766,  aged  70.     Foley,  vii.  514. 

8  He  entered  the  Soc.  1720;  served  the  mission  at  Gateshead  for  some  time; 
during  1740  he  was  in  the  Lancashire  District ;  he  died  at  Leicester  1752,  aged  49. 
Foley,  vii.  480. 

9  He  entered  the  Soc.  1690.  He  was  in  the  London  District  in  170 1.  In  1704 
he  was  at  Mr.  Resbroke's,  Marget  End.  He  died  at  Wealside,  Essex,  1751,  aged  83 . 
Foley,  vii.  678. 

™  Marget-end,  i.e.  Margaretting. 

11  He  entered  the  Soc.  1698  ;  served  the  missions  in  Lancashire  for  many  years  ; 
was  Superior  of  that  "  College"  in  1730,  and  died  in  that  District  1732/3,  aged  58. 
Foley,  vii.  58. 

12  This  was  a  seat  of  the  Gerards  of  Bryn,  and  not  the  house  now  called  Garswood 
(formerly  New  Hall).  Garswood  occurs  in  the  Lists  for  1767,  1768,  1769,  and 
1772. 

13  He  entered  the  Soc.  1681  ;  in  1701  and  1704  he  was  Missioner  in  the 
Lancashire  District,  and  about  1724  his  address  was  as  above,  "the  White  Bull, 
Preston"  He  became  4th  Baronet  of  Haslewood.  In  171 5  he  is  described  as  of 
Alston,  co.  Lancaster.  {Eng.  Cath.  Nonjurors  of  171 5,  Estcourt  and  Payne.) 
Preston  (Friargate)  occurs  in  the  Lists  for  1767,  1768,  1769,  and  1772. 
Foley,  vii.  796. 


SERVED    BY   THE   JESUIT   FATHERS,    1727-1734  l8l 

86.  To  Mr  Franc.  Jernegan1  at  Causey  Hall  near  Norwich. 

87.  To  Mr  Tho.  Brooke2  at  Tesmore  by  Bicester  bagg  Oxfordshire. 

88.  To  Mr  Wm  Mollyneux  3  at  Scholes  near  Prescot  Lancashre. 

89.  (To  Mr  Sam.  Musson  4  at  Blyborough  5  near  Kirton  in  Lindsey, 
Lincolnshire  can.) 

90.  To  Mr  Char.  Percy  6  to  be  left  wth  Mr  Knight  of  ye  Talbot  in 
Bromsgrove  Worcestershre. 

91.  To  M1  Ant.  Beddingfield  at  Fran.  B edding fields  7  Esqr  near 
Harlston,  Suffolk. 

92.  To  Mr  Steph.  Roberts8  at  Mr  Overburys  at  Barton  near 
Morton  in  Marsh  Gloucestershrc. 

93.  To  Mr  John  Pyat9  at  Esqre  Selbys  York. 

94.  To  Mr  Rob.  Constable  15  x 

95.  To  Mr  (Rich.  Caryl 10  can.)  Beaumont n  at  Bonham  by  Shafston 
bagg,  Dorsetshire. 

96.  (To  Mr  (Jos.  Constable 13  can.)  Brown 13  at  Esqre  Plowdens  in 
Worcester  can.) 

I  Otherwise  Jerningham.  He  entered  the  Soc.  1707.  He  was  at  Cossey  Hall, 
the  seat  of  his  family,  in  1724.  He  died  in  London  I739»  aged  51.  Foley, 
vii.  403. 

3  He  entered  the  Soc.  1701.  He  served  the  mission  at  Tusmore  (the  seat  of  the 
Termors)  for  many  years,  and  died  at  Ghent  1761,  aged  82.  Tusmore  occurs  in  the 
Lists  for  1767,  1768,  1769,  and  1772.    Foley,  vii.  91. 

3  He  entered  the  Soc.  1704;  for  many  years  served  the  mission  at  Scholes,  jiear 
Prescot,  Lancashire  ;  in  1728  he  was  declared  Rector  of  the  Lancashire  District; 
in  1745  he  became  7th  Viscount  Molyneux,  and  died  1759,  aged  76.  Scholes  occurs 
in  the  Lists  for  1767,  1768,  1769,  and  1772.     Foley,  vii.  514. 

4  He  entered  the  Soc.  1705.  He  served  the  missions  in  the  Lincolnshire  District 
or  many  years,  and  died  at  St.  Stephen's,  Canterbury,  1769,  aged  83.  Foley, 
vii.  535- 

5  The  seat  of  the  Southcotes,  Baronets. 

6  He  entered  the  Soc.  1685  ;  served  the  mission  of  Grafton  Manor,  co.  Wor- 
cester, for  many  years,  and  died  in  that  district  1735,  aged  71.     Foley,  vii.  585. 

7  Probably  Francis  Bedingfeld,  of  Redlingfield,  co.  Suffolk. 

8  Alias  Swindall.  He  entered  the  Soc.  1695  ;  served  missions  in  Gloucester- 
shire for  some  years  ;  died  at  Ghent  1758,  aged  81.     Foley,  vii.  753. 

9  Entered  the  Soc.  1706  ;  served  the  Yorkshire  missions  for  many  years  ;  in  I724 
was  at  Mr.  Selby'sat  York;  died  there  1743,  aged  57.  During  the  period  1767- 
1772  there  were  five  priests  at  York — at  Lady  Haggerston's,  1767,  1768,  1769; 
at  Mr.  Meynel's,  1767,  1768,  1769,  1772;  at  Mrs.  More's,  Colliergate,  1767,  1768, 
1769,  1772  ;  at  Mr.  Dalton's,  1767,  1768,  1769;  and  at  "  Monast "  (?the  Convent) 
in  1772.     Foley,  vii.  597. 

10  He  entered  the  Soc.  171 1 ;  in  1722  he  was  at  Lul  worth,  co.  Dorset;  then  at 
Ladyholt,  co.  Sussex.  He  left  Ladyholt  about  1724,  and  was  stationed  at  Bonham, 
co.  Somerset;  in  1727  went  to  Cheesburn  Grange,  near  Hexham  (the  seat  of 
Widdringtons)  ;  he  went  to  Stape  Hill  in  1745.  and  died  there  175 1,  aged  58. 
Foley,  vii.  122.  * 

II  Father  William  Beaumont  entered  the  Soc.  171 8  ;  served  in  the  Devon  and 
Cornwall  Districts,  and  at  Bonham  and  Lulworth  in  the  Hampshire  District ;  he 
died  1764,  aged  85.  Bonham  occurs  in  the  Lists  for  1767,  1768,  1769,  and  1772. 
Foley,  vii.  44. 

"  Otherwise  Marmaduke  Constable.  He  entered  the  Soc.  1690;  from  1704  to 
1708  he  was  serving  in  the  Suffolk  District;  about  1724  he  was  residing  with  Mr. 
Plowden  at  Worcester,  and  later  at  Sherington,  co.  Hereford;  in  1741  he  was  in 
the  London  District,  and  died  at  Watten  1750,  aged  78.     Foley,  vii.  159. 

13  It  is  impossible  to  decide  which  of  the  various  Frs.  Brown  this  Fr.  can  be 
identified  with.  Worcester  (Townditch)  occurs  in  the  Lists  for  1767,  1768,  1769, 
and  1772. 


182  ADDRESSES   OF   THE   STATIONS   IN    ENGLAND 

97.  (To  Mr  Geo.  Brinckhurst x  at  Furnix  Pelham  by  Puckeridge  bagg 
Hartfordshire  can.) 

98.  To  Mr  (Christ.  Burton2  can.)  [Jh.]  Bennet3  at  Lytham4  to  be 
left  at  ye  (White  Bull  can.)  Posthouse  in  Preston,  Lancashire. 

99.  (To  Mr  Franc.  Andrews 5  [alias  Evans  ins.]  at  the  Priory  in 
Monmouth  can.) 

100.  To  Mr  (Franc.  Mannock6  can.)  (Richard  Kingsley 7  can.)  at 
Ellingham8  near  Alnwick,  Northumberland.  Franc.  Arthur ■,  Wm 
Kingsley. 

101.  (To  Mr  Rich.  Barard9  near  Welsh  Pool,  Montgomery- 
shire can.) 

102.  (To  Mr  [Wm]  Brinckhurst  at  Mrs  Brighams,  York  can.) 

103.  To  Mr  Ch.  Brockholes 10  at  Blackroad  to  be  left  at  ye  Post 
house  in  Wigan,  Lancashre. 

104.  To  Mr  Ch.  Caryl11  at  Gerard  Bromley12  to  be  left  at  Black- 
brook  by  Stone  bagg,  Staffordshire. 

105.  To  Mr  (John  Chapman  can.)  ([Tho.]  Whitgrave13  ins.)  at 
Salden  near  Winslow,  Bucks. 

I  He  entered  the  Soc.  1694.  Between  1726  and  1730  he  was  Missioner  at 
Furnix  Pelham,  Hertfordshire,  and  died  at  St.  Omer's  1739,  aged  65.  Furnix  Pelham 
is  more  correctly  Pelham  Furneux,  and  was  in  171 5  the  seat  of  John  Francis  New- 
port, Esq.    (Escourt  and  Payne,  Eng.  Cath.  Nonjurors.)     Foley,  vii.  87  and  500. 

3  Entered  the  Soc.  1693  J  served  the  missions  of  Formby  and  Lytham,  co. 
Lancaster,  for  many  years  ;  died  at  Watten  1744,  aged  73.     Foley,  vii.  104. 

3  Alias  or  vere  Gosling. 

4  The  seat  of  the  Cliftons.  It  occurs  in  the  Lists  for  1767,  1768,  1769,  and 
1772. 

5  Entered  the  Soc.  1679  ;  served  in  the  Hereford  and  South  Wales  District;  in 
1724  he  was  at  the  Priory,  Monmouth,  where  he  died  1727,  aged  68.  Foley, 
vii.  12. 

8  Alias  Arthur.  Entered  the  Soc.  1686  ;  in  1701  he  was  Chaplain  to  Mr. 
Fitzherbert,  of  Chester  ;  in  17 10  he  was  a  Missioner  in  Liverpool ;  in  1741  he  was  in 
the  Yorkshire  District ;  he  died  at  York  1748,  aged  78.     Foley,  vii.  485. 

7  No  Father  of  this  name  in  Foley.  There  is,  however,  a  Fr.  William  Kingsley 
(vii.  420)  who  entered  the  Soc.  171 3,  was  at  Ellingham  in  1731,  and  died  there 
1734.  aged  38. 

8  A  seat  of  the  Haggerstons.  It  occurs  in  the  Lists  for  1767,  1768,  1769,  and 
1772. 

9  Or  Barret.  He  entered  the  Soc.  1690;  in  1704  was  a  Missioner  in  the 
London  District ;  in  1 724  he  was  near  Welshpool ;  he  died  at  Watten  1 740,  aged  79. 
Foley,  vii.  34. 

10  He  entered  the  Soc.  1705 ;  from  1711  to  1716  he  was  in  Maryland  ;  he  served 
at  Blackrod  and  Wigan  for  many  years,  and  died  at  Wigan  1759,  aged  75.  Foley, 
vii.  87. 

II  He  entered  the  Soc.  1704.  He  was  at  Gerard's  Bromley  in  1724,  and  was  at 
Stapehill,  co.  Dorset,  from  1738  till  his  death  there  in  1745,  aSed  64.  Foley, 
vii.  122. 

12  Formerly  the  seat  of  the  Lords  Gerard  of  Bromley.  The  old  mission  at  Gerard's 
Bromley  is  now  represented  by  that  at  Ashley,  where  there  is  a  competent  chapel, 
school,  and  priest's  house,  a  fair  congregation,  and  a  suitable  endowment.  For  some 
reason,  for  a  long  period  there  was  no  resident  priest,  while  the  altar  end  of  the  church 
was  converted  into  a  cottage.  It  has  recently  been  resuscitated,  and  once  again  has 
a  resident  priest.  Blackbrook  is  a  hamlet  in  the  parish  of  Maer,  on  the  road  from 
Newcastle  (Staffs.)  to  Market  Drayton.  Bromley  occurs  in  the  Lists  for  1767,  1768, 
1769,  and  1772. 

13  Salden  was  until  1729,  when  Sir  Francis,  the  fourth  and  last  Baronet,  died,  the 
seat  of  the  Fortescues. 


SERVED   BY   THE   JESUIT   FATHERS,    1727-1734  1 83 

106.  To  Mr  (John  Champion  1  can.)  Corby  at  Brugh  a  by  Beddle  3 
bagg  to  be  left  at  Brampton  uppon  Swale)  Yorkshire. 

107.  To  Mr  Wm  Clifton  4  near  Ince  Blundel5  to  be  left  at  ye  Post- 
house  in  Leverpool,  Lancashire. 

108.  To  Mr  William  Collins  6  to  be  left  wth  Mr  Knight  at  ye  Talbot 
Inn,  Bromsgrove,  Worcestershire. 

109.  (To  Mr  Ign.  Constable  7     Do.     can.) 

no.  To  M1'  Wm  Dormer  8  at  ye  Priory  in  Monmouth, 
in.  (To  Mr  Eccop9  at  Mrs  Sales  at  Graveoak  near  Leigh  by 
Warrington  bagg,  Lancashire  can.) 

112.  To  Mr  John  Gifford10  at  Danby  near  Bedall,  Yorkshire. 

113.  (To  Mr  Tho.  Green11  at  Chame  by  Croydon  bagg,  Surrey 
can.) 

1 14.  To  Mr  John  Hardestie 12  at  his  house  in  Leverpool,  Lancashire. 
Jh:  Lallart. 

115.  To  MrTho.  Hildyard13at  Rotherwors  to  be  left  at  ye  Post- 
house  in  Hereford.     Owen  Kingsley. 

116.  To  Mr  (John  Hill  canj  ([Jh.]  Scudamore  ins.)  to  be  left  with 
Tho.  Hopkins  in  Pile  near  Margam,  Glamorganshire. 

117.  (To  Mr  John  Holland  14  at  Penybont  to  be  left  with  ye  Post- 
master at  Oswestre  by  Salop  bagg.  Shropshire  can.) 

I  He  entered  the  Soc.  1713.  In  1724  he  was  at  Brough,  co.  York;  about  1727 
at  Sawston,  co.  Cambs,  the  seat  of  the  Huddlestons,  where  he  lived  many  years. 
He  died  1776,  aged  81.     Foley,  vii.  127. 

3  Or  Brough,  near  Catterick,  the  seat^  of  the  Lawsons.  It  occurs  in  the  Lists  for 
1767,  1768,  1769,  and  1772. 

3  i.e.  Bedale. 

4  He  entered  the  Soc.  1699  ;  served  the  mission  of  Formby,  co.  Lancaster,  for 
nearly  thirty  years,  and  died  there  1749,  aged  71.     Foley,  vii.  141. 

5  The  seat  of  the  Blundells,  a  few  miles  from  Formby.  It  occurs  in  the  Lists  for 
1767,  1768,  1769,  and  1772. 

•  He  is  the  younger  of  the  two  Frs.  William  Collins.  He  entered  the  Soc.  1704 ; 
in  1 72 1  he  was  sent  to  the  Worcester  District,  and  probably  served  the  Grafton 
Mission.     He  died  1745,  aged  62.     Foley,  vii.  150. 

7  Alias  Place.  He  entered  the  Soc.  1709  ;  he  served  in  the  Worcester  District, 
probably  at  Grafton,  and  died  1727,  aged  63.     Foley,  vii.  158. 

8  He  entered  the  Soc.  17 14.  He  served  at  the  Priory,  Monmouth,  also  in  the 
Suffolk  District,  and  died  at  Stapehill,  Dorset,  1758,  aged  68.     Foley,  vii.  207. 

9  He  entered  the  Soc.  1715.  In  1724  he  was  at  Mrs.  Sales'.  He  died  in  London 
1735,  aged  38.     Foley,  vii.  220. 

10  Or  Giffard.  He  entered  the  Soc.  1705.  He  was  at  Danby  (the  seat  of  the 
Scropes)  for  many  years  ;  from  1741  till  his  death  in  1757,  aged  74,  he  was  at 
St.  Omer's.  Danby  occurs  in  the  Lists  for  1767,  1768,  1769,  and  1772.  Foley, 
vii.  301. 

II  Possibly  the  Fr.  Thomas  Westby  alias  Green.  He  entered  the  Soc.  1 724;  served 
the  Hampshire  Mission  for  some  years,  and  died  there  1735/6,  aged  32.  Foley, 
vii.  829  and  909.     See  C.A\S.  ii.  314. 

11  Alias  John  Tempest.  See  note  above,  under  No.  7,  "  Hilton  "  (Rome).  Liver- 
pool (Edmond  Street)  occurs  in  the  Lists  for  1767,  1768,  1769,  and  1772.  See 
C.R.S.  ix.  182. 

13  He  entered  the  Soc.  1 707.  He  was  many  years  a  Missioner  in  the  Hereford 
and  South  Wales  District.  He  died  at  Rotherwas  (the  seat  of  the  Bodenhams)  1746, 
aged  56.     Foley,  vii.  360. 

14  Alias  Martindale.  He  entered  the  Soc.  1690;  he  was  at  Penybont  in  1724. 
He  had  previously  served  in  the  Lincolnshire  District  1 701-4.  He  died  1734, 
aged  68.     Foley,  vii.  367  and  491. 


I84  ADDRESSES   OF   THE   STATIONS   IN    ENGLAND 

118.  To  Mr  Richard  Holland1  at  Warder  Castle2  near  Salisbury, 
Wiltshire. 

119.  To  Mv  Wm  Howard  3  at  M1S  Thorpes  at  Danthorpe  to  be  left 
with  Mr  Wood  grocer  in  Hull,  Yorkshire. 

1 20.  To  Mr  Pet.  Inghilby  4  at  Sanford  to  be  left  at  yc  (Mitre  can  ) 
Star  in  Oxford. 

121.  To  Mr  (Tho.  Inghilby  5  can.)  ([Rob.]  Garbet  can)  Whetenhall 
at  Lullworth  Castle  by  Waram  6  bagg,  Dorsetshire. 

122.  To  Mr  John  Jones  7  at  Frickley  to  be  left  at  ye  Posthouse  in 
Doncaster,  Yorkshire. 

123.  To  Mr  Hen.  Kemp8  at  Wotten  near  Henley,  by  Stratford 
uppon  Avon  bagg,  Warwicksh. 

124.  To  Mr  Wm  Lane  9  at  Padwell  near  Southampton,  Hampshre. 

125.  To  Mr  (Hen.  Leigh  10  can)  Robinson11  to  be  left  at  ye  (White 
Bull  can.)  Posthouse  in  Preston,  Lancash:     Alex:  Leigh. 

126.  To  Mr  Richard  Levinge12  at  Holt  to  be  left  at  ye  Posthouse 
in  Harborough,  Leicestershire. 

127.  To  Mr  John  Masie13  at  West  Grinsted  by  Horsham  bagg 
Sussex. 

1  Or  Joseph  Holland.  He  entered  the  Soc.  1697  ;  he  served  in  the  Hampshire 
District  for  many  years  ;  Wardour  Castle  was  probably  his  principal  residence.  He 
died  1740,  aged  64.     Foley,  vii.  366. 

2  The  seat  of  the  Lords  Arundell,  of  Wardour.  It  occurs  in  the  Lists  for  1767, 
1768,  1769,  and  1772. 

3  He  entered  the  Soc.  1713  ;  in  1724  he  was  at  Danthorpe;  after  serving  in  the 
Yorkshire  District  for  many  years,  he  died  at  Watten  1770,  aged  83.  Foley, 
vii.  375- 

4  He  entered  the  Soc.  17 12.  In  1724  he  was  at  Sandford  (on  Thames),  co. 
Oxford.  He  died  in  Lancashire  I741.  aged  50.  Sandford  was  the  seat  of  the 
Powells  and  later  of  the  Curzons.     Foley,  vii.  391. 

6  He  entered  the  Soc.  1703.  He  was  Chaplain  for  some  years  to  the  Welds  at 
Lulworth  (from  1723  to  about  1729).  He  died  in  Paris  1729,  aged  45.  Lul worth 
occurs  in  the  Lists  for  1767,  1768,  1769,  and  1772.     Foley,  vii.  392. 

6  i.e.  Wareham. 

7  He  entered  the  Soc.  1709;  served  the  mission  of  Frickley  (the  seat  of  the 
Annes),  and  died  in  the  Yorkshire  District  1748,  aged  65.     Foley,  vii.  407. 

8  He  entered  the  Soc.  1691  ;  in  1701  he  was  serving  in  the  Hampshire  District ; 
in  1724  and  later  he  was  at  Wooton-Wawen  (the  seat  of  the  Smiths,  alias  Carrington, 
Lords  Carrington),  and  died  there  1737,  aged  65.     Foley,  vii.  412. 

9  He  entered  the  Soc.  1699  ;  he  was  Missioner  at  Slindon  (the  seat  of  the  Kemps 
and  later  of  the  Eyres),  co.  Sussex,  and  at  Padwell,  both  in  the  Hampshire  District. 
He  died  at  Winchester  1752,  aged  80.     Foley,  vii.  432. 

10  There  is  no  Henry  Leigh  in  Foley,  but  probably  this  is  intended  for  Alexander 
Leigh,  whose  name  also  occurs  under  this  heading.  Alexander  Leigh,  alias  John 
Layton,  entered  the  Soc.  1700.  In  1712  to  1719  he  was  a  Missioner  in  Worcester 
and  that  District;  in  1728-29  he  was  in  the  Suffolk  District,  and  in  1730  was  at 
Preston,  where  he  purchased  a  house  in  Friargate  in  1733  ;  in  1741  he  was  in  the 
Durham  District.     He  died  1748,  aged  6y.     Foley,  vii.  448. 

11  Alias  Gasine  or  Gazain.  He  entered  the  Soc.  171 8  ;  in  1732  was  a  Missioner 
in  the  Lancashire  District.     He  died  at  Preston  1742,  aged  43.     P'oley,  vii.  658. 

12  He  entered  the  Soc.  1705.  He  was  Rector  of  the  Derbyshire  District  in  1738, 
and  Missioner  at  Holt,  co.  Leicester,  the  seat  of  the  Nevilles.  He  died  probably  at 
Holt  1745,  aged  58.  Holt  occurs  in  the  Lists  for  1767,  1768,  1769,  and  1772. 
Foley,  vii.  455. 

13  Or  Massie,  alias  or  vere  Hodges.  He  entered  the  Soc.  171 7.  He  served  the 
mission  of  West  Grinstead  for  some  years,  about  1726,  and  died  at  Hereford  1760, 
aged  62.     Foley,  vii.  492. 


SERVED    BY   THE   JESUIT    FATHERS,    1727-1734  185 

128.  To  Mr(Rich.  Meredith1  can.) i  (Dean  ins.)  at  Mrs  Tichburns 
at  Shirefield  by  Rumsey  bagg,  Hampshire. 

129.  To  Mr  John  Messenger2  at  Brough-Wallis  to  be  left  at  ye 
three  Cranes  in  Doncaster  Yorkshire. 

130.  To  Mr  James  Meynel 3  at  Mr  Thompsons  in  Pontefract  by 
Ferrybridge  bagg,  Yorkshire. 

131.  To  Mr  Hen.  Mollyneux4  (att  Hedg-court  near  East  Grinsted 
Sussex  ins.). 

132.  To  Mr  Rich.  More  at  ye  Starr  in  Holywell  by  Northorp  bagg, 
Flintshire.     (Left  Holywell  1731  ins.) 

133.  To  Mr  Corn.  Murphy5  at  Scarisbrick  6  near  Ormskirck, 
Lancashire. 

134.  To  Mr  Perce  Moystin  7  at  his  house  in  Wigan,  Lancash. 

135.  To  M1'  John  Musson  8  at  ye  Bell  tree  in  Bath. 

136.  To  Mr  (Geo.  Palmer9  can.)  [Rob.]  Petre  at  Eccleston10 
Hall  near  Prescot,  Lancashire. 

137.  (To  Mr  Wm  Pennington11  at  Mr  Hardesties  in  Liverpool 
Lancre  can.) 

138.  To  Mr  Tho.  Petre12  at  Walton-hall  near  Wakefield,  Yorksh16. 

139.  To  Mr  James  Pool 13  at  Mrs  Bincks'  in  Richmond  Yorksh1*. 

1  He  entered  the  Soc.  17 16.  In  1743  he  was  declared  Rector  of  the  Lincoln- 
shire District ;  in  1 724  he  was  at  Shirefield  ;  when  in  Lincolnshire  his  address  was 
Little  Ponton,  near  Grantham.  lie  died  at  St.  Omer's  1754.  aged  58.  Foley, 
vii.  502. 

2  He  entered  the  Soc.  1 708.  He  was  many  years  at  Burghwallis,  the  seat  of  the 
Annes,  and  died  there  1752,  aged  64.  Burghwallis  occurs  in  the  Lists  for  1769  and 
1772;  during  1767  and  1768  the  priest  appears  to  have  lived  at  Winkhouse,  near 
Doncaster.     Foley,  vii.  502. 

3  He  entered  the  Soc.  1708;  was  Missioner  at  Pontefract  for  some  years,  and 
died  1746,  aged  57.     Foley,  vii.  504. 

4  He  entered  the  Soc.  171 3.  In  1724  he  was  at  East  Grinsted;  then  at  Bury 
St.  Edmunds,  and  later  in  the  Hampshire  District.  He  died  at  Redhill,  Surrey, 
I77It  aged  78.     Foley  vii.  513. 

5  He  entered  the  Soc.  171 1  ;  served  the  Lancashire  Missions  for  many  years  ; 
removed  to  London  about  1748-9  ;  and  died  there  1766.     Foley,  vii.  533. 

6  The  seat  of  the  family  of  the  same  name.  Scarisbrick  occurs  in  the  Lists  for 
1767,  1768,  and  1769. 

7  He  entered  the  Soc.  1707  ;  served  the  Wigan  Mission  for  some  years,  and  died 
there  1735,  aged  45.  He  became  3rd  Baronet  in  1720.  Wigan  (Standish  Gate) 
occurs  in  the  Lists  for  1767,  1768,  1769,  and  I772«     Foley,  vii.  530, 

8  He  entered  the  Soc.  1699  ;  became  Chaplain  to  the  Nevilles  at  Holt  in  1724  ; 
he  was  at  Bath  about  1726;  he  died  at  Winchester  1755,  aged  75.  Bath  (Mr. 
Porter's  and  Mr.  Dalton's)  occurs  in  the  Lists  for  1769  and  1772.     Foley,  vii.  535. 

9  He  entered  the  Soc.  171 3  ;  served  the  missions  of  Eccleston  and  Slatedeph, 
and  died  1758,  aged  66.     Foley,  vii.  565. 

10  The  seat  of  the  family  of  that  name.  It  occurs  in  the  Lists  for  1767,  1768, 
1769,  and  1772. 

11  He  entered  the  Soc.  1681  ;  in  1689  he  was  at  Sawston,  co.  Cambridge;  in 
1 701  and  1704  in  the  Derbyshire  District  ;  about  I724  in  Liverpool,  where  he  died 
1736,  aged  75.     Foley,  vii.  584. 

12  He  entered  the  Soc.  1679;  was  many  years  Chaplain  at  Walton  Hall,  the  seat 
of  the  Watertons,  where  he  died  1729,  aged  66.  Walton  occurs  in  the  Lists  for 
1769  and  1772.     Foley,  vii.  595. 

13  Alias  Foxe.  He  entered  the  Soc.  1 707  ;  nearly  all  his  missionary  career  was 
spent  in  Yorkshire ;  in  1 724  he  was  at  Richmond  ;  he  died  in  the  Derbyshire  Dis- 
trict 1760,  aged  75.  Richmond  occurs  in  the  Lists  for  1767,  1768,  1769,  and  1772. 
Foley,  vii.  612. 


l86  ADDRESSES    OF   THE   STATIONS   IN    ENGLAND 

140.  To  Mr  (Giles  Pulton  can.)  Kingsley  at  Belgrave  near  Leicester. 

141.  To  Mr  (John  Richardson1  can.)  [Geo.]  Palmer  (at  Brindle 
can.)  to  be  left  at  ye  (Posthouse  can. ;  White  Bull  can.)  Mitre  in  Preston, 
Lancashire. 

142.  To  Mr  Richard  Richardson.2 

143.  To  Mr  Tho.  Risdon  at  the  Ld  Cliffords  at  (Ubrock  can.) 
Ugbrook  near  Chudleigh,  Devonshre. 

144.  To  Mr  Tho.  Ryther. 

145.  To  Mr  Hen.  Sheldon  3  (Brussells  ins.)  Edm:  Thorold  erased. 

146.  To  Mr  Franc.  Simons.4 

147.  To  Mr  (Edm.  Smith  5  can)  to  be  left  at  Apothecary  Gerards  in 
Wigan,  Lancashire. 

148.  To  Mr  Hill  at  Nettham  Torys  in  Winburn,  Dorsetshire  (alias 
Charles  Stafford  6  at  Canford 7  ins.). 

149.  (To  Mr  (Wignal8  can.)  at  Mr  Walpoles  at  Dunston  near 
Lincoln  can.) 

150.  To  Mr  Franc.  Williams9  at  Ince  Blundel  near  Leverpool, 
Lancashire. 

151.  To  Mr  (Edw.  Withy10  can.)  Wright  at  Warder  Castle  near 
Salisbury,  Wilts. 

152.  To  Mr  Charles  Travagnion11  at  Marshgate  near  Richmond 
Surrey.     Penny  post. 

153.  (To  Mr  [Wm]  Copley  at  Sutton  Coldfield  by  Coleshill  bagg, 
Warwickshire  can.) 

154.  To  Mr  [Mich.]  Dean  at  Mrs  Tichbum's  of  Shirefield  by  Rumsey 
bagg,  Hampshire. 

1  He  entered  the  Soc.  1684;  was  in  Lancashire  in  1700,  and  served  there  for 
many  years  ;  from  1724  to  1728  he  was  stationed  at  Brindle.  He  died  1728,  aged 
66.     See  Cath.  Rec.  Soc.  vol.  iv.  p.  434-     Foley,  vii.  647. 

2  He  entered  the  Soc.  1690 ;  in  1701,  and  later,  he  was  at  Dutton  Lodge  in  the 
Lancashire  District.     He  died  at  St.  Omer's  1738,  aged  69.     Foley,  vii.  647. 

3  He  entered  the  Soc.  1705.  In  1738  he  was  appointed  Rector  of  the  Eng. 
Coll.,  Rome  ;  became  Provincial  1744  ;  in  175 1  he  again  became  Rector  at  Rome, 
where  he  died  1756,  aged  70.     Foley,  vii.  704. 

4  Or  Simeon:  vere  Francis  Plowden.  He  entered  the  Soc.  1682;  in  1693  he 
was  Minister  at  Watten;  in  1701  and  1704  Procurator  at  Paris;  in  1728  at 
Antwerp;  in  1730  again  at  Paris;  he  died  at  Watten  1736,  aged  74.  Foley,  vii. 
712  and  603. 

5  He  entered  the  Soc.  1689/90.  In  1701  or  earlier  he  was  at  Crossen  (sic,  but  is 
not  Croston  intended?),  co.  Lancaster ;  in  1704  and  later  he  was  at  Wigan.  He  died 
l727%  aged  61.     Foley,  vii.  716. 

•  He  entered  the  Soc.  1676;  was  sent  to  London  1696;  served  in  the  Hamp- 
shire District  for  some  years,  and  died  at  Ghent  1732,  aged  80.     Foley,  vii.  717. 

7  The  seat  of  the  Webbes. 

8  He  entered  the  Soc.  1697  ;  in  1724,  and  later,  he  was  at  Mr.  Walpole's.  He 
died  in  that  mission  1728,  aged  48.     Foley,  vii.  843. 

9  Alias  or  vere  Beaumont.  He  entered  the  Soc.  1702.  He  was  serving  in  the 
Maryland  Mission  from  about  171 1  for  seven  years,  and  at  Ince  Blundell  for  most  of 
the  rest  of  his  life.     He  died  there  1738,  aged  56.     Foley,  vii.  43  and  845. 

10  He  entered  the  Soc.  1707  ;  in  1724  he  was  at  Wardour,  the  seat  of  the  Lords 
Arundell;  in  1730  he  was  in  Paris  ;  in  1741  he  was  in  the  Hampshire  District;  in 
1752  he  was  declared  Rector  of  the  London  District ;  in  1759  of  Liege,  where  he 
died  1769,  aged  80.     Foley,  vii.  854. 

11  He  entered  the  Soc.  1685  under  the  name  of  Drummond  ;  from  1695  to  1699 
he  was  in  the  Suffolk  District  ;  in  1704  in  the  London  District ;  he  died  there  1737, 
aged  70.     Foley,  vii.  783  ;  and  C.R.S.  vol.  vii.,  Richmond  Registers. 


SERVED   BY   THE   JESUIT   FATHERS,    1727-1734  187 

155.  To  Mr  Brown1  at  Reasby  to  be  left  at  Langworth  Inn  near 
Lincoln.     Sam.  Musson. 

156.  To  Mr  [Wm]  Lane2  at  Slinden  near  Arundel,  Sussex. 

157.  (To  Mr[Vinc.]  Philip 3  at  Giffords-Hall  near  Stoke  by  Box- 
ford  bagg  Suffolk  can.) 

158.  To  Mr  [Jh.]  Hawker  at  Mr  (Twell  Attorney  at  Law  can)  Mil- 
lingtons,  in  Lincoln.4 

159.  (To  Mr  [Jh.]  Chapman  Junr,  at  ye  Spittle  to  be  left  at  Mr 
Hobbies  in  Windsor,  Berks  can.) 

160.  To  Mr  [Will.]  Beaumont  at  Bonham  by  Shafston  bagg,  Dorset- 
shire. 

161.  To  Mr  Haymand  [alias  Pearse  ins.]  at  Mrs  Roos  at  Trevithick 
near  S.  Colombs.  Cornwall.     [See  also  N°  74  (Foley's  hand).] 

162.  To  Mr  Nevill 5  at  Mr  Pickerings  at  ye  White  horse  in  Woman s 
fMarket  Warwick.     Edw.  Scarisbrick. 

163.  To  Mr  [Hen.]  Stanley  at  Sir  Fran.  Cursons  at  (Great  Milton 
can)  Water  Perry  near  Tetsworth,  Oxfordshire. 

164.  To  Mr  [Rob.]  Colling  wood6  at  Black  Ladys  to  be  left  wth 
Mr  Murson  at  ye  Star  in  Woolverhampton,  Staffordshire. 

165.  To  Mr[Jos.]  Wright  at  Warder  Castle  near  Salisbury,  Wilts. 

166.  To  Mr  [Jh.]  Harper 7  at  Wesby  to  be  left  at  ye  Posthouse  in 
Preston,  Lancashire. 

167.  To  IP  ([Jh.]  Inglefield  can)  R  Molineux  at  Mr  Husseys  at 
Marnhull 8  near  Shafsbury,  Dorsetshire. 

168.  To  Mr  Brown9  at  Dunston  near  Lincoln.     Sam.  Musson. 

169.  To  Mr([Jh.]  Jackson10  can.) Leckonby  n  at  Croston  Hall12 
near  Chorley  by  Wigan  bagg,  Lancashire.    Jh.  Johnson™ 

170.  To  Mr  ([Ch.]  Tempest  can.)  ([Jh.]  Ingilfield  can.)  at  Clytha14 
to  be  left  wth  MrTho:  Lewis  mercer  in  Monmouth. 

171.  To  Mr  Rich(1  Caryk 15  at  Cheesbum  Grange  near  Newcastle, 
Northumbd. 

1  Otherwise  [Samuel]  Musson.     Foley,  vii.  94  and  535. 

2  Slindon  was  the  seat  of  the  Kemps,  and  passed  from  them  to  the  Eyres,  of 
Hassop,  co.  Derby.     It  occurs  in  the  Lists  for  1767,  1768,  1769,  and  1772. 

3  Gifford's  Hall  was  the  seat  of  the  Mannocks.  It  occurs  in  the  Lists  for  1 767, 
1768,  1769,  and  1772. 

4  Probably  John  Millington,  baker,  of  St.  Peter  at  Arches  Parish,  Cath.  Non- 
Juror,  17 17.     (J.  O.  Payne  and  C.R.S.  iv.) 

6  Vere  [Edw.]  Scarisbrick. 

8  Blackladys'  was  the  property  of  a  branch  of  the  Giffards  of  Chillington. 

7  Vere  Berington.  He  entered  the  Soc.  1691  ;  in  1701  and  1704  he  was  at  Mr. 
Herketh's,  of  the  Meols,  co.  Lancaster  ;  about  1724  he  was  at  Westby,  a  seat  of  the 
Cliftons,  of  Lytham.  He  died  1743,  aged  70.  Westby  occurs  in  the  Lists  for  1767, 
1768,  1769,  and  1772.     Foley,  vii.  54  and  334. 

8  Marnhull  occurs  in  the  Lists  for  1768. 

9  Vere  Musson.     See  Foley,  vii.  94  and  535. 

10  He  entered  the  Soc.  17 19;  about  1746  he  was  Superior  of  the  Oxford  Dis- 
trict; he  also  served  in  the  Lancashire  District ;  was  at  Croston  in  1752  ;  and  died 
in  the  same  year  at  Liege  (or  Spa),  aged  54.     Foley,  vii.  896. 

11  Fr.  Richard  Leckonby  served  many  years  in  Lancashire.     Foley,  vii.  445. 

12  A  seat  of  the  Traffords.    It  occurs  in  the  Lists  for  1767,  1768,  1769,  and  1772. 

13  An  alias  for  John  Jackson,  supra. 

14  A  seat  of  the  Jones's,  now  Herberts. 

15  Cheeseburn  Grange  was  a  seat  of  the  Widdringtons,  and  later  of  the  Riddells. 


N 


1 88  ADDRESSES   OF   THE    STATIONS   IN    ENGLAND 

172.  To  Mr  Richard  Cotton x  [Mr  Phillipps — but  this  is  not  cancelled] 
at  Mr  Stockdales  in  Chappel  fields  Norwich. 

173.  To  M1*  Marshall2  at  Mr  Fermors  in  Erie  Street  Joblins  Lays, 
Bristol. 

174.  To  Mr  Lallart  at  Squire  Whettenhalls  at  East-mulling  near 
Tunbridge,  Kent. 

175.  To  Mr  Owen  Kingsley  at  Mr  Byerley's  at  (Bla  can.)  Belgrave 
near  Leicester. 

176.  To  Mr  Edward  Scarisbrick  [Senr] 3  att  Bushy  Hall  near  Wat- 
ford Hertfordshire. 

176A.  To  Mr  Fr:   Dormer4  at  j  CoTe'sTord^*^  }  by  Gloucester 
Bag. 

176B.  To  Mr  Thorpe  5  at  Mr  Northouse's  Bird  Gate,  Leeds. 

177.  To  Mr  Richd  Boucher6  att  Esq1  Chichester  (att  can.)  Arling- 
ton near  Barnstaple,  In  Devonshire. 

178.  To  Mr  Will"'  Boucher  att  Aston  7  near  Stone,  Staffordshire. 

179.  To  MrPlowden8  at  Plowden  near  Bishops  Castle,  Shropshire. 

180.  To  Mr  [Jos.]  Constable  at  Sherington  near  Weobley,  Here- 
fordshire. 

181.  To  Mr  Fairfax9  at  Stape  Hill  near  Wimboorn,  Dorsetshire. 
Gild.  Grey. 

182.  To  Mr  Hacon 10  at  Mrs  Ferrers  at  Sutton  Coldfield  by  Coles  hill 
bag,  Warwickshire.     Ch.  Williams. 

183.  To  M1  Isaac  Gibson11  at  Wm  Watsons  Esq1'  at  Norton  near 
Tewksbury,  Gloucestershire. 

1  Fr.  Richard  Cotton,  alias  Phillips,  entered  the  Soc.  1681  ;  was  at  Norwich  for 
some  years  ;  and  died  1740,  aged  75.     Foley,  vii.  177. 

2  He  entered  the  Soc.  1708  ;  was  at  Mr.  Termor's  at  Bristol  in  1724  ;  in  1734 
he  became  Rector  of  the  Eng.  Coll.,  Rome  ;  he  died  there  1739,  aged  56.  Bristol 
("at  Mrs.  Grosvenor's,  St.  Michells")  occurs  1767,  1768,  1769,  and  1772.  Foley, 
vii.  489. 

3  He  entered  the  Soc.  1682,  under  the  name  of  Neville  ;  in  1700/1  he  was  Mis- 
sioner  in  the  Derbyshire  District  and  Chaplain  to  the  Cliftons,  of  Clifton,  co.  Notts  ;  in 
1 703/4  he  was  in  the  Lancashire  District ;  in  1707/8  again  in  the  Derbyshire  Dis- 
trict;  in  1735  he  was  in  the  London  District,  where  he  died  that  year,  aged  72. 
Foley,  vii.  687. 

4  He  entered  the  Soc.  1734;  he  served  in  the  South  Wales  and  Hereford  Dis- 
tricts, and  died  at  Cherry  Orchard,  Colesford,  co.  Gloucester  (Lord  Gage's),  1770, 
aged  53.  Cherry  Orchard  occurs  in  the  Lists  for  1767,  1768,  and  1769.  Foley, 
vii.  206. 

6  There  is  no  Fr.  Thorpe  in  Foley  that  fits  in  with  the  dates  of  the  MSS. 

6  Arlington  occurs  in  the  Lists  for  1767,  1768,  1769,  and  1772. 

7  A  seat  of  the  Simeons,  and  later  the  property  of  the  Welds.  Aston  occurs  in 
the  Lists  for  1769  and  1772. 

8  Possibly  the  Fr.  Edmund  Plowden,  alias  Gage,  who  entered  the  Soc.  1682  ; 
was  in  the  Staffordshire  District  1701  and  1704,  and  in  1727  was  in  the  London 
District.}*  He  died  at  Ghent  1740,  aged  77.  Plowden  occurs  in  the  Lists  for  1767, 
1768,  1769,  and  1772.     Foley,  vii.  603. 

9  Stapehill  was  then  the  property  of  Lord  Arundell.  It  occurs  in  the  Lists  for 
1767,  1768,  1769,  and  1772. 

10  Alias  Charles  Williams. 

11  He  entered  the  Soc.  1693  or  1695.  In  1701  and  1704  he  was  in  the  Wor- 
cester District;  in  1718  in  that  of  Suffolk.  He  was  at  Mr.  Watson's,  at  Norton, 
near  Tewkesbury,  in  1724.     He  died  1738,  aged  64.     Foley,  vii.  300.     Probably 


SERVED   BY   THE   JESUIT   FATHERS,    1727-1734  189 

184.  To  M1  Waterton1  at  Mrs  Elliots  in  ye  old  Elvet,  Durham. 

185.  To  Mr  [Ric]  Meredith  at  Little  Paunton  near  Grantham,  Lin- 
colnshire. 

186.  To  Mr  [Jh.]  Hawker  at  Mr  Sympsons  joyner  near  S1  Peters 
Church,  Lincoln. 

187.  To  Mr  Grey  at  Dunken  Hall  near  Preston,  Lancashire. 

188.  To  Mr  Rob:  Petre  at  (Calalay  near  Alnwick  Northumbrian.) 
ye  Golden  Lyon  in  Warrington,  Lancashire. 

189.  To  Mr  Busby2  to  be  left  wth  Mr8  Grousvenor  in  Mile   hill 
Bristol. 

Isaac,  fourth  son  of  Sir  Isaac  Gibson,  M.D.,  of  Combe,  co.  Warwick  and  Worcester 
city,  by  his  wife  Katharine,  dau.  of  Sir  Henry  Waldegrave  of  Stanninghall,  Norfolk, 
bart. ;  aged  10  at  the  visitation  of  Warwickshire  1682.     (Harl.  Soc.  lxii.  58.) 

1  Durham  (Old  Elvet)  occurs  in  the  Lists  for  1767,  1768,  1769,  and  1772. 

2  Alias  Brown.     The  address,  c/o  Mrs.  Grosvenor,  Mile  Hill,  Bristol,  occurs  in 
the  Lists  for  1767,  1768,  1769,  and  1772. 


NO.  VI 
ACCOUNT  BOOK  OF  MR.  RALPH  CLAVERING,  1763-1764 

CONTRIBUTED    BY   RICHARD   TRAPPES-LOMAX 

This  consists  of  an  8vo  pocket-book  in  white  parchment  containing  50 
folios.  It  is  inscribed  outside  "Journal  of  expences  in  1773  and  1774  at 
Paris  Sr*  returning  to  Callaly?  These  dates  are  an  evident  error,  and 
should  read  1763- 1764. 

The  writer  of  these  accounts  was  Ralph  Peter  Clavering,  of  Callaly, 
Northumberland.  He  was  the  eldest  son  of  Ralph  Clavering,  of  the  same, 
by  Mary,  daughter  of  Nicholas  Stapleton  (formerly  Errington),  of  Carlton, 
co.  York,  and  Ponteland,  Northumberland.  He  was  born  27  June  1727, 
and  married,  (1)  Eliza,  daughter  of  James  Egan,  who  died  s.p.  1762,  and  was 
buried  at  Whittingham  ;  (2)  Frances,  daughter  of  John  Lynch,  by  whom 
he  had  a  son,  John  Aloysius,  born  1765;  succeeded  his  father  1788,  died 
1826  s.p.,  buried  at  Whittingham.  His  mother  died  24  Nov.  1765,  and  was 
buried  at  Douay  ;  (3)  Mary,  daughter  of  D.  Walsh  (married  1767),  by 
whom  he  had,  with  seven  daughters,  a  son,  Edward,  who  succeeded  his 
half-brother,  John  Aloysius  (see  Cath.  Rec.  Soc.  iv.  252).  Edward  Clavering's 
son,  Edward  John,  had  an  only  child,  Augusta,  who  married  Sir  H.  G. 
Bedingfeld,  Bart.,  of  Oxburgh,  whose  son,  Sir  Henry  P.  Bedingfeld,  is  the 
owner  of  the  Account  Book. 

After  the  French  tour  come  other  entries  connected  with  the  birth  of  the 
writer's  son,  John  Aloysius,  "filioli  mei  primogeniti,"  22  July  1765,  on 
which  day  he  sent  for  his  "brother  Francis  &  sister  from  Alnwick" — 9s., 
cards  3s. — to  doctors,  midwife  etc.  10  guineas  (July  26th) — "  to  Mr  Twenty- 
man  curate  for  registering  ye  birth  of  my  son  John  Aloysius  &  yfc  of 
our  marriage  and  where  we  were  married  £2.  2s. — Aug.  5.  To  Dr  Foster 
and  Dr  Gore,  sent  for  in  ye  night  for  ye  Child  £3.  3s. — To  Mr  Pless[ington], 
a  present  on  Christening  my  son  £1.  is. — To  the  poor  8s. — Aug.  6.  To  the 
fiddler  4s.,"  &c. 

Then  follow  many  miscellaneous  entries — "  Pomfret  cakes  is." — "  visiting 
Lichfield  Church,"  &c,  on  the  way  to  Bristol.  The  chaplain,  Mr.  Joseph 
Walmersley,  alias  Plessington,  seems  to  have  returned  from  Bath,  his 
travelling  expenses  to  Callaly  being  £5,  5s.,  and  after  this  the  entries  were 
"  carried  to  marble-covered  Book." 

The  reason  why  they  were  carried  over  is  not  hard  to  imagine.  His 
wife  never  recovered,  and  died  ere  their  baby  was  four  months  old.  Thus 
this  little  book,  dry  and  commonplace  as  it  may  seem  to  us,  contains  entries 
which  doubtless  recalled  many  a  sad  and  tender  memory  to  Ralph  Clavering. 
They  brought  back  all  the  details  of  his  wooing  Frances  Lynch,  of  his 
exultation  for  his  son  and  heir,  of  his  tears  over  "her  whom  I  love  best  in 
the  world." — No  wonder  the  rest  of  the  book  was  left  blank,  and  the 
accounts  "carried  to  marble-covered  book." 

At  the  end  are  notes  of  money  received,  and  of  an  agreement  made 
April  13, 1764,  when  "  I  was  at  Pontoise,"  for  the  increase  of  an  annuity  of 
£3  a  year  to  his  sister  Anne,  up  to  ^5  (with  the  extinction  of  other  debts), 
on  condition  of  prayers,  &c. 

There  is  a  good  article  in  the  Ushaiv  Magazine  for  July  1905  on  Callaly 
and  the  Claverings.  R,  T.-L. 


ACCOUNT   BOOK   OF   MR.    RALPH   CLAVERING,    1763-1764  191 

[Inside  of  Cover  of  Book  is  written.'] 

£  s. 

Spanish  Grammar  .        .30 

Ilus  Book  .        .  .        i         12 

To  a  pair  of  gloves  .         .     2    „ 

Jany  14  I  received  300  Llvres  of  Dr  Howard 

24  Jan  14     300 

15  Do  20     420 

120  720 

2A 
360 

87 
^1 
124 

60 
NB  I  received  in  all  30,000  Livres  from  Mr 
Darcy. 
Dec:  26  I  gave  Sisr  [Kitty  above]  Clavering  at  cards     io*  6d. 

[Outside.]  Journal  of  expenses 

in  1773  &  1774  [sic]  at  Paris 
&  returning  to  Callaly. 
Memoranda 

I   came  to   ye   Seminary*    Dec.   13th.     I   owed  for   9 
days  board  in  October  and  Letters — 

N.B    I  sent  Sis1*  Ann,  Pontoise")*  Dec  18  140  livres 

R.C.  Debtor  for  Board  .         .         .         .         .         028 

Item  I  owe  for  Bread 12 

for  Her  To  account  for. 
N.B.   I   left    1 140   Livres    in   Mr   Ch:    alias   Doctor  J 

Hands  Dec  30 : 
Jany  Received  from  him — .£300. 
Feby  I  received  all  due  after  paying  Board,  Letters,  wood,  etc. 

N.B.  I  was   5   days  at  Pontoise  which  I   must  deduct  from  ye  9 

*  The  Seminary  of  the  English  Secular  Clergy  in  Paris  was  founded  by  Dr.  Richard 
Smith  (afterwards  Bishop  of  Chalcedon)  in  161 1,  near  Porte  St.  Victoire.  It  was 
removed  under  Dr.  Betham  to  Rue  des  Postes,  Faubourg  St.  Marceaux,  and  opened 
as  St.  Gregory's  Seminary  in  1701. 

+  The  Convent  of  English  Benedictine  Nuns  at  Pontoise  was  a  branch  from  that 
at  Ghent.  They  established  themselves  at  Boulogne  in  1652,  but  removed  to  Pontoise 
in  1658.  Anne  Clavering  was  the  last  Abbess,  for  the  Convent  became  greatly  im- 
poverished, and  in  1784  the  Abbess  and  six  nuns  retired  to  the  English  Benedictine 
Convent  at  Dunkirk.  Anne  or  Mary  Anne  Clavering  was  professed  in  1751,  and  was 
elected  Abbess  24  Oct.  1765.     She  died  at  Hammersmith  8  Nov.  1795. 

t  The  name  Howard  is  omitted.  Dr.  Charles  Howard  was  4th  son  of  Bernard 
Howard,  of  Glossop,  who  was  son  of  Bernard  Howard,  a  younger  son  of  Henry, 
Earl  of  Arundel,  father  of  Thomas,  5th  Duke  of  Norfolk.  He  was  ordained  in 
1742,  and  was  appointed  Superior  of  St.  Gregory's  in  1756.  He  died  in  1792, 
aged  74. 


192  ACCOUNT   BOOK    OF   MR.    RALPH   CLAVERING,    1763-I764 


days   in   October;   there   remaines   41   from   Dec    13th   to   Jan3    18th 
inclusively 

36  days  at  90  sous  per  day 

90  2/0/324(0 


3240 


162 


^*l62.   o.    o. 


N.B.   I  owe  for  wood  &  letters. 


Expended  Livres  s.    d. 

Brought  up  from  a  little  book  to  Oct  28  .     1069     8     - 

To  3  Days  airing  at  Pontoise         .         .         .  312- 

To  Dinner  for  Mr  Pardu  &  self  at  Meulan      .  612- 

To  cards  at  Pontoise 120- 

To  wine  one  gallon 4     -    - 

To  Provision  pour  la  bouche  .         .         .  2  06     - 

To  ye  Poor 6     -     - 

To  a  gallon  of  wine 4    -    - 

To  ye  Poor 1 2     -    - 

To  ye  wine  during  my   stay  there   for  own 

drinking 15   10     - 

To  45  Days  Board  at  Pontoise  at  per 

day  for  self  and  servant    .        .         .         .       112  10     - 
To  Horse  Hire  from  thence  to  S*  Denis         .  6     -     - 

To  dinner  there  &  coach  hire  from  thence 

to  ye  Rue  des  Postes 
To    the    Lodgings   for    Self    &    servant    at 

Pontoise  for  3  months 
To  ye  servant  maid 
Nov.     18  To  the  Depositaire   at  Pontoise  for   several 

extraordinaries 
„       27  To     Do.     for  wood  &  ye  like 
To  Porteridge 

To  2  pr.  of  colered  Silk  shoes 
To  Monsr  Avocats  Dictionary 
To  a  Pamphalet    . 
To  a  Hatt     . 
To  cards  &  Coach  hire 
To  2  pr.  of  black  Silk  Shoes 
To  a  Spanish  Grammar 
To  a  pr.  of  castor  t  gloves 
To  this  book 
Dec.     25  To  Chairs  in  Notre  Damme  etc  etc  Christmas 

Day 
To  the  Poor 

To  the  Concert  Spiritual 
To  a  Coach  \  a  day 
To  the  Coach  man 
To  the  Gare,on  de  place 

*  Here  and  elsewhere  uj£n  is  given,  but  clearly  livres,  approximating  to  the 
modem  franc,  is  intended.     The  second  column  is  for  sous — 20  to  the  livre. 
f  i.e.  beaver  (Century  Dictionary). 


5° 

— 

6 

- 

14 

19 

37 

*5 
16 

22 

10 

10 

- 

1 

10 

21 

- 

5 

- 

22 

0 

3 

- 

2 

5 

— 

12 

1 

19 

- 

12 

3 
8 

_ 

1 
1 

4 
16 

ACCOUNT   BOOK   OF   MR.    RALPH    CLAVERING,    1763-I764  I93 

Dec.     30  To  a  Porter ,  '.     .  -  12     - 

To  Baggs  for  money  at  my  Bankers        .         .  1   16     - 

„        31  To  H  Richardson  for  Private  Outlays  v.  His 

Book 136    -    - 

To  a  French  &  Italien  &  Italien  &  French 

Dictionary  by  Annibali     .         .         .         .         24     -     - 
Deduct  Horses  Hire  pd  per  serv  £6 
To  several  Letters  when  at  Pontoise  pd  to  D. 

Mary  Ann* 8  18     - 

To  Bill  at  ye  Cook-shop  for  self  &  Nunns 

during  3  days  stay  there   .         .         .         .         n  18     - 
To  Bread   bought  during  my  stay  there  in 

November 5  15     - 

To  Vaills  at  the  Convent  having  given  none 

before 

Jan.      13  To  wine 

To  two  Almanacks 

To  2  Horses  Hire  at  6  livres  per  Day  for  5 
Days  when  I  went  to  Pontoise 

To  Dinner  at  S*  Denis 

To  coach  hire 

"to  cards 

To  3  days  Board  when  at  Pontoise 
To  the  Carriage  of  a  Parcell  .... 
Jan.      20  To  a  full  suit  coat,  waistcoat  &  breeches  of 
Red  Flowered  cutt  velvet  ready  made 

„        18  To  coach  hire 

„        19  To  cards        .  .... 

„        21  To  Monsr  Mouton  Dentist  when  he  putt  me 

a  Tooth  with  a  golden  Rivot  &  wire 
„        25  To  ye  Italian  Commedy        .... 

To  Coach  Hire 2 

„        28  To  cards 7   16 

To  Mr  Jno.  Holden  on  his  Draught  on  Sir 
Edward  Blunt  t   for  S£  5s  8d   to  oblige 

him  I  did  it 120     o 

Jan.      31  To  H.  Richardson  for  severals    see  His  book       288     - 
Feby       2  To   my   share   of  expences   in   a   Coach   & 
four  Horses  going  to  &  returning   from 
Versailles  &  [expences,  cancelled}      .         .         19     - 

To  the  Poor -  12 

7  To  Cards -  18 

To  18  Peach  trees  and  two  bitter  Almond 

Trees,  a  present  To  ye  Dames  at  Pontoise  15     - 

do       7  To  Mv  Howard  for  41   days  Board  at   the 

Seminary  at  4 iA  10  pr  [day]     .         .         .       184  10 

do       7  To  a  load  of  wood  burnt  there       .         .         •         21   18 

7  To  postage  of  several  letters  .         .         .         .         13     - 

*  The  diarist's  sister. 

f  Probably  Sir  Edward  Blount,  5th  Baronet,  of  Sodington,  co.  Worcester. 
XIII.  N 


14 

— 

— 

I 

4 

— 

I 

10 

— 

30 

- 

- 

3 

— 

— 

7 

12 

— 

1 

4 

- 

9 

- 

- 

not  paid 

360 

- 

- 

3 

12 

- 

1 

4 

— 

36 

— 

— 

6 

- 

— 

194  ACCOUNT  BOOK   OF  MR.   RALPH   CLAVERING,   1763-1764 


7  To  carriage  of  a  box  from  Ghent   . 
Feb.     10  To  Lorbino's  Dictionary  French  &  Spanish  & 

Spanish  &  French 

10  To  ye  Curiosities  of  Paris  in  2  volumes  8° 
To  Cards 

12  To  ye  Poor 

13  To  Treating  Mrs  Howard  &  Son,  Mra  Thornton 

&  nieces  at  the  Poppit  shew    S*  Germains 
Fair 

19  To  the  Poor  Sfc  Sulpice .... 

20  To  Dinner  at  an  Ordinary  &  coffee 

20  To  seeing  the  Tumblers  at  Sfc  Germains  Fair 

To  Dinner  at  an  Ordinary 

To  an  Opera  Ticket      .... 
26  To  ye  Poor 

28  To  ye  Doctor  6Lis— Surgeon  6£     . 

29  To   my  Italian  Master  for  a   month   or   12 

Lessons 

To  my  share  of  the  expns  of  a  Ball  given 
by  Sir  Thos.  Tancred,*  Howard,  Talbot, 
Neville  &  Clavering,  to  Miss  Thorntons, 
Ravenscroft,  Langdall,  Baker,  Preston, 
Royly,  &  several  others. 
March    3  To   the  Peruvian  Lettres   French   &   Italian 

2  vol  Duodecimo 

4  To  the  Poor  S*  Sulpice 

9  To  the  Enfans  Trouvez  .... 

To  the  Poor  at  Notre  Dame  .         .         .         . 

To  my  Masquerade  dress  being  a  Turks  dress, 

and  my  first  appearance  in  these  Turkish 

diversions — &  Intended  to  be  ye  Last 

To  the  entrance 

12.13  To  ye  Poor 

15  To  an  Opera  Ticket ;  To  the  Italian  Opera    . 

To  the  Poor  Sfc  Sulpice 

22  To  an  Ordinary  Dinner 

To  Chair  Hire  for  9  weeks  in  ye  Churches  at 

io8  per  week 

To  Henry  Richardson's  Book  from  ye  Jan?  31 

to  this  day 

To  grafts  of  fruit  trees  sent  to  Pontoise  . 

25  To  ye  Poor  at  Sl  Sulpice  .  .  .  . 
27]  To  my  share  of  expence8  at  Pontoix  being  in 
28 1  company  with  Mess1-8  Vavasor  &  Lawson 
29 J        3  days  going  and  returning 

26  To  Madame  Armandie,  Mrs  of  the  Hotel  de 

Provence,   in    full    of    what    is    due  for 
Lodgings  from  Jany  1 7  at  2 1  pr  week 


7     7 


15 

6 

4 
6 


21 
6 

3 
2 

3 

7 

6 

12 

36 


27 

5 
6 
6 


12 


10 


4     - 


9 
6 

_ 

_ 

13 

10 

3 

2 

- 

- 

4 

10 

00 

IIII 

08 

- 

1 
6 

4 

— 

24  12 


210    -    - 


*  i.e.  the  5th  Baronet,  of  Boroughbridge,  co.  York. 


ACCOUNT  BOOK   OF   MR.   RALPH   CLAVERING,    1763-1764  195 


28  To  Dame  Mary  Anne  at  Pontoise,  in  part  of 

her  annuity 

N.B.  I  owe  her  for  3  days  Board,  Letters  & 
vaills 
—  To  ye  servants  when  there,  3  livres 

29  To  my  Dinner  at  ye  Ordinary 

To  an  Opera  ticket 

30  To  a  pair  of  Diamond  Shoe  &  Knee  Buckles, 

having  given  in  a  pair  of  old  D°  for  Shoes 
of  Bristol  Stones      .... 

31  To  the  French  House,  a  Tragedy  (Olympie) 
Aprill     1  To  the  Poor  Sl  Sulpice  .... 

To  the  Italian  House    .... 
4  To  dinner,  Hotel  De  Espagne 
6  To  D°  for  self  [Meynel  erased]  &  Bellasis  at 

ye  Swiss  Luxemburg :  very  Dear 
8  To  the  Poor  S*  Sulpice  .... 
To  the  Servant  maid,  Hotel  de  Provence,  vaills 
To  an  Italian  Testament  40   . 
1 1  To  Doctr  Mahony  .... 

18  To  the  Poor  at  Pontoise 
To  Mr  Vertue,  for  wine 
To  several  letters  pd  by   my  Sisr  Ann    at 

Pontoise 

To  treating  the  Relligious  there  at  dinner 
To  9  days  Board  at  3^  ioB  per  day 
To  vaills  at  the  Convent 
To  the  Poor  Sfc  Sulpice  .... 
To  Board  at  the  Seminary     . 

19  To  seeing  the  Abbey  Sfc  Denis 
To  seeing  Notre  Dame 
To  3  or  4  days  Board  at  ye  Seminary 

22  To  the  Poor  S*  Sulpice  ... 
To  the  Poor  S*  Rochs  .... 
To  Cards 

25  To  a  refreshment  &  ye  Poor . 
To  do  seeing  Notre  Dame 

26  To  the  Poor 

May        1  To  the  French  Opera    .... 

To  French  Telemacus  in  two  volumes  120 
To   Sfc   Francis   of  Sales,  Introduction  to 

devout  life  in  French 
To  the  life  of  yt  Saint  in  two  volumes    . 
To  Several  outlays,  on  4  Days  Jaunt ;  in  which 

I   saw   Versaills,   Marli   etc,  in   company 

with  Vavasor  &  Lawson  . 
3  To  1 2  pr  of  Superfine  Silk  Stockens,  6  White 

6  do  Grey,  12^  pr  pr 
5  To  seeing  Monsieur  Julien's  Cabinet  of  Curio 

sities 


90 


- 

10  - 

2 

10  - 

9 

~~ 

72 
6 
6 
6 
2 

00  00 
18  - 

9 
6 

10  00 

9 
6 

10  - 

9 
3 

-  - 

9  05  - 
20  04  - 
31  10 

9 
6 

-  - 

1 

1 

18 

6 

4  - 
4  - 

0  - 

2 

12  - 

8  - 
8  - 

6 

12  - 

7 

10  00 

4 

10  00 

2 

10  00 

5 

00  00 

67 

00  00 

144 

-  - 

6 

—     mm 

196  ACCOUNT   BOOK   OF   MR.   RALPH   CLAVERING,    1763-1764 


24 


27 


29 


4  " 

18  - 

14  - 

10  - 


4 
12 


5  To  Dinner  at  Ordinary  . 

To  several  M  .  .  .  s  *  St  Sulpice 

To  Dinner  at  Mount  Calvaire  in  company  with 

2  Gentlemen,  4  Ladies     . 
For  a  Spiritual  book 
To  severals    .... 
To  Cards      . 
10  To  a  pr  of  embroidered   Sik   shoes,   for  a 

present  For  my  Sister 
13  To  the  Poor  S*  Sulpice  .        .        .        .        .  14 

To  a  Letter 14 

To  Mr  Vertue  at  Pontoise     . 
To  Vaills  there      . 

22  To  seeing  Maisonn 

23  To  the  Bene:[dictine]  Nunns,t  rue  Champs 
des  Aloette,  a  Present 

To  the  Italian  Commedy 

To   a  Piece  of  Italian  Commedy,   "On   ne 

s'avise  jamais  de  Poul "    . 
To  a  refreshment  . 
To  a  Copper  Plate,  with  my  name  engraved 

on  it 
To  the  Poor  Sfc  Sulpice  . 
To  dinner  at  the  Ordinary     . 
To  Cards      .... 
To  a  Refreshment  at  the  King's  Gardens,  for 

some  young  Ladies  &  self 

30  To  seeing  Churches 
do  To  seeing  the  Palais  Royal    . 
do  To  the  Italian  Commedy 

To  a  French  Tragedy  in  Boards 
To  the  Gargon  de  Louage 
To  ye  Coachman  . 

31  To  the  Poor  Sfc  Sulpice  . 
do  To  my  Dinners  at  an  Ordinary 
do  To  the  Spiritual  Concert 

June  To  Coach,  half  a  Day   . 

2  To  the  Taylor's  foreman        ....  2  08 

2  To  Henry  Richardson,  in  part  of  His  Bill  for 

severals,  from  ye  23  of  March  To   this 

Second  of  June 

4  To  the  Italian  Comedy . 

5  To  the  Poor  Notre  Dame      .  -  12 
5  To  the  Capuchins 

*  i.e.  Masses.  Note  the  characteristic  way  of  disguising  distinctively  Catholic 
words,  like  Mass,  Benedictines,  &c. 

f  The  English  Benedictine  Nuns  of  Paris  were  an  offshoot  from  the  Convent  at 
Cambrai,  and  were  established  by  Clementia  Cary  at  Paris  in  165 1.  They  settled  in 
the  Rue  du  Champ  de  l'Alouette  in  1664.  They  came  to  England  after  the  Re- 
volution, and  after  various  wanderings  settled  in  1837  at  Colwich,  in  Staffordshire. 
There  are  memoirs  of  the  nuns  in  Cath,  Rec,  Soc.  ix. 


2 
6 

12 

1 
2 


24 
6 


610 
6 


16 
16 


10 
00 

4 
4 


ACCOUNT   BOOK   OF   MR.    RALPH   CLAVERING,    1763-1764  I97 


6  To 


July 


7 

To 

9 

To 

10 

11 

12 

To 

To 

M 

To 

17 

To 

*7 

To 

22 

To 

To 

23 

To 

24 

To 

To 

To 

27 

To 

To 

29 

To 

30 

To 

To 

1 

To 

To 

To 

To 

4 

To 

5 

To 

7 

To 

10 

To 

10 

To 

To 

To 

16  To 

17 

To 

18  To 

17 

To 

Dinner  at  Choisy  Le  Roy,  in  company 
with  several  Ladies  &  Gentlemen 
the  French  House,  a  Trajedy  (Cromwell) 
my  Share  of  expences  in  a  jaunt  with 
9  Gentlemen  &  Ladies  To  Versaills  & 
Marli,  being  out  three  days  &  a  Half. 
N.B.  I  paid  no  share  of  Coach  Hire,  I 
going  in  Miss  Thorntons  Coach 
a  Prayer  Book  i  . 
several  Presents  to  the  Ladies,  on  a  Party 
in  Bouen,*  as  Trinkets  . 
the  French  Opera     .... 

M  . . .  st      

Cards 

Spiritual  Concert      .... 

a  refreshment 

S*  Sulpice,  for  the  Anniversary  of  M.  Hester 
Stapleton  .         . 

Coach  Hire 

Molieres  works  in  120,  8  volumes 
a  Pastor  Fido  J  one  vol  120,  Italian  . 
seeing  Monsieur  Jeansen's  Garden    . 

a  refreshment 

Sfc  Sulpice,  Sfc  Petre  &  Paule  for  M  ...  s 
4  places  at  the  Italian  House  for  ma 
Chere,  §  Mrs  Howard,  son  &  self  . 
an  Italian  Piece  of  musick 
Entrance  at  Sfc  Cloud,  la  Ball,  for  8  persons 
the  Poor  Sfc  Sulpice  .  . 
M  .  .  .  .  s  at  D°  Church 
postage  of  a  London  Letter 
Bunns  at  S*  Vincenne 
Dinner  at  an  Ordinary 
ye  Italian  Commedy 
M™  Armendy,  in  full  for  Lodgings  due  To 

y*  Day 

Coach  Hire  ..... 
dinner  at  the  Swiss's  in  the  Tuilleries 
the  Seeing  Mr  Juliens  Cabinet  &  ye 
Observatorie  &  Palais  Bourbon 
the  French  Tragidy  .... 
the  French  Commedy,  in  company  with 
ma  Chere,  &  Mrs  D'arcy 

Coach  Hire 

a  pr  of  stone  Buckles,  a  present  to  ma 
Chere 


12 
6 


46  12 

-  04 

12  - 

10  - 

6  - 

6  - 

6  - 

5  i4 


3 
1 

14 

13 

3 

1 
6 

24 
1 
9 
3 
2 
1 
1 
2 
6 


6     - 


10 


10 
12 

8 
10 

14 

o 


210  - 

2  08 

6  - 

6  - 

6  - 

12  - 

2  8 

45  " 


*  This  word  is  uncertain  in  the  original. 

t  See  note  above  under  5  May. 

X  By  Guarini. 

§  The  diarist's  intended  wife,  Frances  Lynch. 


See  C.X.S.  iv.  252. 


198  ACCOUNT   BOOK   OF   MR.    RALPH   CLAVERING,    1763-1764 

18  To  a  pr  of  Pearl  necklace,  a  present  to  ma 

Chere  Future 15     -    - 

To  a  Notary 34- 

24  To  my  sisr  Ann  for  severals  at  Pontoise  viz 
Board  &  presents  to  L.  Abbess  &  the  Nuns 
&  vaills  when  I  went  with  ma  Chere 
Future 72    -    - 

26  To  the  Arch  Bishop's  Clerk  .         .         .         .  9    -    - 
do  To  coffee  &  Orcheat  * 3     -    - 

27  To  3  Box  Tickets  for  Mrs  D'Arcy  Miss  Linch, 

&  Her  Lover  at  ye  Opera  .         .         .         22  10    - 

27  To  seeing  the  King's  Cabinet  of  Curiosities    .  14- 

To  a  Markoset  t  Necklace,  a  present  To  ma 

Chere  Future 48     -    - 

To  2  Box  Tickets,  for  Mr8  Howard  &  Son  for 

the  Opera;  when  the  Latter  did  not  come         15     -    - 

27  To  a  Notary  for  an  Instrument  to  prove  ye 

DthofElJ 3    -  - 

To  a  Copy  of  the  Banns,  Published  at  S* 

Sulpice 6    -  - 

To  seeing  the  Salpetriere       .         .         .         .  -  12  - 

To  the  Poor  there 36- 

28  To  seeing  Val  de  Grace  &  the  Luxemburg     .  2     -  - 
28  To  4  prs  of  Silk  Shoes,  a  present  for  Miss 

Egans 12     -    - 

To  the  Ball  at  Vincennes,  when  I  treated  the 

Family  of  the  D'arcys       .         .         .         .         1 2     -    - 
To  Mra  Howard  Nunn  for  Marriage  Cakes, 

3  for  Herself  &  Miss  Bell  Linch  one — one 

for  Miss  Thornton  &  one  for  Mra  Howard         24     -    - 
To  the  Bishop's  Secretary  &  Clerk  for  several 

requisites  To  the  marriage         .         .         .         15     -    - 

31  To  Doctor  Mahony 6     -    - 

To  the  Surgeon 6    -    - 

To  an  Atlas  in  two  volumes  Folios         .         .         7 1     -    - 

N.B.  I  gave   the  generality   of  Paris   in 
return  value  25  livres  over  &  above — the  3d 
volume  is  To  be  published  price  48  Livres,  & 
given  Dr  Howard  for  me. 
31  To  Father  Maurus  Shaw§  a  present  de  Noce        48    -    - 
Aug        1  To  a  Corbeil,  silver  worked   .         .         .         .         36     -    - 
To  5  sword  Knotts,  Presents  on  our  Marriage        30    -    - 
To  a  Silver  work  Bagg,  a  present  on  D°  to 

Mrs  Howard 9    -    - 

*  i.e.  cider. 

f  i.e.  marcasite  (crystallised  forms  of  iron  pyrites) — a  favourite  jewel  in  the 
eighteenth  century. 

X  »•'•  Eliza  Egan,  his  first  wife. 

§  Dom  Maurus  (Ralph)  Shaw,  of  Rothbury,  Northumberland,  was  professed  at 
St.  Edmund's,  Paris,  12  May  1757. 


ACCOUNT   BOOK    OF   MR.    RALPH    CLAVERING,    1763-1764  1 99 


Miss 


To  2  Bocquais  of  flowers  on  our  marriage 

To  the  Curate  on  our  Marriage 

To  the  Curate  of  St  Phillip  de  Roulle  on  D 

To  the  Poor  on  D° 

To  the  Boy  &  etc . 

To  a  pr  of  white  Silk  Garters  De  Noce  . 

To  the  Poor 

To  the  Bedal  &  etc 

To  the  Curate's  servant 

To  6  Tickets  at  the  Italian  Play,  treating  the 

Darcys 

To  the  play 

To  printed  Cards  . 

To  4  pr  of  silk  shoes  Broaderd  in  gold 
To  the  Town  Drumms,  on  my  marriage 
To  3  pr  of  muslin  ruffles,  a  present  to 

Egans      

To  3  pr  of  Silk  mittens 

To  the  Hire  of  a  Chaise  from  Paris  to  be 

delivered  in  18  days  time  at  Calais  accord 

ing  To  ye  Address  given  me     . 
To  Mr  Biron  Notary  for  our  Marriage  Articles 
To  a  Prayer  Book  for  my  Dear  Wife 
To  Avocats  Dictionary  .... 
To  Reslaeau  French  Grammar 
For  exspences  one  Day  at  Pontoise 
To  16J  ells  of  Red  &  white  striped  sattain,  a 

present  To  ye  woman  I  love  most  Tenderly, 

at  14  livres  pr  elle 

To  two  ells  of  Taffatas 

To  several  Shades  of  Raw  Silks,  a  present  to 

SisrWinefrid 

To  2  pieces  of  Tapestry,  a  present  to  my  dear 

wife         ....... 

To  the   Dentist  Tracalle  for  two   Teeth,  & 

some  other  necessaries  for  them  &  cleaning 

them  over 

To  a  night  Gown  a  Silk  Dauphine  ready  made 
To  Mr  Bell  for  a  Diamond  ring  enclosing  the 

picture  of  my  Dear  Wife,  3 1  Diamonds  at 

about  8  Liv:  pr  Do  . 

To  a  Crystall  for  the  picture  in  my  watch 
To  resetting  a  Diamond  ring . 
To  2  Braceletts  sett  in  Gold  &  coverd  with 

crystal,  my  picture  in  each 
To  the  marriage  Ring  Gold  .... 
To  Le  Roy  watchmaker  in  full  of  his  Bill  for 

my  gold  watch  with  my  Dear  Wifes  Picture 

in  it   exclusive   of  my   old    gold   watch. 

N.B.  The  watch  cost  117  guineas  and  a 


3 
72 

48 
24 

6 
12 
12 

6 

36 
1 

23 

12   —  — 

12   -   — 

8l   -   - 

9  10  00 


72 
72 


18 


4  - 


231 
14 

- 

- 

25 

- 

- 

30 

00 

00 

45 
80 

0 

0 

276 
12 

0 

0 

0 
0 

12 

0 

0 

120 

0 

0 

12 

0 

0 

200 


ACCOUNT   BOOK   OF   MR.   RALPH   CLAVERING,    1763-1764 


half  and  I  had  3  guineas  given  for  ye  gulds 

or  Movements  &  36  Livres  for  or,  for  1  \  oz 

24  gr.  of  Gold 

7  To  Messrs  Trolie  &  Co  for  a  London  Bill  on 

Mr  Selwin,  Swithins  Lane  London  at  30s! 

payable  3  days  sight 
To  my  Dear  Wife  the  Day  I  was  married 
To  Mr  Darcys  servants  when  I  came  away 
To  a  Night  Bagg  for  to  putt  into  ye  Chaise 
To  a  Bonne  for  ma  chere  &  a  Hair  Comb 

To  Severals 

To  Mantua  maker  for  the  fashion  of  sattain 

gown  trimmed  with  white  snaill 

To  the  maid 

To  a  Refreshment  at  the  Tuilleries 

To  seeing  Chantilly        .... 

To  Mr  Stacks  coachman  Cambray 

To  vaills  there 

To  coach  Hire,  Douay  .... 
10  To  wine,  treating  some  Gentlemen  at  Douay 

Colledge 

To  some  young  men,  Relations  there,  a  Boire 

To  the  servants 

10  To  Coach  Hire,  Lisle    .... 
To  a  gargon  de  Place     .... 
To  the  Custom  House  at  Courtray 
13  To   Lady   Abbess   of    Ghent,*    Towards   to 

Portion  of  a  number  lately  professed  there 

13  To  my  Sister  Winefrid,t  being  due  for  some 

Cambreck  &c,  bought  last  winter 
To  Coach  Hire  &  a  gargon  de  place 
To  seeing  Churches  etc  . 

To  treating  the  Relligious  at  Ghent,  &  some 

others  there 

14  To  3  lb  of  Tea,  for  Sisr  Winefrid  2  of  it,  one 

lb.  for  Lady  Abbess  &  one  loaf  of  sugar   . 

To  the  Poor    * 

To  the  Fryars  at  Ghent 

To  the   servants  at   the   Convent   &   at  ye 

Lodgings,  vails         . 
To  a  Purse,  a  present  to  the  Master  of  ye 

House  where  I  lodged  at  Ghent  for  4  days 

Gratis 

To  another  Purse  for  self       . 


220 


4702 

48 

144 

9 

10 
1 

33 

1 
2 

3 
1 
1 

6 
6 

1 
1 


120 

48 
5 
3 

48 


29 
6 

24 


o 
o 
o 

16 

o 

12 

04 

8 

16 
16 


16 
4 


*  The  English  Benedictine  Abbey  at  Ghent  was  an  offshoot  from  that  at  Brussels, 
and  was  founded  by  Lucy  Knatchbull  in  1624.  They  came  to  England  after  the 
French  Revolution  and  are  now  settled  at  Oulton,  near  Stone,  Staffordshire.  The 
Abbess  in  1763  was  Mary  Baptist  Phillips. 

t  Probably  identical  with  the  Scholastica  Clavering,  O.S.B.,  Ghent,  who  died 
14  Jan.  1779.  {Annals  of  the  English  Benedictines  at  Ghent.)  The  date  of  her 
profession  is  not  recorded. 


ACCOUNT   BOOK   OF   MR.    RALPH   CLAVERING,    1763-1764  201 


To  Passage  for  self,  wife,  &  servant  &  Dinner 
for  D°  aboard  ye  Boat  from  Ghent  to 
Bruges  8  Leag 

To  some  wine  at  Ghent 

To  my  Sis1'  Barbara  being  a  Present 

To  the  Augustin  Nuns  *  for  a  treat 

To  wine  &  vaills  there  .... 

To  some  Pious  books    .... 

To  Dunkirk  Bill 

To  an  old  Servant  .... 

To  Coach  hire 

To   Custom   House    officers  at   Mardike 
Graveline 

To  the  Carriage  of  my  Trunk  from  Paris  to 
Dunkirk  .         .         .         .         .  '      . 

21  To  the  Nuns  Gravelin,t  Charity    . 

To  Henry  Richardson's  Book  for  severals 
from  June  ye  2d  to  that  Day  Inclusively 

22  To  the  Bill  at  Calais  one  day 
To  the  Poor 
To  the  Custom  House 
To  ye  servants 
To  Porteredge 

Deduct  as  on  the  following  Page 


io 


4 

IO 

24 

- 

72 

- 

5 
6 



i5 

IO 

— 

12 

14 
24 

27 
6 

3 

1 


16 


17,109  00 
11969  00 


4702 

438 
5140 


I  had  when  I  landed  at  Dover  in  cash,  ex- 
clusive of  5  guineas  received  from  Mr 
Ohannelly  to  be  laid  out  for  him. 

N.B.  I  remitted  English  money  to  Mr  Wright 
^200    value  French        .... 

I  paid  for  severals  on  the  following  day  value 
English  ;£i8.  4.  2  J    value  French  . 

N.B.  This  sum  is  to  be  deducted  from  the 
Total  Disbursed  on  the  foregoing  Page; 
the  Remainder  will  be  the  neat  sum  ex- 
pended from  July  3,  1763,  To  August  23, 
1764  viz  during  my  stay  in  France. 

*  The  English  Canonesses  of  St.  Austin  at  Bruges  were  an  offshoot  from  the 
convent  at  Lou  vain,  and  were  established  in  1629.  They  came  to  England  in  1794, 
but  returned  to  Bruges  after  the  Peace  of  Amiens,  and  still  flourish  there. 

f  The  Convent  of  English  Franciscan  Nuns  (Poor  Clares)  was  established  at 
Gravelines  in  1609.  They  came  to  England  in  1794,  and  eventually  joined  the 
Franciscan  Community  at  Catterick,  Yorkshire. 


NO.   VII 

BOYS   AT   LlfeGE   ACADEMY,    1773-91 

With  the  names  and  addresses  of  their  parents  or  guardians,  and  the 
pensions  paid  through  the  Procurator  in  London. 

CONTRIBUTED   BY   RICHARD  TRAPPES-LOMAX 

The  English  College  at  Liege  was  founded  by  Fr.  John  Gerard,  S.J.,  in 
1616  for  the  training  of  the  "Scholastics"  of  the  Society  in  Philosophy  and 
Theology.  It  was  saved  from  suppression  in  1773  by  the  Prince  Bishop  of 
Liege,  and  the  School  at  Bruges  (formerly  at  St.  Omer's)  was  then  trans- 
ferred to  it.  The  new  College  was  formally  sanctioned  by  the  Bishop  under 
the  title  of  the  "Academy."  In  1794  it  migrated  to  Stonyhurst.  A  list  of 
the  masters  and  students  at  Liege  on  1  October  1776  is  printed  in  Foley's 
Records,  S.J.,  vol.  vii.  Part  I.  p.  1.  This  list  is  compiled  from  the  alpha- 
betical reference-table  which  is  inserted  at  the  beginning  of  the  ledger, 
"Liege  No. 3?  among  the  Farm  St.  M.S.S.  (outside  in  Foley's  hand  :  "  Coll. 
of  Lilge :  School  Ledger").  This  gives  a  name  and  a  reference — e.g. "  P.  1." 
Turning  to  page  1  you  find — "  Entered  &c."  Generally  there  is  more  than 
this,  i.e.  the  accounts  for  three  or  four  years.  The  details  of  these  accounts 
are  here  omitted.  The  beginning  and  end  only  of  the  account  are  noted. 
The  payments  are  on  the  whole  very  uniform :  some  details  of  extra  pay- 
ments will  be  found  at  the  end.  R.  T.-L. 

Angier  James  p.  1.  =  Entered  Oct  27.  1773. 

Angier  Robert  p.  6.  =  Entered  Oct  29  [sic]  1773. 

Anderton  William  p.  1.  =  Entered  Oct  27th  1773.  Pension  paid  by 
Mr  Conyers  1775,  x776- 

Addis  George  &  Charles  p.  72,  73,  =  George  entered  14  Sep.  1781  at 
,£33-12  Charles,  March  /85-  Pension  paid  by  1)  "His  Father  4 
Tooley  Street "  to  March  /84-  2)  By  Mr  Fountaine.  3)  By  Mr 
Hen.  Addis  Exr  to  Br  [executor  to  brother]  George.  [J  p.] 

Angier  Francis  p.  74.  =  entered  on  the  1st  September,  i78i,at  ,£16.  16. 
Entrance  &  \  year  paid  at  Liege. 
P.p.  by  Mr  Angier  Norwich.* 

Arundell  t  p.  32=  The  two  Master  Arundells  entered  ye  8th  Sep. 
1 775  at  £23.  2.  P.p.  by  Mr  Everard  Arundell,  1 776-1 783,  Two 
sons  and  tutor.  [J  page.] 

Archdekin.  p.  34,  =  Entered  28  Oct.  1775.  at  32  guineas. 
P.p.  by  His  father,  Newcastle,  to  1776. 

Atkinson,  p.  178.  =  entered  29  Sep.  86.  at  £>\o. 

P.p.  by  His  Father  to  Sep.  89.  (Ex.  to  12  Dec.)  [J  p.] 

Blount  Hugo,  Charles,  &  Robert  vere  Clifford  %  p.  8.=entered  Nov.  13 
1773.  P.p.  by  Ld.  Clifford,  for  Hugo  to  Nov1'  1775,  for  Charles  till 
[?  1780].     Robert  till  31  Jan.  1779.  {Robert  begins  June  29,  1776.] 

*  Mr.  Angier,  of  Norwich,  is  the  Rev.  Thomas  Angier,  S.J.  (1730-1788),  who 
for  several  years  served  the  Norwich  Mission.     Foley,  vii.  13. 

t  Probably  James  Everard  and  Thomas,  sons  of  James  Everard  Arundell,  3rd  son 
of  the  6th  Lord  Arundell.  James  Everard,  junior,  eventually  became  9th  Lord 
Arundell,  of  Wardour. 

X  The  three  elder  sons  of  Hugh,  4th  Lord  Clifford,  by  Lady  Anne  Lee.  Hugh 
and  Charles  became  5  th  and  6th  Lords. 


BOYS   AT   LIEGE   ACADEMY,   1773-91  203 

Brooke  Joseph  and  Ignatius*  p.  2,  entered  27  Oct.  1773. 
Browne,  James,  Richard,  Robert  &  Andrew,  pp.  2-4  =  entered  October 
27  1773  at  ,£33.  12.  till  Nov.  22  1776. 

P.P.  by  Mr  Smith  [i  p.] 

Barrett  Samuel  p.  24  =  entered  Aug.  11th  1774  at  32  guineas. 

P.P.  by  his  father  till  Aug.  11th  1777.  [3  lines.] 

Blundell  Charles  t  p.  32  =  entered  29  Aug.  1775  at  £$2- 

P.P    by  (1)  Mr  Blundell  of  Ince  till  March  10  1780  by  (2)  Mr 
Townley  till  Feb  10  178 1.  [£  page.] 

Beel p.  35  =  entered  isfc  May  1776  at  ^33.  12.  o. 

P.P.  by  G.  Stephenson,  Little  Stanhope  Street  till  May  1783.  [J  page.] 
Bates  Richard  p.  37  =  entered  June  3d  1776  at  ^32. 

P.P.  by  his  father,  Cowbridge,  Glamorgan  till  Feb  10th  1778. 
Berkeley  Robert  %  p.  42  =  entered  July  15  1778  at  ,£33.  12. 

P.P.  by  Mr  Berkeley  of  Spetchly  till  Jan.  29  1783.  [J  page.] 

Beeston  Henry  p.  56  =  entered  13  Sept  1779  at  £>2$-  2-  °- 

P.P.  by  Lord  Arundell  till  Dec  10,  1785.  [2  lines.] 

Butler  M.  p.  58  =  entered  30  Sept  1779  at  £33.  12.  o. 

P.P.  by  His  father  till  30  March  1782.  [5  lines.] 

Bedingfeld  Rich  §  p.  74  =  entered  1  Sept  1781  at  ^33.  12. 

P.P.  by  Sir  Rich:  Bedingfeld  till  Sept  1785. 
Byrne  Jn°  p.  76  =  entered  17  Oct.  1781  at  ^33.  12. 

P.P.  by  His  father  Mr  Robarts  till  March  /84-  [4  lines.] 

Byrne  Garret  pp  94-5  =  entered  4  Aug  1783  at  £33.  12. 

P.P.  by  Mess™  Lilly  &  Robarts  to  Mar  20.  [2  lines.] 

Bolger  Richard  &  James  p.  102  =  entered  Aug  29,  1783  at  ^33-  I2» 

P.P  by  Mr8  Bolger,  Ballyma,  New  Ross,  Ireland,  till  Aug:  /84. 

[i  Page.] 
PBignall  Nicholas  pp.  144-5  =  entered  AuS  23>  11^  at  £$$*  12- 

P.P.  by  Mr  Selby  &  C.  Nugent  till  Feb  23,  1791.  [a  page.] 

Craythorne  Thomas  ||  p.  4  =  entered  28  Oct  1773  at  £33.  12. 

P.P.  by  His  Mother  at  Ness  till  28  Jan.  1778.  [J  page.] 

Cauvanne  Peter  p.  20  =  entered  14  Jan:  1774.  [No  details.] 

Clifford  Thomas II  p.  3o  =  entered  31  July  1775  at  £33.  12. 

P.P.  by  His  Father  Mr  Tho:  Clifford  till  31  Jan:  1777. 
Cummings  &  Power  pp.  44~5=entered  9  Aug:  1778  at  £33.  12 

P.P.  by  Mr  Mazuel,  Dunquerque,  to  Sept:  9,  1779.  [4  lines.] 

*  See  Foley,  vii.  90. 

f  Charles  (Robert)  Blundell  was  the  only  son  of  Henry  Blundell,  of  Ince,  by 
Elizabeth  Mostyn.     He  was  the  last  heir-male  of  that  family. 

X  Robert  Berkeley  is  probably  the  elder  son  of  John  Berkeley  (younger  son  of 
Thomas  Berkeley,  of  Spetchley,  co.  Worcester),  by  Catherine  Bodenham.  He  in- 
herited that  estate  on  the  death  of  his  uncle  Robert  in  1 804. 

§  Richard  Bedingfeld  was  the  only  son  of  Sir  Richard  Bedingfeld,  4th  Baronet, 
of  Oxburg,  co.  Norfolk,  whom  he  succeeded  as  5th  Baronet  in  1795*  See  C.R.S. 
vol.  vii.  211. 

||  Thomas  Craythorne  was  3rd  son  of  Thomas  Craythorne,  of  Craythorne  and 
Ness,  co.  York,  by  Isabel,  dau.  of  Sir  John  Swinburne,  of  Capheaton. 

IT  Thomas  Clifford  is  apparently  the  eldest  son  of  the  Honble.  Thomas  Clifford 
(2nd  son  of  the  3rd  Lord^Clifford,  of  Chudleigh) ;  his  mother  being  Barbara,  dau.  and 
coheiress  of  James,  Lord  Aston,  of  Forfar.  From  her  he  inherited  Tixall,  in  Stafford- 
shire. Later  he  came  in  for  Burton  Constable,  &c,  in  Yorkshire,  and  took  the  name 
of  Constable.     He  was  created  a  Baronet  in  1815. 


204  BOYS   AT   LIEGE   ACADEMY,    1 7  73-9 1 

Constables  two  p.  31  (Charles  &  Middleton  *)  =  entered  29  Aug:  1775 
at  £33.  12. 

P.P.  by  Mr  Constable,  Everingham  till  [?  April  3,   1778]  Feb  9th 
1779-  [I  page.] 

Constable,    William    Middleton    p.    34  =  entered    29    Aug    1775    at 
£Z3-  12. 

P.P.  by  Mr  Constable,  Everingham  till  29  Aug:  /77.  [5  lines.] 

Chichester  Jn°  t  p-  46  =  entered  16  Oct  1778  at  ^33.  12. 

P.P  by  His  father  till  Oct  1785.  [£  page.] 

Clavering  Jn°  J  p.  54  =  entered  3  July  1779  at  -£33-  I2- 

P.P.  by  His  Father  at  Callaly  till  20  Sept:  1783.  f  J  page.] 

Chichester  Charles  §  pp.  64  &  5  =  entered  21  July  1780  at  £33.  12. 

P.P.  by  Mr  Needham  till  25  Jan  (?  1788).  [J  page.] 

Clifford  Henry  ||  pp.  78  &  9  =  entered  30  June  1782. 

P.P.  by  His  father  at  Tixall  till  May  1785.  [J  page.] 

Carroll  Charles  pp.  86,  7  =  entered  27  Aug  1783  at  ^33.  12.  o. 

P.P.  by  Mr  Johnson,  Coopers  Row,  Tower  Hill  till  25  Aug  1785. 

[£  page.] 
Clifford,  Honbl  Tho:1I  pp.  128,  90  &  91,  129  =  entered  20  Oct  1783  at 
£33.  12. 

P.P.  by  Lady  Clifford  till  April  21,  1788.  [4  accounts.] 

Champney  Jas:  pp.  1 00-101  =  entered  16  July  1782  at  .£20.. 

P.P.  by  His  Father,  West  Raisin  till  21  Aug  1786.  [1  page.] 

Couche,  Jn°  &  W  pp.  102-3  =  entered  Sept  1783  at  ^30. 

P.P.  by  Mrs  Couche  &  Mr  Tho  Couche  till  4  Sept  1788.      [J  page.] 
Clifford,   Henry  pp.    108-9   &    78   &   79**  =  entered  2   Nov:   1785 
at  ^42. 

P.P.  by  His  Father  H[on.]  T.  Clifford  till  April  1786.  [J  page.] 

Carroll  Charles,  Maryland  pp.  116-17  =  entered  April  1787  at  ,£36.  15. 

P.P.  by  Josua  Johnson  till  14  Oct  1790.  [2  pages.] 

Cox  Samuel  pp.  146-7  =  entered  10  Aug  1787  at  .£36.  15. 

P.P.  by  His  father  R.  K.  Cox  till  Feb  1789.  [£  page. 

Chapman,  George  p.  154  =  entered  4  April  1788  at  ^30.     [cancelled. 

P.P.  On  Mr  Lucas's  foundation. 

*  William  Haggerston  Constable,  of  Everingham,  &c.,  had  by  his  wife  Winefred 
Maxwell  an  eldest  son,  Marmaduke,  and  two  younger  sons,  Charles  and  William 
[Middleton].  Marmaduke  succeeded  to  Everingham,  &c,  and  took  the  name  of 
Constable  Maxwell ;  William  inherited  Stockeld  and  Middleton  and  took  the 
name  of  Middleton  ;  and  Charles,  on  his  marriage  to  Elizabeth  Stanley,  of  Hooton, 
took  the  name  of  Stanley. 

t  Possibly  identical  with  John  Palmer,  eldest  son  of  John  Chichester,  of  Arling- 
ton, co.  Devon,  by  Mary  MacDonald. 

t  Probably  identical  with  John  Aloysius  Clavering,  eldest  son  of  Ralph  Clavering, 
of  Callaly,  co.  Northumberland,  by  his  2nd  wife,  Frances  Lynch. 

§  Probably  a  younger  brother  of  John  P.  Chichester.  He  was  the  ancestor  of  the 
Chichesters  of  Calverleigh,  co.  Devon. 

II  Henry  Clifford  was  2nd  son  of  Thomas  Clifford,  of  Tixall,  by  Barbara  Aston. 

IF  Thomas  Clifford  was  4th  son  of  Hugh,  4th  Lord  Clifford,  of  Chudleigh,  by 
Lady  Anne  Lee. 

**  Henry  Clifford  (born  1768)  was  2nd  son  of  the  Hon.  Thomas  Clifford,  of 
Tixall,  and  consequently  identical  with  the  Henry  Clifford  entered  above  (pp.  7% 
and  79). 


BOYS   AT   LIEGE   ACADEMY,    I773-9I  205 

Cliffords,   Walter,   James   &   George*  pp.   162-3  =  Walter  &  James 
entered  1  Jan  88.     George  1  July  1788  at  ^15. 

P.P.  by  Tho:  Clifford,  Tixall. 
Callagan p  166  =  entered  Nov:  1788  at  ^"36.  15. 

P.P.  by  Callagan  Esq.  Bedford  Square  till  May  1788.  [3  lines.] 

Cross  John  p.  i76  =  entered  12  Sept  1788  at  ^31.  10. 

P.P.  by  his  Uncle  till  Sept  12,  1789.  [2  lines.] 

Dalton  William  t  p.  i5  =  entered  11  Dec  1773  at  ^33*   I2- 

P.P.  by  his  Father  till  10  Dec  1782.  [£  page.] 

Daly  Jn°  &  Richard  p.  i6  =  entered  n  Dec  1773.  [No  details.] 

Dormer  James  J  p.  19  =  entered  24  Dec  1773  at  £>Z5  I2- 

P.P.  by  Lady  Shrewsbury  till  June  1777  by  Honble  Francis  Talbot 

till  28  March  1789.  [£  page.] 

Dease   Richard   &  John  pp.   302   &   3 12  =  entered   11   Jan   1777    at 

^33  I2- 
P.P.  by  Mr  Barnewall  till  11  Jan  1780.  [J  page.] 

Dowling  Frederick  pp.  44-7  =  entered  16  Oct  1778  at  ^33   12. 

P.P.  by  His  father,  Exeter,  till  Aug  30  1783.  [2 J  pages.] 

Dowdall,  Walter  &  Anthony   pp.    50-1=  entered    19   May    1779   at 
^33  12. 

P.P.  by  Mr  Barnwall  till  19  May  1780.  [J  page.] 

O'Donnell  (four)  pp.  78-9  =  entered  8th  Sept  1781  at  ^33  12. 

P.P.? 
Dormer  Robert,§  pp.  92-3  =  entered  20  Oct  1783  at  ^33  12. 

P.P.  by  His  father,  Longford  till  April  1786.  [J  page.] 

Dardis  Michael  pp.  100-1  =  entered  13  Sept  1782  at  ^33  12. 

P.P.  by  Mr  Dardis,  Jigginstown,  Mullingar,  Ireland  till  September 
1785.  [ipage.] 

Dease  Oliver  pp.  126-7. 

P.P.  by  Robert  Barnwall,  Sfc  Mary  Ax  till  19  Feb  1789.  [2  pages.] 
Dowdell  Chris,  p.  174  entered  31  Oct  1788. 

P.P.  by to  2  April  1789. 

Eyre,  Francis  ||  p.  25  =  entered  9th  Oct  1774  at  ^33  12. 

P.P.  by  His  Father  to  9  Oct  1775.  [2  lines.] 

*  Apparently  sons  of  Thomas  Clifford,  of  Tixall,  by  Barbara  Aston.  Walter  is  not 
mentioned  in  Burke.  James  was  born  1774,  and  George  in  1779.  When  Liege 
migrated  to  Stonyhurst,  George  Clifford  was  the  first  boy  to  effect  an  entrance.  He 
married  Mary  Coyney,  and  was  father  of  Sir  Charles  Clifford,  Baronet. 

f  William  Dalton  is  probably  the  eldest  son  of  Robert  Dalton,  of  Thurnham,  co. 
Lancaster,  by  his  2nd  wife,  Bridget  More. 

X  James  Dormer  was  eldest  son  of  James,  3rd  son  of  John,  7th  Lord  Dormer. 
He  was  born  in  1765  ;  married  in  1792  Lucy,  dau.  of  Thomas  Fitzherbert,  of  Swyn- 
nerton.  Lady  Shrewsbury  was  his  father's  sister,  Elizabeth,  and  wife  of  the  14th 
Earl  of  Shrewsbury.  The  Hon.  Francis  Talbot  was  a  younger  brother  of  the  14th 
Earl. 

§  Robert  Dormer  was  a  brother  of  James.  Longford  (near  Newport,  Salop) 
was  then  the  property  of  the  Earls  of  Shrewsbury. 

||  Francis  and  James  were  the  sons  of  Francis  Eyre,  of  Warkworth,  co.  North- 
ampton, and  Hassop,  co.  Derby,  &c,  by  Mary  Radcliffe,  daughter  of  Charles  Rad- 
cliffe  (brother  of  James,  3rd  Earl  of  Derwentwater),  by  Charlotte  Maria,  Countess  of 
Newburgh.  Francis  wrongfully  assumed  the  title  of  Earl  of  Newburgh,  and  died  in 
1827,  aged  65.     James  died  in  18 16. 


206  BOYS   AT  LliGE   ACADEMY,   1773-91 

Eyre,  James  p.  60-1  entered  6  Feb  1780. 

P.P.  by  Fran:  Eyre,  Warkworth  to  9  Sept  1783.  [J  page.] 

Farrill,  Peter  p.  12  =  entered  5  Dec  1773  at  ^33  12. 

P.P.  by  MwTuite  to  5  Dec  1780. 
Farrill  Michael  p.  14  =  entered  5  Dec  1773  at  ^33  12. 

P.P.  by  MrB  Tuite  to  5  Dec  1776. 
Fairclough  William,  p.  18  =  entered  19  Dec  1773. 

P.P.  by  Mr  Mansel.  [No  details,  2  lines.] 

Farmer,  James,  p.  24  =  entered  13  Aug:  1774  at  ,£20. 

P.P.  by  Mr  Nelson  to  9  Dec  1775.  [2  lines.] 

Fagans  two  p.  38. 

P.P.  6  Oct  1778.  [1  line.] 

Fitzherbert,  Robert,*  pp.  42-3  =  entered  17  June  1778  at  ^33  12. 

P.P.  by  Mr  Berkeley,  Spetchley  to  26  May  1781.  [J  page.] 

Farrill  [James,  Richard]  four  pp.  66-7=  entered  30  July  1780  at  32 
guineas. 

P.P.  by  J.  Sutton  to  18  March  1783  or  18  Feb  /8s.  [f  page.] 

Ferrall,  Charles  pp.  70-1=  entered  14  June  1781  at  ^33  12. 

P.P.  by  His  Father,  Ballyna,  Clonard  to  Dec  1783.  [f  page.] 

French,  John  &  Thomas  pp.  114,  115, 130,  131  =entered  16  April  1787. 

P.P.  by  Mr  Andrew  French,  Copt  Hall  Court  to  April  1789.. 

[ij  pages.] 
Ferrall,  Charles  pp.  142-3  =  entered  17  Nov  1787. 

P.P.  Mr  Quentin  Dick  of  King  Street,  London  engages  to  pay  all 
expences  of  Mr  Ferrall  at  the  College  at  Liege — paid  to  Nov. 
1790.  [i  page.] 

Fermor,  James  t  p.  170  =  entered  15  July  1788. 

P.P.  by  His  father  W.  Fermor  Esq,  Tusmore  to  July  15,  1789. 

ft  Page.] 
Ferry,  Christopher  pp.  180-1  =  entered  27  Nov  1789  at  £1$  15. 

P.P.  by  Mr  Maire,  Lartington  to  Ap:  1790.  [4  lines.] 

Fitz  Simmonds,  Tho:  &  Michael  p.   2 g2  =  entered  July  10   1776  at 

£33  I2-  [1  Hne.] 

Fitz  Gerald,  George  p  292  =  entered  10  July  1776  at  ^33  12.    [1  line.] 

Grainger p.  22  =  entered  24  June  1774  at  ^33  12. 

P.P.  by  Rob:  Barnewall  Merch*  paymaster  to  7  Jan:  1775.    [3  lines.] 

Greenwood p.  26  =  entered  20  May  1775  at  £33  I2- 

P.P.  by  Sir  Rob*  Throckmorton  to  21  Jan  1778.  [J  page.] 

Gandolphi  Mar11  pp.  94~5  =  entered  19  Aug  1783  at  ^33  12. 

P.P.  by  Mr  Gandolphi  to  August  1785.  [5  lines.] 

Grant pp.  140-1  at  £26  5. 

By  agreement  with  London  District  Master  Grant  was  sent  to  Liege 
on  a  free  place  and  during  his  course  of  Education  the  London 
District  is  to  pay  25  guineas/  an  to  Liege  for  the  maintenance  of 
a  Master.     London  District  to  Liege  Academy. 

*  Robert  Fitzherbert  was  5th  son  of  Thomas  Fitzherbert,  of  Swynnerton,  by 
Mary  Teresa  Throckmorton.  He  died  at  Marino,  Italy,  1802,  aged  39.  Mr. 
Berkeley,  of  Spetchley,  had  married  his  sister  Teresa. 

f  James  Fermor  was  2nd  son  of  William  Fermor,  of  Tusmore  and  Somerton,  by 
Frances  Errington.     He  was  born  in  1773  and  died  in  1852. 


BOYS   AT   LI&GE  ACADEMY,   1773-91  207 

Goodrick  Simon  pp.  152-3  =  entered  July  1788  at  ^20  sent  by  Suffolk 
[Mr  Jos.  Reeve,*  cancelled]. 

P.P.  to  Jan  1790.  [3  lines.] 

Goodwin,  Ja.  pp.  164-5  =  entered  Oct  1788  at  ,£26  5. 

P.P.  by  Mr  Pierce,  Swallow  Street  to  9  Nov  1789.  [J  page.] 

Harrison,  vert  Dillon  p.  23  =  entered  28  June  1774. 

P.P.  by  Ld  Dillon  t  to  21  Jan:  1778.  [J  page.] 

Hussey,  James,  p.  25  =  entered  15  Oct:  1774  at  ^33  12. 

P.P.  by  His  Aunt  Mra  McNamara  to  31  Jany  1779.  [J  page.] 

Hussey s  three  p.  28  =  entered  31  July  1775  at  ^33  12. 

P.P.  by  Mrs  McNamara  to  27  Jan*  1785. 
Howard  two  p.  32  =  entered  8  Sept:  1775  at  £2Z- 

P.P.  by  Mr  Everard  Arundell  to  Mar.  5,  1783.  [J  page.] 

Heneage  two  \  —  Tho  pp.  82-3  =  entered  12  June  1783  at  ^33  12. 

P.P.  by  Lord  Petre  to  17  May  1786.  [J  page.] 

Haddock pp.  82-3  &  112-113  =  entered  12  June  1783  at  ^33  12. 

P.P.  by  Mr  Haddock  to  May  1786.  [J  page.] 

Howard  Edward  p.  184  =  entered  1  July  1789. 

P.P.  to  1  Jany  1790.  [5  lines.] 

Jordan,  James,  p.  n  =  entered  5  Dec  1773  at  ^33.  12. 

P.P.  by  Mra  Tuite  to  5  Dec  1776.  [£  page.] 

Jordan,  John,  p.  13  =  entered  5  Dec  1773  at  ^33.  12. 

P.P.  by  Mra  Tuite  to  5  June  1776.  [J  page.] 

James,  Charles,  p.  17=  entered  9  Dec  1773. 
Jones,  John  §  pp.  50-1  =  entered  23  Feb:  1779  at  ^33.  12. 

P.P.  by  Mr  Jones,  Llanarth  to  April  1780.  [J  page.] 

Jackson p.  io7  =  entered  30  Sept:  1785.  [2  lines.] 

Kirwan,  John  p.  33=entered  28  Sept:  1775  at  ^33.  12. 

P.P.  by  His  Father  in  ye  City  Mere*  to  18  Feb  1778.  [J  page.] 

Kirwan,  Patrick,  pp.  38-9  =  entered  1  Oct  1777  at  ^33.  12. 

P.P.  by  Mr8  Tho.  Kirwan  to  1  April  1778.  [3  lines.] 

Kensington pp.  90-1  =  entered  18  Oct  1783  at  ^33  12. 

P.P.  by  His  Father,  Lombard  Street  to  6  June  1786.  [J  page.] 

Keating,  Roger  pp.  98-9  =  entered  18  Sept:  1783  at  ^33.  12. 

P.P.  Anne  Keating,  Cork;  James  Kingston,  12  Coleman  Street,  to 
14  May  1784.  [3  lines.] 

Knight of  Devon  p.  190  =  entered  28  July  1789  at  ^25. 

P.P.  by  Ja:  Knight  &  Reeve  of  Ugbrooke  to  28  jan:  1790.  [3  lines.] 

Lapasture (on  a  loose  sheet.)     P.P.  Mr  Thomas  Moore  (at  ^36, 

15).  Bill  sent  in  for  June  to  December  1789 — with  extras  from 
1788-1789:  was  on  his  way  back  "with  a  conductor"  from 
Rotterdam. 

*  For  Fr.  Joseph  Reeve,  S.J.,  see  Foley,  vii.  641. 

t   Henry,  nth  Viscount  Dillon  (1705-1787). 

%  The  two  Heneages  are  probably  George  and  Thomas,  sons  of  George  Freschi 
Heneage,  of  Hainton,  co.  Lincoln,  by  Katherine,  dau.  of  Robert,  8th  Lord  Petre. 
Their  father  died  in  1782.  The  Lord  Petre  who  paid  for  them  was  their  uncle, 
Robert  Edward,  9th  Lord. 

§  John  Jones  was  eldest  son  of  Philip  Jones,  of  Llanarth,  co.  Monmouth,  by 
Catherine  Wyborne.  He  was  born  1759,  married  Mary  Lee  in  1789,  and  died  1828. 
His  grandson,  John  Arthur,  took  the  name  of  Herbert. 


208  BOYS   AT   LI^GE   ACADEMY,    1 7 73-9 1 

Lawrenson,  John*  p.  9  =  entered  13  Nov:  1773  at  .£15. 

P.P.  by  His  Father  at  Witham  to  2  April  1779.   '  [4  lines.] 

Lynch,  Edward  p.  30  =  entered  31  July  1775  at  .£33.  12. 

P.P.  by  His  father  to  1784.  [J  page.] 

Lawson,  Johnt  pp.  322  &  32  =  entered  14  May  1777  at  ^33.  12. 

P.P.  by  His  Father  to  14  March  1778.  [5  lines.] 

Lee pp.  88-9  =  entered  18  Oct  1783  at  ^33.  12. 

P.P.  by  Mr  Forest  to  April  1784.  [ij  page.] 

Lombard  &  Kelly  pp.  i5o-i  =  entered  ?  1787. 

P.P.  by  Mr  Gorman  to  March  1790  for  Lombard. 

1788  Mr  Gorman  is  no  longer  responsible  for  Master  Kelly,  [f  page.] 
Lattin pp.  342  &  352  =  entered  16  April  1777  at  ,£33.  12. 

P.P.  by  Mrs  Lattin  Dorset  Street  29,  Dublin  to  Nov  15  1781. 

[4  Page.] 
Mannock  Sir  William,!  p.  io  =  entered  6  Nov  1773  at  ^33.  12. 

P.P.  by  Mrs  Mannock  to  Dec  13,  1776.  [J  page.] 

More  Thomas, §  p.  14  =  entered  n  Dec  1774  at  £33.  12. 

P.P.  by  Mrs  Dalton  to  6  March  1776.  [J  page.] 

Meighan  Thomas  &  George,  p.  17  &  18  =  entered  19th  Dec  1773  at 

£23'  2' 

P.P.  by  Mrs  Meighan  to  Oct  25  1774. 
Maxwells,  three,  p.  20  =  entered  28  Jan  1774.  [1  line.] 

Mathew,  Andrew,  p.  21  =  entered  24  June  1774  at  ^33.  12. 

P.P.  by  Mr  Cruise  to  18  Feb  1778.  [J  page.] 

Mathews,  Hugo,  p.  26  =  entered  28  Jan:  1775  at  £2$. 

By  Jos  Mosley  ||  &  Mr  Matthews  II — vide  Maryland  accounts'to  Aug 
1777.  [2  lines.] 

Meynell pp.  322  &  32  =  entered  16  April  1777  at  ^33.  12. 

P.P.  by  Lord  Stourton  to  14  May  1784.  [J  page.] 

McNamara  John,  pp.  54  &  5  =  entered  1  July  1779  at  £33.  12. 

P.P.  by  His  Father,  Hammersmith  to  Jany  1783.  [|  page.] 

Manby  John,  pp.  62~3  =  entered  26  April  i7[8o]  at  £33-  12. 

P.P.  by  Mr  Manby  to  20  Sept  1782.  [J  page.] 

Moore  G.  &  Thomas,  pp.  70,  122-3,  186-7  =  entered  22  June  1781  at 

^33-  12- 
P.P.  by  Mr  Baring,  Mincing  Lane  to  April  1789.  [3  pages.] 

Murphy  T.  p.  156  =  entered  4  April  1788.  [1  line.] 

Meynell,  Thomas  &  George**  pp.  168-9  (&  loose  sheets)  entered 

18  Sept  1788  at  ^36.  15. 

*  See  Foley,  vii.  437. 

f  Probably  the  second  son  of  John  Lawson  (3rd  son  of  Sir  John  Lawson,  3rd 
Baronet,  of  Brough),  by  Elizabeth  Selby. 

t  Sir  William  Mannock,  6th  Baronet,  of  Gifford's  Hall,  Suffolk,  was  only  son  of 
Sir  William,  the  5th  Baronet,  by  Elizabeth  Alwynne.  He  was  born  in  1759,  and 
died  at  Liege  in  1776. 

§  Thomas  More  may  be  an  alias  for  Thomas  Peter  Metcalfe  (1756-1793), 
only  son  of  Peter  Metcalfe,  of  Glandford  Brigg,  co.  Lincoln,  by  Bridget  dau.  and 
heiress  of  Thomas  More,  of  Barnborough,  co.  York.  Bridget  married  Robert 
Dalton,  of  Thurnham,  co.  Lancaster,  as  her  2nd  husband. 

||  For  Fr.  Joseph  Mosley  or  Moseley,  see  Foley,  vii.  530. 

IT  For  Fr.  Ignatius  Matthews,  see  Foley,  vii.  493. 

**  Thomas  and  George  Meynell  were  the  sons  of  Edward  Meynell,  of  North 
Kilvington,  &c,  co.  York,  by  Dorothy  Carey.  Thomas  (1 775-1 854)  succeeded  his 
father  at  Kilvington,  &c,  and  George  (d.  1844)  was  a  barrister  of  Lincoln's  Inn. 


BOYS   AT   LlfcGE   ACADEMY,    1773-91  209 

P.P.  by  Edw  Meynall  Esq.  ft  P.  Strickland  to  18  March  1791. 

[2  pages.] 
Neagle pp.  68  &  134  &  5  =  entered  10  May  1781  at  ^33.  12. 

P.P.  by  Mr  Sheldon  &  Lord  Petre  to  8  Dec  1788.  [1  page.] 

Orpwood pp.  80-1  =  entered  9  June  1783  at  ^33.  12. 

P.P.  by  His  father,  Topham  [Topsham,  near  Exeter],  Devon,  by  Mr 
Phillips  Junr  &  Mr  Rich:  Wray  to  9  Dec  1784. 
Petre,  two*  pp.  362~72  =  entered  8  Aug:  1777  at  ^33.  12. 

P.P.  by  Lord  Petre  to  8  May  1785.  [f  page.] 

Parish,  Woodbine  t  pp.  40-1  =  entered  1  Sept.  1777  at  ^33.  12. 

P.P.  by  Mr  Woodbine,  Yarmouth  &  Mr  Parish  at  ye  Tower  to  12 
Dec  1782.  [J  page.] 

Price,  John,  pp.  48~9  =  entered  14  Nov:  1778  at  ^33.  12. 

P.P.  by  Mr  Home.  S  Wales,  to  April  1784.  [J  page.] 

Plowes,  John  &  Emanuel  of  Malaga  pp.  136-7  =  entered  10  July  1787. 

P.P.  by  Mash  &  Th:  Gregory,  Kings  Arms  Yard,  Coleman  Street  to 
July  1788.  ft  page.] 

Reilly  Mich:  (?  Hugh)  p.  23  =  entered  28  June  1774  at  ^33.  12. 

P.P  by  Mr  Lynch,  Jefferies  Square  &  Mr  Turner  to  22d  January 
1782.  ft  page.] 

Riddell J  p.  31=  entered  29  Aug:  1775  at  ^33.  12. 

P.P.  by  Mr  Riddell,  Swinburn  Castle  &  Jasper  Gibson  to  March 
1 781.  ft  page.] 

Ryan,  Nico,  pp.  68-9=  entered  30  July  1780  at  .£33.  12. 

P.P.  by  Mr  J.  Sutton  to  30  July  1784. 
Ryan  Martyn,  p.  69  [mention  of  entry  4  Aug:  1783  at  ,£33.  12]. 
Ryan  Henry,  pp.  96~7  =  entered  14  Nov:  1781  at  j£$$.  12. 

P.P.  by  Mr  Ryan,  Liverpool  to  January  1786.  [J  page.] 

Reilly  John  pp.  124-5  &  172  =  entered  15  Jan  1787  at  j£$6.  15  o. 

P.P.  by  His  father,  Thaves  Court,  Holborn  to  July  1789.  [ij  pages.] 
Selbye  John§  p.  21  =  entered  21  March  1774  at  ^33.  12. 

P.P.  by  Mr  Selbye  to  17  May.  [2  lines.] 

f  Smith  James,  p.  12  =  entered  5  Dec:  1773.  [1  line.] 

\  Smith  Jeremiah,  p.  n=entered  5  Dec  1773  at  ^32.  12. 

*  Probably  Robert  Edward  and  George,  sons  of  Robert  Edward,  9th  Lord  Petre, 
by  Anne  Howard.  Robert  became  10th  Lord  Petre,  and  George  was  ancestor  of 
the  Petres  of  Dunkenhalgh,  co.  Lancaster. 

t  Woodbine  Parish  was  the  2nd  son  of  the  Rev.  Henry  Parish,  chaplain  to  Lord 
Townshend,  by  Sarah  Woodbine.  He  remained  at  Liege  till  1783.  In  letters  to  his 
parents  he  speaks  of  his  masters  as  "persons  of  piety,  and  exemplary  in  their  Con- 
duct, who  obtained  the  affection  and  respect  of  their  scholars,"  and  to  the  end  of  his 
life  he  remembered  with  pleasure  the  beautiful  services  in  the  College  Chapel.  In 
another  letter  he  writes  that  "the  reigning  Prince  of  Liege  attended  their  great 
annuaL  festival  at  which  the  scholars  gave  a  display  of  Musick,  Fencing  & 
Dancing,  while  the  Competitors  for  nobler  prizes  in  Literature  sought  for  greater  dis- 
tinction, the  highest  scholars  publickly  disputing  in  Philosophy,  with  the  Professors 
&  Tutors,  who  on  such  occasions  were  invited  to  attend  from  other  seminaries." 
His  son  became  Sir  Woodbine  Parish,  K.C.H.,  and  rose  to  distinction  as  a  diplo- 
matist.    (Information  from  the  Hon.  N.  L.  Kay-Shuttleworth.) 

t  One  of  the  three  sons  of  Thomas  Riddell,  of  Swinburne  Castle,  co.  Northumber- 
land, by  Elizabeth  Widdrington. 

§  Possibly  the  4th  son  of  Thomas  Selby,  of  Biddlestone,  co.  Northumberland,  by 
Eleanor  Tuite. 

XIII.  O 


210  BOYS   AT  LlfeGE   ACADEMY,    1773-91 

P.P.  by  Mr  Talbot  charged  to  the  Academy. 
[They  seem  to  have  stayed  2  years  5  months  &  2  days:  =  ^163, 
8.  o.  Then  came  to  London ; — for  which  total  expences  are  ,£82.  &c. 
Eventually  a  bill  was  sent  in  to  Mr  Corbierenson,  14  May  1790,  with 
the  charge  of  ^168  interest  on  14  years  unpaid  debt  of  240^:  in  all 
^409.  10.  6.] 

Swinburn  Tho:  &  Edw  p.  5  =  entered  29  Oct  1773.  [2  lines.] 

Smythe  Charles  &  Henry,*  p.  27  =  entered  1  June  1775  at  £33-  I2- 

P.P.  by  Mr  Smythe  to  June  28,  178 1.  [|  page.] 

Stricklands,t  two  p.  29  =  entered  31  July  1775  at  ,£33.  12. 

P.P.  by  Mr  Strickland,  Siserg  to  31  Jan:  1781.  [iPaSe-J 

Stratford p.  29  =  entered  31  July  1775  at  ^"33.  12. 

P.P.  by  His  Brother,  Mr  Stratford  to  31  July  1776.  [J  page.] 

Stack p.  282  =  entered  29  June  1776  at  .£33.  12. 

P.P.  by  Dr  Stack  to  29  June  1778.  [3  lines.] 

Scroope J  pp.  34s  &  52  =  entered  16  April  1777  at  ^33.  12. 

P.P.  by  His  Father  Mr  Scroope  to  16  April  1779.  [J  page.] 

Smythe,  three  pp.  40-1  =  entered  6  June  1778  at  £33.  12. 

P.P.  by  Sir  Edw:  Smythe  §  to  14  May  1785.  [|  page.] 

Shuttleworth pp.  44-5  =  entered  9  Aug:  1778  at  ^33.  12. 

P.P.  by  His  father,  London  to  14  May  1782.  [J  page.] 

Salvin,  Croxdale||  pp.  64-5  =  entered  22  July  1780  at  ^33.  12. 

P.P.  by  Mr  Salvin,  Croxdale  to  Jan:  1786.  [J  page.] 

Sanders pp.  92-3  &  138-9  =  entered  20  Oct:  1783  at  £23.  2. 

P.P.  by  His  father,  Worcester  to  20  April  1788.  [2 J  pages.] 

Smythe,  Hugh  &  William  If  pp.  no-i  =  entered  June  1785  at  ^50. 

P.P.  by  Lady  Smythe  to  6  June  1786. 
Shepherd  Joseph  pp.   158-9  &  loose  sheet  =  entered  29  Oct:  /88  at 
^25. 

P.P.  by  His  Uncle  W.  Molyneux.  [J  page.] 

Sturdy  Paul  pp.    160-1    &   loose   sheet  m  entered    17   June   1788   at 

;£i5-  r5- 
P.P.  by  Sir  J.  Lawson  to  17  Dec  1789.  [£  page.] 

Sanders  John  pp.   188-9   &  loose  sheet  =  entered  22   July    1789   at 

^21.0. 

P.P.  by  His  father,  Round  Hill,  Worcester,  Spetchley.  [|  page.] 

*  Charles  and  Henry  Smythe  were  the  sons  of  Walter  Smythe,  of  Brambridge, 
co.  Hants  (younger  son  of  Sir  John  Smythe,  3rd  Bart.,  of  Esh,  &c.),  by  Mary 
Errington.  Their  sister  Maria  was  the  celebrated  Mrs.  Fitzherbert,  and  wife  of 
George  IV. 

+  The  two  Stricklands  are  probably  Thomas  and  William,  sons  of  Charles  Strick- 
land, of  Sizergh,  co.  Westmoreland,  by  Cecilia  Towneley.  Thomas  took  the  name 
of  Standish  on  inheriting  that  estate. 

X  Probably  a  son  of  Simon  Scroope,  of  Danby,  co.  York,  by  Anne  Clementina 
Meynell. 

§  The  4th  Baronet. 

||  Apparently  one  of  the  two  sons  of  William  Salvin  ( 1 723-1 800),  of  Croxdale,  by 
Catherine  Thornton. 

IT  Hugh  and  William  Smythe  were  younger  sons  of  Sir  Edward  Smythe,  4th 
Bart.,  of  Esbe,  &c.  Hugh  (1 769-1 822)  married  Lucy  Sulyarde ;  and  William 
(b.  1770)  vvas  killed  in  battle.  Their  mother  was  Mary,  dau.  of  Hugh,  4th  Lord 
Clifford. 


BOYS   AT  LlfcGE   ACADEMY,    1 7 73-9 1  211 

Tempest,  Stephen,  Richard  &  Charles*  pp.  6-7  =  entered  5  Nov:  1773. 

P.P.  by  Mr  Tempest  to  28  Feb  1776.  [J  page.] 

Tuite  Robert  p.  10  =  entered  5  Dec  1773  at  ^33.  12. 

P.P.  by  M™  Tuite  to  5  Dec  1776.  [J  page.] 

Tancred  Thomas,  p.  19  =  entered  24  Dec  1773  at  ^33.  12. 

P.P.  by  Mr  Webb  to  16  May  1777.  [£  page.] 

Tempest  Stephen, t  p.  27  =  entered  16  July  1775  at  ^£20. 

P.P.  by  Mr  Tempest  of  Broughton  to  16  July  1777.  [J  page] 

Tousler p.  35  =  entered  1  May  1776  at  ^"33.  12. 

P.P.  by  His  father  at  Cobham  to  ?  2  June  1780.  [J  page.] 

Thompsons  two  p.  36  =  entered  5  Aug  1775  at  ^33-  I2» 
n  two     ||     =      ,,  11  ,,  x>23« 

P.P.  by  Mr  Cruise  Merchfc,  Mr  Pierce  Bryan  &  Mr  Kerwan.  [f  page.] 
Trapps 1  pp.  52-3  =  entered  20  June  1779  at  j£s3-  I2, 

P.P.  by  His  father  at  Nidd,  Ripley,  to  3  Feb  1781.  [J  page.] 

Talbot  two  pp.  60-1  =entered  3  May  1780  at ^"33.  12. 

P.P.  by  Mr  Talbot  to  18  Nov:  178(1).  [5  lines.] 

Tristam pp.  72~3  =  entered  26  Aug:  1781  at  £$$.  12. 

P.P.  by  Derby  to  Aug  27  1787.  [£  page.] 

Teighe pp.  84-5  =  entered  20  Aug:  1783  at  ^,33.  12. 

P.P.  by  Mr  Teighe  to  Aug  :  1784.  [2  lines.] 

Tucker,  George  &  Samuel,  pp.  96-7=  entered  7  Nov  /83  at  ^33.  12. 

P.P.  by  Mr  Beuzville,  Steward,  Spitalfields  to  25  April  1 785.  [5  lines.] 
Trafford  two§  p.  i92  =  entered  6  Sept  1790  at  ^36.  15. 

P.P.  by  Mr  Trafford  to  6  March  1791.  [4  lines 

Talbot p.  362  =  entered  17  April  1777  at  ^"33.  12.  [1  line 

Wharton,  Simon,||  p.  8  =  entered  5  Nov:  1773. 

P.P.  by  His  father  Mr  Scroope  to  Sept  1776.  [4  lines.] 

Wade,  Joan,  p.  13  =  entered  5  Dec  1773  at  ^33.  12. 

P.P.  by  Mr  Alex:  Grant,  Merch*  to  Dec  1776.  [4  lines.] 

Walsh  Edward  p.  15  =  entered  n  Dec  1773  at  ,£33.  12. 

P.P.  by  Mr  Hay  to  27  Nov:  1777.  [J  page.] 

White p.  22  =  entered  24  June  1774  at  £$$>  12. 

P.P.  by  Mr  Rob*  Barnewall,  Merc1,  Lopdon  to  9  Feb  1778. 

[i  Page.] 
Walsh  Pierce  p.  33  =  entered  28  Sept:  1775  at  .£33.  12. 

P.P.  by  His  father  (?  Mr  Tho.  Gorman)  Bath  to  ?  n  Oct  1776. 

[2  lines.] 

*  Stephen,  Richard,  and  Charles  were  sons  of  Stephen  Walter  Tempest,  of 
Broughton,  co.  York,  by  Frances  Olive  Meynell.  Stephen  succeeded  his  father  at 
Broughton;  Richard  settled  in  Manchester,  and  d.s.p.  1792 ;  Charles  died  un- 
married 1836. 

t  Stephen  Tempest  was  son  of  Henry  Tempest,  M.D.,  of  London,  by  Eleanor 
Jones ;  Henry  Tempest  being  second  son  of  Stephen  Tempest,  of  Broughton,  by 
Elizabeth  Lawson. 

X  Francis  Michael  Trapps  (or  Trappes)  (1765-1843),  eldest  son  of  Francis 
Trapps,  of  Nidd,  co.  York,  by  Margaret,  dau.  of  William  Witham,  of  Preston-on- 
Tees. 

§  Probably  sons  of  John  Trafford,  of  Trafford  and  Croston,  co.  Lancaster,  by 
Elizabeth  Tempest. 

||  Simon  Wharton  is  apparently  an  alias  for  Simon  Thomas  Scroope,  of  Danby, 
by  Anne  Clementina  Meynell. 


212  BOYS   AT   LI^GE   ACADEMY,    1773-91 

Widdrington,  Riddell*  p.  37  =  entered  21  June  1776  at  ^33.  12. 

P.P.  by  His  Father  Mr  Riddell  to  27  Aug:  1782.  [J  page.] 

White  Thomas  p.  302  =  entered  26  July  1776  at  ^33.  12. 

P.P.  by  Mr  George  White  [?  Mr  Cruise]  to  26  Jan:  /80.  [£  page.] 
White  James  pp.  52-3  =  entered  26  June  1779  at  ^33.  12. 

P.P.  by  His  father,  Bristol  to  26  Dec  1781.  [£  page.] 

Wilson p.  62  =  entered  26  April  at  .£33.  12. 

P.P.  by  Mr  Thew.  [1  line.] 

Wise  Thomas,  pp.  66-7  =  entered  30  July  1780  at  ^33.  12. 

P.P.  by  J.  Sutton  to  30  July  1784.  [f  page.] 

White  Bernard,  pp.  80-1  =  entered  20  Nov:  1782  at  ,£33.  12. 

P.P.  by  Mr  Fermor,  Bp  Hall,  York  &  Mrs  Carr  to  20  May  1784. 

[i  page.] 
Winter  J.  &  T.  pp.  86-7  =  entered  20  Aug  1783  at  ^33.  12. 

P.P.  by  their  father  to  20  Aug  1785.  [5  lines.] 

White,  Nicholas,  pp.  84-5  &  132-3  =  entered  Oct  1785  at  ^36.  15. 

P.P.  by  Gregory  &  C°  &  Mr  Strickland  to  1  July  1788.      [ij  pages.] 

Webb  Tho.  pp.  118-9  =  entered  about  Michaelmas  1785.     His  father 

Pavs  ^4°  Per  an.  the  Acady  to  account  to  him  for  surplus  if  any 

when  the  son  leaves  the  House.     P.P.  to  29  Sept  1787.    [J  page.] 

Young,  Nolley  t  pp.  88-9  =  entered  27  Aug  1783  at  ^31.  10. 

P.P.  by  Mr  Johnson,  Coopers  Row,  Tower  Hill  to 1788. 

[i  Page0 
Zea,  Francis  p.  i82  =  entered  18  May  1789  at  .£36.  15. 

P.P.  by  E.  Bedingfeld  to  Nov  18  1789.  [4  lines.] 

Extras 

The  pension  of  32  guineas  covers  almost  all  expenses.  The  following 
are  samples  of  extras. 

"  Journey  there,"  £>].  7.  o,  £6.  6.  o  ;  "Journey  hither"  (probably 
a  circular  tour),  jQn»  6.  o.  Summer  excursions  were  not  uncommon. 
44  Chaufontaine,  and  jaunt  to  the  Low  Countries,"  ^£20.  5.  8. 

Dress.—"  Walter  Tempest's  Shirts,"  ^3.  n.  8;  "Two  wigs," 
£z-  15*  o.  ;  "Linen  and  clothing  on  going  to  Liege,"  ;£i6.  10.  J; 
"Summer  Waistcoats,"  16.  n£;  "Silk  stockings/'  £$.  17.  4; 
"  boots,"  17s. ;  "  Trunk,"  16s.  6d.  The  "  Uniform,"  £4.  6.0;  "  first 
uniform  dress,  as  usual,"  ^3.  18.  i£.  "  For  uniform  and  great  coat," 
£$.  9.  n.     "Watch  for  Master  Riddell,"  £$.  13.  6. 

Arms.  —  "Walter  Tempest's  cutlass,"  jQi.  3.  9;  "pistols," 
^1.6.9.     "To  a  gun," ^£2.  2.  o. 

Miscellaneous. — A  "  chamber  for  a  year,"  ^5.  5.0.     "  By  a  prize 

*  Widdrington  Riddell  is  probably  identical  with  Edward  Horsley  Widdrington 
Riddell,  of  Felton,  co.  Northumberland,  second  son  of  Thomas  Riddell,  of  Swin- 
burne, by  Elizabeth  Widdrington. 

t  Nolley  Young  is  apparently  intended  for  Notley  Young,  and  an  unintentional 
error  may  exist  in  the  writing.  In  1799  a  Notley  Young  resided  at  Nonsuch,  near 
Washington  City,  D.C.,  U.S.A.,  and  the  Notley  Young  in  the  text  is  in  all  proba- 
bility his  son.  This  or  another  son  joined  the  Jesuits,  and  was  a  professor  at  George- 
town College  in  1804. 


BOYS  AT   LIEGE   ACADEMY,    1773-91  213 

in  the  lottery,"  .£20.  Concerts  appear  frequently  in  later  years.  Be- 
sides "  fencing,"  music  was  frequently  taught,  on  the  harpsicord,  harp, 
flute,  and  violin,  also  singing.  "  To  recreations,  Gazettes  and  con- 
certs," £4.  2.7.     An  extra  charge  "  for  physician  "  is  very  rare. 

The  extras  for  "  Master  Petre "  come  to  the  most  considerable 
figure  mentioned,^.  "Two  suits  of  clothes,  ^5.  n.  o;  6  pair  silk 
stockings,  £2.  9.  o;  Handkerchiefs  and  gloves — 17.  6.;  Half  year 
for  Preceptor,  ^37.  10.  o;  To  jaunt  in  1778,  £16.  3.  o."  In  all, 
the  charges  for  him  were,  per  year  ^120,  ^116,  j£iii,  ;£i45>  £91* 
^88. 


NO.  VIII 

THE  MINUTE  BOOK  OF  THE  ROMAN  CATHOLIC 
CLUB,  1793-8 

CONTRIBUTED   BY  JOSEPH    S.    HANSOM 

The  Roman  Catholic  Club,  set  up  to  counteract  the  evil  action  of  the 
Cisalpine  Club  in  its  schismatical  attempt  to  ignore  the  authority  of  the  Holy 
See,  had  but  a  brief  existence.  The  universality  and  unity  of  the  Church 
under  its  Roman  Headship  being  asserted,  the  reason  for  the  Club's 
existence  terminated.  The  slight  glimpses  of  its  work  and  the  names  of 
those  acting  with  the  Right  Rev.  John  Douglass,  Bishop  of  Centuria,  Vicar- 
General  of  the  London  District,  must  be  of  interest.  The  reader  is  referred 
to  the  works  of  Bishop  Milner  and  Charles  Butler,  Gillow's  Diet.  Eng. 
Calks.,  under  those  headings,  &c. 

Judging  from  the  portly  size  of  the  book  (14x9  inches,  of  about  560 
pages),  and  its  fine  red-leather,  gilded  binding  and  edges,  a  much  longer 
existence  of  the  Club  had  been  anticipated.  The  writing  is  a  beautiful 
specimen  of  penmanship,  presumably  by  the  Secretary,  Mr.  William  Havers. 
It  has  been  handed  down  in  that  family  and  is  now  the  property  of  Mr. 
Thomas  Gerald  Havers,  gt.-gt.-grandson  of  the  Secretary.  Mrs.  Stanislaus 
Havers  kindly  secured  me  a  loan  of  it  some  years  back,  when  I  made  a 
transcript  which  has  since  been  awaiting  its  turn  in  one  of  our  Miscellanea 
volumes.  J.  S.  H. 

(Page  1)  At  a  Meeting  held  at  the  Crown  and  Anchor  Tavern  in 
the  Strand  on  the  3rd  of  June  1793 — 

William  Sheldon  Esqr  in  the  Chair. 

It  was  resolved 

First.  That  a  General  Club  of  Roman  Catholic  Nobility  and  Gentry, 
may  be  conducive  to  the  Body  at  large ;  and  as  their  chief  Object  must 
always  be  to  promote  Unanimity,  they  think  that  End  may  be  better 
obtained  by  a  more  numerous  Attendance.  It  is  therefore  resolved  to 
adjourn  this  Meeting  to  the  second  Thursday  after  Easter  1794. 

Secondly.  That  this  Resolution  be  communicated  to  all  the  Catholic 
Nobility  and  Gentry  by  Letter. 

PRESENT 

Mr  W.  Sheldon  (Chairman)  Mr  R.  Selby 

The  R*  Honble  Lord  Stourton  Mr  Conyers 

The  Rfc  Revd  Dr  Douglass  Mr  Bourke 

Mr  Maxwell  Constable  Mr  Manby 

Mr  C.  Constable  Mr  Blount 

Mr  Mannock  Mr  Berington 

Mr  Needham  Mr  J.  Berington 

Mr  James  Bradshaw  Mr  Webbe  Weston 

Mr  W.  Havers  Mr  Wright 

Mr  Selby  Mr  Walsh  Porter 

In  consequence  of  the  above  Resolutions,  Letters  were  sent  to  all 
the  Roman  Catholic  Nobility  and  Gentry,  requesting  their  Attendance 
on  the  i8t  of  May  1794. 


THE   MINUTE   BOOK   OF   THE   ROMAN   CATHOLIC   CLUB,    1793-8      215 

(2)  At  a  Meeting  (by  Adjournment)  held  at  the  Crown  and 
Anchor  in  the  Strand  on  the  ist  of  May  1794. 

The  Right  Honorable  Lord  Stourton  in  the  Chair. 

In  pursuance  of  the  Resolutions  entered  into  at  the  Meeting  held 
the  3rd  of  June  1793,  the  undersigned  Roman  Catholics  unanimously 
adopted  the  following  Resolutions  for  establishing  General  Meetings 
of  the  Roman  Catholic  Nobility  and  Gentry  in  each  Year. 

Resolved  1.  That  such  of  the  Roman  Catholic  Nobility  and  Gentry, 
who  wish  to  become  Subscribers  to  these  Meetings,  shall  send  their 
Name  and  Place  of  Abode  to  the  Secretary,  and  immediately  pay  the 
Sum  of  One  Guinea,  and  the  same  Sum  annually  in  advance. 

2.  That  the  Vicars  Apostolic  be  invited  by  Letter  always  to  attend 
the  Meetings. 

3.  That  every  Nobleman  and  Gentleman  be  at  Liberty  to  introduce 
any  one  Clergyman  as  his  Guest,  on  giving  previous  Notice  to  the 
Secretary,  that  he  means  to  introduce  a  Friend. 

4.  That  there  shall  be  two  Meetings  in  each  year;  the  first,  on  the 
first  Thursday  after  the  18th  day  of  January  j  and  the  other,  on  the  first 
Thursday  in  May,  and  that  the  Expence  of  the  Ordinary  on  those  days 
be  paid  by  the  Secretary  out  of  the  Sum  subscribed. 

5.  That  the  Nobility  and  Gentry  present  at  these  Meetings  shall 
have  Power  to  call  a  Meeting  on  any  intermediate  day  or  days  paying 
the  Expences. 

(3)  6.  That  any  Proposal  made  at  a  future  Meeting  shall  be  admitted 
or  rejected  by  the  Majority,  but  if  admitted,  shall  not  be  binding  unless 
confirmed  at  a  subsequent  Meeting,  which  shall  not  be  held  in  less  than 
Fourteen  days  after  such  first  Meeting,  and  that  none  of  the  present  or 
any  future  Resolutions  shall  be  expunged  or  altered,  but  by  the  Majority 
of  a  greater  Number  of  Subscribers  than  were  present  when  they  were 
first  voted. 

7.  That  a  Secretary  be  appointed  annually. 

8.  That  the  Secretary  shall  inform  the  absent  Subscribers  what  has 
been  done  at  the  preceding  Meeting. 

9.  That  each  Subscriber  may  send  in  writing  any  Remark  or  Pro- 
posal he  may  think  for  the  Advantage  of  the  Body  to  the  Secretary,  to 
be  by  him  communicated  to  the  Nobility  and  Gentry  who  shall  be 
assembled  at  the  next  Meeting. 

10.  That  if  it  shall  be  judged  expedient  to  call  an  extraordinary 
Meeting,  the  Secretary  shall  give  Notice  thereof  to  the  Subscribers. 

11.  That  no  Person  shall  be  entitled  to  receive  Information  from 
the  Secretary,  except  those  who  shall  have  paid  their  Annual  Subscrip- 
tion previous  to  the  Meeting  in  January. 

12.  That  Dinner  be  on  Table  at  halfpast  five  precisely. 

13.  That  the  Chairman  for  the  next  Meeting  be  now  named,  and  that 
at  every  future  Meeting  the  Chairman  be  named  for  the  succeeding 
one. 

14.  That  the  Secretary  do  call  for  the  Bill  at  Eight  o  Clock  precisely. 

15.  That  these  and  all  future  Regulations  shall  be  entered  by  the 
Secretary  in  a  Book,  in  which  shall  also  be  (4)  entered  the  Names  of 
the  Subscribers,  the  Book  to  be  at  all  times  open  for  the  inspection  of 


2l6      THE   MINUTE   BOOK   OF   THE   ROMAN   CATHOLIC  CLUB,    I793~8 


any  of  the  Roman  Catholic  Nobility  or  Gentry  who  may  afterwards 
wish  to  become  Subscribers. 

1 6.  That  the  Secretary  be  directed  to  send  circular  Letters  to  all 
the  Roman  Catholic  Nobility  and  Gentry  with  a  Copy  of  the  Resolutions 
and  Regulations  adopted  at  this  Meeting,  and  the  List  of  the  Gentle- 
men present. 

17.  That  the  Right  Honorable  Lord  Clifford  be  Chairman  of  the 
next  Meeting. 

18.  That  Mr  Wm  Havers  be  appointed  Secretary. 

The  Thanks  of  the  Meeting  were  voted  unanimously  to  the  Chair- 
man for  his  candid  and  impartial  Conduct. 


PRESENT. 

The  Right  Revd  Dr  Douglass 

The  R1  Honble  the  Earl  of  Newburgh 

The  R1  Honble  Lord  Stourton 

The  R1  Honble  Lord  Arundell 

The  R1  Honble  Lord  Clifford 

Sir  Thomas  Fletewood  Bar* 

Sir  William  Jerningham  Barfc 

Sir  Walter  Blount  Bar1 

Sir  Carnaby  Haggerstone  Bar1 

W.  H.  Maxwell  Constable 

Robert  Clifford 

John  Webbe  Weston 

Everard  Arundell 

Edward  Huddlestone 

Thomas  Weld 

Thomas  Weld,  Junr 

George  Bishop 

Thomas  Stonor 

Edward  Bellew 

Edward  Jerningham 

Thomas  Clifford 

Rowland  Conyers 

Thomas  Nelson 

John  Cary 


Charles  Stanley 
Michael  Blount 
James  Douglass 
Thomas  Meade 
William  Sheldon 
Joseph  Thackeray 
Clement  Kirwan 
George  Cary  Junr 
Francis  Eyre 
Thomas  Huddlestone 
Thomas  Walmesley 
Francis  Hutton  Junr 
Richard  Huddlestone 
William  Mervin  Dillon 
Doctor  Nihell 
Francis  Witham 
William  Witham 
Rickard  Bourke 
Thomas  Couche 
Henry  Huddlestone 
Francis  Plowden 
Edward  Blount 
William  Havers 


(5) 


NAME 

The  R1  Honble  the  Earl 

of  Newburgh 
The      R1    Honble    Lord 

Stourton 
The     R1    Honble     Lord 

Arundell 
The     R1     Honble     Lord 

Clifford 
wthdn  Sir  Thomas  Fletewood  Bar1 


List  of  Subscribers 

place  of  residence 
Slindon,  Sussex 


Stourton  near  Ferrybridge,  Yorks 

Wardour    Castle    near    Salisbury, 

Wilts 
Ugbrooke,  Chudleigh 

Gower  Street,  Bedford  Square 


Sir    William    Jerningham     Cossey  Hall  near  Norwich 
Bar1 


THE   MINUTE   BOOK   OF   THE   ROMAN    CATHOLIC   CLUB,    I793~8      21 7 


Sir  Walter  Blount  Bar1 

Sir  Carnaby  Haggerstone 

Bar* 
Sir  Edward  Smythe  Bar1 

Dead     W:  H:  Maxwell  Constable 

Honble  Robert  Clifford 
wthdu  Thomas  Clifford 

John  Webbe  Weston 
Thomas  Weld 

Everard  Arundell 

Thomas  Weld  Junr 

Thomas  Stonor 

George  Bishop 
*wthdQ  Michael  Blount 
*wthdn  Clement  Kirwan 

*out  of    /Thomas  Meade 
the  Kgdom\ Edward  Bellew 

William  Sheldon 

Peter  Holford 


(6) 


John  Cary 
Charles  Stanley 


Esqrs 


NAME 


Edward  Jerningham 
George  Cary  Junr 


*wthdn  Francis  Eyre 
*D°      James  Douglass 

Rowland  Conyers 
*D°       Thomas  Huddlestone 

Thomas  Walmesley 
*D°       Edward  Huddlestone 
*D°       Henry  Huddlestone 
*D°       Richard  Huddlestone 

W.  Mervin  Dillon 

Joseph  Thackeray 
William  Witham 
Dr  Nihell 
Rickard  Bourke 
Francis  Hutton  Junr 
Francis  Witham 
*D°       Thomas  Couche 

*  In  pencil. 


Mawley  near  Bewdley,  Worcester- 
shire 
Haggerston  Hall 

Wooton,  Henley  in  Arden  War- 
wickshire 

Everingham,  Market- Weighton, 
York. 

Tixall  near  Litchfield,  Staffordshire 
Sutton  Place,  Guildford,  Surrey 
Lulworth  Castle  near  Poole,  Ware- 
ham,  Dorset 
Ashcombe  near  Shaftsbury,  Dorset 
tWestbrooke  House,  Dorchester 

George  Street,  Manchester  Square 
Mapledurham,  Reading,  Berks 
Lime  Street 
Portman  Street 

Gray's  Inn 

Wooton   Henley  in  Arden,  War- 
wickshire 
N°  10  Lincolns  Inn 
N°  58  Upper  Seymour  Street 

PLACE   OF    RESIDENCE 

N°  18  Lincolns  Inn 

Torr  Abbey,  Totness  (or  Newton 

Abbott)  Devon 
Warkworth  near  Banbury,  Oxfordsh 
Bedford  Street,  Bedford  Square 

Hatton  Street 
Hammersmith 
Sarston  near  Saffron  Walden,  Cam: 

Gray's  Inn 

Francis  Street,  Gower  Street  X  re- 
moved 

S*  James's  Street 

Grays  Inn 

Leicester  Place,  Leicester  Fields 

N°  50  Upper  Charlotte  Street 

Red  Lion  Square 

Gray's  Inn 

N°  2  North  Street,  Upper  Char- 
lotte Str 

t  "  Lulworth  Castle"  scored  out. 


2l8      THE   MINUTE   BOOK   OF   THE   ROMAN    CATHOLIC   CLUB,    1793-8 


William  Havers 

Gray's  Inn 

*D° 

John  Needham 

Gray's  Inn 

Henry  Mai  re 

Lartington  nr  Barnard  Castle, 
Durham 

Edward  Constable 

Burton  Constable,  Hull  York: 

Francis  Sheldon 

Wycliffe,  Greta  Bridge 

Thomas  Suffield 

Catton  near  Norwich 

*D° 

Thomas  Nelson 

Conduit  Street 

Philip  Langdale 

Houghton  near  Market  Weigh  ton, 
York: 

*D° 

Anthony  Kirwan 

Lime  Street 

Honble  J.  E.  Arundell 

Salisbury 

John  Dillon            Esq18 

Lincoln's  Inn 

.(7) 

NAME 

Marmaduke  Maxwell 
William  Middleton 

PLACE   OF   RESIDENCE 

Robert  Kilby  Cox 

G*  Queen  Street 

Dead 

Ferrers 

Thomas  Wright 

Henrietta  Street  Covent  Garden 

*wthdl 

1  Sir  Henry  Tichborne  Bar* 

Tichborne,  Alresford,  Hants. 

*D° 

John  Jones 

Llanarth,  Abergavenny. 

Sir     Richard     Bedingfeld 

Oxburgh,  Stoke,  Norfolk 

Bar* 

Sir  William  Gerard  Bar* 

Garswood,  Warrington 

William  Anderton 

Ince,  Wigan 

Thomas  Havers 

Thelton  Hall,  Diss,  Norfolk 

John  Manby  [*d.  1819] 

Bead's  Hall,  Brentwood,  Essex 

Sirt  Thomas  Webbe  Bar* 

N°  148  New  Bond  Str 

Charles  Biddulph 

Burton 

Thomas  Lloyd 

S*  James's  Street 

John  Stonor 

William  Mannock 

Giffords  Hall,  Shalford  S*  Mary, 
Suffolk 

[Pages  8-15  are  left  blank  for  entries^ 

(16)  At  a  Meeting  held  at  the  Crown  and  Anchor  Tavern  on 
Thursday  the  22d  of  January  1795. 

The  Right  Honorable  Lord  Clifford  in  the  Chair. 
It  was  resolved  unanimously 

That  the  Roman  Catholic  Peers  be  requested  to  wait  on  Mr  Pitt, 
with  it  was  understood  they  had  a  Negociation  last  year,  and  that 
they  state  the  increasing  Difficulty  of  the  Situation  of  the  Roman 
Catholics  in  the  present  alarming  State  of  the  Country. 

That  an  extraordinary  Meeting  be  called  to  meet  at  this  Place  on 
Thursday  the  fifth  of  February  to  receive  the  Report  of  the  Peers 
and  to  consider  on  the  most  eligible  manner  of  applying  for  farther 
Relief. 

That  the  Thanks  of  the  Meeting  be  given  to  Lord  Clifford  and  that 
his  Lordship  be  requested  to  take  the  Chair  at  the  next  Meeting. 
*  In  pencil.  t  "Sir"  inserted  later. 


THE   MINUTE   BOOK   OF   THE   ROMAN    CATHOLIC   CLUB,    1793-8      219 

At  the  Adjourned  Meeting  held  at  the  Crown  and  Anchor 
Tavern  on  Thursday  the  fifth  of  February  1795 

The  Right  Honorable  Lord  Clifford  in  the  Chair. 

The  Peers  present  reported  that  they  had  not  yet  had  an  Interview 
with  Mr  Pitt  owing  as  they  conceived  to  the  great  Pressure  of  public 
Business. 

The  following  Resolution  was  then  unanimously  adopted. 
Resolved 

That  in  the  present  Moment  it  appears  inexpedient  to  (17)  call  a 
General  Meeting  of  the  Roman  Catholic  Body :  That  therefore  those 
Noblemen  and  Gentlemen  present,  who  may  have  it  in  their  Power  to 
procure  Information  be  requested  to  digest  such  Plans  and  pursue  such 
Measures  as  they  conceive  best  calculated  to  obtain  further  Relief  for 
the  Body  at  large. 

That  the  next  adjourned  Meeting  be  held  at  the  Crown  and  Anchor 
on  the  5th  of  March. 

The  Thanks  of  the  Meeting  were  unanimously  voted  to  the  Chairman. 

At  an  Adjourned  Meeting  held  at  the  Crown  and  Anchor  on  the 
5th  of  March  1795. 

Francis  Eyre  Esq1*  in  the  Chair. 

This  Meeting  was  adjourned  to  Thursday  the  16th  of  April  1795. 

An  Adjourned  Meeting  was  held  at  the  Crown  and  Anchor  on 
the  16th  of  April  1795. 

The  Right  Honorable  the  Earl  of  Newburgh  in  the  Chair. 

At  a  General  Meeting  held  at  the  Crown  and  Anchor  on  Thurs- 
day the  7th  of  May  1795 

Sir  Carnaby  Haggerston  Bar*  in  the  Chair. 
Resolved 

That  a  General  Call  of  the  Roman  Catholic  Body,  in  the  present 
Moment,  would  be  highly  improper. 

Mr.  W.  Havers  was  rechosen  Secretary  for  the  ensuing  year. 

(18)  At  a  General  Meeting  held  at  the  Crown  and  Anchor  on  the 
21st  of  January  1796 

Sir  Walter  Blount  Bar*  in  the  Chair 

Mr  W.  Weston  was  appointed  Chairman  for  the  next  Meeting. 

At  a  General  Meeting  held  at  the  Crown  and  Anchor  on  the 
5th  of  May  1796 

John  Webbe  Weston  Esq1"  in  the  Chair. 

The  following  Resolution  moved  by  Mr  Sheldon  &  seconded  by 
Mr  Needham  was  unanimously  adopted. 

Resolved,  That  the  Secretary  do  call  for  the  Bill  at  Nine  instead 
of  Eight  oClock  as  expressed  in  Rule  14th. 

The  Thanks  of  the  Meeting  were  unanimously  voted  to  the  Chair- 
man— Mr  Geo:  Cary  was  appointed  Chairman  for  the  next  General 
Meeting.  &  Mr  Wm  Havers  Secretary  for  the  ensuing  year. 


220      THE   MINUTE   BOOK   OF   THE   ROMAN    CATHOLIC   CLUB,    I793~S 

At  a  General  Meeting  held  at  the  Crown  and  Anchor  on  the 
19th  of  January  1797. 

The  Honble  Robert  Clifford  (in  the  absence  of  Mr  Geo:  Cary)  in 
the  Chair. 

The  following  Resolution  moved  by  Mr  Webbe  Weston  &  seconded 
by  Mr  Hutton  was  unanimously  adopted 

Resolved.  That  the  Secretary  do  pay  out  of  the  Fund  to  Mess™ 
Witham  the  Sum  of  Six  Pounds  being  the  Moiety  of  their  Bill  on  the 
Address  to  his  Majesty  on  his  fortunate  Escape  from  Assassination. 

The  Honorable  Robert  Clifford  was  appointed  Chairman  for  the 
next  General  Meeting. 

(19)  At  a  General  Meeting  held  at  the  Crown  &  Anchor  on  the 
4th  of  May  1797. 

The  Honorable  Robert  Clifford  in  the  Chair. 

Mr  Sheldon  moved  and  seconded  by  Mr  Webbe  Weston 

That  the  11th  Article  of  the  Regulations  only  alludes  to  those 
Catholics  who  have  not  received  previous  Information  and  that  the 
Secretary  be  instructed  in  future  to  forward  the  proper  Invitations  to  all 
such  as  have  not  been  already  apprised  of  this  Meeting. 

Resolved  unanimously. 

That  the  Secretary  in  his  next  Circular  Letter  do  inform  the  Sub- 
scribers of  the  Arrears  of  their  respective  Subscriptions  and  request 
them  to  discharge  the  same. 

That  Sir  Thomas  Webbe  Bar1,  be  Chairman  at  the  next  Meeting. 
Mr  Clifford  moved  and  seconded  by  Mr  J:  Stonor. 

That  Mr  William  Havers  be  continued  Secretary  for  the  year 
ensuing.  Resolved  unanimously. 

The  Thanks  of  the  Meeting  were  unanimously  voted  to  the  Chairman. 

(20)  At  a  General  Meeting  held  at  the  Crown  and  Anchor  on 
the  25th  of  January  1798. 

Sir  Thomas  Webbe  being  prevented  attending.  The  Honble 
Robert  Clifford  in  the  Chair. 

Charles  Biddulph  Esqr  was  appointed  Chairman  for  the  next 
General  Meeting. 

Previous  to  the  above  Meeting  the  following  Gentlemen  signified 
to  the  Secretary  their  Intentions  of  discontinuing  their  Subscrip- 
tions. 

Sir  Thomas  Fletewood 

Francis  Eyre  Esqr 

Michael  Blount  Esqr 

Anthony  Kirwan  Esqr 

Clement  Kirwan  Esqr 

Thomas  Huddleston  Esqr 

Henry  Huddleston  Esqr 

Thomas  Couche  Esq1' 

Thomas  Nelson  Esqr 

James  Douglass  Esqr 


THE   MINUTE    BOOK    OF   THE   ROMAN    CATHOLIC   CLUB,    I793~8      221 

At  a  General  Meeting  held  at  the  Crown  and  Anchor  on  the 
3rd  of  May  1798. 

Charles  Biddulph  Esqr  in  the  Chair. 
Mr  Biddulph  moved  &  seconded  by  Mr  Weston. 
That   Charles    Stanley   Esqr   be   Chairman   at    the   next   General 
Meeting  in  January. 

That  Mr  Wm  Havers  be  continued  Secretary  for  the  year  ensuing. 

Resolved  unanimously. 
[  The  rest  of  the  book  is  blank.'] 


NO.  IX 

REGISTERS  OF  FR.  THOMAS  WORTHINGTON,  O.P. 
KEPT  IN  LANCASHIRE,  17 13-17 

CONTRIBUTED  BY  JOSEPH  S.  HANSOM 

These  registers  are  amongst  those  belonging  to  St.  Mary's,  Leeds,  now  at 
Somerset  House  (Yorkshire  non-parochial,  No.  237) ;  but  as  they  refer 
entirely  to  Lancashire,  they  are  here  extracted  from  their  position. 

Fr.  Thomas  Worthington,  O.P.,  seems  to  have  been  acting  as  chaplain 
to  William  Molyneux,  fourth  Viscount  Molyneux  of  Maryborough  in  the 
peerage  of  Ireland,  of  Croxteth  Park,  near  Liverpool,  at  or  near  which  all 
the  marriages  and  baptisms  took  place,  except  the  last  at  Bardsea  in  the 
north  of  Lancashire,  where  Lord  Molyneux  had  a  smaller  seat  or  hunting 
place.  The  registers  afford  a  partial  itinerary  of  Fr.  Worthington,  unknown 
to  the  late  Fr.  Raymund  Palmer,  O.P.,  as  the  misplaced  letter  (really 
belonging  to  the  Middleton  or  Leeds  registers)  is,  at  a  later  date. 

The  registers  were  evidently  put  together  at  a  later  period  and  at  one 
time  from  memory  or  old  notes,  perhaps  both  defective,  the  blanks  empha- 
sizing this  view.     In  one  case  he  writes  over  his  own  dots.  J.  S.  H. 

[There  are  first  16  pages  6x4  inches.  On  p.  [1]  the  first  is  written 
"  3  York  iA,"  [2]  is  blanks  [3  and  4]  most  cut  out,  [7  and  8]  half  cut 
out,  and  [9-16]  all  blank.     The  following  is  written  on  pages  [5  and  6]. 

[5]  Liber  Conjugatorum 

a 
ffr**  Thoma  Worthington,  O.P. 

T.  R.  Anno  Dni.  17 14. 

Denuntiationibus  oibus   omissis, 

in  domo  &  regioni  Croxteath,  nullo  legitimo  impedimento  detecto  Ego 

fr  Thomas  Worthington  O.  P.  Missionarius  Apostolicus  filium 

Pennington,  &  filiam interrogavi,  eorumq  mutuo 

consensu  habito,  Solemniter  per  verba  de  presenti  matrimonio  conjunxi. 

Presentibus  Testibus 

quamplurimis.  Ita  est  f*  Tho:  Worthington  OP. 

Anno  Dni  17 16 

Mense  Julio,  die  22%  Denunciationibus  oibus  omissis.  Nullo 
legitimo  impedimento  detecto,  in  oppido  dicto  Warrington,  Ego  Infra- 
scriptus  Gulielmum  Ld  Molineux,  &  Filiam  Mariam  Skelton  interro- 
gavi, eorumq  mutuo  consensu  habito,  Solemniter  per  vrba  de  presenti 

matrimonio  conjunxi,  Presentibus  Testibus  Notis Skelton, 

Roberto  Molineux,  Jacobo  Leyburn,  &c: 

Jta  est  P  Tho:  Worthington  OP. 

[6]  Mense  Augusto,  die  14*  Denunciationibus  omnibus  omissis, 
nullo  legitimo  impedimento  detecto,  in  domo  &  regione  Croxteath  Ego 
infrascriptus  Hugonem  Anderton  &  Joannam  Rimmer  interrogavi, 
eorumq  mutuo  consensu  habito,  solemniter  per  verba  de  presenti  matri- 
monio C'junxi,  Testibus  notis  Richardo  &  Margarita  Rimmer. 

Jta  est  P  Tho:  Worthington  OP. 


REGISTERS    OF   FR.    THOMAS   WORTHINGTON,   O.P.  223 

Denunciationibus  omnibus  omissis,  nullo 

legitimo  Jmpedimento  decto  in  domo  e  Regioe  Croxteath  Ego  Jnfra- 

scriptus Pilkinton  &  Elizabeth  Rushton  interrogavi, 

eorumq  mutuo  consensu  habito  solemniter  per  verba  de  presenti  matri- 
monio  C'junxi.  Presentibus  Testibus  Notis  Johanna  &  Maria  Woods 
&  Jana  Rushton. 

Jta  e  fr  Tho:  Worthington  OP. 
TR 
[Then  follow  twelve  pages,  6f  x  4!  inches,  are  numbered^ 

(1)  T.  R.  Liber  Baptizatorum 

a 

F.  Thoma  Worthington,  M°  A0:  OP. 

Anno  Dni  17 13. 

Sept:  260  Ego  F  Tho:  Worthington  Mus-  ApU8  O.P.     Baptizavi  in 

Capella  de  Croxteath  Jnfantem  natam  ex  Henrico  &  Catharina  Cowley 

Conjugibus  ex  loco  dicto  Fizackerley,*  cui  impositum  est  Nomen  Annae. 

Patrini  fuerunt  Thomas  Rouston  &  Anna  Rushton, 

Jta  est  fr  Tho:  Worthington  OP. 
Oct:  n°  Jtem  Ego  Baptizavi  Jn  capella  de  Croxteath  Jnfantem 
Natam  ex  Gulielmo  &  Jsabella  Harrison  Conjugibus  ex  loco  dicto 
Highton  t,  cui  impositum  et  Nomen  Sarce.     Patrini  fuerunt  Johannes 
Battersby  &  Elizabeth  Rentford. 

Jta  est  fr  Tho:  Worthington  OP. 

(2)  Oct:  1 30  Jtem  ego  Baptizavi  in  domo  Parentum  Jnfantem 
natam  ex  Johanne  &  Margarita  Tyreir  Conjugibus  in  loco  vicino 
dicto  Fizackerly,  cui  impositum  est  nomen  Aloisice.  Patrini  fuerunt 
Robertus  Wor &  Anna  Pickering. 

Jta  est  f*  Tho:  Worthington  OP. 
Oct:  2 8°  Jtem  Ego  Baptizavi  in  domo  Parentum  Jnfantem  natum 
ex  Georgio  &  Maria  Woods  Conjugibus  in  loco  vicino  vz:  Darby,  \ 
cui  impositum  est  Nomen  Johannis.    Patrini  fuerunt  Matheus  Withing- 
ton,  &  Margarita  Barrow. 

Jta  est  fr  Tho:  Worthington  OP. 
Nov:  i°  Jtem  Ego  Baptizavi  in  domo  Parentum  Jnfantem  natam 
ex  Roberto  &  Maria  Watmore   Conjugibus   in   loco   vicino  dicto 
Fizackerly,   Cui  impositum  est   Nomen   Margaritse.     Patrini   fuerunt 
Robertus  Laurence  &  Margarita  Widdowson. 

Jta  est  fr  Tho:  Worthington  OP. 
Dec:   n°  Jtem  ego  Baptizavi  in   Cubiculo   nostro   in  Croxteath 
Jnfantem  Natam  ex  Edoardo  &  Sara  §  Rose  Conjugibus  in  loco  vicino 

dicto cui  impositum   est   Nomen   Dorotheas      Patrini 

fuerunt  Gulielmus  Rad[e  or  c]liff  &  Anna  Hunt. 

Jta  est  fr  Tho:  Worthington  0:P. 
Anno  Dni  17 14 
Jan:  i°  Jtem  ego  Baptizavi  in  domo  Parentum  in  Darby  Jnfantem 
Natum  ex  Johanne  &  Maria  Smith  Conjugibus,  cui  impositum  est 
Nomen  Jacobi.    Patrini  fuerunt  Gulielmus  Rimmer  &  Margarita  Smith. 

Jta  est  fr  Tho:  Worthington  OP. 

*  Fazackerley.  f  Hightown. 

%  West  Derby.  §  Sara  written  over  dots. 


224  REGISTERS    OF   FR.    THOMAS    WORTHINGTON,   O.P. 

Sept:  260  Jtem  Ego  Baptizavi  in  domo  Parentum  in  Darby  Jnfantem 
Natum  ex  Gulielmo  &  Anna  Hunt  Conjugibus  cui  impositum  est 
Nomen  Roberti.  Patrini  fuerunt  Georgius  Sitgwick  &  Elizabetha 
Bibby.  Jta  est  fr  Tho:  Worthington  OP. 

(4)  Nov:  300  Jtem  Ego  Baptizavi  in  Capella  de  Croxteath  Jnfantem 
Natum  ex  Richardo  &  Margarita  Rimmer  Conjugibus  in  Darby  cui 
impositum  est  Nomen  Roberti.  Patrini  fuerunt  Johannes  &  Elizabeth 
Barrow.  Jta  est  fr  Thomas  Worthington  OP. 

Anno  Dili  17 15 

Feb:  90  Jtem  Ego  baptizavi  in  domo  Parentum  in  Fizackerly 
Jnfantem  Natum  ex  Henrico  et  Catharina  Cowley  Conjugibus,  cui 
impositum  est  Nomen  Davidis,  Patrini  (quoniam  Jnfans  periclitatus 
est)  Ego  Jpse  &  Elizabetha  Rushton. 

Jta  est  fr  Tho:  Worthington  OP. 

Mart:  240  Jtem  Ego  Baptizavi  in  domo  Parentum  in  Darby  Jn- 
fantem   Natum    ex    Gulielmo   &    Johanna    Birch    Conjugibus,    cui 

impositum  est  Nomen  Henrici.     Patrini  fuerunt  Robertus 

...  &  Elizabetha  Rushton.  Jta  est  fr  Tho:  Worthington  OP. 

(5)  Jul:  240  Jtem  Ego  Baptizavi  in  domo  Parentum  in  Darby 
[Infantem  above]  Natum  ex  Georgio  &  Maria  Woods  Conjugibus, 

cui  impositum  est  Nomen  Jacobi.     Patrini  fuerunt 

Jta  est  fr  Tho:  Worthington  OP. 

Sept:  40  Jtem  Ego  Baptizavi  in  domo  Parentum  Jnfantem  Natum 
ex  Roberto  &  Maria  Watmore  Conjugibus  in  loco  dicto  Fizackerly, 

cui  impositum  est  Nomen  Thomae.     Patrini  fuerunt  Jacobus 

&  Joanna  Fleetwood.  Jta  est  fr  Tho:  Worthington  OP. 

Nov:  210  Jtem  Ego  baptizavi  in   Cubiculo  nostro   de   Croxteath 

Jnfantem     Natum     ex Harrison 

Conjugibus,  in  loco  vicino  dicto  Fizackerly.     Cui  impositum  est  Nomen 
Joannis.    Patrini  fuerunt  Robertus  Laurence  &  Maria  Trustram. 

Jta  est  fr  Tho:  Worthington  OP. 

(6)  Nov:  1 70  Jtem  Ego  Baptizavi  in  Domo  Parentum  in  Darby 

Jnfantem  Natam  et   Roberto  & Chanterell  Conjugibus, 

cui  impositum  est  Nomen  Marise.     Patrini  fuerunt  Thomas  Bolt,  & 
Elizabeth  Blackburn.  Jta  est  fr  Tho:  Worthington  OP. 

Dec  1 50  Jtem  Ego  baptizavi  in  Cubiculo  nostro  in  Croxteath  Jnfan- 
tem   Natum    ex Finch cui 

impositum  est  Nomen  Gulielmi ;  Patrini  fuerunt  Gulielmus  Radclif,  & 
Helena  Toys.  Jta  est  fr  Tho:  Worthington  OP. 

Anno  Dni  1716 

Jan:  i°  Jtem  Ego  Baptizavi  in  Cubiculo  nostro  in  Croxteath  Jnfan- 
tem Natum  ex Chapman  ex  Knowsley,  cui 

impositum  est  Nomen  Johannis.     Patrini  fuerunt  Johannes  Hewart  & 
Joanna  Prior.  Jta  est  fr  Tho:  Worthington  OP. 

(7)  Feb:  i°  Jtem  Ego  Baptizavi  in  Oppido  Leverpoole*  Jnfantem 

Natum  ex  Joseph  & Waddesworth,  cui  impositum 

est    Nomen    Josephi.       Patrini    fuerunt Shuttleworth,    et 

Plesington.  Jta  est  fr  Tho:  Worthington  OP. 

Feb:   120  Jtem   Ego   Baptizavi   in   Oppido   Leverpoole  Jnfantem 
*  Liverpool. 


KEPT   IN    LANCASHIRE,    1713-17  225 

natum  ex  Patricio Conjugibus,  cui  impositum 

est  Nomen  Patricij.     Patrini  fuerunt  Daniel  Morphew  & 

Lancaster.  Jta  est  fr  Tho:  Worthington  OP. 

May  240  Jtem  ego  baptizavi  in  Capella  de  Croxteath  Jnfantem 
Natum  ex  Joanne  &  Maria  Smith  Conjugibus,  Cui  impositum  est 
Nomen  Henrici.    Patrini  fuerunt  Johannes  Smith,  &  Catharina  Molom. 

Jta  est  fr  Tho:  Worthington  OP. 

(8)  Aug:  50  Jtem  Ego  Baptizavi  in  Capella  de  Croxteath  Jnfantem 
Natum  ex  Johanne  &  Elizabeth  Johnson  Conjugibus  in  Darby.  Cui 
impositum  est  Nomen  Thomas.  Patrini  fuerunt  Gulielmus  Smith  & 
Maria  Bushel.  Jta  est  fr  Tho:  Worthington  OP. 

Sept:  20  Jtem  Ego  Baptizavi  in  Capella  de  Croxteath  Jnfantem 
Natum  ex  Edoardo  &  Rosa  Finch  Conjugibus.  cui  impositum  est 
Nomen  Jacobi.  Patrini  fuerunt  Matheus  loco  Jacobi  Withington  & 
Dorothea  Rose.  Jta  est  fr  Tho:  Worthington  OP. 

Sept:  300  Jtem  Ego  Baptizavi  in  domo  Parentum  in  Fizackerly 
Jnfantem  ex  \ Tatlock  Conjugibus,  cui  im- 
positum est  Nomen  Henrici.     Patrini  fuerunt Tatlock  & 

Hewart.  Jta  est  fr  Tho:  Worthington  OP. 

(9)  Oct:  70  Jtem  Ego  Baptizavi  in  Domo  Parentum  in  Darby 
Jnfantem  Natam  ex  Johanne  &  Maria  Woods  Conjugibus,  cui  im- 
positum est  Nomen  Eleonorce.  Patrini  fuerunt  Johannes  Ashton  & 
Joanna  Birch.  Jta  est  fr  Tho:  Worthington  OP. 

Nov:  1 50  Jtem  Ego  Baptizavi  in  domo  Parentum  in  Darby  Jnfantem 
Natum  ex  Hugone  et  Joanna  Anderton  Conjugibus,  cui  impositum 
est  Nomen  Jacobi.  Patrini  fuerunt  Gulielmus  Shuttleworth  &  Elizabeth 
Blackburn.  Jta  est  fr  Tho:  Worthington.  OP. 

Anno  Dni  17 17 

Feb:  20  Jtem  Ego  Baptizavi  in  Capella  de  Croxteath  Jnfantem 
Natam  ex  Gulielmo  &  Joanna  Birch  Conjugibus  in  Darby,  cui  im- 
positum est  Nomen  Margaritas.     Patrini  fuerunt  Henricus  Asp 

&  Elizabeth  Abraham.  Jta  est  fr  Tho:  Worthington  OP. 

(10)  Feb:  io°  Jtem  Ego  Baptizavi  in  Capella  de  Croxteath  Jnfantem 
Natum  ex  Thoma  &  Anna  Norris  Cungibus,  cui  impositum  est  Nomen 
Richardi.     Patrini  fuerunt  Robertus  Whiteside.  &  Maria  Latham. 

Jta  est  fr  Tho:  Worthington  OP. 
Maij  90  Jtem  Ego  Baptizavi  in  Capella  de  Croxteath  Jnfantem 

Natum  ex Lipthrop  Conjugibus  in  Darby, 

cui  impositum  est  Nomen  Johannis.     Patrini  fuerunt  Jacobus  Withing- 
ton, loco  cujus  stetit  Gulielmus  Shuttleworth,  &  Elizabeth  Lipthrop. 

Jta  est  fr  Tho:  Worthington  OP. 
Maij  1 30  Jtem  Ego  Baptizavi  in  domo  dicta  Moo  [?]  Beggers-Hall 

Jnfantem   Natam   ex Finch  cui  impositum   est   Nomen 

Susannas.    Patrini  fuerunt Finch  & Lipthrop. 

Jta  est  fr  Tho:  Worthington  OP. 
(n)  Julii  210  Jtem  Ego  baptizavi  in  Capella  de  Croxteath  Jnfantem 

Natam  ex  Edoardo  et  Sara  Rose  Conjugibus  in  loco  vicino 

cui  impositum  est  Nomen  Aloisise.     Patrini  fuerunt  Gulielmus  Radcliff 
pro  Gulielmo  Finch,  &  Elizabeth  Cooper. 

Jta  est  fr  Tho:  Worthington  OP. 

XIII.  p 


226  REGISTERS   OF  FR.   THOMAS  WORTHINGTON,  O.P. 

Aug:  2 5°  Jtem  Ego  baptizaviin  Capella  de  Bardsea  Jnfantem  Natam 
ex  Edoardo  et  Joanna  Boreskin  Conjugibus  in  loco  vicino  dicto 
Cartmell,*  cui  impositum  est  Nomen  Marise.  Patrini  fuerunt  Edoardus 
Tarbock  &  Dorothea  Rigby  loco  aliorum. 

Jta  est  fr  Tho:  Worthington.  OP. 

[This  ends  the  register \  the  initials  T  R  {Thomas  Rees)  being  on 
page  (i  i),  whilst  the  only  remaining  page  (12)  is  occupied  by  the  certificate 
of  three  other  commissioners— John  Bowring,  Sam  Gale  and  John 
Shoveller.'] 

*  Has  been  Cattmell. 


NO.  X 

CATHOLIC  REGISTERS  OF  DANBY,  WEST  WITTON,  AND 
LEYBURN,  YORKSHIRE,  1 742-1840,  WITH  NOTES  OF 
THE  SCROPE  FAMILY,  1663-1754. 

CONTRIBUTED   BY  JOSEPH   S.   HANSOM,   WITH   THE   HISTORY   OF  THE 
MISSIONS   BY   JOSEPH   GILLOW 

The  five  books,  lately  increased  to  six  as  mentioned  below,  are  properly 
described  in  the  certificate  and  above,  and  not  as  of  Danby  alone.  Amongst 
the  non-parochial  registers  at  Somerset  House  they  are  numbered  "  York- 
shire 76."  I  am  indebted  to  the  Registrar-General  for  facilities  to  transcribe 
them,  and  to  Mr.  A.  R.  Bellingham,  Superintendent  of  Records  at  Somerset 
House,  and  his  staff,  for  kindly  attention  to  my  convenience. 

The  earliest  entries  are  relating  to  the  family  of  Scrope  of  Danby.  The 
Danby  general  registers  commence  in  1742,  followed  by  a  lapse  after  1788, 
which,  as  regards  deaths,  is  made  up  by  an  insertion  down  to  1794,  and 
then  continued  to  the  closing  of  the  mission  in  1806.  The  lapse  in  the 
baptisms  is  shorter,  and  the  resumption  takes  place  in  1790.  Afoot-note 
gives  a  probable  explanation  for  omissions  from  1754-58.  From  1806  they 
are  continued  as  West  Witton  registers  to  1835. 

The  Leyburn  registers  commence  in  1793  and  continue  to  1838,  the  last 
three  years  being  an  amalgamation  of  West  Witton  and  Leyburn.  This 
accounts  for  all  these  registers  being  in  the  hands  of  the  Rev.  Richard 
Bolton  at  Leyburn,  when  he  forwarded  them  to  Somerset  House  in  1840. 

The  books  have  had  numbers  given  to  them  with  some  relation  to  the 
dates  and  convenience.     For  the  sake  of  continuity  and  comprehensiveness, 

I  have  here  rearranged  the  order,  giving  the  present  numbers  in  paren- 
theses ;  and  incidentally  I  have  suggested  to  the  Registrar-General  that 
the  books  should  be  altered  in  the  same  way.  A  short  description  of  the 
several  books  seems  advisable. 

I  (VI).  A  new  dummy  volume,  iof  x  Z\  inches,  made  up  for  the  purpose 
of  accommodating  the  old  sheet  of  paper,  now  divided  into  two  by  wear  and 
partly  illegible.  It  contains  notes  and  registers  of  the  Scrope  family  of 
Danby,  formerly  fastened  in  the  Leyburn  registers,  VI  (IV).  They  date 
from  1663  to  1754,  and  are  produced  in  photogravure.    The  certificate  from 

II  (I),  which  refers  to  the  whole  series,  is  more  appropriately  placed  here. 

II  (I).  It  contains  copies  of  the  oldest  general  registers,  viz., — (a) 
Oakley's,  1742-54,  the  originals  of  which  are  not  at  Somerset  House; 
(b)  Wappeler's,  1758-64,  the  originals  being  in  III  (II) ;  (c)  Boone's,  1764-71, 
the  originals  also  being  in  III  (II) ;  (d)  the  original  continuation  of  Boone's 
and  other  registers  to  1788,  with  two  lists  of  confirmations  in  1773  and  '804 
at  the  reverse  end.  The  certificate  in  it  is,  for  our  purpose,  in  I  (VI).  It 
is  an  ordinary  pocket-book  with  pockets,  covered  in  green  vellum  with  a 
common  clasp.     Size,  6}  x  4  inches. 

III  (II).  The  original  registers  by  Wappeler,  1758-64,  and  Boone, 
1764-71.  The  copies  being  in  II  (I),  they  are  not  printed  here  ;  but  have 
been  collated  with  the  copies.  They  are  on  16  pages  of  paper,  6^x4 
inches,  sewn  together,  and  placed  in  a  book  back. 

IV  (III).  Danby  baptisms  from  1790  to  1806  (when  the  chaplaincy  or 
mission  ceased)  continued  at  West  Witton  until  1835,  after  which  date 
West  Witton  registers  appear  in  the  Leyburn  book,  VI  (IV).  They  are 
on  paper,  y\  x  4^  inches,  and  placed  in  a  book  cover. 


228  CATHOLIC   REGISTERS   OF   DANBY,   WEST   WITTON,   AND 

V  (V).  Danby  deaths,  1 794-1 804.  Pages  3-6  have  been  inserted,  and 
contain  a  few  particulars  in  the  interval  between  1788  and  1794,  in  different 
hands.  Although  registers  of  deaths,  four  baptisms  are  recorded  and  dup- 
licated in  IV  (III).  They  are  on  paper  7^x4^  inches,  newly  bound  in 
half  vellum,  with  some  padding  pages. 

VI  (I  V).  The  baptismal  registers  of  Leyburn,  although  not  so  described, 
from  1 793-1 838.  The  Thornburghs  and  subsequently  the  Riddells  had  a 
seat  here.  Some  registers  relating  to  West  Witton  appear  after  those 
registers  cease  in  1835.  The  Scrope  paper  was  formerly  fastened  in  this. 
Size,  8£  x  6^  inches,  placed  in  a  book  cover. 

It  is  impossible  to  differentiate  between  the  registers  of  the  three  places 
in  such  close  proximity.  The  priests  of  one  would  officiate  for  those  of 
another,  and  in  times  of  vacancy  it  was  necessary. 

Amongst  the  names  of  local  Catholics  taking  the  oath  of  allegiance  in 
1 791  and  1792,  there  appear  the  following  in  N.  Riding  Records^  viii. 
153-4: 

Danby. — Simon  Thomas  Scroope,  Esq. ;  John  Sharrock,  gent. ;  Thomas 
Douthwaite,  steward ;  and  Mary  Hedley,  spinster. 

Leyburn.— William  Allen,  gent.;  William  Allen,  junior,  farmer; 
Thomas  Allen,  farmer;  John  Blenkinsop,  farmer;  Robert  Blenkinsop, 
mason ;  Christopher  Dent,  mason  ;  John  Dent,  mason ;  and  John  Shaw , 
farmer. 

West  Witton. — Thomas  Buckle,  gent. ;  and  William  Furniss,  gent. 

Mr.  Gillow  supplies  the  following  notes  regarding  the  missions. 

J.  S.  H. 

HISTORICAL  NOTES  ON  THE  DANBY,  WEST  WITTON,  AND 
LEYBURN  MISSIONS. 

Barker  in  his  delightful  work,  entitled  The  Three  Days  of  Wensleydale, 
dedicated  to  Simon  Thomas  Scrope,  Esq.,  of  Danby-super-Yore,  in  1854, 
traces  a  meagre  yet  interesting  account  of  the  mission  in  Wensleydale  during 
the  long  Dark  Day  of  Persecution.  He  records  the  local  tradition  that  the 
celebrated  Dom  John  Dionysius  Huddleston,  who  subsequently  received 
Charles  II.  into  the  Church,  resided  for  some  time  at  Grove  House,  Leyburn, 
and  attended  to  the  wants  of  the  Catholics  of  the  neighbourhood.  This  may 
be  correct,  but  if  so  it  must  have  been  before  he  joined  the  Benedictine 
Order,  and  during  the  troublous  times  of  the  Civil  Wars,  probably  when 
Henry  Scrope  or  his  brother  Simon  were  the  squires  of  Danby.  He  asserts 
that  a  chaplain  was  almost  always  resident  at  Danby  Hall.  The  Scropes 
came  into  possession  of  that  estate  through  the  marriage  of  the  heiress  of 
Simon  Conyers  with  Henry  Scrope,  of  Spennithorne,  who  died  there  in 
1 591.  Under  one  of  the  rooms  in  the  old  hall  there  is,  or  was  in  Barker's 
time,  a  hiding-place  in  which  the  hunted  missionaries  were  often  and  suc- 
cessfully concealed.  There  was  also  a  similar  hiding-place  at  The  Grove, 
or  Grove  House,  in  Leyburn,  long  the  seat  of  the  Thornburghs,  after  they 
had  ceased  to  reside  at  Selside  Hall,  co.  Westmoreland.  William  Thorn- 
burgh,  of  Selside  Hall,a  Catholic  non-juror  in  1717,  married  Mary  Huddleston, 
a  niece  of  Dom  John  Dionysius  Huddleston,  and  his  son  Francis  Thornburgh 
settled  at  Grove  House,  having  married  a  daughter  of  Thomas  Sudell,  Esq., 
of  Windlass  Park  and  West  Witton,  co.  York.  The  latter's  brother,  Dr. 
William  Thornburgh,  president  of  Douay  College,  died  on  a  visit  to  Grove 
House  in  1750.  This  Francis  joined  the  Chevalier  de  St.  George  in  171 5, 
and  it  was  probably  in  consequence,  after  the  defeat  at  Preston,  that  he 
settled  in  Leyburn,  where  he  died  in  1774,  as  recorded  in  the  registers.  His 
niece  Mary  Thornburgh  became  sole  heiress  to  the  family  estates,  and, 
having  in  1769  become  the  wife  of  Ralph  Riddell,  of  Cheeseburne  Grange, 
second  son  of  Thomas  Riddell,  of  Swinburne  Castle  and  Felton  Park,  Nor- 


LEYBURN,   YORKSHIRE,    1742-1840  229 

thumberland,  Grove  House  passed  to  that  family,  and  at  various  times  has 
been  occupied  by  the  Riddells. 

Grove  House  was  the  secular  mission,  while  that  at  Danby  Hall  was 
generally  served  by  the  Jesuits  until  after  the  suppression  of  the  Society. 
Two  other  chapels  were  eventually  opened  at  Ulshaw  Bridge  and  West 
Witton,  but  all  gradually  merged  into  one  mission.  At  times  it  is  very 
difficult  to  distinguish  between  these  missions,  but  so  far  as  the  tangle  can 
be  unravelled  the  following  sub-divisions  fairly  represent  the  history. 

Danby  Hall. 

Rev.  Thomas  Cornforth  alias  Roydon,  born  in  1679,  was  ordained  priest 
at  Douay  College,  and  thence  was  sent  to  St.  Gregory's  Seminary  at  Paris 
in  1707.  He  did  not  take  degrees  at  the  Sorbonne  as  intended,  and  prob- 
ably came  over  to  the  mission  soon  afterwards,  and  was  placed  as  chaplain 
to  Simon  Scrope,  Esq.,  at  Danby,  where  he  is  met  with  in  17 14.  Some  time 
before  1728,  probably  in  consequence  of  the  persecution  which  followed  the 
Rising  of  171 5,  he  removed  to  Marnhull,  co.  Dorset,  was  elected  an  arch- 
deacon of  the  Old  Chapter  on  July  14,  1739,  and  died  Aug.  5,  1748,  aged  70. 

During  his  chaplaincy  in  17 16  Fr.  Thomas  Worthington,  O.P.,  is  found 
serving  at  Danby,  but  he  was  probably  merely  on  a  visit  to  the  Scropes. 

Fr.  John  Giffard,  S.J.,  seems  to  have  succeeded  Mr.  Cornforth.  He  was 
born  in  London,  Dec.  20,  1683-4,  and  entered  the  Society  in  1705.  Foley 
{Records  S.J.  vii.  301)  states  that  he  was  chaplain  and  missioner  at  Danby 
Hall.  He  left  in  1740,  and  returned  to  St.  Omer's  College,  where  he  died 
Aug.  21,  1757,  aged  74.  During  his  administration,  in  1728,  Bishop  Williams 
made  his  visitation  at  Danby,  and  gave  confirmation  to  40  persons. 

Fr.  Francis  Oakley  alias  Auckland,  S.J.,  succeeded  Fr.  Giffard  in  1740. 
Foley  says  he  was  born  in  Worcestershire,  Aug.  3,  1694,  but  it  is  probable 
that  he  was  the  son  of  Thomas  Oakley,  of  Brailes,  co.  Warwick,  yeoman, 
a  Catholic  non-juror  in  1717.  He  was  superior  of  the  Yorkshire  District  for 
the  Society.  Under  date  Jan.  12,  1745,  he  refers  in  the  register  to  his 
nearly  being  banished  for  baptizing  a  child  at  Ulshaw  Bridge.  He  died  at 
Danby,  still  superior  of  the  Residence,  July  12,  1755,  aged  61.  Oct.  6,  1754, 
is  the  last  entry  in  the  register  by  Fr.  Oakley,  and  from  about  this  date  till 
his  death  it  is  probable  that  he  was  unable  to  attend  to  the  duties  of  the 
mission.  Until  a  resident  successor  was  appointed,  Fr.  Wappeler  in  1758, 
the  chapel  was  served  from  Richmond  by — 

Fr.  Thomas  Hunter,  S.J.,  according  to  Fr.  Laurenson  {C.R.S.  iv.  251), 
succeeded  Fr.  Oakley  at  Danby,  and  served  it  from  Richmond,  which  he  was 
forced  to  leave  by  the  parson  there  for  having  christened  a  child.  From 
1763  to  1766  he  was  at  York  Bar,  being  appointed  superior  of  the  district  in 
the  former  year,  and  in  the  latter  year  he  removed  to  Pontefract.  Finally 
he  was  sent  to  Ghent,  where  he  died  Jan.  30,  1773,  aged  55.  He  was 
followed  by — 

Fr.  Richard  Knight  alias  Thorold,  S.J.,  who  was  also  stationed  at  Rich- 
mond. He  was  the  only  surviving  son  and  heir  of  William  Knight,  of 
Kingerby,  co.  Lincoln,  Esq.,  by  his  second  wife  Lucy  Jennings,  and  was 
born  at  Kingerby,  July  24  (O.S.)  or  Aug.  4  (N.S.),  1720.  He  entered  the 
Society  in  1739,  was  appointed  to  Richmond  June  9,  1743,  and  thence  served 
Danby  with  Fr.  Hunter  between  Fr.  Oakley's  death  in  1755  and  the  appoint- 
ment of  a  resident  chaplain  in  1758.  He  was  still  at  Richmond  in  1761, 
some  time  after  which  he  was  transferred  to  Lincoln.  He  was  appointed 
superior  of  the  Lincolnshire  District  Dec.  3,  1765.  Settling  his  estate  at 
Irnham,  co.  Lincoln,  upon  his  only  sister  Lucy,  the  wife  of  Sir  Thomas 
Rookwood  Gage,  5th  Bart.,  of  Hengreave  Hall,  co.  Suffolk,  he  built  a  new 
chapel  at  Lincoln,  and  also  erected  a  chapel  at  Market  Rasen,  in  1782,  in 
place  of  the  one  at  Kingerby,  which  he  attended  occasionally  from  Lincoln. 


230  CATHOLIC   REGISTERS   OF   DANBY,   WEST   WITTON,   AND 

He  died  suddenly  at  Lincoln,  Dec.  6,  1793  (O.S.),  aged  73,  eminent  for  his 
sanctity. 

Fr.  Wilhelm  Wappeler,  S.J.,  born  Jan.  22,  171 1,  at  Numan  Sigmaringen, 
in  Westphalia,  after  serving  in  Maryland  for  several  years,  returned  to 
St.  Omer's  College,  and  was  in  1748  sent  to  England.  In  1754  he  became 
prefect  at  St.  Omer's,  and  in  1758  was  appointed  resident  chaplain  at  Danby 
Hall.  His  last  entry  in  the  register  is  Sept.  2,  1764,  after  which  he  was 
transferred  to  Liverpool  for  a  short  time.  Subsequently  he  was  sent  to 
Ghent,  and  finally  to  Bruges,  where  he  died  in  Sept.,  says  Dr.  Oliver 
{Collectanea  S.J.),  but  according  to  the  Laity's  Directory  on  Oct.  II,  1781, 
aged  70. 

Fr.  Edward  Boone,  S.J.,  a  native  of  Maryland,  born  Feb.  29,  1734,  who 
entered  the  Society  in  1756,  succeeded  Fr.  Wappeler  at  Danby  in  Sept.  1764, 
and  remained  till  his  death,  Aug.  23,  1785,  aged  51.  It  has  been  asserted 
that  Fr.  Boone  did  not  at  first  reside  at  Danby,  but  lived  at  Grove  House 
after  the  removal  of  Mr.  Phillips,  and  served  Danby  from  thence  until  the 
arrival  of  Mr.  Postlethwaite.  This  is  most  improbable,  as  Grove  House  was 
a  secular  mission,  and  there  is  no  evidence  in  corroboration  of  the  statement. 
In  1773  tne  congregation  at  Danby  consisted  of  45,  and  in  1781  of  80  com- 
municants. After  Fr.  Boone's  death,  the  Society  having  been  suppressed, 
the  uhapel  at  Danby  was  served  temporarily  by — amongst  others — 

The  Rev.  George  Witham,  whose  name  appears  in  the  registers  under 
date  July  15,  1787.  At  the  time  he  was  chaplain  at  Carlton  Hall,  the  seat  of 
the  Stapletons.  He  was  the  eldest  son  of  Thomas  Witham,  Esq.,  M.D.,  of 
Old  Elvet,  Durham,  and  his  wife  Elizabeth,  eldest  daughter  and  co-heiress 
of  George  Meynell,  of  Aldborough  and  Dalton,  co.  York,  Esq.  He  was  born 
Aug.  9,  1750,  and  was  sent  to  Douay  College  in  1763,  but  left  in  his  third 
year's  divinity  on  Sept.  9,  1774,  to  teach  at  St.  Omer's  College,  then  under 
secular  rule,  and  was  ordained  priest.  In  July,  1 781,  he  succeeded  the  last 
Jesuit  chaplain,  Fr.  William  Allan,  at  Carlton  Hall,  where  he  appears  to  have 
remained  till  1791.  He  then  became  chaplain  to  the  14th  Earl  of  Shrews- 
bury, and  afterwards  to  the  Countess,  at  Lacock  Abbey,  co.  Wilts.  It  was 
there  that  he  printed  at  his  own  private  press  in  the  abbey  The  History  of 
Lacock  Abbey,  or  Locus  Beatce  Maria ',  1806,  4to,  pp.  53.  After  the  death  of 
the  Countess,  Aug.  II,  1809,  aged  85,  Mr.  Witham  retired  to  Durham,  where 
he  died  in  his  house  in  Old  Elvet,  May  1,  1829,  aged  79.  In  the  same  year 
that  Mr.  Witham  appears  in  the  registers  the  Benedictines  accepted  the 
charge  of  the  chaplaincy  at  Danby  Hall,  and  appointed — 

Dom  John  Dunstan  Sharrock,  O.S.B. 

He  was  born  at  Walton-le-dale,  co.  Lancaster,  in  1754,  being  a  member 
of  an  old  Benedictine  family,  was  professed  at  Dieulward,  and  came  to  the 
mission  at  Danby  in  1787.  In  the  following  year,  1788,  died  the  squire, 
Simon  Scrope.  His  wife,  Anne  Clementina,  was  the  daughter  and  co-heiress 
of  George  Meynell,  of  Aldborough  and  Dalton,  Esq.,  and  hence  she  was 
aunt  to  the  Rev.  George  Witham  previously  mentioned.  It  was  decided  to 
erect  an  independent  chapel  at  Ulshaw  Bridge,  Danby-on-Yore,  and  a  small 
plain  building  was  opened  in  that  year,  1788,  chiefly  through  the  munificence 
of  the  Scropes.  It  was  apparently  served  by  the  priests  attending  the 
domestic  chapel  in  the  hall,  and  its  subsequent  history  will  be  treated  here- 
after. Fr.  Sharrock  remained  at  Danby  till  1793,  when  he  went  to  Hesleyside 
until  the  following  year,  and  thence  was  transferred  to  Long  Horsley,  where 
he  died  May  7,  183 1.     He  was  succeeded  at  Danby  by — 

Dom  Thomas  Austin  Lawson,  O.S.B.,born  at  York  in  1768,  who  was  son 
of  John  Lawson,  Esq.,  third  son  of  Sir  Henry  Lawson,  3rd  Bart.,  of  Brough 
Hall,  co.  York,  and  his  wife  Mary,  eldest  daughter  of  Sir  John  Shelley, 
3rd  Bart.,  of  Michelgrove,  co.  Sussex.  His  mother  was  Elizabeth,  daughter 
of  Thomas  William  Selby,  of  Biddleston  Hall,  co.  Northumberland,  Esq. 


LEYBURN,  YORKSHIRE,    1742-1840  231 

He  was  professed  at  St.  Gregory's,  Douay,  in  1779,  and  ordained  priest  in 
1783.  Coming  to  the  mission,  he  was  placed  at  Danby  in  1793,  ms  first 
signature  in  the  registers  being  dated  March  4  of  that  year.  He  only 
remained  until  the  following  year,  his  last  entry  in  the  register  being  under 
date  Feb.  4,  though  he  is  said  to  have  left  in  May,  1794.  He  was  then 
transferred  to  Richmond.  In  1803  he  was  called  from  Richmond  to  teach 
at  St.  Gregory's  College,  then  at  Acton  Burnell,  co.  Salop,  but  disliking  the 
occupation  he  returned  to  Richmond  three  months  later.  Thus  he  remained 
at  Richmond  till  his  appointment  in  18 14  as  prior  of  St.  Gregory's,  which 
removed  to  Downside  in  that  year,  and  continued  in  that  office  till  18 18.  He 
then  served  Kilvington,  1818-22,  after  which  he  became  vicar  to  the  Bene- 
dictine nuns  at  Salford  Hall  till  his  death,  April  23,  1830,  aged  62.  He  held 
the  titular  dignity  of  prior  of  Gloucester  from  18 18.  Meanwhile  a  French 
e'migrd  priest  appears  to  have  settled  in  the  locality  as  early  as  1790,  and  to 
have  assisted  the  Benedictines  in  serving  the  two  chapels  at  Danby  and 
Ulshaw  Bridge,  presuming  the  editor  of  the  registers  is  correct  in  ascribing 
entries  in  the  registers  to  his  hand.     His  name  was — 

Pere  Delalonde.  Fr.  John  Laurenson,  S.J.,  in  his  notes  of  chaplaincies 
in  the  north  during  the  18th  century  {C.R.S.  iv.  252),  says  that  this  very 
respectable  e'migrd  next  supplied  Danby,  and  "  made  great  improvements  in 
the  grounds,  was  ingenious  in  patch-work,  &c,  very  steady  in  his  clerical 
duties,  and  after  staying  4  or  5  years  returned  in  179-  to  France,  where  he 
obtained  a  curacy  at  Dieppe  ;  his  departure  was  much  regretted."  The  last 
entry  in  the  registers  by  Pere  Delalonde  was  on  Jan.  16,  1801,  and  the  next 
entry,  eleven  months  later,  by  Pere  Dupont. 

It  has  been  said  {Merry  England,  No.  64,  p.  260),  questionably  the 
writer  thinks,  that  Pere  C.  Devienne,  cure*  de  Freulleville,  proche  Dieppe  en 
France,  assisted  his  friend  Pere  Delalonde  at  Danby.  It  was  this  good 
priest  who  returned  the  Danby  registers  of  deaths,  Book  V  (V),  in  1819  after 
the  death  of  Pere  Duboscq  in  Oct.  18 18,  who  would  appear  to  have  taken 
them  with  him  to  Freulleville.  Devienne  succeeded  him  there,  and  was 
76  years  of  age  in  1819. 

Pere  J.  I.  Dupont,  late  vicaire  d'Ecalles,  du  diocese  de  Rouen  (Plasse, 
Le  Clerge  Francais,  ii.  408).  His  last  entry  is  March  5,  1802,  and  his 
successor  was — 

Fr.  John  Laurence  Eccles,  O.S.F.,  a  Lancashire  man,  who  came  from 
the  Franciscan  residence  at  Osmotherley,  in  Yorkshire,  in  1802,  his  first 
entry  in  the  registers  being  on  June  13.  He  left  in  1804  to  make  room  for 
the  Rev.  Dominic  Joseph  Maini,  and  returned  to  Osmotherley,  whence  after 
a  short  time  he  went  to  Sizergh  Castle,  co.  Westmoreland,  the  seat  of  the 
Stricklands,  where  he  died  a  jubilarian  in  the  Order,  "  remarkable  for  his 
humility  and  piety,"  says  Fr.  Laurenson  {C.R.S.  iv.  252),  March  15,  1810. 
An  imperfect  memoir  of  him  appears  in  Fr.  Francis  Thaddeus  Hermans' 
Franciscans  in  England,  p.  227. 

Rev.  Dominic  Joseph  Maini  came  from  Crathorne,  where  he  had  gone 
in  1798,  his  first  entry  in  the  registers  being  on  Jan.  9,  1804.  Fr.  Laurenson 
says  that  he  "  grew  melancholy  and  dissatisfied  in  less  than  a  year,"  and 
his  last  register  seems  to  be  that  at  Ulshaw  Bridge,  Aug.  21,  1805.  Dominic 
Maini,  who  subsequently  was  known  by  the  Christian  name  of  Joseph  only, 
was  sent  to  Sedgley  Park  School,  in  Staffordshire,  in  1784,  and  after  he  had 
been  ordained  priest  at  Ushaw  was  placed  at  Crathorne  in  1798,  whence  he 
came  to  take  charge  of  the  Ulshaw  Bridge  and  Danby  Hall  mission  in  1804, 
and  took  up  his  residence  at  Jolly  Pot.  From  here  he  removed  in  1805  to 
Formby,  in  Lancashire,  whence  in  1834  he  was  transferred  to  Yealand  in 
the  same  county,  and  remained  there  till  1 846.  He  then  served  St.  Anthony's, 
Liverpool,  until  shortly  before  his  death  in  1854.  His  temporary  successor 
at  Ulshaw  Bridge  was — 


232  CATHOLIC   REGISTERS   OF   DANBY,   WEST   WITTON,   AND 

Pere  J.  B.  Jolly,  who  signs  the  registers  for  the  first  time  May  18,  1806. 
This  is  the  last  entry  in  the  Danby  registers,  and  henceforward  all  Danby 
baptisms  are  entered  in  the  West  Witton  registers.  It  has  been  said  that 
Ulshaw  Bridge  chapel  was  closed  in  this  year,  and  that  the  Danby  mission 
was  united  with  the  one  at  West  Witton,  a  small  chapel  dedicated  to 
St.  Bartholomew,  opened  in  this  year  by  the  Rev.  Richard  Billington,  of 
Grove  House,  Leyburn,  who  continued  rector  until  his  death  at  Grove 
House  in  1830.  Nevertheless,  it  is  certain  that  the  domestic  chapel  at 
Danby  Hall  was  more  or  less  served  from  West  Witton  until  1832,  when 
the  Scrope  family  ceased  to  live  at  the  hall  for  twenty-five  years.  Pere 
J.  B.  Jolly  continues  to  make  occasional  entries  in  the  registers  until  May 
18,  181 1.  He  finally  returned  to  France,  where  he  died,  chanoine  regulier 
de  Ste.  Genevieve,  and  cure-  du  diocese  de  Rennes,  Sept.  27,  1828,  aged  86. 
Meanwhile  the  names  of  the  two  following  priests  temporarily  serving  the 
mission  are  found  in  the  registers — 

Rev.  Michael  Wharton,  on  April  15,  1807,  when  probably  he  was  staying 
at  Danby  Hall.  He  was  born  in  1733,  near  Kirby  Stephen,  co.  Westmore- 
land, and  was  descended  from  the  Whartons,  of  Wharton  and  Kirkby  Thore 
in  that  county,  and  also  of  Yorkshire,  one  of  whom,  Sir  Michael  Wharton, 
of  Beverley,  Knt.,  was  living  in  1724.  They  were  also  connections  of  the 
Scropes,  through  the  marriage  of  Simon  Scrope,  of  Danby,  who  died  in 
1691,  with  Mary,  daughter  of  Michael  Wharton,  of  Beverley,  Esq.  He  was 
ordained  priest  at  the  English  College  at  Lisbon,  Dec.  20,  1760,  and  left  for 
England  on  July  18,  1761.  He  became  chaplain  at  Leighton  Hall,  Lanca- 
shire, whence  in  1 782  he  removed  the  mission  to  Yealand,  where  the  lord  of 
the  manor,  Richard  Thomas  Gillow,  of  Leighton  Hall,  subsequently  erected 
a  church.  There  he  died  Dec.  10,  1809,  aged  76,  rural  dean  of  the  hundred 
of  Lonsdale. 

Fr.  Peter  Philip  Potier,  O.P.,  chaplain  to  the  Meynells  at  The  Friary, 
Yarm  {vide  memoir  Gillow,  Biog.  Diet.  Eng.  Caths.  v.  348).  He  likewise 
was  probably  visiting  at  Danby  Hall  when  his  entry  was  made  in  the  registers 
on  Oct.  18,  1809. 

Pere  J.  Duboscq,  a  French  Emigre,  who  returned  to  France,  became 
cure  of  Our  Lady  of  Freulleville,  near  Dieppe,  and  died  suddenly  at  Paris  in 
Oct.  18 1 8,  was  evidently  serving  one  of  the  chapels  at  West  Witton  or 
Danby,  as  shown  by  his  entries  in  the  register  on  Feb.  17  and  Nov.  3,  18 16, 
and  May  8,  1817.  After  this  the  mission  appears  to  have  been  entirely 
served  by  Mr.  Billington  from  Grove  House  till  his  death  in  1830,  and  then 
by  his  successor — 

The  Rev.  Thomas  Middlehurst,  who  at  first  resided  at  Grove  House  and 
thence  attended  to  the  chapel  at  West  Witton.  In  1835  the  latter  was 
formed  into  a  separate  mission,  and  Mr.  Middlehurst  removed  thither, 
Mr.  Parker  being  appointed  to  take  charge  of  the  new  chapel  and  presbytery 
erected  in  Leyburn  and  opened  in  that  year.  In  1839  Mr.  Middlehurst  was 
transferred  to  Pleasington  Priory,  in  Lancashire,  but  returned  to  West 
Witton  in  the  same  year,  and  remained  in  charge  till  1844,  when  West 
Witton  ceased  to  be  a  separate  mission  and  was  re-united  with  Leyburn. 
Mr.  Middlehurst  then  went  to  Kippax  Park,  Yorkshire,  and  remained  there 
till  1848.  After  a  rest  from  missionary  duty  he  was  appointed  to  Malton, 
1850-7,  then  removed  to  Egton  Bridge,  but  returned  to  Malton  in  the  same 
year,  and  remained  there  till  his  death,  July  12,  1880,  aged  78. 

In  1868  the  late  Mr.  Joseph  A.  Hansom  was  engaged  to  transform  and 
make  certain  additions  to  the  old  chapel  at  Ulshaw  Bridge,  dedicated 
to  SS.  Simon  and  Jude — no  doubt  suggested  by  Simon,  the  favourite  family 
name  of  the  Scropes — which  was  opened  on  June  10th  of  that  year,  and  has 
since  formed  a  separate  mission.     The  list  of  incumbents  is  as  follows  : — 

Rev.  Robert  Gibson,  1868  till  shortly  before  his  death,  May  25,  1882. 


LEYBURN,   YORKSHIRE,    1742-1840  233 

Rev.  John  O'Donnell,  1881-2. 
Rev.  John  Leadbetter,  1882-5. 
Rev.  David  J.  Smith,  1885-9. 
Rev.  William  Kirkham,  1889-97. 
Rev.  John  Murphy,  1 897-1 906. 
Rev.  John  J.  McCabe,  1906-7. 
Rev.  Geoffrey  Cremer,  1907  to  date. 

Leyburn. 

The  Rev.  John  Huddleston,  before  his  admission  into  the  Benedictine 
Order  under  the  religious  name  of  Dionysius,  as  already  related,  is  tradition- 
ally said  to  have  served  Grove  House,  but  whether  this  be  so,  or  that  he  was 
the  chaplain  at  Danby  Hall,  and  thence  served  Leyburn,  is  now  impossible 
to  say.  There  is  no  indication  of  his  serving  here  in  the  obituaries  he  noted 
in  his  Missal,  now  in  the  writer's  possession,  though  from  some  of  the  anni- 
versaries it  might  be  inferred  that  he  had  Yorkshire  associations  {C.R.S. 
i.  123).     The  earliest  evidence  of  a  priest  at  Grove  House  refers  to — 

Rev.  Henry  Maire,  of  the  ancient  family  seated  at  Hartbushes,  co. 
Durham.  His  father  was  Christopher  Maire,  Esq.,  a  Catholic  non-juror  in 
1 717,  and  his  mother,  Frances  Ingleby,  was  of  the  old  Catholic  family  of 
that  name  seated  at  Lawkland  Hall,  co.  York.  He  was  born  May  19,  1714 
(s.v.),  and  was  sent  to  Douay  College,  where  he  was  ordained  priest  May  29, 
and  left  the  college  for  the  English  mission  on  Aug.  25,  1738.  He  was 
appointed  chaplain  to  Francis  Thornburgh,  Esq.,  of  Grove  House,  Leyburn, 
but  after  about  three  years,  in  or  before  1741,  left  to  assist  the  Rev.  James 
Skelton  at  Raventofts.  Subsequently  he  served  Nidd  Hall,  the  seat  of 
Francis  Trappes-Byrnand,  Esq.,  and  thence  he  went  to  Cliffe-on-Tees,  the 
seat  of  the  Withams,  where  he  succeeded  the  Rev.  Nicholas  Clavering  in 
1768,  and  died  there,  suddenly,  on  Nov.  5,  1775,  aged  61.  Possibly  there 
was  a  vacancy  for  some  little  time  at  Grove  House,  during  which  the  mission 
would  be  served  from  Danby.    Anyhow  the  next  chaplain  on  record  was — 

Rev.  Peter  Phillips  alias  Purshall,  who  was  ordained  priest  at  the  English 
College  at  Rome,  though  his  name  (like  many  others)  is  omitted  from  the 
Diary  published  by  Bro.  Foley.  He  came  to  Grove  House  from  Egton 
Bridge  in  1743,  and  probably  left  in  1757  for  Ugthorpe,  where  he  died  Nov. 
23,  1 761.  During  his  time,  the  Rev.  William  Thornburgh,  D.D.,  president 
of  Douay  College,  came  over  on  a  visit  to  his  brother  Francis,  and  died  at 
Grove  House,  March  4,  1750.     He  was  succeeded  by — 

Rev.  John  Postlethwaite,  born  Aug.  20,  1727  (N.S.),  son  of  Richard 
Postlethwaite  and  his  wife  Anne  Newsham,  of  Westby,  co.  Lancaster,  be- 
came an  alumnus  at  Douay  College  in  logic,  Dec.  28,  1748,  who  was  ordained 
priest  in  1752  or  1753,  left  the  college  for  the  English  mission  on  July 
23»  1755,  and  so  far  as  can  be  ascertained  came  to  Grove  House  when 
Mr.  Phillips  left  for  Ugthorpe.  It  was  probably  after  the  death  of  Mr. 
Thornburgh,  in  1774,  that  he  removed  to  Hill  Top  in  Leyburn,  where  he 
erected  the  sun-dial  which  was  still  there  when  Mr.  Barker  wrote  in  1854. 
There  he  died  Jan.  5,  1785,  aged  57,  being  attended  in  his  last  illness  by 
Fr.  Boone  of  Danby.  After  this  Leyburn  seems  to  have  been  served  by 
temporary  priests,  and  the  registers  do  not  enlighten  us  as  to  their  names 
until  an  entry  dated  June  9,  1793,  by — 

Rev.  Richard  Billington.  He  was  son  of  Thomas  Billington,  of  an 
ancient  Catholic  family  of  yeomen  long  seated  at  Bartell,  in  Woodplumpton 
in  the  Fylde,  co.  Lancaster,  and  his  wife  Mary  Rigby.  He  was  born  in 
March  1757,  and  was  sent  to  Sedgley  Park  School,  whence  he  proceeded  to 
Douay  on  the  Rev.  Richard  Kendal's  fund,  now  at  Ushaw,  and  was  admitted 
into  the  college  on  Nov.  13,  1772.  He  became  an  alumnus  on  June  24,  1779, 
received  the  subdiaconate  in  1783,  the  diaconate  in  the  following  year,  and 


234  CATHOLIC   REGISTERS   OF   DANBY,   WEST   WITTON,   AND 

was  appointed  to  teach  syntax  on  Oct.  i,  1784,  but,  after  being  ordained 
priest,  left  the  college  for  the  mission  on  April  n,  1775.  He  was  stationed 
in  the  north,  and  from  Jan.  to  May  1793,  is  found  supplying  at  Lartington 
Hall  after  the  death  of  the  Rev.  Edward  Kitchen.  In  this  year,  on  June  9, 
1793,  ne  commenced  the  Leyburn  registers,  and  took  up  his  residence  at 
Grove  House.  From  1806  he  also  served  the  chapel  at  West  Witton,  his 
earliest  register  there  being  dated  Dec.  14  of  that  year.  In  1819  John 
Clifton,  of  Clifton,  Westby,  and  Lytham,  co.  Lancaster,  Esq.,  whose  wife 
was  Elizabeth,  daughter  of  Thomas  Horsley  Widdrington  Riddell,  Esq.,  of 
Felton  Park  and  Swinburne  Castle,  co.  Northumberland,  came  to  reside  at 
Grove  House,  and  remained  for  twenty-two  years.  Mr.  Billington  continued 
to  live  in  the  house  till  his  death,  when  his  remains  were  deposited  in  the 
parish  churchyard  of  West  Witton,  and  a  white  marble  tablet  was  subse- 
quently erected  on  the  north  wall  of  the  new  Catholic  chapel  at  Leyburn, 
bearing  the  following  inscription  :  "  Sacred  to  the  Memory  of  the  Reverend 
Richard  Billington,  during  Thirty-seven  years  the  beloved  Pastor  of  the 
Catholics  of  Wensleydale.  He  was  simple  in  his  manners,  and  faithful  in 
the  discharge  of  his  duties.  He  died  on  the  6th  of  October,  1830,  aged  7^ 
R.I.P." 

Rev.  Thomas  Middlehurst  succeeded  to  the  charge  of  the  two  chapels 
at  Leyburn  and  West  Witton.  He  was  son  of  John  Middlehurst,  of  Parr, 
co.  Lancaster,  and  his  wife  Jane  Clayton,  and  was  born  Sept.  II,  1802.  He 
was  admitted  into  the  English  College  at  Lisbon  on  Jan.  13,  1819,  became 
an  alumnus  April  1,  1823,  and  after  ordination  left  for  the  English  mission 
July  6,  1824.  He  temporarily  served  at  Callaly  Castle,  the  seat  of  the 
Claverings,  in  1830,  and  then  was  appointed  to  Leyburn  and  West  Witton 
upon  the  death  of  Mr.  Billington.  In  1834  it  was  decided  to  supersede  the 
small  chapel  at  Grove  House,  and  the  present  edifice,  with  its  adjacent 
presbytery,  was  commenced.  The  new  church,  dedicated  to  SS.  Peter  and 
Paul,  was  solemnly  opened  on  Wednesday,  Oct.  14,  1835.  The  chapel  was 
spacious,  but  devoid  of  ornament,  and  was  lighted  by  three  pointed  windows 
on  the  south  side,  and  a  large  one  at  the  east  end.  Behind  the  altar  was  a 
reredos  of  tasteful  design  and  execution,  painted  by  Mr.  Edward  Gell,  a 
promising  young  artist.  It  consisted  of  three  compartments,  the  central  one 
representing  Our  Lady  with  her  Divine  Son,  and  SS.  Peter  and  Paul  depicted 
on  the  side  divisions,  all  the  figures  being  life  size.  The  whole  was  in  the 
mediaeval  style,  and  painted  on  a  gold  ground  with  diapering  and  mottoes. 
A  handsome  and  finely  tuned  organ,  built  by  Paxton  of  York,  on  the  same 
plan  as  that  in  York  Minster,  was  purchased  by  subscription,  and  opened 
Nov.  16,  1843.  The  sanctuary  lamp  was  the  gift  of  Charles  Gregory  Fairfax, 
of  Gilling  Castle,  Esq.,  in  1845.  Simon  Scrope,  Esq.,  of  Danby,  is  said  to 
have  been  the  main  subscriber  to  the  cost  of  the  building.  Upon  the  opening 
of  the  new  church,  Mr.  Middlehurst  withdrew  to  West  Witton,  as  already 
related,  and  he  was  succeeded  at  Leyburn  by — 

Rev.  William  Parker,  whose  first  entry  in  the  registers  is  dated  Nov.  25, 
1835.  He  was  the  younger  brother  of  the  Rev.  Thomas  Parker,  of  Stella, 
and  both  brothers  were  educated  and  ordained  at  Ushaw  College.  In  1831 
Mr.  Parker  was  placed  at  Whitby,  where  he  remained  till  his  appointment 
to  Leyburn.  In  1837  he  was  transferred  to  St.  Patrick's,  Liverpool,  where 
he  remained  till  his  death,  a  martyr  to  charity,  April  30,  1847,  aged  43.  He 
was  the  first  of  the  many  priests  who  died  of  typhus  fever  contracted  during 
the  terrible  epidemic  of  that  year. 

Rev.  Richard  Bolton  succeeded  in  1837.  He  was  sent  to  Sedgley  Park 
School  in  181 1,  and  thence  proceeded  to  the  English  College  at  Lisbon, 
where  he  was  admitted  Dec.  27,  1826,  was  ordained  priest,  left  for  the 
mission  July  30,  1837,  and  was  appointed  to  succeed  Mr.  Parker  in  that 
year.     He  remained  till  his  death,  Nov.  13,  1866,  and  was  succeeded  by — 


LEYBURN,   YORKSHIRE,    1742-1840  235 

Rev.  Laurence  McGonnell,  1867-70. 

Rev.  Thomas  A.  Loughran,  1870  till  death,  May  6,  1875. 

Rev.  Edward  Pearson,*educated  at  Sedgley  Park  1837-41,  then  at  Ushaw, 
whence  he  was  ordained  priest  at  York,  Dec.  31,  1861,  and  appointed  to 
St.  Marie's,  Bradford,  1862-3;  Doncaster,  1863-71;  Pocklington,  1871-5  ; 
succeeded  Mr.  McGonnell  as  above  in  1875,  elected  canon  of  Middlesborough 
in  1 88 1,  remained  at  Leyburn  till  his  retirement  from  missionary  duty  in 
1893,  and  died  at  Sheffield,  April  10,  1894. 

Rev.  William  Maher,  1893-5. 

Rev.  Joseph  Canon  Dodds,  1895-1912. 

Rev.  Arthur  William  Philip  Calvert,  1912. 

Rev.  Sydney  Charles  Francis  Calvert,  191 2  to  date.  J.  G. 

Book  I  (VI). 
[The  body  of  the  blank  form  of  the  certificate,  filled  in  as  shown  by  italics, 
is  transposed  here  from  Book  II  (I).     It  refers  to  the  whole  series  of  five 
books,  and  the  Scrope  registers  which  follow  in  this  book.] 

CERTIFICATE 
2    YORK 

The  annexed  or  accompanying  Bookj  are  the  original  Register 
Book^  of  Dandy,  West  Witton,  and  Leyburn  which  haz><?  been  kept  for 
the  Roman  Catholic  ChapeU  called  St  Bartholomeiv  6°  St  Peter's, 
situate  in  [blank,  the  places  being  given  above]  in  the  County  of  York 
founded  about  the  year  lyyi  ;  Danby  dissolved  1806. 

The  Bookj  sent  ha^  been  from  time  to  time  in  the  custody  of  the 
Rev'"fs  Oakley,  Boone,  Wappeller,  Lawson,  Postlewhate,  Dupent,  Bil- 
lington,  Middlehurst,  Parker,  Apos.  Miss,  for  the  time  being,  of  the 
Chapel;  and  are  sent  to  the  Commissioners  from  the  immediate 
custody  of  the  Rev*  Richard  Bolton  of  Leyburn  [St  Peter's  above] 
Catholic  Chapel  Apostolic  Missionary  in  the  County  of  York  who  has 
kept  them  since  1837,  as  Witness  my  handwriting.  Signed  the  jisi  day 
of  October  1840,  Rev*  R.  Bolton. 

THE   SCROPE    FAMILY   REGISTERS 

[These  two  pieces  of  paper  were  originally  one  sheet  folded.  It  was 
formerly  in  Book  VI  (IV),  is  in  part  illegible,  and  here  given  as  accurately 
as  possible.     It  is  marked  "  2  York,"  the  size  being  about  iogx  y§  inches.] 

[1]  Nomina  Filiorum  et  Filiarum 

Symonis  Scroope 
T.R  de  Danby  Sup  Yore. 

Armigeri 
Catharina:  Baptizata  fuitt  die  130  decemb:  1663 
Maria:  Baptizata  fuit  die  23d0  Septem:  1665 
Symon':  Baptizatus  fuit  die  140  Novem:  1666 
Joannes:  Baptizatus  die  i8U0  Septem:  1668 
Christopher[u]s.  Baptizatus  die  180  Aprilis  1670 
Margarita:  Baptizata  die  270  Aprilis,  1672 
Noia  et  Natalitia  Filioru  et  Filiaru 
Symonis  junioris  Scroope  de  Danby 
Sup  Yore  Armigeri. 


236  CATHOLIC  REGISTERS   OF  DANBY,  WEST  WITTON,  AND 

Maria  Dorothea  Scroop  baptizata  fuit  die  29,  nata  die  28  Novem- 

bris  1702 

Francisca  Scroope  Nata  Londini  7bris  6to  i  705 
Catherina  Scroope  Nata  Lond:  Aug:  ye  ioth — 1706 
Edwardus  Scroope  Natus  apud  Thonock  Aug:  ye  ioth  i  709.* 
Symon  Scroope  Natus  Apud  Thonock  ad  4ta  hora  pomeriediana 

March  21th  i7o| 

i7ii/i2  die  vndeccimo  [Feb  over  Jan]:  mane  inter  horam  3tiam  et  4ta 

apud  Danby  Henricus  Josephus  [Scroope  supra]  Natus  est  et  baptiz- 

atus  i4to  ejusdem. 

James  Scroope  born  att  Dandy  [sic]  Novembr  ye  5tlx  i  7  i  5  att  Night 

betwixt  8  &  9  of  ye  Clocke. 

Nomina  et  natalitia  Prolis  Dni  Simonis  Scroofpe] 

Armigeri  De  Danby  ab  Anno  Dni  1754. 
Frances  Scroope  was  Born  at  Danby  super  yure  on  the  Sixth  Day 
of  October,  It  being  Sunday,  twenty  Minutes  before  four  a  Clock  in 

(Turn  over) 
[2J  the  Morning,  &  She  was  Baptised  a  little  before  ten  a  Clock  the 
Same  morning  In  the  year  1754.  by  me  F.  Oakley 

NB.  In  the  new  Missal  She  is  Say'd  to  have  been  born  the  quarter 
before  four,  whereas  it  was  twenty  Minutes. 
Vivat  et  Oret  pro  me.     Dead,  Turn  back. 
[3]  i  68 1/2  Jan:  29  intra  horam  4tam  et  5 tarn 
Quievit  in  Do:  Domina  Brigitta  Scroope 
aetatis  suae  75 
Requiescat  in  pace. 
i69i  December  ye  22th 

Symon  Scroope  Esqr  changed  this  liffe  for  a  better 

Anno  aetatis  suae  79  Requiescat  in  pace. 
1723  [?  March  ye  isfc  xd  out]  February  ye  28th 

Symon  Scroop  Esqr  chang'd  this  Life  for  a  better  an:  aetatis  suae  57. 

Requiescat  in  pace. 
1720  October  ye  17th 

Edward  Scroope  departed  this  Life  aetatis  suae  13.     Requiescat 
in  pace. 

[1732/3J.     ye  10         James]         Scroope  departed  this  life  aetatis 
suae  1 2  Requiescat  in  pace,  t 

Frances  Scroop  chang'd  this  life  for  a  better  ye  10  of  September 
anno  1733  aetatis  [?]6.     Requiescat  in  pace.f 

1754.  the  7th  of  November  about   three   in   the   morning,   Died 
Frances  Scroope,  aged  one  month,  &  one  day.     Oret  pro  me. 
See  the  new  Missal. 

[Following  crossed  out]  the  1 7th  Septbr  died  Mary  Strickland  of 
Richmond.     R.I.P.  T.  R. 

*  Thonock,  near  Gainsborough. 

f  These  entries  were  very  difficult  to  decipher  when  I  copied  them  ;  but  since 
the  paper  was  mounted  they  are  illegible. 


LEYBURN,   YORKSHIRE,    1742-1840  237 

Book  II  (I). 

DANBY   REGISTERS. 

[Inside  binding]     ^Eternae  sit  honos  Triadi,  sit  gloria  Sanctis. 

This  Register  Mr  Boone  bought  1771,  &  set  down  what  Mr  Oakley 
[SJ.  in  a  later  hand]  did  concerning  his  Mission  at  Danby  from  1742 
to  1758,  &  from  1758  what  Mr  Wappeller  [S.J.  above]  did  in  his 
mission  at  Danby  to  1764,  when  Mr  Boone  SJ.  began  the  Mission  at 
Danby,  the  Seat  [of]  Simon  Scroope  Esqr.     His  utere  mecum. 

[Page  1]     T.R.  1742 

The  Register  of  Christenings,  Marriages  &c  at  Danby  by  F.  Frank 
Oakley  SJ. 

April  8.  I  Christened  at  the  Bridge  Elisabeth  Topham,  born  at 
Middleham. 

April  9.  I  administered  Margaret  NN.  Millars  wife  of  the  Parish 
of  Thornton,  she  died. 

April  28.    I  administered  Charles  Robinson  of  Wensley,  recovered. 

May  2d.     I  administered  Frank  Stabler  at  East  Witton,  he  dyed. 

Sepbr  9.     I  baptized  Charles  Ward,  Son  of  NN.  Ward  of  Wensley 

Decbr  15.  I  received  into  the  Church  Marga[rate  Xd  out,  rite 
above]  Stabler  of  Thornton  Wife  of  Will:  Stabler. 

Decbr  19.  I  administered  Christ:  Medcaff  of  Hutton  Hang  at 
Layburn. 

Decbr  19.     I  baptized  Elisabeth,  child  of  NN.  Stabler  at  Layburn. 

[2]  1743 

January  8.  I  baptized  Ann  child  of  William  &  Margarite  Stabler 
of  Thornton.     Sponsors  James  Cook,  Elis:  Allen. 

Aprill  i°.  I  baptized  at  Layburn  Joseph  Son  of  NN.  Ray;  he 
dyed  Apr.  2d. 

April  25.    I  administred  Mary  More  of  East  Witton,  she  recovered. 

Nov:  15.  I  christened  at  Danby  a  Scotchman  beggar  with  one 
Legg,  his  son  Claud. 

Sepbr  30  I  administerd  old  Mr  Tho:  Heddon  at  Bedall.  He 
dyed  Oct.  4. 

1744 

February  6.  I  administred  [to  above]  Margaret  More  at  E.  Witton 
the  Viacticu',  she  the  1 5  without  the  holy  Oiles,  I  was  sent  for  too  late. 

August  5.  I  baptized  at  W.  Witton  Mary  Daughter  of  Thomas 
Furnace.  Sponsors  Tho:  Denison  of  W.  Witton  &  Mary  Allen  of 
Thornton. 

August  22.  I  administered  the  Viaticu'  to  Will:  Slie  at  E.  Witton, 
he  dyed  [3]  Sepbr  3d  without  the  holy  Oyles,  I  not  being  called  in  time. 

Dec.  7.  I  baptized  at  Thornton  Barbara,  B.  Child  of  Mary 
Natteress.  The  Father  young  Christ:  Hall.  I  stood  God-Father, 
Molly  Fletcher  was  God- Mother.  The  Child  was  born  27  of  Nov.  & 
dyed  in  1 746. 

1745 
Jan:  12.     I  baptized  at  Ulshaw-Bridge  James  Son  of  Will:  Topham 
&  Lucy  his  Wife  of  Middleham.     Sponsors  John  Pease  senr  &  Elis: 
Allen  Junr  for  which  I  hardly  escaped  [banishment  xd  out]. 


238  CATHOLIC  REGISTERS   OF  DANBY,  WEST  WITTON,  AND 

Decbr  19.  I  baptized  at  the  Bridge  Jane,  Daughter  of  Will: 
Stabler  of  Hornby.     Sponsors  Henry  Horner,  Molly  Allen. 

1747 
Octbr  13  I  married  at  Ulshaw  bridge  James  Cook  &  Elis:  Allen. 

1749 
May  .  .  I  helped  Mary  Winn  at  Thornton,  she  dyed  4  days  after. 
May      .     I  baptized  Edward,  Son  of  Tho:  Petch  &c  at  E.  Witton. 

W  1753 

August  28.  I  baptized  at  Bellerby  William,  Son  of  John  Nether- 
dell  &  NN  his  wife  (a  Protes:).  Sponsors  Peter  Blenkin*  &  N. 
Robinson. 

1754 

May  29.  I  baptized  at  Thornton-Steward  James,  the  Son  of 
George  Courtley  &  his  Wife  Jane.  Sponsors  James  Cook  &  Ann 
Furnise. 

Sepbr  10.  I  baptised  at  Layburn  Jane  Daughter  of  Tho:  Denison. 
Sponsors  Frank  Danby  &  Ann  Withom. 

Sepbr  15.  I  baptised  at  Danby  Jane  the  Daughter  of  George 
Colbeck  &  Jane  his  Wife.      Sponsors  George  Courtley  &  Elis:  Cook. 

Octbr  6.     I  baptized  at  Danby  Frances  Daughter  of  Simon  Scroope 
Esqr  &  his  Lady  Ann  Clementina.     Sponsors  William  Sheldon,  Senr, 
Esqr  &  M18  Tempest.     See  the  new  Missal  at  Danby  in  the  beginning. 
Hue  usq.  P.  Oakley. 

[5]  {Page  ■  in  Book  inl 

The  same  continued  by  F.  W.  Wappeller,  S.J. 
175M 

April  2d.  Baptized  Mary,  Daughter  of  John  Pease,  Junr  &  Dorothy 
his  wife.  Sponsors  James  Cook  &  Frances  Horner ;  the  child  was  born 
the  same  day. 

June  23d.  Baptized  Jane,  born  13  of  June,  Daughter  of  Jane 
Metcalf.     Sponsors  William  M'Arther  \  &  Mary  Pease. 

May  10.  received  into  the  Church  Eleonore  Corbeck  of  Ellin- 
string^ 

Sep.  6.  Administered  the  last  Scmts  ||  to  NN.  Dent  at  Layburn.^F 
He  died  7.  ditto. 

Sept.  12.  Baptized  at  Layburn  Mary  Daughter  of  Will:  Allen 
Junr.  &  Mary  his  Wife.  Sponsors  Will:  Allen  Sen1*  &  Mr3  Thomburgh  : 
the  child  was  born  the  same  day. 

{2}  Oct  31.  Baptized  at  Layburn  Henry  Son  of  Michael  &  Mar- 
garet Lawson.  Sponsors  John  &  Elisabeth  Blenkinsop  :  the  child 
was  born  25  of  octbr. 

*  Doubtless  Blenkinsop. 

f  No.  Ill  book  seems  to  be  the  original  of  the  following,  as  far  as  16  July  1771, 
differences  being  shown  in  footnotes.  The  pages  of  Book  III  are  given  in  small 
brackets.  From  what  Mr.  Gillow  says  above  about  Fr.  Thomas  Hunter,  it  is 
possible  that  the  Registers  relating  to  Danby  Hall  from  1754  to  1758  may  be  mixed 
with  those  of  Richmond.  The  latter  commence  in  1748,  and  we  propose  to  print 
them  later. 

%  "  MacArthur"  in  Book  III. 

§  "  A  widow  at  Ellington  "  in  Book  III. 

H    Viaticum  is  generally  used  in  Book  III.     Sometimes  Holy  Oils  added. 

\  Properly  spelt  '*  Leyburn"  in  Book  III ;  also  later. 


LEYBURN,  YORKSHIRE,    1742-1840  239 

[6]  December  29.  Baptized  at  Danby,  Simon  Thomas,  born  the 
same  day,  son  of  Simon  Scroope  Esqr  &  his  Lady  Ann  Clementina. 
Sponsors  Henry  Scroope,  Esqr  &  M™  Margaret  Strickland  of  Sizergh. 

1759 

February  18.  Died  at  East  Witton*  Hanna  Coates,  she  had  the 
Viaticu',  was  buried  the  20. 

March  26.  Old  Mra  Ingram  died  at  Middleham  unexpectedly, 
I  was  not  called. 

May  29.  John  Stavely  died  at  East  Witton,  he  had  the  last 
Scmts  &  was  buried  the  31st. 

May  29.  Died  at  Lay  burn  Christopher  Barker,  I  administered  to 
him  the  Ext:  Unction,  he  died  of  an  apoplexy. 

{3}  In  July.     I  administered   the  Viaticu   and   H.   Oils  to   M™ 
Brotherton  at  Layburn,  she  died  some  days  after. 
[7]  1760 

January  7.  William  Hornby  died  at  Middleham.  He  had  the 
last  Scmts:  he  was  received  into  the  Church  some  time  before  by 
Mr  Siddal  at  Yarm. 

In  April,  received  into  the  Church  N.N.  Hunter  of  Sedburt 
in  the  W.  riding,  he  was  instructed  by  Mr  William  Strickland  at 
Sizergh. 

June  29.  Assisted  at  the  Marriage  \  of  George  Ascough  §  a  Pro- 
testant &  Frances  Coates  a  Catholic  of  East  Witton.  ||  Witnesses 
James  &  Elisabeth  Cook  at  the  Bridge. 

Sept  2i.  Baptized  Thomas  son  of  John  Pease  II  &  his  Wife 
Dorothy,  he  was  born  the  13  at  a  great  distance  from  Danby. 
Sponsors  George  Courtley  &  Frances  Asc©ugh.§ 

In  Novbr.  received  into  the  Church  Dorothy  Thomson  born  near 
Borrowbridge. 
[8]     {4}  1761 

June  12.  received  into  the  Church  Elisabeth  Thakerer.** 

July  8.  Administered  the  last  Scmts  to  Mre  Grace  Bell  at  Wens- 
law,  tt  she  died  21  ditto. 

July  n.  Administered  the  last  Scmts  to  M™  Lucy  Topham  at 
Middleham,  she  recovered. 

August  10.  Baptized  at  E.  Witton  John  son  of  George  &  Fanny 
Ascough. §     Godmother  Mrs  Coates  :  he  died  some  days  after. 

August  17.  Assisted  at  the  marriage  of  William  M' Arthur}}:  & 
Elisabeth  Hixon,§§  witnesses  Thomas  Hill  &  Mary  Chapellow.|||| 

*   Withon  in  Book  III. 
+  Sedbergh.     Sedbur  in  Book  III. 

%  Some  caution  was  necessary  ;  but  there  can  be  no  doubt  of  this  being  a  Catholic 
marriage  ceremony  before  Fr.  Boone,  and  that  he  blessed  the  marriage. 
§  Ascoat  in  Book  III. 
H  East  Withon  in  Book  III. 
If  John  Pease,  Jun.,  in  Book  III. 
**   Taker  in  Book  III. 
ft  Wensley  \nB00V  III. 
£t  MacArthur  in  Book  III. 
§§  Hixson  in  Book  III. 
t|||   Chappelow  in  Book  III. 


240  CATHOLIC  REGISTERS   OF  DANBY,   WEST  WITTON,  AND 

1762 

January  8.  received  into  the  Church  John  Nelson  of  Richmond. 

[9]  January  24.  Died  at  Danby  Francis  Pinchback,  he  had  the 
H.  Oils,  but  not  the  Viaticu'  on  account  of  his  illness,  he  was  buried  at 
Thornton. 

Feb  2.  Assisted  at  the  marriage  of  William  Topham  Junr  {5} 
&  Jane  NN.  a  Prot.  Witnesses  Will  &  Elisabeth  M'Arthur*  & 
Elis.  Cook 

March  16.  Died  at  Middleham  Elisabeth  Atkinson  aged  78,  she 
had  the  Viaticu  &  was  buried  18. 

April  25.  Baptized  Jane  Daughter  of  John  t  &  Dorothy  Pease, 
sponsors  John  Topham  &  Frances  Horner. 

May  31.  Administered  the  last  Scmts  to  William  Errington,  he 
died  the  7  of  June  &  was  buried  at  E.  Witton.J 

August  1 8.  Assisted  at  the  Marriage  of  Ralph  Standish  Esqr  & 
Miss  Henrietta  Strickland.  Witnesses  Mr  &  M™  Scroope,  Mr  &  Mrs 
Strickland  §  &c 

[10]  In  Novbr.  received  into  the  Church  William  Topham  Senr  of 
Middleham. 

December    23.       Administered    the    last    Scmts   to    old   mother 
Courtley   at   Constable   Burton  ||,   she   died   the   next   day   &:   was 
buried  at  Fingel.  || 
{6}  1763    . 

March  25.  Baptized  James,  born  21,  Son  of  William  &  Jane 
Topham.     Sponsors  John  Topham  &  Elis.  Cook. 

June  6.  received  into  the  Church  &  administered  the  last  Scmts  to 
John  Grey  at  Richmond,  he  died  the  9th  following. 

July  20.  Baptized  John,  born  the  same  day,  son  of  Will:  &  Elisa- 
beth M'Arthur.     Sponsors  Michael  Errington  &  MrB  Scroope. 

August  7.  received  into  the  Church  Elisabeth  Muncaster. 

Octbr  18.  received  into  the  Church  Mark  Scot,  Tenant  of  Mr 
Scroope. 

[11]  {7}  1764 

Feb:  11th.  Baptized  at  HarnbylT  Jane  Daughter  of  Elisabeth 
Thakerer,**  born  the  23d  of  January,  Godmother  Elisabeth 
Thakerer  **  the  childs  grandmother. 

February  10.  John  Sanders,  Mr  Scroope's  Groom  was  drowned 
in  the  River  Yore  ft,  the  Corps  was  found  some  weeks  after  &  buried 
at  Thornton. 

April  7.  Baptjzed  Dorothy,  born  6,  Daughter  of  John  }  }  &  Dorothy 
Pease.     Sponsors  John  §§  &  Mary  Pease. 

*  Mac  Arthur  in  Book  III. 
t  John  Pease,  Junr,  in  Book  III. 
X  Withon  in  Book  III. 

§  MTS  Strickland,  Mr  Strickland  in  Book  III. 

H  In  the  parish  of  Fingall,  N.  Riding ;  not  the  place  in  the  parish  of  Swine, 
E.  Riding. 
IT  Hornby. 

**   Taker  m  Book  III. 

ff    Youre  in  Book  III.     The  spellings  are  various  as  Ure,  Eure. 
XX-  John  pease  Jun  in  Book  III. 
§§  John  pease  sen.  in  Book  III. 


LEYBURN,   YORKSHIRE,    1742-1840  24 1 

August  8.  received  into  the  Church  Rachel  Hill,  wife  to  Gerry  Hill 
at  Middleham. 

August  27.  Administered  the  Last  Scmts  to  Edward  Stavely  at 
E.  Witton.* 

Septmbr  2.  Baptized  Dorothy,  born  31  August,  Daughter  of  Gerry 
&  Rachel  Hill.  Sponsors  Thomas  Hill  &  his  Sister  Dorothy  at 
Richmond.  Huiusq'  P.  Wappeller. 

[12]  {8  in  Book  III}. 

The  same  contued  by  F.  Edwd  Boone,  [at  Danby  t]  S.J.  1764. 

Nov.  22.  Edwd  Stavely  died  at  E.  Witton,  he  had  the  Scmts 
from  Mr  Wappeller. 

Nov.  26.  Elis.  Cook  at  the  Bridge  had  the  last  Scmts.  She 
recovered. 

1765 

June  2d.  I  administered  the  Viaticu'  to  John  Pease  senr  the  3d  the 
H.  Oils,  he  died  &  was  buried  that  day. 

July  31.  I  assisted  at  the  Marriage  of  John  Topham  &  Molly 
Gibson,  witnesses  John  Pease,  Bella  Connyers  &  Elis.  Rakestraw. 

August  26.  I  administered  the  last  Scmts  to  Mary  Gargrave  at 
Fingle  J,  she  died  the  28,  &  was  buried  next  day. 

Sepbr  6.  I  administered  the  last  Scmts  to  old  Mr  Kirton  at  Gunner- 
side  in  the  Dales,  he  recovered. 

[13]  Sepbr  28.  I  administered  the  last  Scmts  to  old  Chappellow 
at  Layburn,  he  recovered. 

Nov.  29.  Will:  Topham  senior  died  suddenly  at  Middleham,  no 
help,  I  not  called. 

{9}  December  8.  I  baptized  at  Hutton-Hangue  §  John,  born  the 
6,  son  of  John  &  Dorothy  Pease.  Sponsors  Michael  Errington  & 
Elisabeth  Topham.     E.  B. 

1766 

Febr.  3d.  I  administered  the  Viaticu'  to  old  Nelly  Mud  at  mel- 
berby,  the  5  the  H.  Oils,  she  recovered. 

March  25.  I  baptized  at  Danby  ||  Thomas,  born  the  21,  son  of 
Gerry  &  Rachel  Hill  of  Middleham  ||,  Sponsors  Thomas  Mallem  & 
Nelly  Jefferson,  the  child  died.     E.  B. 

April  22.  I  baptized  at  Danby  Clementina,  Elisabeth,  Frances, 
[14]  born  the  same  day,  daughter  of  Simon  Scroope  Esq1'  &  his  Lady 
Annll  Clementina.  Sponsors  William  Constable  of  Burton  Esqr  & 
Lady  Brown.     E.  B. 

{10}  April  25.  Baptized  at  E.  Witton  Thomas,  born  the  24,  son  of 
George  Ascough  a  Protestant,  &  his  wife  Frances  a  Catholic.  Old 
Mrs  Coates  was  God-mother.     It  died. 

May  18.     Baptized  at  Danby  Mary,  born  the  17,  Daughter  &  John 

*    Withon  in  Book  III. 

f  The  words  at  Danby  omitted  in  Book  III  may  point  to  a  change  of  address  as 
well  as  priest. 
X  Finghall. 

§  Hutton-Hang  rightly  in  Book  III. 

II  In  Book  III  at  Danby  is  interlined,  and  of  Middleham  is  omitted. 
1  In  Book  III  Ann  is  interlined  above,  Elizabeth  crossed  out. 
XIII.  Q 


242  CATHOLIC   REGISTERS    OF   DANBY,   WEST   WITTON,   AND 

&  Mary  *  Topham.     Sponsors  Master  Scroope  t  &  Miss  Witham  of 
Durham.     E.  B. 

August  13.  I  administered  the  last  Scmts  to  Mary  Millar  in  the 
Dales,  she  recovered. 

Nov.  11.  I  assisted  at  the  marriage  by  Proxy  of  Nicholas  White 
Esqr  X  of  Orotava  in  Teneriffe  &  Miss  Barbara  Strickland  of  [15] 
Richmond;  Simon  Scroope  Esqr.  stood  proxy.  Witnesses  William 
&  Ralph  Sheldon  Esqrs  MrB  &  Miss  Fany  Scroope,  Mr,  M™  &  Miss 
Strickland.§ 

1767 

March  18.  I  administered  the  last  Scmts  to  James  Cook  at  the 
Bridge,  he  recovered. 

March  20.  I  baptized  at  Richmond  Mary,  six  weeks  old,  daughter 
of  William  &  Ann  Branson.  Sponsors  Thomas  Plumber  &  Ann 
Hood.     E.  B. 

May  19.  I  baptized  at  Danby  Mary,  born  the  13,  daughter  of 
Ralph  &  Birgit  Siddell  ||  of  Masham.  Sponsors  Master  Scroope  U 
&  Mrs  Thornburgh  of  Layburn. 

June  28.  Baptized  at  Danby  Ann,  born  the  26,  Daughter  of  John 
&  Dorothy  Pease.  Sponsors  Thomas  Mallem  &  Nelly  Mudd.  She 
died. 

[16]  {12}  1768 

January  22.  I  administered  the  H.  Oils  to  Harry  Horner  at 
Middleham,  he  died  that  same  night  &  was  buried  the  next  day. 

January  23.    Michael  Errington  foolishly  married  a  Protestant.** 

January  30.  I  baptized  at  Danby  Thomas  born  the  27,  son  of 
Gerry  &  Rachel  Hill.  Sponsors  Thomas  Hill  &  Nelly  Mudd. ft 
E.B.JI 

February  20.  James  Cook  at  the  Bridge  died  suddenly,  I  was 
sent  for,  but  not  in  good  time,  he  was  buried  the  22d. 

March  2d.  Mr  Howard  of  Richmond  baptized  at  the  Bridge  Eliza- 
beth &  Lucy  Topham  born  the  19  of  February,  twin  children  of  Will 
&  Elisabeth  Topham.  Sponsors  to  Elisabeth,  William  Sturdy  & 
Molly  Topham.  To  Lucy,  James  &  Elisabeth  Topham.  Lucy  died 
1770.  January  27,  1769,  the  2  children  were  baptized  at  Church. 
O  tempora,  O  Parson, §§  O  Shame. 

*  Molly  in  Book  III. 

t  Simon  Scroope  Junior  Esqr  in  Book  III. 

%  In  Book  III  it  reads  living  in  ye  Canary  Islands. 

§  In  Book  III  this  reads:  "  Witnesses,  William  Sheldon,  Ralph  Sheldon,  Esqrs, 
R*  Strickland,  Mra  Scrope,  Mra  Strickland,  Miss  Scrope,  {11}  &  Miss  {paper  cut]  & 
plenty." 

H  Siddle  in  Book  III. 

IF  In  Book  III  Simon  Scroope  Junr  Esqr- 

**  In  Book  III  at  the  end  of  the  previous  entry  there  has  been  inserted  only — 
2 j  Mic.  Errington  married. 

tt  Mud  in  Book  III. 

Xt  Initials  in  different  hand  and  ink. 

§§  Book  III  reads :  M  Mr  Howard  of  Richmond  supplied  on  account  of  2  trouble- 
some neighbours.  I  hope  we  shall  hear  no  more  about  it.  The  children  were 
afterwards  Baptized  at  Church.  O  tempora.  O  Parson."  Mr.  Gillow  says  this  is  the 
Rev.  Francis  Holme  alias  Howard,  S.J. 


LEYBURN,   YORKSHIRE,    1742-1840  243 

[17]  {13}  August  16.  Married  at  Layburn,  William  Sturdy  to 
Susan  Withom. 

Octobr  28.  Baptized  at  Danby  William,  born  26,  Son  of  John  & 
Dorothy  Pease.     Sponsors  Thomas  Hill  &  Jane  Courtley.     E.  B.* 

Nov.  6.  Baptized  at  Danby  Thomas  born  the  2d  Son  of  Michael 
&  Isabella  Errington.  Sponsors  Thomas  Mallem  &  Jane  Errington. 
E.  B.* 

Nov.  20.  I  assisted  at  the  marriage  of  Joseph  Harker  a  Protestant 
&  Jane  Errington  a  Catholic,  witnesses  William  &  Elisabeth  M'Arthur, 
at  the  Bridge.  E.  B.  maxime  invito,  t  Harker  afterwards  broke  his 
solemn  promises  about  changing  his  religion,  never  will  I  again  take  a 
Protestants  word  about  religion. 

December  [3d  xd  out]  2d.  I  baptized  at  Danby,  John  born  the  i8t 
Son  of  John  &  Mary  Topham.  Sponsors  Joseph  Gibson  &  Ann 
Hixon.     E.  B.* 

[18]  {14}  1769 

June  5.  I  administered  the  last  Scmts  to  Rachel  Hill  at  Middle- 
ham,  she  recovered  after  a  long  illness. 

June  25.  I  baptized  \  at  the  Bridge,  John,  born  the  24,  Son  of 
Thomas  &  Dorothy  Hixon.  Sponsors  Thomas  Mallem  &  Nelly 
Jefferson.     E.  B.§ 

Septmbr  2d.  John  Milburn  died  at  Thornton  ||  without  the 
Scmts  by  my  fault,  he  was  buried  the  next  day. 

October  19.  Ralph  Riddell  Esqr  was  married  to  miss  Molly 
Thornburgh  at  Layburn.H 

Nov.  17.  I  baptized  at  the  Bridge,  Mary  Gertrude,  born  the  15, 
daughter  of  William  &  Elisabeth  M'Arthur.  Sponsors  Thomas 
Malien**  &  Nelly  Mudd.     E.  B.ft 

1770 

January  10.  Jane  Courtley  died  at  Burton,  \  \  I  was  never  sent 
for. 

[19]  January  14.  I  baptized  at  Middleham,  Jane  born  12, 
Daughter  of  Gerry  &  Rachel  Hill.  Sponsors  William  Sturdy  & 
Dorothy  Hixon.     The  child  died  i5-§§ 

{16}  March  9.  I  administered  the  H.  Oils,  at  Danby  to 
Elisabeth  Aukland  (Mra  Tempest's  Maid)  ill  in  the  small  Pox,  she 
could  not  receive  the  Viaticu'  on  account  of  a  cough,  she  died  the  13 
in  great  pain  &  convulsions. 

April  17.     I  administered  the  H.  Oils  to  Mary  Mallem  [at  Danby 

*  Initials  in  different  hand  and  ink. 
t  The  entry  in  Book  III  stops  at  this  point. 
t  The  address  at  Ullshaw  Bridge  is  omitted  in  Book  III. 

§  Initials  in  different  hand  and  ink.     In  Book  III  at  the  bottom  of  page  13  is, 

out  of  place  and  crossed  out — "  Ralf  Riddell  born  July  18  [1772  crossed  out],  1771." 

||  Mr.  Boone  omits  in  Book  III  the  omission  of  rites  and  his  self-accusation. 

IT  Owing  to  this  marriage  with  Mary,  daughter  of  George  Thornbrough,  the 

Leyburn  estate  passed  into  the  family  of  Riddell  of  Cheeseburn  Grange,  as  it  still 

remains. 

**  In  Book  III  Mallem,  which  may  be  a  corruption  of  Malham. 

ft  Initials  in  different  hand  and  ink. 

tt  The  note  in  Book  III  stops  at  this  point. 

§§  Gerard  in  Book  III.     The  writer  piously  adds,  "  Oret  pro  me." 


244  CATHOLIC  REGISTERS   OF  DANBY,  WEST  WITTON,  AND 

above]  (the  Steward's  mother)  she  could  not  on  account  of  her  illness 
receive  the  Viaticu',  she  died  the  19. 

May  29.  I  administered  the  last  Scmts  to  Jane  Courtley  at 
Thornton,*  she  died  the  30. 

June  26.  I  baptized  at  Middleham  William,  Francis,  Paul  born 
the  26,  son  of  William  &  Susan  t  Sturdy.  [20]  Sponsors  Francis 
Thomburgh  esqr  &  Miss  Molly  Renoldson.J  He  died  1776,  oret 
pro  me. 

July  16.  I  baptized  at  Middleham,  William,  born  the  15,  Son  of 
John  &  Mary  Topham.  Sponsors  John  Pease  &  Elisabeth  Topham. 
E.  B.§ 

{15}  July  31.  I  assisted  at  the  marriage  of  Robert  Sturdy  &  Jane 
Dunn  at  Danby.  Witnesses  Miss  Fanny  Scroope  &  Thomas  Mallem, 
Steward.     E.  B.§ 

August  8.  I  baptized  at  Middleham  Christopher  Richard,  born 
the  8,  Son  of  Thomas  &  Dorothy  Hixon.  Sponsors  William  Sturdy  & 
Elisabeth  Hixon.     E.  B.§ 

Aug  24.  I  baptized  at  Danby  Joseph,  born  21st,  Son  of  John  & 
Dorothy  Pease.     Sponsors  Joseph  Hudson  &  Ann  Hixon.     E.  B.§ 

1771 

May  15.  I  baptized  at  Middleham  Rachel,  born  the  14,  Daughter 
of  Gerry  ||  &  Rachel  Hill.  Sponsors  Robert  &  Susan  Sturdy.  She 
died.lF 

[Book  III  (II)  of  which  the  last  two  pages  are  in  reversed  order  ends 
here,  Book  II  (I)  resuming  independently,] 

[21]  July  9.  I  baptized  at  Middleham  Robert,  born  the  8th,  son  of 
Robert  &  Jane  Sturdy.  Sponsors  William  Sturdy  &  Ann  Dunn. 
E.  B.§ 

July  30.  I  administered  the  H.  Oils  to  Thomas  Hill  (Coach-man 
at  Danby)  he  could  not  receive  the  Viaticum  on  account  of  his  illness, 
&  on  the  ist  of  August  the  Viaticum,  he  being  something  better, 
repeated  the  3  of  September,  &  he  died  the  10th. 

1772 

January  14.  I  administered  the  last  Sacraments  to  Mrs  Mary 
Pease  at  Hutton-Hang.     She  died  the  18.    R.  in  P. 

May  11th.  I  administered  the  last  Sacraments  to  Dolly  Hixon 
at  the  Bridge.     She  died  the  20th.     R.  in  P. 

June  19.  I  Baptized  at  Middleham,  Margaret,  born  the  18, 
Daughter  of  William  &  Susanna  Sturdy.  Sponsors  Robert  & 
Dorothy  Sturdy. 

[22]  July  25.  I  administered  the  Viaticum  to  old  Mrs  Coates  at 
East  Witton. — recovered. 

August  18.  I  administered  Jerry  Hill  at  Middleham,  ill  in  a  fever. 
recovd 

*  In  Book  III  correctly  Thornton-Steward. 
t  Susannah  in  Book  III. 

X  The  part  after  this  sign  (J)  is  on  the  top  of  the  page  and  may  refer  to  the 
previous  entry,  but  is  crossed  out.     The  previous  part  is  slightly  scored  out. 
§  Initials  in  different  hand  and  ink. 
||   Gerard  in  Book  III. 
1T  In  Book  III  is  added  in  March  iff 2.     Oret p  m. 


LEYBURN,   YORKSHIRE,    1742-1840  245 

1773 

Jan.  14.  I  baptized  at  Hutton-Hang,  Ann,  born  12,  daughter  of 
John  &  Dorothy  Pease.  Sponsors  Michael  Errington  &  Elizabeth 
Horner.     E.  B.* 

February  16.  I  baptized  at  Richmond  Jane,  about  one  month 
old,  Daughter  of  William  &  Ann  Branson.  Sponsors  Thomas  Key 
&  Ann  [?  Bane  xd  out,  Bane  above].     E.  B.* 

February  24.  I  baptized  at  Middleham  Rosamund,  born  the  23 
of  February,  Daughter  of  Robert  &  Jane  Sturdy.  Sponsors  Phillip 
Sturdy  of  Newsteadf  &  Miss  Elizabeth  Ashmell  of  Stockton. 

May  2  2d.  I  administered  the  last  Sacraments  to  Nelly  Mudd  of 
Melberby  J  in  Coverdale.     She  recover'd. 

[23]  1774 

March  22.  I  administered  the  Viaticu  to  Nelly  Mudd  of  Melberby, 
recov: 

May  25.  I  administered  the  last  Scmts  to  M18  Cook  at  the 
Bridge.     E.  B.* 

June  20.  I  baptized  at  Middleham  Paul,  born  the  same  day,  son 
of  William  &  Susan  Sturdy.  Sponsors  John  Duwicket  in  London 
&  Elizabeth  Blenkinsop  in  Lay  burn.     E.  B.* 

July  i8t.     I  administered  the  holy  Oils  to  M1'8  Cook  the  2d  time. 

July  8.     Died  at  the  Bridge-House  M18  Cook.     R.  in  P. 

Sometime  in  August,  I  administred  the  last  Scmts  to  Nelly  Mudd 
at  Melberby  in  Coverdale,  she  had  a  long,  very  long  illness. 

Nov.  23.  Nelly  Mudd  died  at  Melberby  in  Coverdale.  R.  in 
Pace. 

[24]  1775 

May  30.    I  administer'd  the  Viaticu  to  Mark  Scot  at  Spenithorn. 

June  5.     I  administred  the  H.  Oils  to  Mark  Scot  at  Spenithorn. 

June  11.     Died  at  Spenithorn  Mark  Scot,  aged  79.    R.  in  P. 

November  26.  I  administerd  the  last  Sacraments  to  Mrs  Horner 
at  Thornton  Steward. 

Decbr  3.     Mrs  Horner  died  at  Thornton  Steward.     R.  in  P. 

1776 

August  10.  Jane  Mecalf  §  died  suddenly  at  east  Witton,  as  I  had 
no  notice  of  her  illness,  she  died  without  any  help.     R.  in  P. 

August  12.  I  baptized  at  Hutton-Hang  James,  born  the  same 
day,  son  of  John  &  Dorothy  Pease.  Sponsors  Michael  Errington 
&  Dorothy  Wodman.  He  died  the  29  of  Novbr  following.  Oret 
pro  me. 

[25]  September  21.  I  baptized  at  Middleham  Ann,  born  the  same 
day,  Daughter  of  William  &  Susana  Sturdy.  Sponsors  Robert  & 
Jane  Blenkinsop  of  Layburn.     E.  B.* 

November  16.  I  baptized  at  Middleham  Jane,  born  the  15, 
Daughter  of  Robert  &  Jane  Sturdy.  Sponsors  George  Dunn  of 
Newcastle,  &  Mra  Scroope  of  Danby.     E.  B.* 

*  Difterent  hand  and  ink. 

+  Newstead  in  East  Witton  parish. 

X  Melmerby. 

§  Doubtless  Metcalf(e)  or  Medcalf(e). 


246  CATHOLIC   REGISTERS   OF   DANBY,   WEST   WITTON,   AND 

December  16.  Died  at  East  Witton  sometime  in  Summer  Eliza- 
beth Jefferson,  a  Protestant,  a  Methodist,  a  Catholic,  or  it  is  to  be 
feared  a  nothing.  She  had  often  in  her  former  days  come  to  prayers 
at  Danby,  but  not  for  several  years  past ;  [in  xd  out]  during  her  illness 
I  never  heard  of  her,  nor  that  she  ever  asked  or  desired  I  should 
visit  her,  &  neither  did  I  ever  hear  of  her  death  till  this  day  16  of 
December.     E.  Boone. 

1777 
March  31     Died  [suddenly  above]  at  the  bridge  John  McArthur, 
aged  13  in  the  14th  year  of  his  age.     R.  [This  entry  is  crossed  out,  as 
out  of  place.     See  in  right  order.] 

[26]  1776 

December  29.  I  received  into  the  Church  Henry  Brown  a  boy 
about  17  years  old.     E.  B.* 

March  31.  Died  at  the  Bridge  House  [suddenly  above]  John 
McArthur  in  the  14  year  of  his  age.     R.  in  P. 

1778 

February  n.  Betty  Topham  of  the  Bridge  House  without  my 
consent  or  knowledge  maried  a  Protestant. 

April  ist.  Died  at  Middleham  old  M™  Jefferson.  I  was  not 
informed  of  her  illness,  neither  did  I  hear  of  her  till  after  she  was  dead 
&  buried. 

May  24.  I  administered  the  H.  Oils  to  Mr  Strickland  at  Danby 
ill  in  a  fever.  He  could  not  receive  the  Viaticu  on  account  of  his 
medicines. 

May  25.  Died  at  Danby  at  4  o'clock  in  the  afternoon  Robert 
Strickland  Esq1"  aetatis  45.     R.  in  Pace. 

[27]  October  17.  I  Baptized  at  Middleham  Susanna,  born  the  15th, 
Daughter  of  William  &  Susanna  Sturdy ;  Sponsors  John  &  Elizabeth 
Blenkensop  of  Layburn.     She  died  January  24.  1779.     Oret  p.  me. 

October  21.  I  Baptized  at  Middleham  William,  born  the  20th,  son 
of  Robert  &  Jane  Sturdy.  Sponsors  John  Dunn  of  Newcastle  &  Mrs 
Traps  of  Nidd.     E.  B. 

December  2d.  I  Baptized  at  Danby  William,  born  the  same  day, 
Son  of  Raph  &  Elisabeth  Marley  of  the  Bridge-House.  The  Father 
a  Protestant,  the  Mother  a  Catholic.  Sponsor  James  Kendray  & 
Molly  Pease.     E.  B. 

1779 

May  17.  The  child  of  Rob*  Sturdy  aged  7  months  died  at 
Middleham. 

[28]  August  24.     Betty  Pease  foolishly  married  a  Protestant. 

September  7.  I  administered  the  holy  Viaticu  to  Margaret  Rennet 
at  Danby,  aged  81.     And  on  12  the  extreme  Unction.     E.  B. 

1780 

April  5.     Tho8  Pease  foolishly  married  a  Protestant  Girl. 

April  9.  I  baptized  at  Middleham  John  the  son  of  Robert  &  Jane 
Sturdy.  Sponsors  John  &  Mary  Dunn.  The  child  was  born  the  8. 
E.  B. 

*  Different  hand  and  ink. 


LEYBURN,   YORKSHIRE,    1742-1840  247 

May  7.  I  baptized  at  Danby  John,  born  16  April,  Son  of  George 
&  Mary  Siddell  belonging  to  Beadale.  Sponsors  Thomas  Foss  & 
Mary  Robison.     E.  B. 

June  14.     Mary  Pease  foolishly  married  a  Protestant. 

[29]  1781 

March  27.  Mr  Knatchbull*  baptized  Mary,  born  the  25,  Daughter 
of  Ralf  a  Protestant  &  Mary  Hops  a  Catholic.  Sponsors  Thomas 
Douthwate  &  Elisabeth  [Siddell  xd  out,  Ridley  above].  The  child  was 
baptized  at  Danby.     E.  B. 

April  11.  I  baptized  at  Danby  John,  born  the  7th,  son  of  Thomas 
&  Ann  Pease.     Sponsors  John  Pease  snr  &  Eleanor  Mudd.     E.  B. 

1782 

January  28.  I  baptized  at  Middleham  William,  born  the  same 
day,  son  of  Robert  &  Jane  Sturdy.  Sponsors  Cuthbert  Dunn  & 
Magaret  Smith,  both  of  Newcastle.     E.  B. 

Febry  i8t.  I  administered  the  Extreme  unction  to  Fanny  Horner 
at  Spenithorn.  She  was  not  able  to  receive  the  Viaticum  on  account 
of  her  illness.     She  died  the  next  morning.     R.  in  P. 

[30]  May  30.  I  administered  the  holy  Oils  to  Elisabeth  M'Arthur 
at  the  Bridge-house,  she  could  not  receive  the  Viaticum  on  account  of 
her  illness.     She  died  next  morn  May  31.     R.  in  P. — E.  B. 

July  4.  I  administered  the  Viaticu  to  Magaret  Rennet  at  Danby. 
E.  B. 

November  7.  I  administered  the  holy  Oils  to  Jane  Coldbeck 
at  Ellinton.     E.  B. 

Novbr  16.  I  administered  the  holy  Viaticum  to  Jane  Corbeck  at 
Ellinton.     E.  B. 

Novbr  18.  Died  at  Ellinton  after  very  long  illness  Jane  Cor- 
beck.    R. 

1783 

March  14.  I  received  into  the  Church  Edwd  Harrison  supposed 
to  be  on  his  death-bed  ;  but  he  recovered  after  8  months  illness.    E.  B. 

[31]  June  24.  I  administered  the  Viatic'  &  H.  Oils  to  M"  Coates 
at  Witton.     E.  B. 

June  28.     Died  at  Witton  Mrs  Coates  setatis  93.     R.  in  P. 

Augt  11.  I  baptized  at  Middleham  Mary,  born  10th,  daughter 
of  William  &  Susan  Sturdy.  Sponsors  Antony  &  Dolly  Wodman. 
E.  B. 

September  28.     James  Kirkly  foolishly  married  a  Protestant. 

1784 

January  3d.  I  baptized  at  Danby  John,  bom  the  2d,  son  of  Raph 
&  Elisabeth  Marley  of  the  Bridge  house.  Sponsors  Michael  Erring- 
ton  &  Ann  Charlton.     E.  B. 

May  17.  I  assisted  at  yc  marriage  of  James  Kendray  of  Yarm  & 
Ann  Charlton  of  Danby.  Witnesses  Mrs  &  Mr  S.  Scroope  &  all  this 
family  &  Thos  Errington.     E.  B. 

[32]  In  summer  78  &  82.  I  received  into  the  Church  Mary  & 
Catharine  Blackburn.     E.  B. 

June  6.     I  received  into  the  Church  Mary  Kirkley  of  Thornton. 
*  The  Rev.  Robert  Knatchbull,  S.J. 


248  CATHOLIC   REGISTERS    OF   DANBY,    WEST   WITTON,    AND 

July  27.  I  baptized  at  Middleham  Elisabeth,  born  the  26,  daughter 
of  William  &  Susan  Sturdy.  Sponsors  Peter  &  Mary  Blenkensop. 
E.  B. 

August  5.  I  baptized  at  Danby  Jane,  born  the  4,  Daughter  of 
James  &  Mary  Kirkley  of  Thornton.  Sponsors  Thos  Davison  & 
Nelly  Mudd.     E.  B. 

Decbr  25.  I  administered  the  Viaticum  &  H.  Oils  to  Mr  Postle- 
whate  at  Layburn.     On  the  5th  of  January  he  died. 

1785 

January  5.     Died  at  Layburn  Mr  Postlewhate.*     R.  in  P. 

[33]  January  17.  I  baptized  at  Danby  William,  born  ye  13th,  son 
of  Raph  &  Mary  Hops.  Sponsors  Thomas  Douthwhate  &  Dorothy 
Pease.     E.  B. 

Janry  19.  I  baptized  at  Danby  Elisabeth,  born  ye  7th  of  the  same 
month,  Daughter  of  Thos  &  Elisabeth  Ward  of  Wenslay— E.  B.— 
Sponsors  George  &  Elizabeth  Bell. 

February  7.  I  baptized  at  Mount  Park  Andrew,  born  ye  19  of 
January,  son  of  John  &  Isabella  Bell,  sponsors  Andrew  &  Elisabeth 
Bell.     E.  B. 

February  14.  I  baptized  at  Layburn  Henry,  born  ye  10  of  the 
same  month,  son  of  Jane  Lawson  &c.  Sponsors  Peter  Blenkensop  & 
[Easter  xd  out,  Esther  above]  Allan.     E.  B. 

April  26.  I  received  into  the  Church  James  Slingler,  an  old 
Servant,  supposed  to  be  upon  his  death-bed.  James  Slinger  died  on  the 
12  of  May.     R.  in  P.  Sine  Scmntis 

[34]  July  17.     Apostatized  Elisabeth  Pease. 
1786  at  Danby 

January  the  5th  1786,  Baptized  Simon  the  Son  of  [?  So  Corbe 
xd  out]  &  Marysh  [?]  Corbeck,  born  ye  19th  of  December  1785. 
Spons™  John  Peas  &  Mary  Topham.  N:B:  Mary  Topham  stood  for 
Alice  Corbeck  the  Grand  Mother.  [This  entry  is  in  a  large  hand, 
quite  different  from  the  rest.  The  next,  perhaps  a  post  entry,  is  a  third 
writing.] 

[1787] 

March  ye  9,  1787,  was  baptized  at  Danby  Elizabeth  Kirkley, 
Daughter  of  James  et  Mary  Kirkley.  Sponsrs  Thomas  Douthwaite  & 
Dorothy  Pease. 

[35]  1787 

July  15  at  Danby  was  baptized  Peter  Hops  [like  Kops]  son  of 
Ralph  &  Mary  Hops.  Sponsors  Thomas  Pease,  Dorothy  Wadman, 
born  June  29.  1787,  by  me  G.  Witham. 

[The  above  entry  is  the  only  o?ie  in  the  same  hand.  The  two  next 
are  quite  different.] 

[i797]  .    ju 

Decmbr  1797.  I  married  at  Burg  Wallis  t  John  Byng"  &  Ann 
Lawrence  of  Hampole  in  presence  of  Richard  Thomson  &  his  Wife. 

*  The  Rev.  John  Postlethwaite. 

t  Burghwallis,  seven  miles  from  Doncaster.  The  seat  of  the  Tasburgh  and  Anne 
families. 


LEYBURN,   YORKSHIRE,    1742-1840 


249 


[?    1798] 

Jan17  23d.  Baptized  at  Aberford,*  Agnes  ye  Daughter  natural  of 
Hellen  Aspinal.     Sponsors  Peter  Wray  &  ye  Nurse  t  T.  R. 

[36]  We  certify  that  this  is  one  of  the  Registers  or  records  deposited 
in  the  General  Record  Office  pursuant  to  the  Act  of  the  4th  Victoria, 
Cap.  92.  John  Bowring  1 

Thos  Rees        ^Commr" 
John  Shoveller] 

[Here  folloiv  58  blank  pages,  and  traces  of  26  more  torn  out.  The 
remaining  four  as  folloivs,  are  used  from  the  reverse  end,  [Ri]  &rc.\ 

fRil   Lord   Bishop   Walton   confirmed   at   Danby  on   Wednesday 


May  26th  1773 

DANBY   CONGREGATION 

Marck  Scot      .     . 

.  Petrus. 

Thomas  Hill    .     . 

Joannes. 

Will"  Jordan  Barker 

.  Josephus. 

Thomas  Pease 

Jacobus. 

Simon  Corbeck     . 

Joannes. 

John  Pease      .     . 

Josephus. 

John  M'Arthur     .     . 

Josephus. 

William  Pease  .     .     . 

Franciscus. 

James  Courteley   . 

Augustinus. 

Joseph  Pease   .     . 

Augustinus. 

Thomas  Errington 

Michael. 

THE 

GIRLS 

Miss  C.  E.  F.  Scroope 

Maria. 

Ellis  Coldbeck      .     . 

Maria. 

Elizabeth  Glenton 

Maria. 

Mary  Coldbeck     . 

Anna. 

Dorothy  Sturdy    . 

Margarita. 

Jane  Coldbeck 

Elizabetha. 

Mary  M'Arthur     . 

Elizabetha. 

Mary  Pease.     .     . 

Dorothea. 

Ann  Nelson     .     . 

Maria. 

Elizabeth  Pease    .     . 

Maria. 

[R  2]  Jane  Metcalf 

Elizabetha. 

Dorothy  Pease 

Lucia. 

Rachel  Hill      .     . 

Maria. 

Jane  Pease  .     .     . 

Elizabetha. 

Dorothy  Hill    .     . 

Lucia. 

Ann  Pease  .     .     . 

Barbara. 

BEDAL   CONGREGATION 

George  Rikerby    . 

.     Georgius. 

Thomas  Summers 

.     Thomas. 

Hannah  Lodge 

.     Maria 

LEYBURN   CONGREGATION 

Richard  Chapellow 

.     Joannes. 

William  Wetherill 

.     Gulielmus. 

Factum  Danby  2  6°  Maij 

ADui  millessimo 

septingentessimo                         Sponsore 

septuagess 

imo  tertio 

D. 

E.  Boone 

[R  3]    Lord    Bishop   Gibson 

confirmed    at    Danby 

on   Tuesday 

Oct.  30^  1804 

Thomas  Hodgson 

Franciscus 

Catharine  D.  Scroope 

Maria 

John  Hodgson      .     . 

Joseph 

Scholastica 

John  Sidgewick     . 

Thomas 

Ann  Scroope    .     . 

Maria  Teresa 

Joseph  Sidgewick 

Augustinus 

Frances  Scroope   .     . 

Maria  Anna 

James  Kendray     .     . 

Paul 

Mary  (Paul)  Sturdy   . 

Maria 

*  Eight  miles  from  Leeds. 
t  These  are  the  initials  of  Thomas  Rees,  the  commissioner,  not  a  priest. 


250 


CATHOLIC   REGISTERS    OF   DANBY,   WEST   WITTON,   AND 


Mary  Sturdy     .     .     .  Anna 

Rebecca  Sidgewick    .  Maria 

Mary  Hodgson     .     .  Anna 

Margaret  Hind      .     .  Maria 

Frances  Hoggith  .     .  Maria 

Mary  Rowland      .     .  Ann 

Elizabeth  Kirkley.     .  Maria 

Barbara  Kendray  .     .  Maria 

Mary  Kirkley   .     .     .  Anna 

Ann  Todd  ....  Maria 

Eliz.  Raper.     .     .     .  Maria 

Alice  Hill    ....  Maria 

[R  4]                     Factum  Danby 

[o,  gbris               ^  Sponsore 
entesmo  quarto    J       J.  Maini 

A.D.   Millessimo  Octing 

Book  III  (II). 

[As  explained  in  the  introduction  the  contents  are  copied  in  Book  II  (I), 
and  are  consequently  not  printed  here.     The  two  have  been  collated.] 

Book  IV  {III). 

[A.  B  blank]  baptisms  at  danby.* 

[C]  The  Register  of  Christenings  at  Danby  upon  Yure,  Parish  of 
Thornton  Steward  in  the  County  of  Yorkshire ;  Seat  of  Simon  Thomas 
Scroope  Esq™. 

Year  of  our  Lord  1790. 

(1)  T.  R.  Year  1790.     April.     [In  margin.] 

On  the  seventeenth  of  April  one  thousand  seven  hundred  and 
ninety,  was  born  at  three  a  Clock  in  the  Morning,  and  baptised  at 
Danby,  on  the  Same  Day,  Simon  Thomas,  son  of  Simon  Thomas  and 
Catherine  Scroope.  Sponsors  Edward  Meynell  Esqre  of  Yarm,  and 
Anna  Clementina  Scroope. 

1 79 1.     October.     [In  margin.] 

On  the  fourth  of  October  one  Thousand  seven  hundred  and  ninety 
one  was  born  at  ten  a  Clock  in  the  evening  and  immediately  baptised 
at  Danby,  Catherine  Dorothea,  Daughter  of  Simon  Thomas  and 
Catherine  Scroope,  Sponsors  Stephen  Tempest  of  Broughton  Esqre 
and  Dorothea  Meynell  of  Yarm. 

[  The  two  entries  above  seem  in  the  same  hand  as  the  Rev.  Delalonde's, 
who  writes  the  registers  even  when  the  Rev.  Thomas  Law  son  signs  them.] 

(2)  Year  1793.     March.     [In  margin.] 

On  the  fourth  of  March  one  thousand,  seven  hundred  and  ninety 
three,  was  baptised  at  Ley  burn,  by  me  under  signed,  John,  born  on  the 
first  instant,  son  of  George  and  anna  Rowland  t ;  Sponsors  John 
Blankinson  J,  and  Barbara  Smithson.  §  Thomas  Lawson. 

On  the  fifteenth  of  march,  one  thousand  seven  hundred  and  ninety 
three,  was  baptised  at  Danby,  by  me  under  signed,  John,  born  on  the 
tenth  instant,  son  of  John  and  isabella  Bell  ||,  of  West-Witten,  Sponsors 
henry  umphrey  and  Elizabeth  Bell.  II  Thomas  Lawson. 

On  the  Twelfth  of  April,  one  thousand  seven  hundred  and  ninety 
three,  was  born  at  half  an  hour  past  one  in  the  afternoon,  and  (3)  bap- 
tised on  the  same  day  at  Danby  by  me  undersigned,  Anna  Clementina, 

*  Continued  after  1806  at  West  Witton.        f  In  Book  V  is  added  {olivi  Raiper). 
%  Blankinsop  in  Book  V.      Query  Blenkinsop. 

§  The  Register  written  by  Rev.  Delalonde ;  but  the  signature  by  the  Rev.  Thomas 
Austin  Lawson,  O.S.B.,  as  in  Book  V. 

||  In  Book  V  is  added  {olim  Umphrey).        H  Thomas  omitted  in  Book  V. 


LEYBURN,   YORKSHIRE,    1742-1840  2$  I 


lghter  of  Simon  Thomas,*  and  Catherine  Scroope  t,  Sponsors 
rd   Thomas   Meynell  %   of    London  and  Clementina  §   Maxwell  of 


Dauj 
Rev' 

Kerconell  in  Scotland.  *  Th.  Lawson. 

year  1794.     february     [In  margin.] 

On  the  fourth  of  february,  one  thousand,  seven  hundred  and  ninety 
four,  was  baptised  at  Thornton  Steward,  helena,  born  from  yesterday 
(by  me  undersigned)  Daughter  of  james,  and  mary  craven ;  Sponsors 
james  Kirkley  and  anna  Brown.  ||  Thomas  Lawson. 

On  the  twenty  seventh  of  July,  one  thousand  seven  hundred  and 
ninety  four,  was  born  and  baptised  at  Danby,  by  me  undersigned, 
Thomas,  son  of  Thomas  and  Alise  hill,  of  Mildfdlejham,  Sponsors 
jeremia  hill,  and  Dorothea  Wadman.  if  Delalonde  P8t. 

(4)  On  the  seventh  of  October,  one  thousand,  seven  hundred  and 
ninety  four,  was  baptised  at  Danby,  by  me  undersigned,  Mary,  born 
from  yesterday,  Daughter  of  james  and  anna  Kendray  of  East- Witten, 
Sponsors  Thomas  Douthwaite  of  Danby  and  Clementina  Elizabeth 
Maxwell  of  Kerconnell  in  Scotland.  Delalonde  P8t 

On  the  sixtenth  of  november,  one  thousand  seven  hundred  and 
ninety  four  was  baptised  at  Thor[n]ton  Steward,  by  me  under-signed, 
james,  born  on  the  thirteenth  instant,  son  of  james  and  mary  Kirkley, 
Sponsors  John  Buckle  of  West- Witten,  and  anna  Allen  of  Leyburn. 

Delalonde  P8t. 

On  the  twenty  eighth  of  november,  one  thousand  seven  hundred 
and  ninety  four,  was  born  at  five  a  (5)  clock  in  the  morning,  and 
baptised  on  the  same  day  at  Danby,  by  me  undersigned,  frances, 
Daughter  of  Simon  Thomas  and  Catherine  Scroope,  Sponsors 
francis  Witham  of  Gray's  inn,  London,  and  M18  Catherine  Selbey  of 
Yarm.  Delalonde  P8t 

year  1795.     february.     [In  margin.'] 

On  the  thirteenth  of  february,  one  housand  seven  hundred  and 
ninety  five,  was  baptised  at  Thorfn  above]ton  steward,  by  me  under- 
signed, james,  born  on  the  eleventh  instant,  son  of  james  and  mary 
Craven.  Sponsors  William  Mcarthur  of  Danby  and  mary  Kirkley  of 
thorton-steward.  Delalonde  P.Sfc 

On  the  twenty  ninth  of  March,  one  thousand  seven  hundred  and 
ninety  five,  was  born  and  baptised  on  the  same  day  at  Dantzie,**  by  me 
undersigned,  Mary,  Daughter  of  Thomas  and  anna  Douthwaite,  (6) 
Sponsors  George  Douthwaite  of  Brugh  1 1  hall,  and  Elizabeth  Birdsall 
of  Oxton.J  %  Delalonde  P8t 

*  Thomas  omitted  in  Book  V.  f  {olim  Meynell)  added  in  Book  V. 

X  The  Rev.  Thomas  Meynell,  S.J.  §  Clementina  Elizabeth  M.  in  Book  V. 

||  The  register  written  by  Rev.  Delalonde  ;  but  the  signature  by  the  Rev.  Thomas 
Lawson  as  in  Book  V.  The  object  seems  the  former's  wish  to  keep  baptisms 
separate.     So  he  transcribed  Ft.  Lawson's  amongst  deaths,  and  got  him  to  sign  four. 

U  The  register  and  signature  both  in  one  hand,  that  of  Rev.  Delalonde. 

H«#  A  farm-house,  probably  then  occupied  by  Thomas  Douthwaite,  as  steward  to 
the  Scrope  estates.     See  introduction. 

f+  Now  written  Burgh,  and  pronounced  Bruff.  George  Douthwaite,  house 
steward  to  Sir  John  Lawson,  took  the  oath  of  allegiance,  13  Jan.  1791. 

XX  See  following  register.  The  Birdsalls  appear  in  York  Registers  (C.fi.S.  iv.), 
and  Liverpool  {Ibid.  ix.).  Oxton  may  be  in  Woodchurch,  Cheshire,  now  a  suburb  of 
Birkenhead, — not  the  place  in  Tadcaster  parish.  Their  son  Robert  Butler  Birdsall 
was  drowned  in  the  Mersey  29  Sept.  1816,  aged  23. 


252  CATHOLIC   REGISTERS   OF   DANBY,   WEST   WITTON,   AND 

year  1796.     March.     [In  margin.'] 
On  the  Twenty  first  of  March,  one  thousand  seven  hundred  and 
ninety  six,  was  born  and  baptised  at  Dantzie,  by  me  undersigned, 
anna,  Daughter  of  Thomas  and  anna  Douthwaite,  Sponsors  Cottam 
Birdsall  of  Oxton  and  Elizabeth  Douthwaite  of  Brugh-hall. 

Delalonde  Psfc 
On  the  fifth  of  June  one  thousand  seven  hundred  and  ninety  six, 
was  born  between  three  and  four  a  Clock  in  the  morning,  and  baptised 
on  the  same  day  at  Danby,  by  me  undersigned,  Edward  Gervase,  son 
of  Simon  Thomas,  and  Catherine  Scroope,  Sponsors  james  Maxwell 
Esquire  of  Kerconell  in  Scotland,  and  Anna  Mary  Meynell  of  yarm. 

Delalonde  P8t. 
(7)  On  the  twenty  fifth  of  August,  one  thousand  seven  hundred 
and  ninety  six,  was  baptised  at  thornton  Steward,  by  me  undersigned, 
Mary,  born  on  the  twenty  fourth,  Daughter  of  james  and  Mary  Craven, 
Sponsors  John  hoguet  of  York,  and  frances  Champeny  of  Danby. 

Delalonde  Pst. 
On  the  twelfth  of  September  one   thousand  seven  hundred   and 
ninety  six,  was  baptised  at  Thornton  Steward,  by  me  undersigned,  Mary, 
born  on  the  tenth  instant,  Daughter  of  Mathew  and  anna  Roantree, 
Sponsors  Laurence  Bays  and  Mary  [?  Racjine  *  of  Danby. 

Delalonde  P8fc. 
1797  february.  [In  margin.] 
On  the  first  day  of  february  one  thousand  seven  hundred  and 
ninety  seven,  was  baptised  at  Danby,  by  me  undersigned,  Marguerita, 
(8)  born  on  the  thirty  first  ult°,  Daughter  of  Charles  and  Martha 
Moody  of  Mildham  [Middleham],  Sponsors  George  Moody  and 
Marguerita  Moody  of  Richmond.  Delalonde  P8t. 

On  the  twenty  second  of  July  one  thousand  seven  hundred  and 
ninety  seven,  was  baptised  at  Danby,  by  me  undersigned,  John,  born 
on  the  twenty  first  instant,  son  of  Joseph  and  Dorothea  Cuckfield  of 
hunton,  Sponsors  John  Sedgwich  and  Rebecca  Sedgwich  of  Burton. 

Delalonde  P8t. 
On  the  seventh  of  august  one  thousand  seven  hundred  and  ninety 
seven  was  born  at  Danby,  twenty  minutes  past  four  a  Clock  (9)  in  the 
morning,  and  baptised  on  the  same  day,  by  me  undersigned,  Mary 
Barbara,  daughter  of  Simon  Thomas  and  Catherine  Scroope,  Sponsors 
Thomas  Meynell  of  Yarm  and  frances  Scroope  of  Richmond. 

Delalonde,  P8t. 

1798.     January.     [In  margin.] 

On  the  sixth  of  January  one  thousand  seven  hundred  and  ninety 

eight  was  baptised  at  Danby  by  me  undersigned,  William,  born  on  the 

thirtieth  of  december  Last,  son  of  Thomas  and  Alise  hill  of  Mildham 

[Middleham],  Sponsors  Lawrence  Bays  and  Dorothea  hadley  of  Danby. 

Delalonde  P8t 

(10)  On  the  eighteenth  of  february  one  thousand  seven  hundred 

and  ninety  eight  were  born  and  on  the  same  day  baptised  at  Dantzie, 

by  me  undersigned,  Thomas,  and  John  William,  sons  of  Thomas  and 

anna  Douthwaite,  Sponsors  of  Thomas  the  first  born,  Simon  Thomas 

*  Or  Reine ;  but  very  doubtful,  as  a  change  has  been  made. 


LEYBURN,   YORKSHIRE,    1742-1840  253 

Scroope  Esquire  of  Danby,  and  anna  Clementina  Scroope  Senior  of 
York  ;  Sponsors  of  John  William,  Revd  William  Danson  *  of  Askew,  and 
Catherine  Dorothea  Scroope  junior  of  Danby.  Delalonde  Psfc. 

On  the  fifteenth  of  July  one  Thousand  seven  hundred  and  ninety 
eight  was  born,  and  on  the  sixteenth  ditto  was  baptised  at  Thornton 
Steward  by  me  undersigned  harriet,  Daughter  of  James  and  mary 
Kirkley,  Sponsors  William  furniss  and  jennet  furniss  of  West-Witten. 

Delalonde  Pst 

(11)  on  the  Sixteenth  of  august  one  Thousand  seven  hundred  and 
ninety  eight  was  born,  and  on  the  seventeenth  ditto  was  baptised  at 
Danby  by  me  undersigned,  William,  Son  of  Paul  and  mary  Sturdy  of 
Mildham  [Middleham] — Sponsors  William  Sturdy  and  Susanna  Sturdy 
of  Mildham.  Delalonde  P8t. 

on  the  Thirteenth  of  September  one  thousand  seven  hundred  and 
ninety  eight  was  born,  and  on  the  fourteenth  ditto  was  baptised  at 
Thornton  Steward  by  me  undersigned,  helena,  Daughter  of  james  and 
mary  Craven,  Sponsors  Thomas  hill  and  anna  Sturdy  of  Mildham 
[Middleham].  Delalonde  P8t. 

on  the  Twentyfourth  of  September  one  thousand  Seven  hundred 
and  ninety  eight  was  born,  and  on  the  twenthSixth  ditto  was  baptised 
at  Thornton-Steward  (12)  by  me  undersigned,  anna,  daughter  of 
Mathew  and  anna  Roantree,  Sponsors  John  hoguet  of  Danby,  and 
anna  Roantree  of  Wycliffe  Boat  house  County  of  Durham. 

Delalonde  P8t. 

on  the  Thirteenth  of  October  one  thousand  seven  hundred  and 
ninety  eight  was  born  at  Danby,  and  on  the  same  day  was  baptised  by 
me  undersigned,  henry,  Son  of  Simon  Thomas,  and  Catherine  Scroope, 
Sponsors  George  Meynell  of  yarm,  and  Catherine  Selbey  of  Biddleston 
in  the  County  of  Northumberland.  Delalonde  Pst. 

[i799] 

on  the  twenty  third  of  february  one  thousand  seven  hundred  and 
ninety  nine  was  born,  and  on  the  third  of  march  was  baptised  at  Danby 
by  me  undersigned,  anna  (13)  Daughter  of  Joseph  and  Dorothea 
Cuckfield  of  hunton,  Sponsors  John  Sedgwick  and  Rebecca  t  Sedgwick 
of  Burton.  Delalonde  Pst. 

[1800] 

on  the  twentieth  of  January  on  thousand  eight  hundred  was  born 
and  on  the  twenty  first  ditto  was  baptised  at  Mildham  [Middleham]  by 
me  undersigned,  Rachel,  daughter  of  Thomas  and  alise  hill,  of  Mild- 
ham, Sponsors,  Laurence  jackson  &  Anna  Sturdy  of  Mildham. 

Delalonde  P8t. 

On  the  eleventh  of  february  one  thousand  eight  hundred  was  born 
and  on  the  same  day  was  baptised  at  Leyburn  by  me  undersigned, 
jane,  daughter  of  John  and  anna  Blenkinsop,  Sponsors  (14)  Richard 
allanson  and  anna  Blenkinsop  of  Leyburn.  Delalonde  Pst 

on  the  Second  of  March  one  thousand  [seven  hun  xd  out]  eight 
hundred  was  born,  and  on  the  same  day  baptised  at  Dantzie  by  me 

*  The  Rev.  William  Danson  died  at  Aiskew,  Bedale,  15  Nov.  1806,  aged  76. 
f  I   have  taken  the  liberty  of  giving  this   spelling ;  but  in   the   original  it  is 
absolutely  Rebeeea. 


254  CATHOLIC   REGISTERS   OF   DANBY,   WEST   WITTON,   AND 

undersigned,  Joseph,  Son  of  Thomas  and  anna  douthwaite,  Sponsors 
William  Morgan  of  Yarm  and  Elizabeth  Birdsall.         Delalonde  Pst 

on  the  tenth  of  July  one  thousand  eight  hundred  was  born,  and  on 
the  fourteenth  ditto  was  baptised  at  Bellerby  by  me  undersigned  henry 
son  of  John  and  isabella  Bell,  Sponsors  William  furniss  and  marguarita 
Buckle  of  West  Witten.  Delalonde  Pst. 

(15)  On  the  twelfth  of  November  on  Thousand  eight  hundred  was 
born,  and  on  the  same  day  was  baptised  at  the  Bridge  by  me  under- 
signed, Elizabeth,  daughter  of  John  and  frances  hogget,  Sponsors 
William  Smithson  and  Elizabeth  Champney  of  Yarm. 

Delalonde  Pst. 
[1801] 
On  the  Sixteenth  of  January  one  thousand  eight  hundred  and  one 
was  born,  and  on  the  eighteenth  ditto  was  baptised  at  Thornton 
Steward  by  me  undersigned,  John,  son  of  james  and  Mary  Craven, 
Sponsors  William  Mcarthur  of  Danby  and  Mary  Coldbeck  of  Elling- 
ton. Delalonde  Pst. 

(16)  On  the  twenty  fifth  of  December  one  thousand  eight  hundred 
and  one,  was  born  at  Danby,  &  the  same  day  was  baptised,  by  me 
undersigned,  frederic,  son  of  Simon  Thomas  and  Catherine  Scroope, 
sponsors  Thomas  Strickland  of  Sizergh  Esqr,  and  Elizabeth  Ashmal  of 
Lambs  Conduit  Street,  London.  Dupont  p8t. 

[1802] 
On  the  sixth  of  January  one  thousand  eight  hundred  and  two  was  born 
&  was  baptised  by  me  undersigned  Mary  Lumley,  daughter  of  Robert 
&  Elen  Lumley  of  Mildham,  sponsors,  paul  Sturdy  of  Mildham  and 
Ann  Richardson  Dupont  pst. 

(17)  On  the  eight  of  february  one  thousand  eight  hundred  &  tow 
was  baptised  by  me  undersigned  at  ulshaw  bridge,  parish  of  east  witton 
thomas  son  of  Matthew  and  Anna  Roantree,  born  the  day  before 
about  half  past  ten  at  night,  Sponsors  Thomas  Roantree  &  hanna 
Besst.  Dupont  pst. 

[The  rest  of  p.  17  is  take?i  up  with  a  less  complete  and  crossed  out 
entry  of  the  folloiving  certificate.} 

(18)  On  the  twenty  eighth  of  february  one  thousand  eight  hundred 
and  two  was  baptised  by  me  undersigned  Stephen  son  of  paul  and  Mary 
Sturdy  of  Mildham,  born  on  the  twenty  six  instant,  sponsors  Stephen 
Sturdy  and  Margeret  Sturdy.  Dupont  pst 

[June  ye  13th  in  margin]  On  ye  Thirt:  of  June  one  thousand  Eight 
hundred  and  two  was  Baptised  by  me  undersigned ;  Sophia  Elizabeth 
Douthwaite  ye  Daughter  of  Thomas  and  Anna  Douthwaite ;  Sponsors 
John  Birdsall,  Sophia  Fisher.  Jn°  Eccles 

[In  margin,  July  ye  17th]  One  Thousand  Eight  hundred  and  two 
was  born,  and  Eighteenth  ditto  was  Baptized  by  me  undersigned  :  Ann 
Craven  ye  Daughter  of  James  and  Mary  Craven.     Sponsers 

and  Elizabeth  Havelock  of  Danby.     [No  signature,  but  the 
same  ivriting  as  that  of  Rev.  John  Eccles.'] 

[19]  On  Tuesday  the  3d  of  August  one  Thousand  Eight  Hundred 
and  two  was  born  and  on  the  same  Baptized  at  the  Bridge  by  me 
undersigned,  Wllm  Hogget  the  Son  of  John  and  Frances  Hogget, 


LEYBURN,  YORKSHIRE,    1742-1840  255 

Sponsors  Wllm  Hogget  of  Cragg  in  Parish  of  Rombelkirk  [Romaldkirk  ?] 
and  Mary  Champney  of  Yarm.  Jn°  Eccles. 

ti8o3] 

[In  margin,  June  16,  1803]  was  born  at  Danby  at  half  past  eight 
o  clock  p.m.  &  baptized  the  same  day  by  me  undersigned  Monica 
Scroope,  daughter  of  Simon  T.  &  Catharine  Scroope.    Spons8  George 
Cary  Esqr  of  Torr  Abbey  &  Eliz  Wright  of  Kelvedon.         J.  Eccles. 
(20)  a.d.  1804 

On  the  26th  of  June  was  born,  &  on  the  27th  was  baptized  Ann 
[Sturdy  above]  Daughter  of  Paul  &  Mary  (olim  Brotherton  con- 
jugum).     Sponsors  Robert  Watson  &  Ann  Sturdy  (both  by  proxy). 

ita  testor.     J.  Maini. 

On  the  of  Novr  was  born  &  on  the  6th  of  the  same  was 

baptized  Dorothy  [Raper  above]  daughter  of  &  Eliza- 

beth (olim  Hevlock  *  conjugum.)     Sponsor 

J.  Maini 
1805 

On  the  21  March  at  3.0  oclock  a:m.  was  born  &  on  the  same  day 
baptized  Charles  George,  son  of  Simon  T.  &  Catharine  Scoope, 
Spons  Wm  Sheldon  Esqr  of  Beyley  [Beoley]  &  Teresa  Meynell  of 
Yarm.     baptvi  ego.  J.  Maini. 

On  the  13  of  July  was  born,  &  on  the  14  of  the  same  was  baptized 
Jane  daughter  of  Thomas  &  Mary  (olim  Chapman)  Hodgson. 
Spons8  Thomas  Lamb  &  Helen  White,     baptvi  ego.         Jos.  Maini. 

(21)  For  the  baptism  of  Catharine  Rowntree  see  the  Register  at 
West  Witton  [21  Aug.  1805,  p.  271.     Query  Leyburn  registers]. 

[1806] 

on  the  eighteenth  of  May,  one  thousand  eight  hundred  and  six,  was 
baptised  at  Danby  by  me  undersigned,  Mary,  born  on  the  fourteenth 
instant,  daughter  of  James  and  elizabeth  raper,  of  East-Witton. 
Sponsors  John  Hodgson  and  elizabeth  White.  Jolly  p8t. 

[West  Witton  Registers  ?] 

Die   Decembris   14  nata,  et  die  22  ejusdem  mensis  ejusdemque 
anni  baptizata  fuit  Maria  Barker  filia  Ephraim  et  Franciscae  Barker 
(olim  Hogarth)  conjugum :  patrinus  fuit  gulielmus  smithson,  matrina 
Catharina  Champney — a  me  Richardo  Billington,  Misso  Apco. 
(22)  1807 

Die  februarii  15  nata,  et  die  17  ejusdem  mensis,  ejusdemq  anni 
baptizata  fuit  Susanna  Sturdy  filia  Stephani  et  Elizabethae  Sturdy 
(olim  Wilson)  conjugum  :  patrinus  fuit  John  plilips,  matrina  Elizabetha 
Sturdy. — A  me  Richardo  Billington,  Misso  Apco. 

Mense  Septembris  1804  nata,  et  die  7  [februarii  xd  out]  Januarii 
1807  bapitzata  fuit  sub  conditione  Joann  [a  above]  Steed  filia  Gulielmi 
et  Elizabeth  [ae  above]  Steed  (olim  Chapman)  conjugum.  patrinus 
fuit  Thomas  Hodgson,  matrina  Anna  Rowntree.  a  me  Richardo 
Billington,  Misso.  Apco. 

(23)  Die  aprilis  14.   1807  et  die  15  ejusdem  mensis  ejusdemque 

*  An  error  for  "  Havelock."  The  family  which  became  so  distinguished  in  the 
military  annals  of  our  country  from  the  time  of  the  Indian  Mutiny  were  long  settled 
as  yeomen  in  Cleveland  or  the  Langbarugh  Wapentake,  Yorkshire. 


256  CATHOLIC   REGISTERS    OF   DANBY,   WEST   WITTON,   AND 

anni  baptizata  fuit  Margarita  Sturdy  filia  pauli  et  Elizabeths  Sturdy 
(olim  Braddertton)  conjugum :  patrinus  fuit  Antonius  Wadman, 
matrina  Maria  Sturdy,  a  me  [Richardo  Billington  xd  out,  Michaele 
Wharton  above]  Mis80  Anglc0. 

on  the  [eighteenth  xd  out,  twenty  one  above]  of  June,  one  thousand 
eight  hundred  and  seven,  was  baptised  at  Danby  by  me  undersigned, 
John,  born  on  the  eighteenth  instant,  son  of  James  &  elizabeth 
Rayper  of  East-Witton ;  sponsors  Havelock  and  ann  Kendray. 

J.  B.  Jolly. 

Die  30  novembris  1807  natus,  et  die  2  decembris  [1807  above] 
baptizatus  fuit  joannis  Hodgson,  films  Thomae  et  Mariae  Hodgson, 
(olim  Chapman)  conjugum :  matrina  fuit  Hannah  Best,  a  me  Richardo 
Billington  [Mis80  Anglc0  in  margin.] 

(24)  Die  Decembris  12.  1807  nata,  et  die  13  ejusdem  mensis 
ejusdemq  anni  baptizata  fuit  Joanna  Rowntree  filia  Mathei  et  Annae 
Rowntree  (olim  Syrtis)  conjugum:  patrinus  fuit  Georgius  Crow, 
matrina  Jsabella  Crow,  a  J.  B.  Jolly. 

[1808] 
Die  Decembris  18.  1808  nata,  et  die  30  ejusdem  mensis  ejusdemq 
anni  baptizata  fuit  Elizabetha  Newsham  filia  Josephi  et  Marise  New- 
sham  (olim  Duck)  conjugum  :  patrinus  fuit  Josephus  Duck,  matrina 
Maria  Duck,  a  me  Richardo  Billington.    Mis80  Anglico. 

[1809] 

(25)  Die  20  augusti  1809  nata,  et  die  21  ejusdem  mensis,  ejusdemq 
anni  baptizata  fuit  Elizabetha  Sturdy  filia  pauli  et  Mariae  Sturdy  (olim 
Bratherton)  conjugum  :  patrinus  fuit  Robertus  Blenkinsop,  matrina 
Dorothaea  Wadman.     a  me  Richardo  Billington,  Misso  Apco. 

Die  oct:  16.  1809  natus,  et  die  18  ejusdem  mensis  ejusdemq  anni 
baptizatus  fuit  Nicholas  Raper,  filius  jacobi  et  Elizabethan  Raper(olim 
Havelock)  conjugum  :  patrinus  fuit  Gulielmus  Laiton,  matrina  Maria 
Blacklock.  a  petro  potier  Misso.  Apco. 

(26)  Die  22  oct:  1809  nata,  et  die  24  ejusdem  mensis  ejusdemq 
anni  baptizata  fuit  Maria  Hodgson  filia  Thomae  et  Mariae  Hodgson 
(olim  Chapman)  conjugum  :  matrina  fuit  Helena  Anderson,  a  me 
Richardo  Billington.     Misso  Apco. 

Die  nata,  et  die  29  Dec:  181  o  baptizata  fuit 

Elizabetha  Jmison   filia  et    Annae    Jmison  (olim 

Blackburn)  conjugum,  a  me  Richard  Billington,  Mis80  Apco. 

For  Mary  Sturdy  see  the  year  1827. 

[1810] 

(27)  Die  26  Decembris  [1810  above]  natus,  et  die  27  ejusdem  mensis 
ejusdemq  anni  baptizatus  fuit  Joannis  Hodgson  filius  Thomae  et  Mariae 
Hodgson  (olim  pickering)  conjugum  :  patrinus  fuit  Thomas  Simon 
Scroope,  matrina  Maria  Hodgson,  a  me  Richardo  Billington,  Misso. 
Apco. 

Paul  Sturdy  see  page  50. 

[1811] 

The  18th  of  may  181 1  Elizabeth  Cassy  daughter  of  Robert  and  [Jane 
xd  out,  Celia  above]  Cassy  was  baptized  by  the  Revd  Mr  Jolly  at  Danby 
in  testimony  of  which  J  subscribe  my  name,  Richard  Billington. 


LEYBURN,   YORKSHIRE,    1742-1840  257 

Die  25  [181 1  above]  septembris  nata,  et  die  i  octobris  baptizata 
fuit  Maria  Plews,  filia  Mathaei  et  Margarita?  plews  (olim  Herd)  con- 
jugum  :  patrinus  fuit  Simon  Scroope,  Matrina  Eleanor  (28)  Anderson 

a  me  Richardo  Billington,  Misso  Apco. 

For  Paul  Sturdy  see  the  year  1827. 

[1812] 

Die  14  [Dec  xf*  out]  Januarii  181 2  natus  et  eadem  ipsa  die  bapti- 
zatus  fuit  Gulielmus  Rowntree  filius  Mathei  et  Annae  Rowntree  (olim 
Sirtis)  conjugum,  patrinus  fuit  gulielmus  Bickardike,  matrina  Maria 
Thwaites,  a  me  Richardo  Billington,  Misso  Apco. 

October  the  9th  [18 12  above]  was  born  sara  Metcalf  daughter  of 
Mary  Metcalf,  and  on  the  22  of  October  18 12  the  same  was  baptized 
by  me  Richard  Billington,  Apostolic  (29)  Missionary.  Mary  Kirkley 
was  God-mother. 

[1813] 

Die  10  februarii  181 3  nata  et  die  13  ejusdem  mensis  ejusdemq 
anni  baptizata  fuit  Joanna  Raper,  filia  Jacobi  et  Elizabethan  Raper 
(olim  Havelock)  conjugum  :  patrinus  fuit  gulielmus  Bickerdyke, 
matrina  Helena  Anderson,  a  me  Richardo  Billington,  Misso  Apco. 

Mark  Jackson  was  born  february  6.  18 13.  Helen  White  was  her 
God-mother.  Her  father's  name  is  Bernard  Jackson,  her  mother's 
Mary,  (Doil  [befor  xd  out]  before  marriage)  Jackson.  Mary  Jackson 
was  baptized  by  me  Richard  Billington,  [apostolical  missionary  in 
margin.] 

(30)  [1814] 

Die  Septembris  26,  18 14,  natus  &  die  29  ejusdem  Mensis  &  anni 
baptisatus  fuit  Jacobus  Kendray  filius  Jacobi  &  Elizabeths  Kendray 
(olim  powel  Conjugum,  patrinus  fuit  Thomas  [?  H]ill,  Matrina  Anna 
Kendray,  a  me,  Richardus  Billington. 

die  decembris  8.  18 14  nata  &  die  9  ejusdem  Mensis  &  anni  bapti- 
sata  fuit  Barbara  Maria  Rowntree,*  filia  Mathaei  &  Mariae  nowtree  * 
(olim  Surtees)  Conjugum,  patrinus  fuit  Eduardus  Scroope,  matrina 
anna  Scroope,  a  me — Richardus  Billington. 

[1815] 

Die.  1.  februarii  181 5  natus  Est,  &  die  2  :  Ejusdem  Mensis  &  anni 
Baptisatus  fuit  Thomas  hodgson  filius  Thomse  &  Mariae  hodgson 
(olim  Chapman)  Conjugum. — patrinus  fuit  Carolus  Buckle.  Matrina t 
Rowntree.     a  me.  Richardus  Billington. 

(31)  Mary  Sturdy  daughter  of  Stephen  and  Elisabeth  Sturdy 
was  born  January.  13.  1809.  for  Stephen  Sturdys  children,  Except 
Susanna  see  the  Register  at  West  witton. 

\The  above  confused  entry  is  crossed  out.] 

Baptisatus  Est  april  25.  18 15.  Jacobus  Raper  filius  Jacobi  & 
Elizabethan  Raper  Conjugum  (olim  havelock.)  natus  fuit  aprilis  17. 
18 15.  patrinus  fuit  Ricardus  pearson,  matrina  Anna  pearson,  a  me 
Richardus  Billington. 

Sara  Rutter  born  181 5  see  page  51  [interlined] 

*  The  first  has  been  changed  into  Rowntree,  perhaps  from  Nowtree  as  left 
unchanged  in  the  second  case, 
f  Christian  name  omitted. 
XIII.  R 


258  CATHOLIC   REGISTERS    OF   DANBY,    WEST   WITTON,   AND 

[1815  or  16?] 

Die.  11.  Januarii,  nata  &  die  23  Ejusdem  Mensis  &  anni  Bap- 
tisa[ta  above]  fuit  Sara  Rulter  *  filia  Jonathan  &  Marise  Rulter  con- 
jugum. 

For  William  Sturdy  see  the  year  [1827  above]. 

Die  Maii  9,  181 5.  &  die  11  Ejusdem  Mensis  &  anni  baptisa  fuit 
Adeliza  Dinsdle  filia  georgii  &  Dorothse  Dinsdle  (olim  Hill)  Con- 
jugum, patrinus  fuit  Thomas  hill.  (32)  Matrina  Adeliza  hill,  a  me. 
Richard  Billington. 

Die  15.  maii  1815.  natus.  &  die  16.  Ejusdem  Mensis  &  anni  bapti- 
satus  fuit  Robertus  Dowson,  films  christophori  &  Joannse  Dowson 
(olim  prest)  Conjugum.  Matrina  fuit  Maria  Sturdy — a  me.  Richardus 
Billington. 

[1816] 

Die  februarii  16.  181 6.  &  die  17  Ejusdem  Mensis  &  anni,  baptisatus 
fuit  Jacobus  Thendray  [Kendray],  filius  Jacobi  &  Elizabethan  Then- 
dray  [Kendray]  (olim  powel)  Conjugum.  patrinus  Jacobus  powel, 
Matrina  Barbara  Turpis.     a  me  J.  Duboscq,  Misso  Apco. 

Die  Martii  31.  1816.  nata  &  baptisata  fuit  Anna  Sturdy,  filia 
Stephani  &  Elizabethan  Sturdy  (olim  wilson)  Conjugum,  patrinus 
Georgius  Gascoyne  &  Matrina  Maria  Gascoyne,  a  me,  J.  Duboscq, 
Misso  Apost. 

(33)  Die  [septembris  6  xd  out,  augusti  30.  18 16  above]  nata  et  die 
6  [ejusdem  mensis  ejusdemq  anni  xd  out,  septembris  6.  18 16  above] 
baptizata  fuit  Anna  Raper  filia  Jacobi  et  et  Elizabetha  Raper  (olim 
Havelock)  conjugum :  patrinus  fuit  gulielmus  Havelock,  [patrinus 
xd  out,  matrina  above]  fuit  Maria  Havelock,  a  me  Richardo  Billington, 
Misso.  Apco. 

Die  3  nobembris  1816,  natus,  &  die  4  Ejusdem  Mensis  &  anni 
baptisatus  fuit  charolus  Gascoyne  filius  Georgii  &  Mariae  Gascoyne 
(olim  Thwaites),  patrinus  Charolus  Scroope,  Matrina  francisca 
Scroope,  a  me :  J.  Duboscq.  Misso.  Apos. 

(34)  1817 

Die  21  [Jennuarii  over  something]  nata  &  die  9  [sic]  t  ejusdem 
Mensis  &  anni  baptizata  fuit  Maria  Day,  filia  Joannis  &  Christianas 
Day  Conjugum.  patrinus  Revd  Richardus  Billington.  Matrina  francisca 
Scroope,  a  me.  J.  Duboscq,  Misso.  Apos. 

Die  20  februarii  18 17  &  die  9  ejusdem  Mensis  &  anni,  nata  fuit 
Maria  Dinsdle,  filia  Georgii  &  Dorotae  Dinsdle,  patrinus  thomas  hill, 
Adelisse  hill — Babtisata  fuit  a  me,  J.  Duboscq,  Miss  Apo. 

James  Raper  son  of  James  and  Elizabeth  Raper  was  born  April 
17.  1815  in  the  village  of  East  Witton,  and  baptized  by  the  Revd  Robert 
Johnson  the  25  of  the  same  month,  the  sponsors  were  Richard  pearson 
(35)  and  Ann  pearson.     Richard  Billington 

Die  7  Maii  181 7  &  die  8  hujusdem  Mensis  &  anni  Baptisatus  fuit 

*  Jonathan  Rutte^s  name  appears  frequently  in  the  Catholic  Registers  of 
Wycliffe,  and  later  in  these. 

t  The  writing  under  "Jennuarii"  is  probably  accountable  for  the  error  in  dates. 


LEYBURN,   YORKSHIRE,    1742-1840  259 

Georgius  Rutter  filius  Jonathae  &  mariae  Rutter,  patrinus  Georgius 
Gascoyne,  Matrina  Bella  Baltche.  a  me  J.  Duboscq,  Missio.  apost. 

[1818] 
Mary  Gascoyne  daughter  of  George  &  Mary  Gascoyne  [(formerly 
Thwaites)  above]  was  born  Feby  8.  1818  at  Ulshaw  bridge  near 
Middleham  in  the  county  of  York  &  baptized  by  me  on  the  11th  of 
the  same  month.  Sponsors  Anthony  Curry  and  Jane  Thwaites. 
Richard  Billington,  Apostolical  Missionary. 

(36)  die  martii  15,  181 8  natus  et  die  16  [martii  18 18  above]  bap- 
tizatus  fuit  Thomas  Kendray  filius  Jacobi  et  Elizabethan  Kendray 
(olim  powel)  conjugum  :  patrinus  fuit  Carolus  Buckle,  matrina  Eliza- 
betha  Davison,  a  me  Richardo  Billington,  Misso  Apco. 

die  septembris  [19  xd  out  in  pencil  and  20  above]  1818  natus  fuit 
Thomas  Rutter  filius  Jonathan  et  Mariae  Rutter  (olim  Barwick) 
conjugum  :  patrinus  fuit  Mathaeus  Rowntree,  matrina  Elizabetha  Lang- 
staff,  a  me  Richardo  Billington,  Misso  Apco. 

(37)  [1819] 

Die  22  martii  1819  nata  et  die  23  ejusdem  mensis  ejusdemq  anni 
baptizata  fuit  Hannah  Burden  filia  Thomaa  et  Mariae  Burden  (olim 
Doil)  conjugum : 

[The  following  entry  is  in  a  different  hand.] 

Dominus  Dubosq,  presbiter  gallicanus  prius  signatarius  et  mis- 
sionarius  cecedit  mortuus  parisiis  anno  domini  1818  mense  octobris  p. 
C.  Devienne*  parochus  Santae  dominae  de  Freulleville  diocesi  rotho- 
magensis,  nunc  ejus  successor  aetatis  meae  76. 

Die  23  [Junii  18 19  above]  natus  et  die  3  Julii  18 19  Baptizatus  fuit 
Henricus  Raper  filius  Jacobi  et  Elizabethae  Raper  (olim  Havelock) 
conjugum :  patrinus  fuit  Nicholas  Havelock,  matrina  Maria  Havelock, 
a  me  Richardo  Billington,  Misso  Apco. 

John  Day  born  18 19  see  page  52  [Inserted  later] 

(38)  August  the  fifteenth  one  thousand  eight  hundred  &  nineteen 
was  born  at  Ulshaw  Bridge  House  Catherine  Mary  &  baptized  by  me 
the  under  signed  august  the  eighteenth  1819,  Daughter  of  George 
gascoyne  &  Mary  [his  wife  above]  formerly  Thwaites.  Sponsors 
Catherine  Dorothy  Scroope  &  Frederick  Scroope,  Richard  Billington, 
Apostolic  missionary. 

Francis  Rutter  son  of  Jonathan  and  Mary  Rutter  formerly  Bar- 
wick  married  was  born  november  16.  1819  [and  baptized  and  christe'nd 
above]  by  me  november  18.  181 9.  Richard  Billington  :  Sponsors  were 
Stephen  Sturdy  and  Catharine  Milburn. 

(39)  [1820] 

Die  Julii  25.  1820  nata  et  die  30  ejusdem  mensis  ejusdemq  anni 
baptizata  fuit  Anna  Kendray,  filia  Jacobi  et  Elizabethae  Kendray 
(olim  powel)  conjugum :  patrinus  fuit  Thomas  powell,  matrina 
Dorothea  powel,  a  me  Richardo  Billington  [Apco  thrice,  the  middle 
o?ie  xd  out]. 

[1821] 

Die  Julii  14.  182 1  natus  et  die  15  ejusdem  mensis  ejusdem  anni 
baptizatus  fuit  Henricus  Gascoign  filius  Georgii  et  Mariae  Gascoign 
*  See  commencement  of  Book  V,  p.  264  post. 


260  CATHOLIC   REGISTERS   OF  DANBY,   WEST   WITTON,   AND 

(olim  Thwaits)  conjugum  :  patrinus  fuit  Henricus  Scroope,  matrina 
Catharina  Scroope,  a  me  Richardo  Billington,  Misso  Apco. 

[1822] 

(40)  Elizabeth  Dinsdale  daughter  of  of  George  and  Dorothy  Dins- 
dale  (formerly  Hill)  was  born  February  the  eleventh  1822  at  Middleham 
&  was  baptized  by  me  on  the  twelfth  of  the  same  month.  Sponsors 
William  &  Mary  Hill.     Richard  Billington. 

Agnes  Frances  daughter  of  William  and  Isabella  Nailor  (formerly 
Balch)  was  born  February  the  twenty  eighth  one  thousand  eight 
hundred  and  twenty  two  at  Thirn  and  baptized  by  me  on  the  5th  of 
March,  Sponsors  Simon  Thos:  Scroope  and  Frances  Scroope — Richard 
Billington. 

(41)  Isabella  Rutter  Daughter  of  Jonathan  and  Mary  Rutter 
(formerly  Barwick)  was  born  May  the  tenth  &  baptized  by  me  on 
the  15  of  the  said  month  one  thousand  eight  hundred  and  twenty  two, 
sponsors  Charles  Buckle  &  Frances  Turnbull.     Richard  Billington. 

[1823] 
Mary  Bigley  Daughter  of  Michael  and  Isabella  Bigley  (formerly 
Foster)  was  born  the  second  day  of  December  and  baptized  by  me 
(the  undersigned)  on  the  seventh  of  the  same  month  1823,  sponsor 
Stephen  Sturdy,  Richard  Billington. 

(42)  John  Rutter  Son  of  Jonathan  and  Mary  Rutter  (formerly 
Barwick)  was  born  November  the  eighth  and  baptized  by  me  the 
tenth  of  the  said  month  one  thousand  eight  hundred  &  twenty  three. 
Sponsors  Charles  Buckle  and  Mary  Avery.     Richard  Billington. 

Elizabeth  Nailor  Daughter  of  William  and  Isabella  Nailor  (formerly 
Balsh)  was  born  December  12th  1823  and  baptized  by  me  the  sixteenth 
of  the  said  month,  sponsors  William  Priestman  and  Catherine  Milburn. 

Richard  Billington. 
[1824?] 

(43)  Paul  Sturdy  Son  of  Stephen  Sturdy  and  Catherine  his  wife 
(formerly  Casey)  born  April  the  seventh  one  thousand  eight  hundred 
and  twenty  [three  xd  out]  four  *  and  baptized  by  me  the  undersigned 
on  the  twelfth  of  the  said  month.  [Sponsors  William  &  Elizabeth 
Sturdy  above.]     Richard  Billington. 

r*  .  tl823l 

Thomas  Gascoign  son  of  George  &   mary    his   wife   (formerly 

Thawaits)  born  August  17th  one  thousand  eight  hundred  &  twenty 

three  &  baptized  by  me  the  undersigned  on  the  eighteenth  of  the  same 

month  &  year.     Sponsors  William  Roantree  &  Ann  Roantree. 

Richard  Billington. 

[l825] 

(44)  Elizabeth  Kendray  daughter  of  James  Kendray  &  Elizabeth 
his  wife  (formerly  Powel),  born  February  the  eighteenth,  one  thousand 
eight  hundred  and  twenty  five  and  baptized  by  me  the  undersigned  on 
the  twenty  second  of  the  same  month  1825.  Sponsors  William  Plews 
and  Catherine  Milburn.     Richard  Billington  Apostolical  missionary. 

*  The  word  "four"  is  written  in  limited  space  at  the  end  of  the  line.  If  the 
correction  is  right,  it  will  be  observed  that  the  date  of  the  following  entry  must  be 
wrong. 


LEYBURN,   YORKSHIRE,    1742-1840  261 

\The  last  and  eight  previous  registers  seem  to  be  written  in  a  lady's 
hand  for  the  priest's  signature,  which  is  shaky.  The  two  following  and 
the  fourth  seem  written,  with  difficulty,  by  him.] 

Elizabeth  sturdy  daughter  of  Stephen  and  Ruth  sturdy  his  wife 
(formerly  Herd)  was  born  december  26.  1825  and  baptized  by  me  the 
undersign'd  december  28.  1825.  sponsors  were  Charles  Buckle  & 
Frances  Turnbull.     Richard  Billington,  Apostolical  Missionary. 

[1826?] 

(45)  Margaret  Dinsdle  daughter  of  George  and  Dorothy  Din[s 
above]die  his  wife  (formerly  Hill)  was  born  november  9,  1824  and 
baptized  by  me  the  undersignd  november  10.  i82[4  X* out,  6  above]. 
The  sponsors  were  John  Clarkson  and  Susannah  sturdy.  Richard 
Billington,  Apostolical  missionary. 

[  The  hand  changes  again,  to  a  lady's  (?),  the  signature  being 
different.] 

William  Sturdy  son  of  Stephen  &  Catherine  Sturdy  his  wife 
(formerly  Casey)  was  born  December  the  twenty  fifth  one  thousand 
eight  hundred  and  twenty  six  and  baptized  December  the  27th  of  the 
same  year  by  me  the  undersigned.  The  sponsors  were  Stephen  and 
Anne.  Sturdy.     Richard  Billington,  Apostolical  missionary. 

[1827] 

(46)  [1827  March  31st  in  margin.]  Barbara  Kendray  daughter  of 
James  and  Eliza.  Kendray  his  wife  (formerly  Powel)  was  born 
March  31  &  baptized  by  me  the  undersigned  April  [an  erasure]  2, 
sponsors  George  Johnson  and  Frances  Turnbull.  Richard  Billington, 
Apostolical  Missionary. 

[1809] 
Mary  Sturdy  daughter  of  Stephen  and  Elizabeth  Sturdy  his 
wife  (formerly  Wilson)  was  born  January  the  13th  [1809  above]  and 
baptized  by  me  the  undersigned  January  14th  1809,  sponsors  Paul 
Sturdy  and  Elizabeth  Phillips.  Richard  Billington  Apostolical  mis- 
sionary. 

[The  following  entry  and  note  within  brackets  referring  to  a  post  entry 
on  page  50  (262  here)  have  been  crossed  out,  but  inserted  here.] 

[1811] 
(Paul   Sturdy  Son   of  Stephen   and   Elizabeth   Sturdy   his   wife 
(formerly  Wilson)  was  born  December  the  13th  181 1  and  baptized  by 
me  the  undersigned.     Sponsors  Paul  Sturdy  and  Anne  Sturdy.     Richard 
Billington  Apostolical  missionary. 
(See  2  pages  4  pages  forward.) 

[18 14] 

(47)  [1827.  in  margin.]  William  Sturdy  Son  of  Stephen  Sturdy 
and  Elizabeth  his  wife  (formerly  Wilson)  was  born  January  the  15th 
1 8 14  and  baptized  by  me  the  undersigned  January  the  17th  of  the  same 
year.     Richard  Billington,  Apostolical  Missionary. 

[1827] 
[1827  in  margin.]   Helen  Rutter   Daughter  of  Jonathan    Rutter 
&  Mary  his  wife  (formerly  Barwick)  was  born  at  Fingal  april  the  14th 
1827  &  baptized  by  me  the  undersigned  april  the  18th  of  the  said  year. 
Sponsors,  Joseph  Douthwaite,  Anne  Robson.        Richard  Billington. 


262  CATHOLIC   REGISTERS   OF   DANBY,  WEST   WITTON,   AND 

Elizabeth  Raper  born  of  James  and  Elizabeth  Raper  [his  wife 
above]  (formerly  [Ra.  xd  out]  Havelock)  was  born  June  28.  1827  and 
baptized  by  me  the  undersigned  July  2.  1827.  Sponsors  were  Nicholas 
Havelock  and  Frances  Turnbull.     Richard  Billington. 

(48)  Robert  Sturdy  [was  above]  born  december  the  10.  1827  of 
Stephen  and  Ruth  Sturdy  (formerly  Herd)  his  wife  :  and  baptized  by 
me  the  undersigfned  above]  december  the  18.  1827.  Sponsors  were 
Mathew  Rowntree  and  Ann  Sturdy.     Richard  Billington. 

[1828] 

1828.  Catherine  Charlotte  Mary,  Daughter  of  Anthony  George 
Wright,  Esqre  &  of  Catherine  Dorothy  his  wife  (formerly  Scroope) 
was  born  January  the  tenth  one  thousand  eight  hundred  and  twenty 
eight,  and  baptized  by  me  the  undersigned  January  the  eleventh  of  the 
same  year.  Sponsors  John  Biddulph  Esqre  of  Burton  Park  Sussex  and 
Catherine  Dorothy  Scroope  of  Danby  Hall  Yorkshire.  Richard 
Billington. 

Thos.  Dinsdale  [born  above]  1828  see  page  52. 

(49)  Die  Januarii  13  natusfuit  Gulielmus  Wardel  et  die  14  ejusdem 
mensis  ejusdemq  anni  [year  omitted] ;  baptizatus  fuit  Alius  Georgii  et 
Elizabethse  Wardel  (olim  Sturdy)  conjugum  :  patrinus  fuit  Gulielmus 
Sturdy,  matrina  Anna  Sturdy,  a  me  Richardo  Billington  Misso  Apco. 

[The  above  is  probably  the  last  written  by  Fr.  Billington,  the  rest 
being  signed  by  him.] 

Anne  Marguerite  Sturdy  Daughter  of  Stephen  and  Catherine  Sturdy 
his  wife  (formerly  Casey)  was  born  October  the  7th  [1827  above]  and 
baptized  by  me  the  undersigned  October  the  9th  [or  10th  above]  1827. 
Sponsors  Thos  Smith,  Margfaret  over  uerite]  Sturdy. 

Richard  Billington. 

(50)  Anne  Rutter  Daughter  of  Jonathan  and  Mary  Rutter  his 
wife  (formerly  Barwick)  was  born  May  12th  1829  and  baptized  by  me 
the  undersigned  May  the  19th  1829.  Sponsors  William  Rutter,  and 
Margaret  Hardy.     Richard  Billington. 

William  Kendray  son  of  James  and  Elizabeth  Kendray  (formerly 
Powel)  his  wife,  was  born  June  2nd  1829  &  baptized  by  me  the  under- 
signed June  9th  1829,  sponsors  Jonathan  Rutter  and  Mary  Kendray. 
Richard  Billington 

1810 

Paul  Sturdy  son  of  [Elizabeth  %d  out]  Stephen  and  Elizabeth 
Sturday  (formerly  Wilson)  his  wife  was  born  13th  of  December 
1 810  baptized  by  me  the  undersigned  15  of  the  said  month,  sponsors 
Robert  Watson  and  Anne  Sturdy.  Richard  Billington. 

[1815] 

(51)  Sarah  Rutter  Daughter  of  Jonathan  and  Mary  Rutter  (formerly 
Berwick)  his  wife,  was  born  12th  of  January  18 15  and  baptized,  by  me 
the  undersigned  the  1 5th  of  the  said  month  1 8 1 5 .    Richard  Billington 

Alice  Dinsdale  Daughter  of  [Dorothy  xr  out,  George  above]  and 
[George  xd  out,  Dorothy  above]  Dinsdale  (formerly  Hill)  his  wife  was 
born  May  9th  18 15  and  baptized  by  me  the  undersigned  11th  of  the 
said  month  181 5.     Sponsors  Thos.  Hill  and  Margaret  Johnson. 

Richard  Billington. 


LEYBURN,   YORKSHIRE,    1742-1840  263 

[1819] 

(52)  John  Day  the  Son  of  John  and  Christiana  Day  (formerly 
Potter)  his  wife,  born  8th  [1819  above]  of  January  and  baptized  by  me 
the  undersigned  the  10th  of  the  said  month  18 19,  sponsors  James 
Kirkley  and  Mary  Roantree.  Richard  Billington 

[1828] 
Thos.  Dinsdale  son  of  George  and  Dorothy  Dinsdale  (formerly 
Hill)  his  wife  was  born  June  2nd  1828  and  baptized  by  me  the  under- 
signed the  4th  of  the  said  month  1828.     Sponsors  Tho8  Hill  and  Anne 
Sturdy.  Richard  Billington. 

[1829] 

(53)  Margaret  Sturdy  daughter  to  Stephen  and  Ruth  Sturdy 
(formerly)  Hird,  was  born  the  22nd  day  of  December  1829  and  baptized 
by  me  the  undersigned  the  28th  of  December  of  the  same  year.  Spon- 
sors Mathew  Roantree  &  Catherine  Milburn.  Richard  Billington. 

1831 

Emma  Dinsdale,  daughter  of  George  and  Dorothy  Dinsdale  (for- 
merly Hill)  his  wife  was  born  at  Midlam  the  14th  day  of  February 
[183 1  above],  and  baptized  by  me  the  undersigned  on  the  23rd  of 
February  in  the  same  year.  Sponsors  William  Roantree  &  Elizabeth 
Sturdy.  Thomas  Middlehurst. 

Jane  Sturdy,  Daughter  of  Stephen  [Sturdy  xd  out]  and  Catharine 
Sturdy  (formerly  Cazey)  his  wife,  was  born  at  Midlam  the  8th  day  of 
March  [1831  above]  and  baptized  by  me  the  undersigned  the  22d  day 
of  March  of  the  same  year,  Sponsors  Wm  Sturdy,  and  Elizabeth  Sturdy. 

Thos  Middlehurst. 
(54)  1832 

Jane  Sturdy  daughter  of  Stephen  and  Ruth  Sturdy  (formerly 
Herd)  his  wife,  was  born  4th  June  1832  and  baptized  by  me  the  under- 
signed the  7th  of  June  of  the  same  year.  Sponsors  Thomas  Hill,  and 
Mary  Hardy.  Thomas  Middlehurst  App:  Miss. 

Joseph  Kendray  son  of  James  and  Elizabeth  Kendray  (formerly 
Powel)  his  wife,  was  born  11th  July  1832,  and  baptized  by  me  the 
undersigned  the  16th  of  the,  same  month  and  the  same  year.  The 
Godmother  Elizabeth  Raper.  Thomas  Middlehurst. 

l833- 
1833     Die  220  Martii  natus,  et  die  70  Julii  ejusdem  anni  baptizatus 

fuit  Jannes  Sturdy,  filius  Stephani,  et  Catharinae  Sturdy  (olim  Cazey) 

conjugum.     Patrinus  fuit  Joannes  Blackburn  et  Matrina  Anna  Sturdy, 

a  me  Thoma  Middlehurst  Miss:  App: 

(55)  1834 

1834.  Die  40  Septembris  natus,  et  die  50  Octobris  baptizatus  fuit 
Joannes  Sturdy,  filius  Stephani  et  Ruth  Sturdy  (olim  Herd)  conju- 
gum     Matrina  fuit  Elizabeth  Wardle.     a  me  Thoma  Middlehurst  M.A. 

1834.  Die  300  Octobris  natus,  et  die  20  Decembris  baptizatus  fuit 
Thomas  Dinsdale,  filius  Georgii,  et  Dorothea?  Dinsdale  (olim  Hill) 
conjugum.  Patrinus  fuit  Joannes  Chapileo  [?],  et  Matrina  Joanna 
Duck.  a  me  Thoma  Middlehurst.  M.A. 

1834.  Die  20  Decembris  nata,  et  die  6°  ejusdem  mensis  ejusdemque 
anni  baptizata  fuit  Francisca  Key,  filia  Bryani,  et  Elizabeth  Key  (olim 


264  CATHOLIC   REGISTERS   OF   DANBY,   WEST   WITTON,   AND 

Davison)  conjugum.     Patrinus  fuit  Josephus  Douthwaite,  et  Matrina 
Francisca  Scroope.  a  me  Thoma  Middlehurst.  M.A. 

[56]         .  .  183s 

1835.  Georgius  Harker  films  Jacobi  et  Margaritae  Harker  (olim 
Craven)  conjugum,  natus  die  2oa  Septembris  1835  et  baptizatus  fuit 
die  24  ejusdem  mensis  et  anni.  Patrinus  fuit  Josephus  Sedgwick,  et 
Matrina  Rebecca  Sedgwick  a  me  Thoma  Middlehurst  M.A 

T.R. 
The  remainder  of  the  page  is  blank .] 

57]  We  certify  that  this  is  one  of  the  Registers  or  Records  de- 
posited in  the  General  Register  Office,  pursuant  to  the  Act  of  the 
4th  Victoria,  Cap  92.  John  Bowring    ] 

Thos  Rees         |Coramr8 
John  Shoveller  J 
[The  remainder  of  the  page  and  the  whole  of  twelve  more,  being  the 
rest  of  the  book,  are  blank.'] 

Book  V  ( V). 

DEATHS    AT    DANBY.* 

[Outside  front]  [1]  2  York  V. — Registres  des  morts.  Chapelle 
Catholique  De  Danby.  18 19.  p.  C.  Devienne  Cure  de  Freulleville 
proche  Dieppe  en  France,  ami  de  mr  Delalonde.f 

[2]  The  Register  of  Deaths  at  Danby  upon  Yure  Parish  of 
Thornton  Steward,  in  the  County  of  Yorkshire,  Seat  of  Simon  Thomas 
Scroope,  Esq.     Year  of  our  Lord  1794. 

[3  blank,  4]  William  &  Easter  Allan  20  March 

Ann  Pease  25th  June  88 

Lady  Brown  died  ye  20th  of  March 

Baptised  at  Hutton  Hang. 

I  baptised  at  Hutton  Hang  Ann  the  [natural  above]  Daughter  of 
Dorothy  Pease,  Sponsors  John  Pease  &  Eleanore  Mudd.  June 
25/88. 

Baptised  at  Thornton  Alice  ye  natural  Daughter  of  Agnes  Pierson, 
Sponsors  the  Grand  Father  &  Grand  Mother.     July  20/88. 

I  baptised  at  Midleham  [Elizabeth  xd  out,  Mary  above]  Hill, 
Daughter  of  Thos  &  Elizabeth  Hill,  Spons:  Anthony  &  Dorothy 
Wad  man. 

Baptised  at  Danby  Ann  ye  Daughter  of  James  &  Ann  Kendray, 
Spons: 

[Hand  changes ;  but  the  foregoing  pages  were  not  akvays  part  of  the 
book.] 

ts]TR  1793 

\  Die  ia  Martii  1793  Natus,  et  die  4  Martii  ejusdem  anni  baptizatus 
fuit   (Laburni)  Joannes   Ro[w  over  y]land    filius    Georgii    et    Annae 

*  Four  baptisms  are  duplicated  in  the  early  part. 

t  From  the  notice  of  the  death  in  Paris,  in  October  1818,  of"  Dominus  Dubosq 
.  .  .  prius  signilarius"  conveyed  by  C.  Devienne  in  1819,  it  may  be  that  "  Dubosq  • 
is  alias  "  Delalonde,"  and  had  taken  the  registers  to  France  with  him.  (See  p.  259 
ante.) 

'X  Compare  with  the  English  copy  in  Book  IV,  p.  250  ante. 


LEYBURN,   YORKSHIRE,    1742-1840  265 

Rowland  (olim  Raiper)  Conjugum.     Patrinus  fuit  Joannes  Blankin- 
sop,  Matrina  Barbara  Smithson,       A  Me  Thoma  Lawson  Miss  Ap. 

*  Die  ioa  Martii  1793  natus  &  die  15*  Martii  baptizatus  fuit 
Joannes  Bell  (From  West  Witten)  Filius  Joannis  [Bell  xd  out]  et 
Isabellas  Bell  (olim  Umphrey)  Conjugum.  Patrinus  fuit  Henricus 
Umfrey,  Matrina  Elizabeth  Bell. 

A  Me  Thoma  Lawson  Miss°  Apco. 
[6]  *  Die  12  Aprilis  1793  Nata  et  eodem  die  Baptizata  fuit  Anna 
Clementina  Scroope  filia  Simonis  et  Catharinae  Scroope  (olim  Mey- 
nell)  Conjugum.     Patrinus  fuit  Thoma  Meynell,  Matrina  Clementina 
Elizabeth  Maxwell.  A  Me  Thoma  Lawson  Miss  Ap 

1794 

*  Die  tertia  Februarii  1794  nata  et  quarta  Februarii  ejusdem  anni 
baptizata  fuit  (in  vico  Thor[n]ton)  Helena  Crav[en]  filia  Jacobi 
Craven,  et  Mariae  Craven  (olim  [?  MacJArthur)  Conjugum.  Patrinus 
fuit  Jacobus  Kirkley  et  Anna  Brown. 

A  me  Thoma  Lawson  Miss°  Apco. 

[Hand  changes.] 
7]  Year  1794  September.     [In  margin.] 

On  the  Sixteenth  of  September  one  thousand  seven  hundred  and 
ninety  four,  Died,  and  on  the  eighteenth  was  buried  at  Thorton 
Steward  by  me  undersigned, — Helena  Craven,  aged  seven  months  and 
thirteen  days,  Daughter  of  james  and  Mary  Craven,  Delalonde  Psfc 

October — on  the  twenty  ninth  of  September,  one  thousand,  seven 
hundred  and  ninety  four,  Died,  and  on  the  first  of  October  was  buried 
at  Hunton  t  by  me  undersigned, — Robert  Colbee,  aged  two  years  and 
half,  Son  of  Simon  and  Mary  Colbee  Delalonde  P8fc 

year  1795  May  [In  margin.] 

On  the  twenty  ninth  of  May  one  Thousand  seven  hundred  and 
ninety  five,  Died,  and  on  the  thirty  first  ditto  was  buried  at  East-Witten 
[8]  Mary  Kendray,  aged  seven  months  and  three  days,  Daughter  of 
james  and  anna  Kendray. 

June.  On  the  Twenty  first  of  June,  one  thousand  seven  hundred 
and  ninety  five,  died  at  hunton-hang  [Hutton-Hang],  and  on  the 
twenty  fourth  ditto  was  buried  by  me  under-signed,  John  Pease  aged 
Sixty  five  years.  Delalonde  P8t. 

[1796] 

October — on  the  fifth  of  October  one  thousand  seven  hundred  and 
ninety  six,  Died,  and  on  the  Seventh  ditto  was  buried  at  Thornton 
Steward  by  Me,  undersigned,  John  aged  four  years,  Son  of  james  and 
Mary  Craven.  Delalonde  Psfc 

1797  January  [In  margin.] 

on  the  twenty  fifth  of  January  one  thousand  seven  hundred  and 
ninety  seven,  died,  and  on  the  twenty  seventh  ditto  was  buried  at 
Midlham,  Rachel  Hill,  aged  sixty  three  years.     Wife  of  jerry  hill. 

Delalond  Pst 

[9]  December— On  the  eighth  of  December,  one  thousand  seven 
hundred  and  ninety  seven  died,  and  on  the  tenth  ditto  was  buried  at 

*  Compare  with  the  English  copy  in  Book  IV,  p.  250-1  ante.  • 

t  Hutton. 


266  CATHOLIC   REGISTERS   OF  DANBY,   WEST   WITTON,   AND 

Mildham  *  by  me  undersigned  jeremia  hill,  "aged  fifty  nine  years  and 
eight  months  Delalonde  Pst 

1798  April  [In  margin.] 

On  the  ninth  of  april  one  thousand  seven  hundred  and  ninety  eight, 
died  at  York,  and  on  the  fourteenth  ditto  was  buried  at  Ulshaw  Chapel, 
parish  of  East  Witten,  by  me  undersigned  Anna  Clementina  Scroope 
Widow  of  the  late  Simon  Scroope  Esqr  of  Danby,  aged  seventy  three 
years —  Delalonde  P8t 

June — on  the  Second  of  June  one  thousand  seven  hundred  and 
ninety  eight — Died  at  Ellington  in  the  Seventy  Sixth  year  of  her  age, 
and  was  on  the  fourth  ditto  buried  [10]  buried  by  me  undersigned 
Alise  Colbee  widow  of  Late  George  Colbee.  Delalonde  Pst 

1799  february  [In  margin.] 

on  the  sixteenth  of  february  one  Thousand  seven  hundred  and 
ninety  nine,  died  at  Thornton  Steward  Mathew  Roentree,  aged  four 
years,  son  of  Mathew  and  anna  Roentree  and  on  the  eighteenth  ditto 
was  buried  by  me  undersigned  Delalonde  Psfc 

1800  July.     [In  margin.] 

On  the  ninth  of  July  one  thousand  eight  hundred  died  at  Mount 
Park  house,  parish  of  Winsley,  and  on  the  twelfth  ditto  was  buried  by 
me  undersigned  Andrew  Bell  aged  eighty  years.  Delalonde  Pst 

1802  January.     [In  margin.] 

On  the  fourth  of  January  one  thousand  eight  hundred  and  two  died 
at  Thornton  Steward  James  Kirkley  aged  forty  eight  and  on  the 
seventh  ditto  was  buried  by  me  undersigned  Dupont  pst 

March — On  the  fifth  of  March  one  thousand  eight  hundred  and 
two  died  at  thor[n]ton  Steward  Alice  widow  of  Thomas  Winn,  aged 
about  eighty  four  years,  and  on  the  sixth  ditto  was  buried  by  me 
undersigned  Dupont  pst 

1804  January.     [In  margin.] 

On  the  ninth  of  Janry  one  thousand  eight  hundred  and  four  died  at 
the  Bridge-house  John  Hogget,  aged  &  was  by  me  undersigned 

buried  the  same  day —  Jos.  Maini. 

1805  January     [In  margin.] 

On  Wednesday  the  tenth  of  July  one  thousand  eight  hundred  & 
five  died  Mary  Chappelow  aged  97  &  was  buried  by  me  undersigned 
on  the  12th  do.  Jos.  Maini. 

[  The  initials  of  Thomas  Rees  and  his  signature  with  those  of  the  other 
tiuo  commissioners  to  the  usual  certificate  follow  on  the  same  page.  Four 
blank  pages  follow,  t  ] 

Book  VI  (IV) 

LEYBURN    REGISTERS 

[1]     2  York  IV  [In  pencil]  Rec.  7  Nov. 

Liber  Baptismalis 
T.R.  ab  Anno  Domini.  1793 

Die  9  junii  1793.  natus,  et  eodem  die  1793  Baptizatus  fuit  Jacobus 
Blenkinsop  Alius  Joannis  et  Anna?    Blenkinsop  (olim    Husband) 
*  Middleham. 

f  Since  I  copied  the  above,  the  book  has  been  bound  in  quarter  vellum  and 
some  padding  pages  added. 


LEYBURN,   YORKSHIRE,    1742-1840  267 

conjugum  :    patrinus   fuit    Richardus   Chapilaw,   Matrina  Anna  Blen- 
kinsop.  a  me  Richardo  Billington 

missionario  Apostolico. 

Die  30  Aprilis  1793  nat[us  x{i  out,  a  above],  et  die  28  julii  ejusdem 
anni  Baptizatfus  f  ar  out]  a  fuit  Joanna  Harwood  filia  Rogerii  et 
Helenae  [erasure]  Harwood  (olim  Barnett  [?])  conjugum  :  patrinus 
fuit  Joannis  Birchall,  a  Thoma  Lawson  missionario  Apostolico. 

[2]  Die  1  Octobris  1793  nata,  et  die  2  ejusdem  mensis  1793 
Baptizata  fuit  Anna  Dent  filia  Joannis  et  Annse  Dent  (olim  Saunders) 
conjugum :  patrinus  fuit  Joannis  Blenkinsop,  Matrina  Maria  Mables. 
a  me  Richardo  Billington,  Miss°  Apco. 

[i794] 

Die  3  Januarii  1794  nata,  et  die  6  ejusdem  mensis  1794  Baptizata 
fuit  Maria  Tidyman,  filia  Chrystophfosi  **  out]eri  et  Eliz.  Tidyman 
(olim  Blenkinsop)  conjugum :  Patrinus  fuit  Joannis  Blenkinsop, 
matrina  Joanna  Lawson.     a  me  Richardo  Billington,  Misso  Apc0. 

Die  26  Martii  1794  nata,  et  eadem  [ipsa  above]  die  1794  Baptizata 
fuit  Margarita  Blenkinsop,  filia  Roberti  et  Annae  Blenkinsop  (olim 
Raper)  conjugum  :  patrinus  [3]  fuit  Joannis  Blenkinsop,  Matrina  Maria 
Blenkinsop.     a  me  Richardo  Billington  Misso  Apco 

Die  31  Martii  1794  nata,  et  eadem  ipsa  die  1794  Baptizata  fuit 
Maria  Sidgwick,  filia  Richardi  et  Elizabethse  Sidgwick  (olim  Theak- 
stone)  conjugum :  patrinus  fuit  Josephus  Sidgwick,  Matrina  Maria 
Sidgwick.     a  me  Richardo  Billington,  Miss0  Apco. 

Die  15  Aprilis  1794  nata,  et  eadem  ipsa  die  1794  Baptizata  fuit 
Jsabella  Robinson,  filia  Jacobi  et  Jsabellae  Robinson  (olim  Nelson) 
conjugum :  patrinus  fuit  Carolus  Robinson,  Matrina  Elizabethan  Hum- 
phrey,    a  me  Richardo  Billington,  Miss°  Apco. 

[4]  [i795] 

Die  2  Februarii  [1795  above]  nata,  et  die  8  ejusdem  mensis  1795 
Baptizata  fuit  Elizabetha  Dent,  filia  Joannis  et  Annae  Dent  (olim 
Saunders)  conjugum :  patrinus  fuit  Chrystophorus  Dent,  Matrina 
Margarita  Dent,  a  me  Richardo  Billington  Miss°  Apco. 

Die  Aprilis.  19.  1795  [nata  above],  et  die  24  ejusdem  mensis  ejus- 
demque  anni  Baptizata  fuit  Anna  Blenkinsop,  filia  Joannis  et  Annae 
Blenkinsop  (olim  husband)  conjugum  :  patrinus  fuit  Petrus  Allison, 
Matrina  Anna  Allen,  a  me  Richardo  Billington,  Miss0  Apc0. 

Die  Aprilis  27.  1795  nata,  et  die  29  ejusdem  mensis  ejusdemq  anni 
Baptizata  fuit  Elizabetha  Roland,  filia  Georgii  et  Annce  Roland  (olim 
Raper)  conjugum  :  patrinus  fuit  Joannis  Dent,  Matrina  Joanna  Lawson, 
a  me  Richardo  Billington  Miss°  Apc0. 

[5]  Die  Junii  19.  1795  nata,  et  die  12  julii  ejusdem  anni  Baptizata 
fuit  Margarita  Robinson,  filia  Jacobi  et  Jsabellae  Robinson  (olim 
Nelson)  conjugum  :  patrinus  fuit  Carolus  Robinson,  Matrina  Eliza- 
betha Ward,  a  me.  Richardo  Billington.  Miss°  Apco. 

[1796] 

Die  Februarii,  4.  1796  natus,  et  die  5  ejusdem  mensis  1796  Bapti- 
zatus  fuit  Christopherus  Tidyman,  filius  Christopheri  et  Elizabethse 
Tidyman  (olim  Blenkinsop)  conjugum  :  patrinus  fuit  Robertus  Blen- 
kinsop, matrina  Elizabetha  Ward,  a  me  Richardo  Billington.  Miss0  Apco. 


268  CATHOLIC   REGISTERS    OF   DANBY,   WEST   WITTON,   AND 

Die  Septembris.  2.  1796  natus,  et  die  3  ejusdem  mensis  1796  Bapti- 
zatus  fuit  Robertus  Blenkinsop,  filius  Roberti  et  Annae  Blenkinsop 
(olim  Raper)  conjugum  :  patrinus  fuit  Petrus  Blenkinsop,  matrina  Anna 
Blenkinsop,  a  me  Richardo  Billington,  Miss°  Ap(:°. 

[6]  Die  septembris  19.  1796  natus,  et  eodem  ipso  die  Baptizatus 
fuit  carolus  Tasker,  filius  Francisci  et  Elizabethan  Tasker  (olim  Handy) 
conjugum:  patrinus  fuit  Carolus  Robinson,  Matrina  Anna  Robinson, 
a  me  Richardo  Billington  Miss°  Apco. 

[i797] 

Die  Martii.  15.  1797  natfus  xd  out,  a  above]  et  eodem  ipso  die 
Baptizata  fuit  Sara  Bell  filia  Joannis  et  Jsabellae  [long  erasure]  Bell 
(olim  Humphrey)  conjugum :  patrinus  fuit  Joannis  Buckle,  Matrina 
Maria  Buckle,  a  me  Richardo  Billington  Miss0  Apco. 

Die  Martii  30.  1797  natus,  et  eodem  ipso  die  Baptizatus  fuit  Petrus 
Blenkinsop  filius  Joannis  et  Annan  Blenkinsop  (olim  Husband)  con- 
jugum :  patrinus  fuit  Petrus  Blenkinsop,  Matrina  Joanna  Lawson,  a  me 
Richardo  Billington,  Misso  Apco. 

[7]  Die  Aprilis  6.  natus,  et  die  7  ejusdem  mensis  1797  Baptizatus 
fuit  Carolus  Robinson,  filius  Jacobi  et  Jsabellae  Robinson  (olim 
Nelson)  conjugum :  patrinus  fuit  Franciscus  Tasker,  matrina  Eliza- 
beth a  Tasker,  a  me  Richardo  Billington  Miss°  Apco. 

Die  Junii  19.  [1797  above]  natfus  xd  out,  a  above],  et  die  21  ejusdem 
mensis  1797  Baptizata  fuit  Elizabetha  Tidyman,  filia  Chrystophori  et 
Elizabethan  Tidyman  (olim  Blenkinsop)  conjugum :  patrinus  fuit 
Benjaminus  Blenkinsop,  matrina  Elizabetha  Sidgwick,  a  me  Richardo 
Billington,  Mis80  Apco. 

Die  Augusti  12.  1797  nata,  et  die  13  ejusdem  mensis  1797  Baptizata 
fuit  Hannah  Roland,  filia  Geo[r]gii  et  Annas  Roland  (olim  Raper) 
conjugum  :  patrinus  fuit  Richardus  Allison,  Matrina  Anna  Blenkinsop, 
a  me  Richardo  Billington,  Miss°  Apco. 

[1798] . 
Die  Novembris  30.  1798  nata,  et  die  1  Decembris  1798  Baptizata 
fuit  Anna  [Tit  xd  out]  Tidyman,  filia  Chry[sos  ^w/Jstorphori  et  Eliza- 
bethan Tidyman  (olim  Blenkinsop)  conjugum  :  Matrina  fuit  Maria 
[8]  Blenkinsop,  a  me  Richardo  Billington  Misso  Apco. 

[i799] 

Die  februarii  9  [1799  above]  nata,  et  die  18  [ejusdem  mensis  above, 
ejusdemque  anni  below]  Baptizata  fuit  Anna  Robinson,  filia  Jacobi  et 
Jsabellae  Robinson  (olim  Nelson)  conjugum  :  patrinus  fuit  Carolus 
Robinson,  Matrina  Elizabetha  Tasker,  a  me  Richardo  Billington 
Mis80  Apco. 

Die  Augusti  2.  1799-  natus,  et  eodem  ipso  die  baptizatus  fuit  Guliel- 
mus  Roland,  filius  Georgii  et  Annae  Roland  (olim  Raper)  conju- 
gum :  Matrina  fuit  Elizabetha  Dent,  a  me  Richardo  Billington,  Miss" 
Apco. 

Die  Novembris  6.  1799.  nata>  et  eodem  ipso  die  baptizata  fuit  Anna 
Humphrey,  filia  Henrici  et  Dinae  Humphrey  (olim  Thompson) 
conjugum :  patrinus  fuit  Gulielmus  Furniss,  Matrina  Maria  Buckle, 
a  me  Richardo  Billington,  Miss°  Apco. 

[9]     for   the   baptism   of    Jane    Blenkinsop,    daughter    of    John 


LEYBURN,   YORKSHIRE,    1742-1840  269 

Blenkinsop  junior  of  Leyburn,  see  the  baptismal  book  at  Danby,  she 
having  been  christen'd  by  the  priest  of  that  place. 

Die  Junii  3  [1800  above]  natus,  et  die  5  baptizatus  fuit  Joannes 
Tidyman,  Alius  Christofori  et  Elizabethan  Tidyman  (olim  Blenkinsop) 
conjugum :  patrinus  fuit  Joannes  Blenkinsop  nepos,  Matrina  fuit  Anna 
Allen,  a  me  Richardo  Billington  Misso  Apco. 

For  the  baptism  of  Henry  Bell,  son  of  John  Bell  senior  of  Bellerby, 
see  the  baptismal  book  at  Danby,  he  having  been  baptized  by  the 
chaplain  of  that  house  in  my  absence. 

Die  Augusti  28  [1800  above]  natus,  et  die  29  [ejusdem  mensis  above] 
baptizatus  fuit  Gulielmus  Roland,  Alius  Georgii  et  Annae  Roland 
(olim  Raper)  conjugum:  patrinus  fuit  Christophorus  Dent,  Matrina 
Maria  Stabler,  a  me  Richardo  Billington  Misso  Apco. 

[10]  Die  aprilis  21  [1801  above]  nata,  et  die  maii.  3.  1801  baptizata 
fuit  Elizabetha  Robinson,  filia  Jacobi  et  Jsabellae  Robinson  (olim 
Nelson)  conjugum :  patrinus  fuit  Mathaeus  Bell,  matrina  Elizabetha 
Tasker,  a  me  Richardo  Billington  Misso  Apco. 

Die  Aprilis  23.  1801  natus,  et  die  maii  10.  1801  baptizatus  fuit 
Joannes  Ward,  Alius  Roberti  et  Joannae  Ward  (olim  Mason)  con- 
jugum :  patrinus  fuit  Thomas  Ward,  matrina  Elizabetha  Bell,  a  me 
Richardo  Billington  Mis80  Apco. 

Die  Julii  22.  1801  natus,  et  die  23  ejusdem  mensis  ejusdemque 
anni  Baptizatus  fuit  Robertus  Tidyman,  Alius  Joann  [b/ot,  ae  above] 
Tidyman  :  patrinus  fuit  Christophorus  Tidyman,  matrina  Elizabetha 
Tidyman,  a  me  Richardo  Billington  Misso  Apco. 

[11]  Die  Novembris  9.  1801  nata  et  eadem  ipsa  die  baptizata  fuit 
Maria  Bell,  Alia  Andreas  et  Mariae  Bell  (olim  Sidgwick)  conjugum  : 
patrinus  fuit  Richardus  Billington,  matrina  Anna  Allen,  a  me  [eodem 
above]  Richardo  Billington  Misso  Apco. 

Die  Julii  18, 1802  nata  et  eadem  ipsa  die  baptizata  fuit  Teresia  Tidy- 
man, Alia  Chrisophori  et  Elizabethan  Tidyman  (olim  Blenkinsop) 
conjugum  :  patrinus  fuit  Joannes  Blenkinsop  senior,  matrina  Anna 
Blenkinsop,  a  me  Richardo  Billington  Misso  Apco. 

Die  Augusti  13.  1802  nata,  et  die  15  ejusdem  mensis  ejusdemque 
anni  baptizata  fuit  Elizabetha  Dobson,  Alia  Joannis  et  Elizabethae 
Dobson  (olim  Blenkinsop)  conjugum  :  patrinus  fuit  Joannis  Blen 
[i2]kinsop  avus  infantis,  matrina  Anna  Blenkinsop  proamita*  infantis 
a  me  Richardo  Billington  Misso  Apco. 

Die  Octobris  24  [1802  above],  et  die  25  ejusdem  mensis  ejusdemque 
anni  baptizatus  fuit  Andreas  Bell,  Alius  Andreae  et  Mariae  Bell  (olim 
Sidgwick)  conjugum :  patrinus  fuit  Joannes  Sidgwick,  matrina 
Rebecca  Sidgwick,  a  me  Richardo  Billington  Misso  Apco. 

[1803] 

Die  25  [1802  above]  Decembris  natus,  et  die  16  januarii  1803 
baptizatus  fuit  Jacobus  Ward,  Alius  Roberti  et  Joannae  Ward  (olim 
Mason)  conjugum  :  patrinus  fuit  Carolus  Ward,  matrina  Elizabetha 
Ward,  a  me  Richardo  Billington  Misso  Apco. 

Die  Junii  17.  1803  nata,  et  die  ejusdem  mensis  ejusdemque  anni 
baptizata  fuit  Anna  Walker,  Alia  Joannis  et  Annae  Walker,  (olim 
%  Proavita  may  be  meant. 


270  CATHOLIC   REGISTERS   OF   DANBY,